Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is LMS.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Shade English, German, Dutch, Scottish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary, from Old English scead ‘boundary’.nickname for a very thin man, from Middle English schade ‘shadow’, ‘wraith’.... [more]
Shadow English
Origin unidentified. The name Shadue, Schadewe is recorded in England in the 12th and 13th centuries, from Middle English shadwe ‘shadow’, Old English sceadu (see Shade)... [more]
Shim Korean
Alternate transcription of Sim.
Sideris Greek
Greek reduced and altered form of the personal name Isidoros (see Isadore), altered by folk etymology as if derived from sidero ‘iron’ (classical Greek sideron), and hence regarded as an omen name: ‘may the child grow up to be as strong as iron’.
Sidwell English
From an English surname of uncertain origin, possibly originally a habitational name from an unidentified place with a second element from Old English well(a) ‘spring’, ‘stream’, but on the other hand early forms are found without prepositions... [more]
Sim Scottish, Dutch
Scottish and Dutch: from the personal name Sim, a short form of Simon.
Snowe English
Variation of Snow.
So Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Su.
Hungarian
Metonymic occupational name for a salt seller or producer, from ‘salt’.
Soames English
Denoted a person hailing from a village called Soham in Cambridgeshire, England. The place name itself means "homestead by the lake" from Old English "lake" and ham "farm, homestead"... [more]
Somerville Scottish, Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Scottish (of Norman origin) habitational name, probably from Graveron Sémerville in Nord, named with the Germanic personal name Sigimar (see Siemer) + Old French ville ‘settlement’... [more]
Sørensdatter Danish, Norwegian
Strictly feminine patronymic of Søren.
Soule English, French, Medieval English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps derived from the vocabulary word soul as a term of affection.... [more]
Soulier French
Metonymic occupational name for a shoemaker, from Old French soulier ‘shoe’, ‘sandal’.... [more]
Spark English, German
Northern English: from the Old Norse byname or personal name Sparkr ‘sprightly’, ‘vivacious’.... [more]
Sparrow English
English: nickname from Middle English sparewe ‘sparrow’, perhaps for a small, chirpy person, or else for someone bearing some fancied physical resemblance to a sparrow.
Speakman English
English (chiefly Lancashire) nickname or occupational name for someone who acted as a spokesman, from Middle English spekeman ‘advocate’, ‘spokesman’ (from Old English specan to speak + mann ‘man’).
Spero Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Spiro.
Spicer English, Jewish, Polish
English: occupational name for a seller of spices, Middle English spic(i)er (a reduced form of Old French espicier, Late Latin speciarius, an agent derivative of species ‘spice’, ‘groceries’, ‘merchandise’).... [more]
Spínola Portuguese
Portuguese topographic name from a diminutive of espinha ‘thorn’, ‘thorn bush’.
Spinola Italian
Italian (Liguria) diminutive of Spina. Italian topographic name for someone living by Monte Spinola in the province of Pavia.
Spurgeon English
Unexplained meaning.
Stancil English
English habitational name from a place so named in South Yorkshire.
Stang German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German stang, German Stange ‘pole’, ‘shaft’, hence a nickname for a tall, thin person, a metonymic occupational name for a maker of wooden shafts for spears and the like, or a metonymic occupational name for a soldier.
Stanislaw Polish, German
Polish from the personal name Stanislaw, composed of the Slavic elements stani ‘become’ + slav ‘glory’, ‘fame’, ‘praise’... [more]
Stehr German
From Middle High German ster ‘ram’, hence probably a nickname for a lusty person, or possibly a metonymic occupational name for a shepherd.
Stenzel German
German from a reduced pet form of the Slavic personal name Stanislaw (see Stencel, Stanislaw).
Stetson English
Of unknown origin and meaning, though likely English.
Stiles English
From Old English stigel, stigol ‘steep uphill path’ (a derivative of stigan ‘to climb’).
