Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is LMS.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ALARIE French, French (Quebec)
French: reflex of the Visigothic personal name Alaric, which is composed of Germanic elements meaning ‘all power’. This form was established in Quebec from 1681.
ALBAZ Jewish, Northern African
Ashkenazic Jewish name meaning, "falconer" found mainly amongst Jewish peoples emigrating from Algeria and Morocco.
AMORY English, Norman
English from a Germanic personal name, Aimeri, composed of the elements haim ‘home’ + ric ‘power’. (The same elements constitute the etymology of Henry.) The name was introduced into England from France by the Normans... [more]
ANDERSDOTTER Swedish
Strictly feminine patronymic of Anders.
ARGYLL Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
From the regional name Argyll, a county of southwestern Scotland, named in Gaelic as Earre Ghàidheal ‘coast of the Gaels’. Argyll was the earliest part of Scotland to be settled by Gaelic speakers from Ireland from the 6th century onwards... [more]
ARMOUR Scottish, Northern Irish
From Middle English, Old French armure, blended with the agent noun armer (see Armer), hence an occupational name for a maker of arms and armor. The collective noun armure denoted offensive weapons as well as the more recently specialized sense of protective gear.
ASHBY English
English: habitational name from any of the numerous places in northern and eastern England called Ashby, from Old Norse askr ‘ash’ or the Old Norse personal name Aski + býr ‘farm’.
ASHCROFT English
English (chiefly Lancashire) topographic name from Middle English asche ‘ash tree’ + croft ‘enclosure’, or a habitational name from a minor place named with these elements.
AU Chinese
Chinese variant of Ou.
AUGELLO Italian
Italian (Campania) dialect variant of Uccello ‘bird’, hence either a nickname for a diminutive, birdlike person or an occupational name for a fowler. Compare Auciello.
BA Chinese
Chinese from the name of the kingdom of Ba, which existed in Sichuan during the Zhou dynasty (1122–221 bc). Descendants of some of the ruling class adopted the name of the kingdom as their surname... [more]
BARDEN English
English: habitational name from places in North and West Yorkshire named Barden, from Old English bere ‘barley’ (or the derived adjective beren) + denu ‘valley’.
BARNER English
Southern English habitational name for someone who lived by a barn.
BARRICK English
Variation of Barwick.
BARWICK English, German
English: habitational name from any of various places called Barwick, for example in Norfolk, Somerset, and West Yorkshire, from Old English bere ‘barley’ + wic ‘outlying farm’, i.e. a granary lying some distance away from the main village.... [more]
BAYERS German
Variant of Bayer.
BEETHOVEN Dutch, Flemish
Combination of beeth 'beetroot' and hoven, the plural of Hof, meaning 'farm'. Beethoven is therefore 'beetroot farms'. There is a village named Betthoven in the province of Liège.
BEHR German, Dutch
German and Dutch variant of the personal name Bähr (see Baer).
BENDTSDATTER Danish (Archaic), Norwegian (Archaic)
Strictly feminine patronymic for Bendt.
BERESFORD English
English: habitational name from a place in the parish of Alstonfield, Staffordshire named Beresford, from Old English beofor ‘beaver’ (or possibly from a byname from this word) + Old English ford ‘ford’... [more]
BERETTA Italian
Northern Italian variant spelling of Berretta.
BERNER English, Norman
From the Norman personal name Bernier from Old English beornan ‘to burn’, hence an occupational name for a burner of lime (compare German Kalkbrenner) or charcoal. It may also have denoted someone who baked bricks or distilled spirits, or who carried out any other manufacturing process involving burning... [more]
BERNER German, Low German
German habitational name, in Silesia denoting someone from a place called Berna (of which there are two examples); in southern Germany and Switzerland denoting someone from the Swiss city of Berne. ... [more]
BERNETT Scottish, English
Altered spelling of Scottish and English Burnett or French Bernet.
BERRETTA Italian
From berretta, originally meaning ‘hooded cloak’ (Latin birrus), later ‘headdress’, ‘bonnet’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of such headgear or a nickname for an habitual wearer.
BERRICK English
Variation of Barwick.
BIRCH English, German, Danish, Swedish (Rare)
From Middle High German birche, Old English birce, Old Danish birk, all meaning "birch". This was likely a topographic name for someone living by a birch tree or a birch forest... [more]
BIRKE Low German, Swedish (Rare)
Variant of Birk. Perhaps a shortened form of any of various Danish and Norwegian surnames beginning with Birke-, for example Birkeland and Birkelund ("birch grove").
BIRKS English
Northern English variant of Birch.
BLUFORD English, American (South)
Possibly an English habitational name from a lost or unidentified place. The name occurs in records of the 19th century but is now very rare if not extinct in the British Isles. In the U.S. it is found chiefly in TX and TN.
BOCK German, Upper German, Jewish, English
Altered spelling of German Böck (see Boeck) or Bach.... [more]
BOLDT German
From the Germanic personal name Baldo, a short form of the various compound names with the first element bald ‘bold’.
BONGIORNO Italian
Italian from the medieval personal name Bongiorno (composed of bono ‘good’ + giorno ‘day’), bestowed on a child as an expression of the parents’ satisfaction at the birth (‘it was a good day when you were born’).
