Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is Feiticeiro.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
BEH German
Possibly a variant of Boehm.
BLASE German
Derivative of Blasius.
BRANCHE French
From Old French branche meaning ‘branch’ (which is from Late Latin branca meaning ‘foot’, ‘paw’), the application of which as a surname is not clear. Compare Branch.
BRIAN Irish, English, French
1) Variant spelling of Bryan. ... [more]
BRIAND French
Variant of Brian.
CASTON English
A habitational name from a place named Caston, which is from the unattested Old English personal name Catt or the Old Norse personal name Káti + Old English tūn meaning ‘farmstead, settlement’.
COACH Irish
Origin uncertain. Most probably a reduced form of Irish McCoach, which is of uncertain derivation, perhaps a variant of McCaig.
COACH French
Possibly an altered spelling of French Coache, from the Norman and Picard term for a damson, probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of plums.
COURT English, French, Irish
A topographic name from Middle English, Old French court(e) and curt, meaning ‘court’. This word was used primarily with reference to the residence of the lord of a manor, and the surname is usually an occupational name for someone employed at a manorial court.... [more]
DOSTER German, Belgian
A German surname, which is from an agent derivative of the Middle High German words 'doste' and 'toste' (meaning ‘wild thyme’, ‘shrub’, ‘bouquet’). It is a topographic surname which was given to someone whose land abutted an uncultivated piece of land, or possibly an occupational name for someone who dealt herbs.... [more]
EARHART English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Ehrhardt.
EHRHARDT German
From a Germanic personal name composed of Old High German ēra, meaning ‘honor’, and hard, meaning ‘brave’, ‘hardy’, or ‘strong’.
EISNER German, Jewish
Occupational name for an ironworker, smith, or ironmonger, from an agent derivative of Middle High German īsen and German Eisen, meaning ‘iron’ (see Eisen).
EMEL German
From a short form of any of the various Germanic personal names beginning with the element amal, which means ‘strength’ or ‘vigor’.
ENGELS German, Dutch
A patronymic surname from the given name Engel.
EPSTEIN German, Jewish
A habitational name for someone from a place named Eppstein, which is from Old High German ebur meaning ‘wild boar’ and stein meaning ‘stone’.
FAHR German, German (Swiss)
A topographic name for someone who lived near a crossing point on a river, from Middle High German vare, meaning ferry.
FLOWERS English
Patronymic from Flower.
FORE English (American)
Americanized spelling of German Fahr.
GAMER Jewish
From the Russian pronunciation of Hamer.
GROOVER English (American)
Americanized form of German Gruber.
GRUBER German, Jewish
A topographic name for someone who lived in a depression or hollow, from Middle High German gruobe or German Grube meaning ‘pit’ or ‘hollow’, plus the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.
GRUBER Jewish
A nickname from an inflected form of Yiddish dialect grub meaning ‘rude' or 'impolite’.
HADLEY English
A habitational name from either a place named Hadley, or a place named Hadleigh. The first is named from the Old English personal name Hadda + lēah (means ‘wood’, ‘(woodland) clearing’), and the other three are from Old English hǣð (meaning ‘heathland’, ‘heather') + lēah.
HEE Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
A Danish habitational name from any of several places named from a word meaning ‘shining’ or ‘clear’, referencing a river.... [more]
JACARUSO Italian
An Italian surname from a compound of Ia- (from the personal name Ianni) and the southern Italian word caruso, which means ‘lad’ or ‘boy’.
JACKETT English
From a pet form of the given name Jack.
JACQUEMIN French
From a pet form of the given name Jacques.
KILIAN German, Dutch, Polish, Czech
from the Irish personal name Cillín (see Killeen).
KILL German, Dutch
Possibly from a short form of Kilian.
KILL German
A habitational name for someone from a place named Kill.
KILL Jewish
Of uncertain origin; perhaps a nickname from Yiddish kil meaning ‘cool’.
LATO Hungarian, Polish
From Hungarian látni meaning ‘to see’, hence a nickname for a wise person or an occupational name for a clairvoyant, or possibly for an official who checked the quality of products at markets.... [more]
LAURA Italian
Either from the given name Laura or a topographic name from Latin laurea meaning "laurel".
LAURA Spanish
Of uncertain origin; in some cases, it is possibly a habitational name from a place named Laura.
MASSA Italian
A habitational name from any of the various places named Massa (for example, Massa Lubrense or Massa di Somma, both in the Metropolitan City of Naples, or Massa d’Albe in the Province of L'Aquila), which were all named from the medieval Latin word massa, meaning ‘holding’ or ‘estate’.
