Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is LMS.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Kiehl Medieval Low German
From Middle Low German kil ‘wedge’, applied as a metonymic occupational name or as a pejorative nickname for a ruffian. Possibly a habitational name from Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein, from Dutch and Frisian kil ‘stagnant water’ (see Kiel)... [more]
Kiel Dutch
Dutch from Middle Dutch kidel, kedel ‘smock’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who make such garments or perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore one. Also a dutch habitational name from a place so named in Antwerp or from the German city Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein.
Kiel Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Kil.
Kiel Polish
Polish from kiel ‘tooth’, ‘fang’, hence a nickname for someone with bad or protruding teeth.
Kieran Irish (Anglicized)
Irish anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ciaráin ‘descendant of Ciarán’, a byname from a diminutive of ciar ‘dark’, ‘black-haired’... [more]
Kil Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) of uncertain origin; perhaps a nickname from Yiddish kil ‘cool’.
Kil Korean
There is one Chinese character for the Kil surname. In the 1930 census, there was a significantly larger number of Kils living in Korea; it was the 62nd most common name in Korea. In a census taken after the Korean War, however, it had dropped to 72nd... [more]
Kilmester German
Kilmester is attested as a surname near Rostock in the 13th century.
Kincaid Scottish
Scottish habitational name from a place near Lennoxtown, north of Glasgow, which is first recorded in 1238 as Kincaith and in 1250 as Kincathe... [more]
Kingsford English
English habitational name from any of various places named Kingsford, for example in Essex, Devon, Warwickshire, and Worcestershire. The name ostensibly means ‘the king’s ford’, but the one in Worcestershire is named as Ceningaford ‘ford of Cena’s people’.
Kiplin English
A locational surname that takes its name from the hamlet of Kiplin in the English county of North Yorkshire. In turn, the hamlet is said to derive its name from Old English Cyppelingas, which means "the people of Cyppel", as it consists of the Old English personal name Cyppel with the Old English word ingas meaning "people".
Kipping German
German: habitational name from a place named with Middle High German kip ‘point’, ‘peak’ or from Kippingen in the Rhineland.
Kittell German (Anglicized), English
English: variant of Kettle. ... [more]
Knabe German
German status name for a young man or a page, from Middle High German knabe (English knave). In aristocratic circles this term denoted a page or squire (a youth destined to become a knight), while among artisans it referred to a journeyman’s assistant or (as a short form of Lehrknabe) ‘apprentice’... [more]
Knape German
Variant of Knapp.
Knappe German
German variant of Knapp.
Knoll English, German, Jewish
English and German topographic name for someone living near a hilltop or mountain peak, from Middle English knolle ‘hilltop’, ‘hillock’ (Old English cnoll), Middle High German knol ‘peak’... [more]
Koelsch German
German from the adjective kölsch, denoting someone from Cologne (German Köln).
Konstantinopolites Greek
Given to someone from Constantinople.
Kott German, Polish, Czech
German: variant of Koth or Kotz.... [more]
Kuch German
German metonymic occupational name for a pastry cook, from German kuchen ‘cake’, or simply a variant of Koch ‘cook’.
Kühl German, Low German
The spelling Kühl results from a folk-etymological association with High German kühl ‘cool’ (Middle High German küel(e), a nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’... [more]
Kuhlman German
Nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm.’
Kuhlmann German
German (also Kühlmann) nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’ (see Kuhl).
Kupfer German, Jewish
German (Küpfer) and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a worker or trader in copper, Middle High German kupfer, German Kupfer ‘copper’... [more]
Laithen English
English habitational name from any of various places so called, for example in Lancashire (near Blackpool) and in North Yorkshire. The former was named in Old English as ‘settlement by the watercourse’, from Old English lad ‘watercourse’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’; the latter as ‘leek enclosure’ or ‘herb garden’, from leac ‘leek’ + tun... [more]
Lalonde French
French (Normandy): habitational name from any of various places in Normandy, so named from Old Norse lundr ‘grove’, with the definite article la.
Lande French, Norwegian, Jewish
French: topographic name for someone living on a heath, lande (from Gaulish landa ‘space’, ‘land’), or a habitational name from any of numerous minor places named La Lande from this word.... [more]
Landen Belgian
Belgian habitational name from Landen in Brabant.