BRASS English, German
English (Northumberland): variant of Brace.... [more]
BRESLIN Irish
Irish (Sligo and Donegal): Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breisláin ‘descendant of Breisleán’, a diminutive of the personal name Breasal (see Brazil).
BRETON French, English
French and English: ethnic name for a Breton, from Old French bret (oblique case breton) (see Brett).
BROUWER Dutch
Dutch occupational name for a brewer of beer or ale, Middle Dutch brouwer.
BRUNSWICK English, German
English habitational name from the city in Saxony now known in German as Braunschweig. ... [more]
BUERK German (Anglicized)
German from a short form of the personal name Burkhardt, a variant of Burkhart.
BUERMEISTER German
North German: status name for the mayor or chief magistrate of a town, from Middle Low German bur ‘inhabitant, dweller’, ‘neighbor’, ‘peasant’, ‘citizen’ + mester ‘master’.
BUFORD English, French (Anglicized)
English: most probably a variant of Beaufort.... [more]
BURKINS English
English variant of Birkin, Burkin, a habitational name from the parish of Birkin in West Yorkshire, so named with Old English bircen ‘birch grove’, a derivative of birce (see Birch).
BURMEISTER German
North German: status name for the mayor or chief magistrate of a town, from Middle Low German bur ‘inhabitant, dweller’, ‘neighbor’, ‘peasant’, ‘citizen’ + mester ‘master’.
BUSSE German, English
German: variant of Buss. ... [more]
BYERS German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Bayers.
CAMPER English
Respelling of German Kamper or Kämpfer (see Kampfer). The surname Camper is recorded in England, in the London and Essex area, in the 19th century; its origin is uncertain, but it may have been taken there from continental Europe.
CAMPION Norman, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: status name for a professional champion (see Champion, Kemp), from the Norman French form campion.
CARLING Swedish
From the personal name Karl, which is also a common place name prefix, and the common surname suffix -ing "belonging to".
CARNER German, English
Americanized spelling of German Karner or Körner (see Koerner).... [more]
CARRERA Spanish, Italian
Spanish: topographic name for someone living by a main road, carrera ‘thoroughfare’, originally a road passable by vehicles as well as pedestrians (Late Latin carraria (via), a derivative of carrum ‘cart’), or a habitational name from any of various places named with this word.... [more]
CASSATT French
Origin uncertain. This is not known as a surname in Britain. It may be an Americanized form of a French name such as Casault.
CASTILLE French
Regional name for someone from Castile in central Spain (see Castilla).
CHALMERS Scottish
Variant of Chambers. The -l- was originally an orthographic device to indicate the length of the vowel after assimilation of -mb- to -m(m)-.
CLEVELAND Norwegian (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Norwegian Kleiveland or Kleveland, habitational names from any of five farmsteads in Agder and Vestlandet named with Old Norse kleif "rocky ascent" or klefi "closet" (an allusion to a hollow land formation) and land "land".
COBAIN Scottish
This unusual surname is of Old Norse origin and is found particularly in Scotland. It derives from an Old Norse personal name Kobbi, itself from an element meaning large, and the Gaelic bain, denoting a fair person, with the diminutive ('little' or 'son of') form Cobbie.
COILL Irish
Meaning, "hazel tree."
COLDEN English, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire named Colden, from Old English cald ‘cold’ col ‘charcoal’ + denu ‘valley’.... [more]
COLES English, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
COLLARD English, French
English and French: from the personal name Coll + the pejorative suffix -ard.
COMEAU French, French (Acadian), Louisiana Creole
French: from a Gascon diminutive of Combe.
COMEAUX French (Acadian), French Creole
Variant spelling of French Comeau.
COVEY Irish, English
Irish: reduced form of MacCovey, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cobhthaigh (see Coffey).... [more]
CRABB English, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
CRANSHAW English
From Cranshaw in Lancashire, named from Old English cran(uc) ‘crane’ + sceaga ‘grove’, ‘thicket’.
CROGHAN Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Conchruacháin ‘son of Cú Cruacháin’, a personal name meaning ‘hound of Croghan’. Croghan in county Roscommon was the ancient royal site of the province of Connacht.
CROOKS English
Patrynomic for Crook.
CRUSOE English (Rare)
According to Reaney and Wilson this name was taken to England by John Crusoe, a Huguenot refugee from Hownescourt in Flanders, who settled in Norwich.
CUMBERLAND English
Regional name for someone from Cumberland in northwestern England (now part of Cumbria).
CWYNAR Polish
Polonized form of the German surname Zwirner, an occupational name for a yarn or twine maker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German zwirn ‘twine’, ‘yarn’
DAHLKE German
Eastern German: from a pet form of the Slavic personal names Dalibor or Dalimir, which are both derived from dal- ‘present’, ‘gift’.
DALGLIESH Scottish
Scottish habitational name from a place near Selkirk, first recorded in 1383 in the form Dalglas, from Celtic dol- ‘field’ + glas ‘green.’