Stockard Scottish Gaelic, Dutch
Scottish: occupational name for a trumpeter, Gaelic stocaire, an agent derivative of stoc ‘Gaelic trumpet’. The name is borne by a sept of the McFarlanes.... [more]
Stoehr German
From Middle Low German store ‘sturgeon’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who caught or sold sturgeon, or a nickname for someone with some supposed resemblance to the fish... [more]
Stohr German
North German (Stöhr): see Stoehr.... [more]
Stokely English
Variation of Stockley.
Stratton English
English: habitational name from any of various places, in Bedfordshire, Dorset, Hampshire, Norfolk, Oxfordshire, Somerset, Suffolk, Surrey, and Wiltshire, so named from Old English str?t ‘paved highway’, ‘Roman road’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
Streeter English
English (Sussex) topographic name for someone living by a highway, in particular a Roman road (see Street).
Strycker Dutch
From Dutch de Strycker, an occupational name for someone responsible for measuring out cloth or grain. See also Stryker.
Stryker Dutch
From Dutch Strijker, an occupational name for someone whose job was to fill level measures of grain by passing a flat stick over the brim of the measure, thus removing any heaped excess... [more]
Suh Low German
North German from Middle Low German su ‘sow’, either a metonymic occupational name for a swineherd or an offensive nickname.
Swain Scottish, Irish, English
Northern English occupational name for a servant or attendant, from Middle English swein "young man attendant upon a knight", which was derived from Old Norse sveinn "boy, servant, attendant"... [more]
Sweeny Irish
Irish variant spelling of Sweeney.
Szydło Polish
Means "awl" in Polish, used as an occupational name for a cobbler.
Tabbert German, Frisian
From Middle Low German tabbert, Middle Dutch tabbaert ‘tabard’, a sleeveless overgarment worn by men in the Middle Ages, (ultimately from French tabard, from Late Latin tabardum)... [more]
Taber English, Polish
English: variant spelling of Tabor. ... [more]
Talcott English, Norman
Norman habitational name from Taillecourt in France.... [more]
Tallón Spanish
Either a Spanish variant of Catalan Talló (see Tallo) or a habitational name from any of the places in A Coruña, Ourense, and Pontevedra provinces called Tallón.
Tallon English, Irish, Norman, French
English and Irish (of Norman origin), and French from a Germanic personal name derived from tal ‘destroy’, either as a short form of a compound name with this first element (compare Talbot) or as an independent byname... [more]
Tatke German
Unknown source.
Tebbs English
Variant of Tibbs.
Tebow Dutch, Belgian, French
From the Old French personal name Teobaud, Tibaut (see Theobald).
Tefft English
Variant of English Taft. This surname was already well established in Connecticut and Rhode Island by 1715.
Thackery English
English (Yorkshire) habitational name from Thackray in the parish of Great Timble, West Yorkshire, now submerged in Fewston reservoir. It was named with Old Norse þak ‘thatching’, ‘reeds’ + (v)rá ‘nook’, ‘corner’.
Theisen German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish, and Norwegian: patronymic from a reduced form of the personal name Matthias or Mathies (see Matthew).
Theissen German
North German: patronymic from Theiss.
Thiessen German, Danish
Reduced form of the personal name Matthias or Mathies.
Thulis Irish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
Thurles English
Today's generation of the Thurles family bears a name that was brought to England by the migration wave that was started by the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Thurles family lived in Suffolk, at Thurlow which was in turn derived from the Old English word tryohlaw, meaning dweller by the hill.
Timm German, Dutch, English
English: probably from an otherwise unrecorded Old English personal name, cognate with the attested Continental Germanic form Timmo. This is of uncertain origin, perhaps a short form of Dietmar... [more]
Tolan Irish
Recorded as O' Tolan, O' Twolan, Toland, Toolan, Toolin, apparently Thulis, possibly on some occasions O' Toole, and probably others, this is an ancient Irish surname of very confusing origins... [more]
Tomahawk Sioux
The name comes from Powhatan tamahaac, derived from the Proto-Algonquian root *temah- 'to cut off by tool'. Algonquian cognates include Lenape təmahikan, Malecite-Passamaquoddy tomhikon, Abenaki demahigan, all of which mean "axe".