Landers Dutch
Patronymic from Lander.
Langhorn English, Danish, Dutch
Northern English: probably a habitational name from a minor place in Soulby, Cumbria, called Longthorn, from Old English lang ‘long’ + horn ‘projecting headland’, or a topographic name with the same meaning.... [more]
Lapp German
From Middle High German lap(pe) ‘cloth’, ‘patch’, ‘rag’; a metonymic occupational name for a mender of clothes or shoes, or a nickname for a simple-minded person.... [more]
Larcella Italian
Variation of Lauricella, from a pet form of Laura.
Larsdatter Norwegian, Danish
Strictly feminine patronymic for Lars.
Laughton English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places in England so called. Most of them, as for example those in Leicestershire, Lincolnshire (near Gainsborough), Sussex, and West Yorkshire, are named with Old English leac ‘leek’ + tun ‘enclosure’... [more]
Lauricella Italian
From the pet form of Laura.
Laviolette French, French (Quebec), French (Acadian)
A secondary surname, associated with some forty family names in Canada and also used independently since 1698, a nickname from the flower violette ‘violet’, with the definite article la. In feudal France it was a name given to soldiers and domestic servants.
Lawton English
Habitational name, common in Lancashire and Yorkshire, from Buglawton or Church Lawton in Cheshire, or Lawton in Herefordshire, named in Old English as ‘settlement on or near a hill’, or ‘settlement by a burial mound’, from hlaw ‘hill’, ‘burial mound’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
Lawyer Dutch (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Dutch Lauwer, an occupational name for a tanner or leather worker.
Leidig German
From a short form of any of several Germanic personal names composed with the first element liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’. Also a nickname for a disagreeable, cantankerous person, from Middle High German leidic ‘disagreeable’, ‘tiresome’.
Leinbach German
German topographic name from any of several streams called leinbach, from Middle High German lin ‘flax’ or Middle Low German leie (genitive leien) ‘rock’, ‘stone’ + bach ‘stream’.
Lemon English, Northern Irish, Scottish
English: from the Middle English personal name Lefman, Old English Leofman, composed of the elements leof ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ + mann ‘man’, ‘person’... [more]
Lennis Scottish
May be a variant of the Scottish surnames Lennie or Lennox.
Leonardo Italian, Spanish, German
Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese from the Germanic personal name Leonhard, formed from the elements leo ‘lion’ + hard, ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’; this was an early medieval saint’s name (see Leonard).
Lesch German
German variant of Loesch.
Lescher German
German metonymic occupational name for a mediator or arbitrator, or possibly for a fireman, from Middle High German leschære ‘extinguisher’.
Lever French, English
Nickname for a fleet-footed or timid person, from Old French levre ‘hare’ (Latin lepus, genitive leporis). It may also have been a metonymic occupational name for a hunter of hares... [more]
Leverett English
Diminutive of Lever, from the Middle English personal name Lefred, Old English Leofred, composed of the elements leof ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ + red ‘counsel’.
Linde German, Dutch, Jewish, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a conspicuous lime tree, from Middle High German, Dutch linde, Scandinavian lind. There are several places, especially in North Germany, named with this word... [more]
Lindley English, German
English habitational name from either of two places in West Yorkshire called Lindley, or from Linley in Shropshire and Wiltshire, all named from Old English lin ‘flax’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘glade’, with epenthetic -d-, or from another Lindley in West Yorkshire (near Otley), named in Old English as ‘lime wood’, from lind ‘lime tree’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’... [more]
Linney English
From an Old English female personal name Lindgifu, Lindgeofu, composed of the elements lind ‘lime (wood)’, i.e. ‘shield’ (a transferred sense) + gifu, geofu ‘gift’.
Lisle Norman, English, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: variant spelling of Lyle.
Littlejohn Scottish, English
Distinguishing epithet for the smallest of two or more bearers of the common personal name John. Compare Meiklejohn... [more]
Livingstone Scottish, Irish, Jewish
Scottish: Habitational name from a place in Lothian, originally named in Middle English as Levingston, from an owner called Levin (Lewin), who appears in charters of David I in the early 12th century.... [more]
Loepp Dutch
Variant of Loop.