DARLING Literature, English, Scottish
English and Scottish: from Middle English derling, Old English deorling ‘darling’, ‘beloved one’, a derivative of deor ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ (see Dear). This was quite a common Old English byname, which remained current as a personal name into the 14th century... [more]
DAW English, Scottish
English and Scottish from a pet form of David. ... [more]
DAW Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Deaghaidh, ‘descendant of Deaghadh’, a personal name of uncertain origin. It may be composed of the elements deagh- ‘good’ + ádh ‘luck’, ‘fate’; some such association seems to lie behind its Anglicization as Goodwin.
DEA Irish
Irish: reduced form of O’Dea.
DEARY English
Nickname for a noisy or troublesome person, from Anglo-French de(s)rei ‘noise’, ‘trouble’, ‘turbulence’ (from Old French desroi). topographic for someone who lived by a deer enclosure, from Old English deor ‘deer’ + (ge)hæg ‘enclosure’.
DEERY Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Daighre ‘descendant of Daighre’, a byname meaning ‘fiery’.
DEVALSON English
Meaning, "son of Deval."
DEVORE French
French: variant of De Var, a habitational name for someone from a place named Var, for example in Charente. Respelling of French Devors, a habitational name, with the preposition de, for someone from Vors in Aveyron.
DIAMOND English
English variant of Dayman (see Day). Forms with the excrescent d are not found before the 17th century; they are at least in part the result of folk etymology.
DICKIE Scottish, Northern Irish
From a pet form of Dick.
DILLIE German
Probably an altered spelling of Dilley or Dilly or possibly of German Dillier. A variant of Dilger.
DILLION Irish, English
Possibly a variant of Dillon.
DINEEN Irish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duinnín ‘descendant of Duinnín’, a byname from a diminutive of donn ‘brown-haired man’ or ‘chieftain’.
DOSS German, German (Austrian), German (Swiss)
German: Habitational name for someone from Dosse in Altmark. Variant of Dose ... [more]
DUBHAGÁINN Irish
Derived from the given name Dubhagáin.
DÜCK Low German, German
North German nickname for a coward, from Low German duken ‘to duck or dive’. ... [more]
DUCK Dutch
Dutch variant of Duyck. In a German-speaking environment, this is also a variant of van Dyck and Dyck.
DUGGAN Scottish, Irish, English
Scottish and Irish variant spelling of Dugan. ... [more]
DUNDAS Scottish, Northern Irish
Scottish and northern Irish (Counties Leitrim and Fermanagh): habitational name from Dundas, a place near Edinburgh, Scotland, which is named from Gaelic dùn ‘hill’ + deas ‘south’.
DUYCK Dutch
Dutch nickname from Middle Dutch duuc ‘duck’; in some cases the name may be a derivative of Middle Dutch duken ‘to dive’ and cognate with Ducker. Compare also Duck
DYCK Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a dike, Dutch dijk. Compare Dyke.
EAMES English
Probably from the possessive case of the Middle English word eam ‘uncle’, denoting a retainer in the household of the uncle of some important local person. Possibly also a variant of Ames.
EARLY Irish, English, American, German
Irish: translation of Gaelic Ó Mocháin (see Mohan; Gaelic moch means ‘early’ or ‘timely’), or of some other similar surname, for example Ó Mochóir, a shortened form of Ó Mochéirghe, Ó Maoil-Mhochéirghe, from a personal name meaning ‘early rising’.... [more]
EASTLEY English
A Saxon village called East Leah has been recorded to have existed since 932 AD. (Leah is an ancient Anglo-Saxon word meaning 'a clearing in a forest'). There is additional evidence of this settlement in a survey from the time which details land in North Stoneham being granted by King Æthelstan to his military aid, Alfred in 932 AD... [more]
EGEDE Scandinavian
Derived from a place name on Sjælland containing the name element EIK meaning "oak".
EICH German
German from Middle High German eich(e) ‘oak’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived near an oak tree. In some cases, it may be a habitational name for someone from any of several places named with this word, for example Eiche or Eichen, or for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of an oak.
EICHHORN German, Jewish
German topographic name for someone who lived on or near an oak-covered promontory, from Middle High German eich(e) ‘oak’ + horn ‘horn’, ‘promontory’. German from Middle High German eichhorn ‘squirrel’ (from Old High German eihhurno, a compound of eih ‘oak’ + urno, from the ancient Germanic and Indo-European name of the animal, which was later wrongly associated with hurno ‘horn’); probably a nickname for someone thought to resemble the animal, or alternatively a habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a squirrel... [more]
EISELE German
From a short pet form of the personal name Isenhart, from Old High German isan ‘iron’ + hart ‘hardy’, ‘strong’. From Isenlin, a compound of Middle High German isen ‘iron’ + the hypocoristic suffix -lin, hence a nickname for a blacksmith, ironworker, or dealer in iron.
ELKINS English
Patronymic of Elkin.
ELLENDER German
Respelling of German Elender, a nickname for a stranger or newcomer, from Middle High German ellende ‘strange’, ‘foreign’, or a habitational name for someone from any of twenty places named Elend, denoting a remote settlement, as for example in the Harz Mountains or in Carinthia, Austria.