Toolan Irish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
Toolin Irish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
Toran Galician, Irish
Galician (Torán): habitational name from the village of Santa María de Torán in Ourense province.... [more]
Torrence Scottish, Irish
Scottish and northern Irish habitational name from either of two places called Torrance (one near East Kilbride, the other north of Glasgow under the Campsie Fells), named with Gaelic torran ‘hillock’, ‘mound’, with the later addition of the English plural -s.... [more]
Torrent Spanish
A topographical name for someone who lived by a flood stream, deriving from the Spanish torrente. Topographical surnames were among the earliest created, since both natural and man-made features in the landscape provided easily recognisable distinguish names in the small communities of the Middle Ages... [more]
Tough Scottish, English
Scottish variant of Tulloch. In Scotland it is pronounced tyookh. ... [more]
Tow Scottish
Scottish: Variation of Tulloch.... [more]
Truett English
English habitational name from Trewhitt in Northumbria, named from Old Norse tyri ‘dry resinous wood’ + possibly an Old English wiht ‘river bend’.
Trusty English
This is a late medieval occupation descriptive name given to a professional witness, in effect an early Solicitor, the name deriving from the Olde French "Attester" - one who testifies or vouches for a contract or agreement.
Tuíneán Irish
Meaning, "watercourse."
Tulloch Scottish
Scottish habitational name from a place near Dingwall on the Firth of Cromarty, named with Gaelic tulach ‘hillock’, ‘mound’, or from any of various other minor places named with this element.
Twyford English
English habitational name from any of the numerous places named Twyford, for example in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Derbyshire, Hampshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Middlesex, and Norfolk, from Old English twi- ‘double’ + ford ‘ford’.
Tylson English, German (Anglicized)
English: variant of Dyson (see surname Dye). ... [more]
Valee German
From French origin, denoting someone who lives or comes from a valley.
Valen English, Scottish
English and Scottish: from a medieval personal name, Latin Valentinus, a derivative of Valens (see also Valente), which was never common in England, but is occasionally found from the end of the 12th century, probably as the result of French influence... [more]
Valente Italian, Galician, Portuguese
Italian, Galician, and Portuguese: nickname from valente ‘brave’, ‘valiant’.... [more]
Vallie German
Probably an altered spelling of German Valee, a fairly common surname of French origin denoting someone who lived in a valley. The name in Germany is also spelled Wallee.
Vaux French
French, English, and Scottish habitational name from any of various places in northern France called Vaux, from the Old French plural of val ‘valley’.
Velte German
German variant of Velten.
Velten Dutch, German
Dutch and German from a vernacular form of the personal name Valentin (see Valentine).
Velten Norwegian
Norwegian habitational name from any of several farmsteads, mainly in Hedmark, named with velte ‘log pile’.
Verdon French
Habitational name from a place so named, for example in Dordogne, Gironde, and Marne.
Wakeley English
Habitational name from Wakeley in Hertfordshire, named from the Old English byname Waca, meaning ‘watchful’ (see Wake) + Old English leah ‘woodland clearing’.
Wallee German
Of French origin, denoting a person who lives in or is from a valley.
Warnecke German
North German from a pet form of the personal name Warner, Low German form of Werner.
Warneke German
German variant spelling of Warnecke.
Warnke German
German variant of Warnecke.
Warns Dutch, German
Dutch habitational name from places so named in Friesland and Overijssel. The one in Friesland was the site of a famous victory of Frisians over the Hollanders in the 14th century. ... [more]
Waverly English
Meaning, "from Waverley (Surrey)" or "from the brushwood meadow." From either waever meaning "brushwood" or waefre meaning "flickering, unstable, restless, wandering" combined with leah meaning "meadow, clearing."
Weinmann German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) occupational name for a viticulturalist or wine merchant, Middle High German winman, German Weinmann.
Welles English
Variant of Wells.
Wellington English
Habitational name from any of the three places named Wellington, in Herefordshire, Shropshire, and Somerset. All are most probably named with an unattested Old English personal name Weola + -ing- (implying association with) + tun ‘settlement’.