Loesch German
German metonymic occupational name from Middle High German lösch ‘fine leather’.
Loewen Dutch
Dutch variant of Loewe.
Lösch Low German, Upper German
North German metonymic occupational name for a maker of fine leather, from Middle Low German losche ‘fine leather’. South German variant of Lesch (see Loesch).
Losee Dutch (Anglicized)
Perhaps an Americanized spelling of Lossie, a vernacular derivative of the female personal name Lucia... [more]
Lowenstein Jewish
Combination of German Löwe "lion" and stein "stone". In some cases an ornamental name associated with the name Levi (see also Levy and Lew).
Loxley English
English: habitational name from any of various minor places named Loxley, as for example one in Warwickshire, which is named with the Old English personal name Locc + leah ‘woodland clearing’.
Lubbe German, Slavic, Prussian
Variant of Lubben. Germanized form of a Slavic or Old Prussian name formed with lub- ‘love’, ‘dear’ (see Luba).
Lubben Low German, Dutch
Dutch and North German (Lübben) patronymic from German Lübbe, Dutch $Lubbe, short forms of the personal names Leopold and Lübbert (see Luebbert)... [more]
Lucca Italian
A habitational name from Lucca Sicula in Agrigento province, Sicily, which was called simply Lucca until 1863. It was probably originally named with a Celtic element meaning ‘marshy.’
Lugg English
English (Devon) probably from a local vernacular derivative of Lucas. However, Reaney posits an Old English personal name, Lugga, from which this name could be derived.
Lutter Dutch, English, German
Dutch and English: variant of Luter.... [more]
Luxton English
English habitational name from a minor place, probably one of two in Devon, so called from the possessive form of the Middle English personal name or surname Lugg (from Old English Lugga) + Middle English tune, tone ‘settlement’ (Old English tun).
Lyman English, German (Anglicized), Dutch
English: topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow or a patch of arable land (see Layman). ... [more]
Lynley English
Variant spelling of Lindley.
Lyselia Swedish (Rare, Archaic)
Feminine form of Lyselius used in the 18th century.
Mac An Fhilidh Irish
Meaning, "son of the poet."
Mac Cearbhaill Irish
Meaning, "son of Cearbhaill."
Mac Coingheallaigh Irish
Meaning, ‘son (or descendant) of Coingheallach’, a personal name meaning ‘faithful to pledges’.
Mac Conghaile Irish
Meaning, "son of Conghal."
Mace English, French
English: from a medieval personal name, a survival of Old English Mæssa, which came to be taken as a pet form of Matthew.... [more]
Macfayle Manx
Variant of Mac Phaayl. This form was recorded on the Isle of Man in 1511.
Mac Gaoithín Scottish Gaelic
Meaning ‘son of Gaoithín’, a personal name derived from the diminutive of gaoth ‘clever’, ‘wise’.
Mac Gille Íosa Scottish
Meaning ‘son of the servant of Jesus’. Compare Mcleish. The usual spelling in Scotland is Gillies.
Mack Scottish, Irish, German, Dutch, French
Scottish (Berwickshire) and Irish: from the Old Norse personal name Makkr, a form of Magnus (Old Irish Maccus)... [more]
Macnelly Northern Irish, Scottish
Scottish (Galloway) and northern Irish: variant of Mcneely.
Macon French, German
French: See Maçon. An occupational name for a mason, French maçon. Habitational name from places so called in Saône-et-Loire, Allier, Aube, the Côte d’Or, Gers, and Deux-Sères... [more]
Mac Phaayl Manx
Means "son of Paayl" in Manx Gaelic, Paayl being the Manx form of Paul.... [more]
Mac Phàil Scottish Gaelic
Means "son of Pàl".... [more]
Mac Phóil Irish
Means "son of Pól".... [more]
Macquayle Manx
Meaning, "son of Paul."
MacRoy Scots
The ancient Dalriadan-Scottish name MacRoy is a nickname for a person with red hair. MacRoy is a nickname, which belongs to the category of hereditary surnames. Nicknames form a broad and miscellaneous class of surnames, and can refer directly or indirectly to one's personality, physical attributes, mannerisms, or even their habits of dress... [more]
Mac Suibhne Irish, Scottish
Meaning, "son of Suibhne" (a byname meaning "pleasant").