ELLINGHAM English
Habitational name from places so named in Hampshire, Northumbria, and Norfolk. The first of these is named from Old English Edlingaham ‘homestead (Old English ham) of the people of Edla’, a personal name derived from a short form of the various compound names with a first element ead ‘prosperity’, ‘fortune’; the others may have the same origin or incorporate the personal name Ella (see Ellington).
ELLINGTON English
English habitational name from places in Cambridgeshire, Kent, Northumbria, and North Yorkshire; most are so named from Old English Ellingtun ‘settlement (Old English tun) associated with Ella’, a short form of the various compound names with a first element ælf ‘elf’, but the one in Kent has its first element from the Old English byname Ealda meaning ‘old’.
ELMORE English
An English habitational name from Elmore in Gloucestershire, named from Old English elm ‘elm’ + ofer ‘river bank’ or ofer ‘ridge’.
EMERY English, French, Norman
English and French from a Germanic personal name, Emaurri, composed of the elements amja ‘busy’, ‘industrious’ + ric ‘power’. The name was introduced into England from France by the Normans... [more]
ENGELBERT German, English, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of engel (see Engel) + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The widespread popularity of the name in France during the Middle Ages was largely a result of the fact that it had been borne by a son-in-law of Charlemagne; in the Rhineland it was more often given in memory of a bishop of Cologne (1216–25) of this name, who was martyred.
ESAU Welsh, German
From the Biblical personal name Esau, meaning ‘hairy’ in Hebrew (Genesis 25:25).
ESLER German
German: byname or occupational name for someone who drove donkeys, from Middle High German esel ‘donkey’ + the agent suffix -er.
EVERSON English
Patronymic from the personal name Ever. See also Evers.
EVERTON English
Habitational name from any of various places, in Bedfordshire, Merseyside, and Nottinghamshire, so named from Old English eofor ‘wild boar’ + tun ‘settlement’.
EVOLA Italian
Perhaps a topographic name from ebbio ‘danewort’ (Sambucus ebulus), from Latin ebullus, or possibly a habitational name from a minor place named with this word.
FAGIN Jewish
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): variant spelling of Feigin.
FALLOW English, Jewish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by a patch of fallow land, Middle English falwe (Old English f(e)alg). This word was used to denote both land left uncultivated for a time to recover its fertility and land recently brought into cultivation.... [more]
FAYRE English
Variation of Fair.
FELTY Upper German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of South German Velte, from a short form of the personal name Valentin (see Valentine).
FENNING English
Topographic name for a fen dweller, from a derivative of Old English fenn (see Fenn).
FÉVRIER French
Meaning, "February."
FIELDING English
Topographic name from an Old English felding ‘dweller in open country’.
FIFER German, American, Slovene
Americanized and Slovenian spelling of German Pfeiffer.
FINCH English
English: nickname from Middle English finch ‘finch’ (Old English finc). In the Middle Ages this bird had a reputation for stupidity. It may perhaps also in part represent a metonymic occupational name for someone who caught finches and sold them as songsters or for the cooking pot... [more]
FINE Jewish (Anglicized)
Jewish Americanized spelling of Fein.
FINLAYSON Scottish
Patronymic from Finlay.
FIRTH English, Scottish, Welsh
English and Scottish: topographic name from Old English (ge)fyrhþe ‘woodland’ or ‘scrubland on the edge of a forest’.... [more]
FISH Medieval English, Jewish
From Middle English fische, fish ‘fish’, a metonymic occupational name for a fisherman or fish seller, or a nickname for someone thought to resemble a fish.... [more]
FORDE English, Irish
Variant of Ford. This is a very common spelling in Ireland.
FORET French, French Creole
From Old French forest ‘forest’, a topographic name for someone who lived in or near a royal forest, or an occupational name for a keeper or worker in one. See also Forrest. This surname is frequent in Louisiana.
FORSYTHE Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic personal name Fearsithe, composed of the elements fear ‘man’ + sith ‘peace’. Some early forms with prepositions, as for example William de Fersith (Edinburgh 1365), seem to point to an alternative origin as a habitational name, but no place name of suitable form is known... [more]
FOULKS English
English from a Norman personal name, a short form of various Germanic names formed with folk ‘people’. See also Volk.
FREDMAN Swedish, Jewish
Swedish: ornamental name composed of the elements fred ‘peace’ + man ‘man’.... [more]
FRIEDMANN German, German (Swiss), Jewish
German and Swiss German from a derivative of Friedrich. ... [more]
FURMAN Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish, Slovene, English, German (Anglicized)
Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic), and Slovenian: occupational name for a carter or drayman, the driver of a horse-drawn delivery vehicle, from Polish, Yiddish, and Slovenian furman, a loanword from German (see Fuhrmann)... [more]
FUSS Medieval Low German
German from Middle High German fus ‘foot’, hence most probably a nickname for someone with some peculiarity or deformity of the foot, but perhaps also a topographic name for someone who lived at the foot of a hill.
GABLE English
Northern English: of uncertain origin, perhaps a habitational name from a minor place named with Old Norse gafl ‘gable’, which was applied to a triangular-shaped hill. The mountain called Great Gable in Cumbria is named in this way.... [more]
GAGNEAU French
Variation of Gagne.