MASSARA Italian, Greek
Either a feminine form of Massaro or from the equivalent occupational or status name in medieval Greek, (massaras meaning ‘peasant’ or ‘share cropper’) which is from the word massaria meaning ‘small farm’.
MASSARO Italian
An occupational or status name from the word massaro, which in northern Italy denoted a tenant farmer or sharecropper, and in central and southern Italy, could also denote an agent or steward of a rural estate.
MCCARTAN Scottish Gaelic
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Artáin (meaning ‘son of Artán’), which is a diminutive of the personal name Art, meaning ‘bear’.
MCCARTNEY Scottish Gaelic
Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mac Artaine, (meaning ‘son of Artan’) which is a diminutive of the personal name Art, meaning ‘bear’ or ‘hero’. Compare Irish Mac Artáin (see McCartan), of which this surname is a variant.
MEADOW English
A topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow. The form meadow derives from mǣdwe, the dative case of Old English mǣd.
PADGHAM English
A habitational name.
PADLEY English
A habitational name from a place named Padley, which was probably named with the Old English personal name Padda and lēah meaning ‘glade, woodland clearing’. Alternatively, the first element may have been padde, meaning ‘toad’.
PERPICH English (American)
Americanized spelling of Croatian and Serbian Prpić. Prporuše was a term denoting young girls who, in the dry season, would visit houses in the village and pray for rain.
PETROVICH Ukrainian, Belarusian
Patronymic from Petro, the Ukrainian form of Peter.
PIN English
Variant spelling of Pinn.
PIN French, Dutch
A topographic name for someone living by a pine tree or in a pine forest, or a habitational name from a place named with the Old French word pin, meaning ‘pine’.
PIN Cambodian
Of unexplained origin.
PINN English, German
A metonymic occupational name for a maker of pins or pegs, which is from Middle English pin and Middle Low German pinne meaning ‘pin’ or ‘peg’. In some cases, the German name was an metonymic occupational name for a shoemaker.
PINN English (British)
A topographic or habitational name from a place named with Middle English pinne, meaning ‘hill’ (Old English penn).
POZOS Spanish, Galician
A habitational name from any of several places named with the plural of pozo, meaning ‘well’. See Pozo.
RAPPA Italian, Sicilian
from Sicilian rappa meaning ‘bunch, cluster’ or Italian rappa meaning ‘lock, quiff’, which was presumably applied as a nickname with reference to someone’s hair.
RIDINGER German
A habitational name for someone from a place named Riding or Rieding. It is also possibly an altered spelling of Reitinger, a topographic name from Reit(e), which means ‘clearing’ (Old High German riuti).
RODRIGO Spanish, Portuguese
From the given name Rodrigo.
ROST German
From a nickname for a red-haired person, from Middle High German rost meaning ‘rust’.
ROST German
A metonymic occupational name for a limeburner or blacksmith, from Middle High German, Middle Low German rōst meaning ‘grate, grill’ or Middle High German rōst(e) meaning ‘fire, embers, pyre, grate’ (typically one for burning lime).
SCARRY Irish
Shortened Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Scurra, meaning ‘descendant of Scurra’, a personal name of uncertain origin.
SCURRY Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Scoireadh, meaning ‘descendant of Scoireadh’.
SKERRY Irish
Variant of Scarry or Scurry.
SMOLLETT English, Scottish
From a nickname for someone who had a small head.
SPRY English
Was apparently a nickname for an active, brisk, or smart person. The word spry is of obscure origin.
STAUBER German, Jewish
An occupational name from Staub, with the addition of the German agent suffix -er.
SUR German
Variant of Sauer.
SUR Indian, Bengali (Hindu), Sanskrit
A Hindu surname based on a nickname from Sanskrit šūra, which means ‘brave’.
SUR Korean
A variant of (see So).
THUNBERG Swedish
An ornamental name from thun, which is an ornamental (old) spelling of tun meaning ‘fence, yard’ and berg.
WACKER German
From a nickname for a bold or energetic person, from Middle High German wacker meaning ‘fresh’, ‘lively’, ‘brave’, or ‘valiant’.
WACKERMAN English (American), German
From the Americanized spelling of German Wackermann, a variant of Wacker, with the addition of Middle High German man, meaning ‘man’.
WACŁAWSKI Polish
A habitational surname for someone from a place named Wacławice or a place called Wacławów, which were all named from the personal name Wacław.
WAIT English
Variant spelling of Waite.
WAITT English
Variant spelling of Waite.
WATTERSON Scottish, Northern Irish
From an altered form of the given name Walter.
WURTZ German
A metonymic occupational name for a greengrocer or grower or seller of herbs, from Middle High German würz, meaning ‘herb’.
ZEE Dutch
Reduced form of Dutch van der Zee.