Madeley English
English: habitational name from places so named in Shropshire and Staffordshire, named in Old English with the personal name Mada + leah ‘woodland clearing’.
Magner Irish, Ancient Germanic
Irish from a pet form of the Scandinavian name Magnus, in Ireland borne by both Vikings and Normans.... [more]
Main Scottish, English, French, Norman
Various origins explained include:... [more]
Maine French
French topographic name from Old French maine ‘dwelling’, ‘residence’, ‘abode’, or a habitational name from any of numerous places so named.
Maine Scottish, English
Scottish and English variant spelling of Main.
Mainé Catalan
Variant of Mainer.
Mansell Anglo-Norman, French
A status name for a particular type of feudal tenant, Anglo-Norman French mansel, one who occupied a manse (Late Latin mansa ‘dwelling’), a measure of land sufficient to support one family... [more]
Mantey German, Polish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Manthei in Schwerin province. This name is also established in Poland.
Mapleton English
The surname Mapleton was first found in Kent where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor.
Markell Dutch, German, Slovene (Anglicized)
Dutch and German: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Markolf, composed of the elements marc, merc ‘boundary’ + wolf ‘wolf’... [more]
Markham English
English name from a place in Nottinghamshire, named in Old English as 'homestead at a (district) boundary', from mearc 'boundary' + ham 'homestead'. English surname used as an equivalent of Gaelic Ó Marcacháin 'descendant of Marcachán', a diminutive of Marcach (see Markey).
Martain German (Rare)
Possibly a Germanized form of Dutch Martijn.
Martelle English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese
English and German: from a medieval personal name, a pet form of Martin or Marta.... [more]
Martello Italian
Southern Italian: nickname for someone with a forceful personality, from Italian martèllo ‘hammer’ (Late Latin martellus), or a metonymic occupational name for someone who used a hammer in their work.
Masey English, Scottish, French, Norman
English and Scottish (of Norman origin) and French: habitational name from any of various places in northern France which get their names from the Gallo-Roman personal name Maccius + the locative suffix -acum.... [more]
Masse English, French, Dutch
English: variant of Mace ... [more]
Mathias French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Dutch: from the personal name Mathias (see Matthew).... [more]
Matias Filipino, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Czech (Americanized)
Spanish (Matías), Portuguese, and Dutch: from the personal name (see Matthew).... [more]
Matthias German, Dutch, English, Welsh, Greek
German and Dutch: from the personal name Matthias (see Matthew).... [more]
Mayfair English
Locational surname based off Mayfair, a district in the City of Westminster in London, England.
Mayne Irish
Irish, of Norman English origin but in County Fermanagh used sometimes to represent McManus.
Mayne French
French variant of Maine.
Mccarl Irish (Anglicized)
Probably an Americanized form of Mccarroll.
Mcclean Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish variant of McLean.
Mccool Scottish (Anglicized), Northern Irish (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
Scottish and northern Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Dhubhghaill (see Mcdowell). ... [more]
Mcgillis Scottish (Anglicized)
Scottish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Gille Iosa ‘son of the servant of Jesus’... [more]
Mckeehan Scottish Gaelic
A patronymic from a personal name or byname derived from caoch ‘blind’, ‘purblind’.
Mcneely Scottish, Northern Irish, Irish
Scottish (Galloway) and northern Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac An Fhilidh ‘son of the poet’.... [more]
Mcquinnelly Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Coingheallaigh or Ó Coingheallaigh ‘son (or descendant) of Coingheallach.’
Mcswain Irish, Scottish
Anglicization of Mac Suibhne.
Medley English
Habitational name, either a variant of Madeley (a name common to several places, including one in Shropshire and two in Staffordshire), named in Old English as ‘Mada’s clearing’, from an unattested byname, Mada (probably a derivative of mad ‘foolish’) + leah ‘woodland clearing’; or from Medley on the Thames in Oxfordshire, named in Old English with middel ‘middle’ + eg ‘island’... [more]
Mée French
French habitational name from places called (Le) Mée in Mayenne, Eure-et-Loir, and Seine-et-Marne, derived from Old French me(i)s ‘farmstead’ (Latin mansus).