GALBRAITH Scottish, Scottish Gaelic
Ethnic name for someone descended from a tribe of Britons living in Scotland, from Gaelic gall ‘stranger’ + Breathnach ‘Briton’ (i.e. ‘British foreigner’). These were either survivors of the British peoples who lived in Scotland before the Gaelic invasions from Ireland in the 5th century (in particular the Welsh-speaking Strathclyde Britons, who survived as a distinctive ethnic group until about the 14th century), or others who had perhaps migrated northwestwards at the time of the Anglo-Saxon invasions.
GANNON Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mag Fhionnáin, a patronymic from the personal name Fionnán. This name, from a diminutive of fionn ‘white’, ‘fair’, was borne by several early Irish saints.
GARFINKEL Yiddish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) ornamental name or nickname from Yiddish gorfinkl ‘carbuncle’, German Karfunkel. This term denoted both a red precious or semi-precious stone, especially a garnet or ruby cut into a rounded shape (in which case it is an ornamental name), and a large inflamed growth on the skin like a large boil (in which case it is a descriptive nickname).
GATLIN English
English of uncertain origin; probably a variant of Catlin or Gadling, a nickname from Old English gœdeling ‘kinsman’, ‘companion’, but also ‘low fellow’.
GATLIN German
Possibly an altered spelling of German Göttling, from a Germanic personal name formed with god ‘god’ or god ‘good’ + -ling suffix of affiliation, or, like Gättling (of which this may also be an altered form), a nickname from Middle High German getlinc ‘companion’, ‘kinsman’.
GERLING German
German patronymic from a short form of a Germanic personal name beginning with the element gar, ger ‘spear’, ‘lance’.
GIBBON English
English from the medieval personal name Gibbon, a pet form of Gibb.
GIEL Medieval English
From a medieval personal name of which the original form was Latin Aegidius, from Greek aigidion ‘kid’, ‘young goat’. Compare English Giles.... [more]
GILLARD English
English from a pejorative derivative of the personal name Giles.
GILLARD English, French, Swiss
English and French from an assimilated form of the personal name Gislehard, a compound of Old High German gisel ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble youth’ (see Giesel) + hard ‘hardy’... [more]
GILLETTE English, French
English: from a feminine form of Gillett.... [more]
GILLIARD French, Swiss
French and Swiss French from a derivative of Gillier, from the Germanic personal name Giselher, composed of gisil ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble offspring’ (see Giesel) + heri ‘army’.
GILLIES Scottish
Scottish variant of Gillis or McGillis.
GILLIS Dutch
Dutch form of Giles.
GOERTZE German
Probably a variant of Göretz, a reduced form of Gerhards (see Gerhardt), or a variant of Goertz.
GOERTZEN German
German: probably a variant of Göretz, a reduced form of Gerhards (see Gerhardt), or a variant of Goertz.
GOGNON French, Occitan
Nickname for an aggressive or belligerent man, from Old French Gagnon ‘ mastiff’, ‘guard dog’. Possibly from Occitan ganhon ‘young pig’, applied as an offensive nickname. See also Gonyeau.
GONYEAU French
Respelling of French Gagnon, found predominantly in New England, possibly also of Gagneau, from a diminutive of Gagne.
GOODY Medieval English
From Middle English god dai ‘good day’, possibly applied as a nickname for someone who frequently used this greeting.... [more]
GOTHAM English
English: habitational name from Gotham in Nottinghamshire, so named from Old English gat ‘goat’ + ham ‘homestead’ or hamm ‘water meadow’.
GRADEN Scottish
Habitational name from the lands of Graden in Berwickshire.
GRANGE English, French
English and French topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, from Middle English, Old French grange (Latin granica ‘granary’, ‘barn’, from granum ‘grain’)... [more]
GRAWERT Low German, German (East Prussian)
As a Low German name, Grawert is derived from Middle High German grā and Old High German grāo "gray" (originally "shimmery, gleaming"). As a surname, it was a nickname given to someone with gray hair.... [more]
GRAYDEN Irish
Variation of Graden.
GUENTHER German
German: from a Germanic personal name composed of gund ‘battle’ + hari, heri ‘army’.
GUIDRY French (Cajun)
From a personal name based on the Germanic root waido ‘hunt’. The name is particularly associated with Cajuns in LA, who seem all to be descended from Claude Guédry dit Grivois, who arrived in Acadia before 1671.... [more]
GUILLIOT French
From a pet form of the personal name Guille, itself a short form of Guillaume.
GUION French
French: from the Germanic personal name Wido (see Guy).
GUST German
German: from a short form of the personal name Jodocus, which is either a Latinized form of a Breton name, Iodoc, borne by a 7th-century Breton saint (compare Jost and Joyce) or from a reduced form of the personal name Augustus.... [more]
HAILES Scottish, English
Scottish habitational name from Hailes in Lothian, originally in East Lothian, named from the Middle English genitive or plural form of hall ‘hall’. ... [more]
HALLIWELL English
Northern English (Lancashire) habitational name from a place near Manchester called Halliwell, from Old English halig ‘holy’ + well(a) ‘well’, ‘spring’, or from any of the numerous other places named with these elements (see Hollowell).