Welton English
Habitational name from any of various places named Welton, for example in Cumbria, Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, and East Yorkshire, from Old English well(a) ‘spring’, ‘stream’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
Wentworth English
Habitational name from places in Cambridgeshire and South Yorkshire called Wentworth, probably from the Old English byname Wintra meaning ‘winter’ + Old English worð ‘enclosure’... [more]
Weseloh German
German habitational name from a place so named near Hannover.
Wester German
From Middle High German wëster ‘westerly’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived to the west of a settlement, or a regional name for one who had migrated from further west.
Whitlock English
Nickname for someone with white or fair hair, from Middle English whit ‘white’ + lock ‘tress’, ‘curl’. Compare Sherlock. ... [more]
Wideman Swedish (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Swedish Widman.
Widman Swedish
Meaning uncertain. Perhaps a combination of Old Swedish viþr "wood, forest" or vid "wide" and man "man". It is also possible, though less likely, that it is a re-spelling of Vikman, where the first element is Swedish vik "bay".
Widman German
Altered spelling of German Widmann.
Widmann German
Variant of Wiedmann ‘huntsman’ and Wideman.
Wiebe German
From a short form of any of various Germanic personal names beginning with wig ‘battle’, ‘war.’
Wiedemann German
Variation of Wideman.
Wiedmann Upper German
North German variant of Widemann (see Wideman).
Wild Medieval English, English, German, Jewish
English: from Middle English wild ‘wild’, ‘uncontrolled’ (Old English wilde), hence a nickname for a man of violent and undisciplined character, or a topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of overgrown uncultivated land.... [more]
Wilkes English, Frisian
English: patronymic from Wilk.... [more]
Wille German
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names beginning Willi-, as for example, Willibrant, Willihart.
Windham English, Irish (Anglicized)
English habitational name from Wyndham in West Sussex, near West Grinstead, probably named from an unattested Old English personal name Winda + Old English hamm ‘water meadow’; or from Wymondham in Leicestershire and Norfolk, named from the Old English personal name Wigmund (see Wyman) + Old English ham ‘homestead’... [more]
Witten Low German
North German patronymic from Witte.
Woelk German
German variant spelling of Wölk (see Wolk).
Woelke German
German variant spelling of Wölke, itself a variant of Wolk.
Wolston English
From the Middle English personal name Wolfstan or Wolstan, Old English Wulfstan, composed of the elements wulf ‘wolf’ + stan stone or a habitational name from any of a large number of places called Woolston(e) or Wollston, all of which are named with Old English personal names containing the first element Wulf (Wulfheah, Wulfhelm, Wulfric, Wulfsige, and Wulfweard) + Old English tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
Woodlock Irish, French, English
From an Old English personal name, Wudlac, composed of the elements wudu ‘wood’ + lac ‘play’, ‘sport’.
Woodman English
Occupational name for a woodcutter or a forester (compare Woodward), or topographic name for someone who lived in the woods. ... [more]
Worthington English
Habitational name from places in Lancashire and Leicestershire named Worthington; both may have originally been named in Old English as Wurðingtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Wurð", but it is also possible that the first element was Old English worðign, a derivative of worð ‘enclosure’.
Wurðingtun English
Habitational name from places in Lancashire and Leicestershire named Worthington; both may have originally been named in Old English as Wurðingtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Wurð", but it is also possible that the first element was Old English worðign, a derivative of worð ‘enclosure’.
Younger English, American
English (mainly Borders) from Middle English yonger ‘younger’, hence a distinguishing name for, for example, the younger of two bearers of the same personal name. In one case, at least, however, the name is known to have been borne by an immigrant Fleming, and was probably an Americanized form of Middle Dutch jongheer ‘young nobleman’ (see Jonker)... [more]
Yule Medieval English
Nickname for someone who was born on Christmas Day or had some other connection with this time of year, from Middle English yule ‘Christmastide’ (Old English geol, reinforced by the cognate Old Norse term jól).
Yvenson English
Meaning, "son of Evan" or "son of Ivan."
Zanto German
Unknown origin and history.