Mellody Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Maoiléidigh ‘descendant of Maoléidigh’, a byname composed of the elements maol ‘chief’ + éidigh ‘ugly’.
Merivale English
The surname Merivale was first found in Cornwall and Devon, where this prominent family flourished. Walter Merifild was recorded in Devon in 1200 but it is believed the family had established itself earlier in St... [more]
Merl Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) metronymic from the Yiddish female personal name Merl, a pet form of Hebrew Miryam (see Mirkin).
Merrifield English
English habitational name from any of various places, such as Merryfield in Devon and Cornwall or Mirfield in West Yorkshire, all named with the Old English elements myrige 'pleasant' + feld 'pasture', 'open country.' See also Merivale.
Mifflin English
An English West Country variant of the original Welsh-Breton personal name Merlin.
Milhouse English
Variant spelling of Millhouse.
Mill Scottish, English
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived near a mill, Middle English mille, milne (Old English myl(e)n, from Latin molina, a derivative of molere ‘to grind’)... [more]
Milner English, Scottish
Northern English (mainly Yorkshire) and Scottish: variant of Miller, retaining the -n- of the Middle English word, which was a result of Scandinavian linguistic influence, as in Old Norse mylnari.
Minnow English
Possibly derived from the English word "minnow", a small fish.
Minor English, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
Mirkin Jewish
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): metronymic from the Yiddish female personal name Mirke, a pet form of the Biblical Hebrew name Miryam.
Moberley English
English habitational name from Mobberley in Cheshire, named in Old English as ‘clearing with a fortified site where assemblies are held’, from (ge)mot ‘meeting’, ‘assembly’ + burh ‘enclosure’, ‘fortification’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’.
Mobley English
English reduced form of Moberley.
Modena Italian, Judeo-Italian
Italian and Jewish (from Italy) habitational name from the city of Modena in Emilia-Romagna.
Molaison American
Unexplained meaning.
Moyle Cornish, Welsh
Cornish and Welsh: descriptive nickname meaning ‘bald’, from Cornish moyl, Welsh moel.
Murrey English, Scottish, Irish
English, Scottish, and Irish variant of Murray.
Myshkin Russian
Myshkin is the possessive case of the diminutive of the word 'mouse'.
Napierala Polish
Nickname for an insistent person, from a derivative of napierac ‘advance’, ‘press’, ‘urge’.
Neale English, Scottish, Irish
English, Scottish, and Irish variant of Neal.
Neeley Irish
Reduced form of Mcneely.
Niemann North Frisian
North German form of Neumann, from Middle Low German nie + man.
Niemeyer Low German
North German nickname for a newly arrived steward or tenant farmer, from Middle Low German nie ‘new’ + Meyer.
Nikkel German, Dutch
Possibly an altered spelling of Dutch Nikel, from the personal name, a Dutch form of Nicholas.
Oakwell English
Recorded in the modern spellings of Ockwell and Oakwell, this is an English surname. It is locational and probably either from the former village of Oakwell-in-the-Blean in the county of Kent, or Ockwell Manor, and again a former village, near Bray, in Berkshire
Oates English
Patronymic from the Middle English personal name Ode (see Ott).
Oatis English
Altered spelling of Otis, itself a variant of Oates.
Oats English
Variation of Oates.
Ó Cearnaigh Irish
Means "descendant of Cearnach" in Irish Gaelic. Compare Kearney, Ó Ceithearnaigh.
Ó Céirín Irish
Meaning ‘descendant of Céirín’, a personal name from a diminutive of ciar ‘dark’, ‘black’. English patronymic -s has been added superfluously.
Ó Ciaráin Irish
A byname from a diminutive of ciar ‘dark’, ‘black-haired.'
O'coill Irish
Meaning, "wood, forest, or shrub hazel tree."
O Coingheallach Irish
Meaning, "descendent of Coingheallach."
Ó Coingheallaigh Irish
Meaning, ‘son (or descendant) of Coingheallach.’
Ó Cuill Irish
Meaning, "wood, forest, or shrub hazel tree."
O'dea Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Deaghaidh, ‘descendant of Deaghadh’, a personal name of uncertain origin... [more]
Ó Deaghaidh Irish
Meaning, "descendent of Deaghaidh."
Offutt German
Possibly a respelling of German Auffahrt ‘ascension’.