HALLOW English
English: topographic name from Middle English hal(l)owes ‘nooks’, ‘hollows’, from Old English halh (see Hale). In some cases the name may be genitive, rather than plural, in form, with the sense ‘relative or servant of the dweller in the nook’.
HAMBERG German, Danish, Jewish
German, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from any of several places named Hamberg. Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Hamburg.
HAMBERGER German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name for someone from any of various places named Hamberg. Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Hamburger.
HAMBURG German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from the great city and port at the mouth of the river Elbe, named with the Germanic elements ham ‘water meadow’ + burg ‘fortress’, ‘fortified town’.
HAMBURGER German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name for someone from Hamburg.
HAMP English, German
English: unexplained; compare Hemp.... [more]
HANLIN Scottish, English
Scottish and English: probably a variant spelling of Irish Hanlon.
HARBOR English
English: variant spelling of Harbour.
HARBOUR English
Variant of French Arbour or a metonymic occupational name for a keeper of a lodging house, from Old English herebeorg "shelter, lodging".
HARDEKOP German (Rare)
Derived from Middle High German hart "hard" and kopf "head". As a surname, it was given to a hard-headed, stubborn person.
HARMENINCK Frisian
Patronymic of Hermann.
HAROLD English, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name Hereweald, its Old Norse equivalent Haraldr, or the Continental form Herold introduced to Britain by the Normans. These all go back to a Germanic personal name composed of the elements heri, hari ‘army’ + wald ‘rule’, which is attested in Europe from an early date; the Roman historian Tacitus records a certain Cariovalda, chief of the Germanic tribe of the Batavi, as early as the 1st century ad... [more]
HAROLD Irish
Of direct Norse origin, but is also occasionally a variant of Harrell and Hurrell.
HASLEY English
Habitational name of uncertain origin. The surname is common in London, and may be derived from Alsa (formerly Assey) in Stanstead Mountfitchet, Essex (recorded as Alsiesheye in 1268). nother possible source is Halsway in Somerset, named from Old English hals ‘neck’ + weg ‘way’, ‘road’.
HATTENDORF German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from places called Hattendorf, near Alsfeld and near Hannover. The element hatt, had means ‘bog’
HAUSCH German
From the Germanic personal name Huso, a short form of a compound name composed with hus ‘house’, ‘dwelling’ as the first element.
HAWTHORN English, Scottish
English and Scottish: variant spelling of Hawthorne.
HAYFORD English
English habitational name from several places called Heyford in Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire, or Hayford in Buckfastleigh, Devon, all named with Old English heg ‘hay’ + ford ‘ford’.
HEATHCOTE English
English habitational name from any of various places called Heathcote, for example in Derbyshire and Warwickshire, from Old English h?ð ‘heathland’, ‘heather’ + cot ‘cottage’, ‘dwelling’.
HEILAND German
South German: from Middle High German heilant ‘savior’, ‘Christ’, presumably either a name given to someone who had played the part of Christ in a mystery play or an occupational name for a healer, from Middle High German heilen ‘to heal’, ‘save’.
HEIN German, Dutch, Danish, Jewish
German, Dutch, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from a short form of the Germanic personal name Heinrich.
HEMSLEY English
English: habitational name from either of two places in North Yorkshire called Helmsley. The names are of different etymologies: the one near Rievaulx Abbey is from the Old English personal name Helm + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’, whereas Upper Helmsley, near York, is from the Old English personal name Hemele + Old English eg ‘island’, and had the form Hemelsey till at least the 14th century
HENLEY English, Irish, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Oxfordshire, Suffolk, and Warwickshire, are named with Old English héan (the weak dative case of heah ‘high’, originally used after a preposition and article) + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’... [more]
HENSLEY English
Probably a habitational name from either of two places in Devon: Hensley in East Worlington, which is named with the Old English personal name Heahmund + Old English leah ‘(woodland) clearing’, or Hensleigh in Tiverton, which is named from Old English hengest ‘stallion’ (or the Old English personal name Hengest) + leah... [more]
HEYER English, German, Dutch
English variant of Ayer. ... [more]
HIGHLAND English, German
English, Scottish, and Irish: variant spelling of Hyland.... [more]
HIND English, Scottish
English (central and northern): nickname for a gentle or timid person, from Middle English, Old English hind ‘female deer’.... [more]
HINDLEY English
English (Lancashire): habitational name from a place near Manchester, so named from Old English hind ‘female deer’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’.
HITTLE German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of German Hüttl (see Huettl).
HOLBROOK English, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of various places, for example in Derbyshire, Dorset, and Suffolk, so called from Old English hol ‘hollow’, ‘sunken’ + broc ‘stream’. ... [more]
HOLLADAY English
English: from Old English haligdæg ‘holy day’, ‘religious festival’. The reasons why this word should have become a surname are not clear; probably it was used as a byname for one born on a religious festival day.
HOLLAND Irish (Anglicized), Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÓileáin, a variant of Ó hAoláin, from a form of FAOLÁN (with loss of the initial F-). Compare Whelan.
HOLMSTEN Swedish
Ornamental name composed of Swedish holm "islet" and sten "stone".
HOME English, Scottish
English and Scottish variant spelling of Holme.
HUETTL Upper German
South German (Hüttl) diminutive of Hütt (see Huett).
HURRELL English, Norman
English (of Norman origin) from a derivative of Old French hurer ‘to bristle or ruffle’, ‘to stand on end’ (see Huron).
HURRELL Irish
This may be an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hEarghaill ‘descendant of Earghall’, a variant of Ó Fearghail (see Farrell).
HUX German
Probably from a topographic name Huck or Hucks, of uncertain origin. It occurs in many place and field names.
HYLAN Scottish, English
Variation of the surname Hyland.
IRETON English
Habitational name from either of two places in Derbyshire called Ireton, or one in North Yorkshire called Irton. All of these are named from the genitive case of Old Norse Íri ‘Irishmen’ (see Ireland) + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.... [more]
ISELLE French
Frenchified forms of Iseli, a Swiss German variant of Eisele.... [more]
JENCKES English
"Back-formation" of Jenkin, a medieval diminutive of John.
JENSDATTER Norwegian, Danish
Strictly feminine patronymic of Jens.
JESTEN Dutch
Variation of Joosten.
JETSON English
A patronymic from the personal name Jutt, a pet form of Jordan. Compare Judson.
JORGENSON German, English
Respelling of Jørgensen or Jörgensen (see Jorgensen) or the Swedish cognate Jörgens(s)on.
JOST Dutch, German
Dutch and German: from a personal name, a derivative of the Breton personal name Iodoc (see Joyce), or from the personal name Just.
JOURDINE French, English
English and French variant of Jordan.
JÜNGER German, Jewish
German (Jünger) distinguishing name, from Middle High German jünger ‘younger’, for the younger of two bearers of the same personal name, usually a son who bore the same name as his father... [more]
JUNIFER ?
Matronymic of Jenifer.
KĄKOL Polish
Means "corncockle".
KARÉLIN Russian
Altered spelling of Russian Karélin, ethnic name for someone from Karelia (see Karjala).
KARJALA Finnish
Finnish from karja ‘cattle’ + the local suffix -la, or possibly from a word of Germanic origin, harja- ‘host’, ‘crowd’, Old Swedish haer. Historic records suggest that the Germanic inhabitants of the area around Lake Ladoga (in present-day Russia) used this term to refer to the Finns who once lived there.
KÄRLIN German
German surname from the personal name Karl. Also an altered spelling of German Gerling.
KARLIN Swedish
Swedish variant spelling of Carlin.
KARLIN Polish
Polish habitational name from a village in Poland.
KAYLOR Scottish, German
Variant of Scottish Keillor.... [more]
KEARNS Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Céirín ‘descendant of Céirín’, a personal name from a diminutive of ciar ‘dark’, ‘black’. English patronymic -s has been added superfluously.
KEEL Irish
Irish reduced form of McKeel.
KEEL German (Swiss)
Swiss German variant of Kehl.
KEEL German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Kühl (see Kuhl), Kiehl, or Kiel.
KEILLOR Scottish
Habitational name from a place in Angus called Keilor.
KELM German
Germanized form of Polish Chelm ‘peak’, ‘hill’, a topographic name for someone who lived by a hill with a pointed summit, or habitational name from a city in eastern Poland or any of various other places named with this word.
KELTON Scottish
Scottish habitational name from the village of Kelton in the parish of the same name in Kirkcudbrightshire.
KEMPER German, Dutch
German: status name denoting a peasant farmer or serf, an agent noun derivative of Kamp ... [more]
KENNEALLY Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cionnfhaolaidh ‘descendant of Cionnfhaoladh’, a personal name derived from ceann ‘head’ + faol ‘wolf’.
KENNELLY Irish
Variant spelling of Kenneally.
KEUCH German
Variation of Kuch.
KIEHL Medieval Low German
From Middle Low German kil ‘wedge’, applied as a metonymic occupational name or as a pejorative nickname for a ruffian. Possibly a habitational name from Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein, from Dutch and Frisian kil ‘stagnant water’ (see Kiel)... [more]
KIEL Dutch
Dutch from Middle Dutch kidel, kedel ‘smock’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who make such garments or perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore one. Also a dutch habitational name from a place so named in Antwerp or from the German city Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein.
KIEL Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Kil.
KIEL Polish
Polish from kiel ‘tooth’, ‘fang’, hence a nickname for someone with bad or protruding teeth.
KIERAN Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ciaráin ‘descendant of Ciarán’, a byname from a diminutive of ciar ‘dark’, ‘black-haired’. It was borne by two Irish saints, a hermit of the 5th century and the founder of the monastery at Clonmacnoise.
KIL Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) of uncertain origin; perhaps a nickname from Yiddish kil ‘cool’.
KIL Korean
There is one Chinese character for the Kil surname. In the 1930 census, there was a significantly larger number of Kils living in Korea; it was the 62nd most common name in Korea. In a census taken after the Korean War, however, it had dropped to 72nd... [more]
KILMESTER German
Kilmester is attested as a surname near Rostock in the 13th century.