Ó Hearghaill Irish
Variation of Gaelic Ó Fearghail ‘descendant of Fearghal’, a personal name composed of the elements fear ‘man’ + gal ‘valor’.
Olesdatter Danish
Strictly feminine patronymic of Ole.
Ollis English
Unexplained surname found in records of Bristol and Bath.
Ó Maoiléidigh Irish
Meaning, ‘descendant of Maoléidigh’, a byname composed of the elements maol ‘chief’ + éidigh ‘ugly’.
Ó Miadhaigh Irish
Meaning ‘descendant of Miadhach’, a byname meaning ‘honorable’.
Onslow English
Recorded as Onslow, Onslowe and the dialectal Anslow, this is an English surname. It is locational from a place called Onslow described in Victorian times as being "a place within the liberty of Shrewsbury, in Salop', the original and still confusingly used, name for the county of Shropshire.
Orchard English, Scottish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by an orchard, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower, from Middle English orchard.... [more]
Ó Ruadhagáin Irish
Meaning, 'son of Ruadhagáin."
Ó Ruairc Irish
Meaning, ‘descendant of Ruarc.’
O' Tolan Irish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
Ó Toráin Irish
Meaning, ‘descendant of Torán’, a personal name formed from a diminutive of tor ‘lord’, ‘hero’, ‘champion’.
O’toran Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Toráin ‘descendant of Torán’, a personal name formed from a diminutive of tor ‘lord’, ‘hero’, ‘champion’.
O' Tuathalain Irish
May translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
O' Twolan Irish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
Packard English, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
Paddington English
Believed to mean "Pada's farm", with the Anglo-Saxon name Pada possibly coming from the Old English word pad, meaning "toad".
Painter English, Medieval French, German
English: from Middle English, Old French peinto(u)r, oblique case of peintre ‘painter’, hence an occupational name for a painter (normally of colored glass). In the Middle Ages the walls of both great and minor churches were covered with painted decorations, and Reaney and Wilson note that in 1308 Hugh le Peyntour and Peter the Pavier were employed ‘making and painting the pavement’ at St... [more]
Parsley Medieval French, English, Norman, French
Derived from Old French passelewe "cross the water."... [more]
Passelewe Medieval English
The medieval name is from Old French passe(r) ‘to pass or cross’ + l’ewe ‘the water’, hence a nickname, probably for a ferryman or a merchant who was in the habit of traveling overseas, or else someone who had been on a pilgrimage or crusade.
Pathé French
Meaning, "Dweller near an important path or footway."
Pauley English, German
English: from a medieval pet form of Paul.... [more]
Paysen German, Frisian
Patronymic from the personal name Pay, the Frisian form of Paul.
Payson German, Frisian
German and Frisian variant spelling of Paysen, a patronymic from the personal name Paul.
Peik German
From Middle Low German pek ‘sharp, pointed tool or weapon’.
Pelham English
From the name of a place in Hertfordshire, which meant "Peotla's homestead" in Old English.
Pennant Celtic
Meaning, "Belonging to Pennant" (a common Welsh place-name).
Pennywell English
English habitational name from Pennywell in Tyne and Wear or from a similarly named lost place elsewhere.
Perdue English, Irish, French
English and Irish from Old French par Dieu ‘by God’, which was adopted in Middle English in a variety of more or less heavily altered forms. The surname represents a nickname from a favorite oath... [more]
Petke German
German surname derived from a diminutive form for Peter.
Pettis English
From the possessive or plural form of Middle English pytte, pitte ‘pit’, ‘hollow’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a pit, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, as for example Pett in East Sussex.
Philpot English
English (chiefly southeastern): from the Middle English personal name Philipot/Philpot, a pet form of Philip.
Pike English, Irish
English: topographic name for someone who lived by a hill with a sharp point, from Old English pic ‘point’, ‘hill’, which was a relatively common place name element.... [more]
Pinkney English
Variant spelling of Pinckney.
Pitcher English, German
From an agent derivative of Middle English pich ‘pitch’, hence an occupational name for a caulker, one who sealed the seams of ships or barrels with pitch. English variant of Pickard... [more]
Poley French, German, Jewish
French: variant of Polet, Paulet, pet forms of Paul.... [more]
Powyes English
Unknown source. Surname of many early American pilgrims.