KINCAID Scottish
Scottish habitational name from a place near Lennoxtown, north of Glasgow, which is first recorded in 1238 as Kincaith and in 1250 as Kincathe. The former spelling suggests derivation from Gaelic ceann ‘head’, ‘top’ + càithe ‘pass’, whereas the latter would point to cadha ‘quagmire’ as the second element.
KINGSFORD English
English habitational name from any of various places named Kingsford, for example in Essex, Devon, Warwickshire, and Worcestershire. The name ostensibly means ‘the king’s ford’, but the one in Worcestershire is named as Ceningaford ‘ford of Cena’s people’.
KIPPING German
German: habitational name from a place named with Middle High German kip ‘point’, ‘peak’ or from Kippingen in the Rhineland.
KNABE German
German status name for a young man or a page, from Middle High German knabe (English knave). In aristocratic circles this term denoted a page or squire (a youth destined to become a knight), while among artisans it referred to a journeyman’s assistant or (as a short form of Lehrknabe) ‘apprentice’... [more]
KNAPE German
Variant of Knapp.
KNAPPE German
German variant of Knapp.
KNOLL English, German, Jewish
English and German topographic name for someone living near a hilltop or mountain peak, from Middle English knolle ‘hilltop’, ‘hillock’ (Old English cnoll), Middle High German knol ‘peak’... [more]
KOELSCH German
German from the adjective kölsch, denoting someone from Cologne (German Köln).
KONSTANTINOPOLITES Greek
Given to someone from Constantinople.
KOTT German, Polish, Czech
German: variant of Koth or Kotz.... [more]
KUCH German
German metonymic occupational name for a pastry cook, from German kuchen ‘cake’, or simply a variant of Koch ‘cook’.
KÜHL German, Low German
The spelling Kühl results from a folk-etymological association with High German kühl ‘cool’ (Middle High German küel(e), a nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’... [more]
KUHLMAN German
Nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm.’
KUHLMANN German
German (also Kühlmann) nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’ (see Kuhl).
KUPFER German, Jewish
German (Küpfer) and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a worker or trader in copper, Middle High German kupfer, German Kupfer ‘copper’. As a Jewish name it is often an ornamental name.
LALONDE French
French (Normandy): habitational name from any of various places in Normandy, so named from Old Norse lundr ‘grove’, with the definite article la.
LANDE French, Norwegian, Jewish
French: topographic name for someone living on a heath, lande (from Gaulish landa ‘space’, ‘land’), or a habitational name from any of numerous minor places named La Lande from this word.... [more]
LANDEN Belgian
Belgian habitational name from Landen in Brabant.
LANDERS Dutch
Patronymic from Lander.
LANGHORN English, Danish, Dutch
Northern English: probably a habitational name from a minor place in Soulby, Cumbria, called Longthorn, from Old English lang ‘long’ + horn ‘projecting headland’, or a topographic name with the same meaning.... [more]
LAPP German
From Middle High German lap(pe) ‘cloth’, ‘patch’, ‘rag’; a metonymic occupational name for a mender of clothes or shoes, or a nickname for a simple-minded person.... [more]
LARCELLA Italian
Variation of Lauricella, from a pet form of Laura.
LARSDATTER Norwegian, Danish
Strictly feminine patronymic for Lars.
LAUGHTON English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places in England so called. Most of them, as for example those in Leicestershire, Lincolnshire (near Gainsborough), Sussex, and West Yorkshire, are named with Old English leac ‘leek’ + tun ‘enclosure’... [more]
LAURICELLA Italian
From the pet form of Laura.
LAURSEN German, Norwegian, Danish
Norwegian, Danish, and North German: patronymic from Laur, a short form of Lawrence.
LAVIOLETTE French, French (Quebec), French (Acadian)
A secondary surname, associated with some forty family names in Canada and also used independently since 1698, a nickname from the flower violette ‘violet’, with the definite article la. In feudal France it was a name given to soldiers and domestic servants.
LAWTON English
Habitational name, common in Lancashire and Yorkshire, from Buglawton or Church Lawton in Cheshire, or Lawton in Herefordshire, named in Old English as ‘settlement on or near a hill’, or ‘settlement by a burial mound’, from hlaw ‘hill’, ‘burial mound’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
LAWYER Dutch (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Dutch Lauwer, an occupational name for a tanner or leather worker.
LEIDIG German
From a short form of any of several Germanic personal names composed with the first element liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’. Also a nickname for a disagreeable, cantankerous person, from Middle High German leidic ‘disagreeable’, ‘tiresome’.
LEINBACH German
German topographic name from any of several streams called leinbach, from Middle High German lin ‘flax’ or Middle Low German leie (genitive leien) ‘rock’, ‘stone’ + bach ‘stream’.
LEMON English, Northern Irish, Scottish
English: from the Middle English personal name Lefman, Old English Leofman, composed of the elements leof ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ + mann ‘man’, ‘person’. This came to be used as a nickname for a lover or sweetheart, from Middle English lem(m)an... [more]