Prose German
From a short form of the personal name Ambrose.
Prue English, French
English: nickname for a redoubtable warrior, from Middle English prou(s) ‘brave’, ‘valiant’ (Old French proux, preux).... [more]
Pruitt English, French
French and English: nickname from a pet form of Old French proux ‘valiant’, ‘brave’, or ‘wise’ (see Proulx, Prue).
Quackenbush Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Dutch Quackenbosch, a topographic name from Dutch quaak ‘swamp’ (cognate with the English word quagmire) + bosch ‘woodland’, ‘wilderness’.
Quayle Irish (Anglicized), Scottish (Anglicized), Manx (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of various Gaelic patronymics derived from the given name Paul - namely, Manx Gaelic Mac Phaayl meaning "son of Paayl"; Scottish Gaelic Mac Phàil "son of Pàl"; and Irish Gaelic Mac Phóil "son of Pól"... [more]
Quenby English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps a variant of Quarmby, a habitational name from a place so called in West Yorkshire.
Quill Irish
Quill or Quille is an anglicised version of the Irish surnames Ó Cuill, Coll, Coill, and O'coill (Ó Coill), all of which mean wood, forest or shrub Hazel Tree... [more]
Quille Irish
Variation of Quill.
Quinley English, Scottish, Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Apparently an altered form of Scottish McKinley or a reduced form of Irish Mcquinnelly, Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Coingheallaigh or Ó Coingheallaigh ‘son (or descendant) of Coingheallach’, a personal name meaning ‘faithful to pledges’.
Ramone Spanish (Anglicized), Portuguese (Anglicized), Catalan (Anglicized)
From Spanish, Portuguese, and Catalan Ramón, from the personal name Ramón or Ramon, of Germanic origin (see Raymond).
Randel French, German
French: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Rando, a short form of various compound names formed with rand ‘(shield) rim’ as the first element... [more]
Randle English
English: variant spelling of Randall or Americanized spelling of Randel.
Rang German
Variant of Range.... [more]
Range German, French
German: nickname for a ragamuffin, from Middle High German range ‘naughty boy’, ‘urchin’.... [more]
Ranger English, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
Räuber German, German (Swiss)
German, Swiss German: derogatory nickname, from Middle High German roubære ‘robber’, ‘bandit’, ‘highwayman’ (from roub, roup ‘booty’, ‘spoils’).
Rauch German
Perhaps an occupational nickname for a blacksmith or charcoal burner, from Middle High German rouch, German Rauch ‘smoke’, or, in the case of the German name, a status name or nickname relating to a hearth tax (i.e. a tax that was calculated according to the number of fireplaces in each individual home).
Ravenel English, French
Habitational name from Ravenel in Oise or a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of horseradish, from a diminutive of Old French ravene ‘horseradish’ (Latin raphanus)... [more]
Reade English
English variant spelling of Read.
Reading English
Habitational name from the county seat of Berkshire, which gets its name from Old English Readingas ‘people of Read(a)’, a byname meaning ‘red’. Topographic name for someone who lived in a clearing, an unattested Old English ryding.
Redig Dutch, Upper German
Dutch and North German variant of Redding.
Redpath Scottish, English
Habitational name from a place in Berwickshire, probably so called from Old English read ‘red’ + pæð ‘path’. This name is also common in northeastern England.
Reese Low German, Dutch, German
Nickname for a very big man, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rese ‘giant’.... [more]
Reever German
Possibly an altered form of German Riefer, a patronymic from the personal name Rüef, a reduced form of Rudolf.
Reise German, Jewish
German (Westphalia) topographic name, from Middle Low German ris, res ‘swamp’. ... [more]
Reiser German, Upper German
Habitational name for someone from Reis or Reissen in Bavaria (see Reis). An occupational name from Middle High German reisære ‘warrior’, ‘traveler’... [more]
Reisner Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) nickname for a traveler, from an agent derivative of German reisen ‘to travel’ (see Reise). Also a variant of Reis.
Reisner German
A habitational name for someone from a place called Reisen (for example in Bavaria), Reissen in Thuringia, or Reussen on the Saale river. A variant of Reiser Also from an agent derivative of Middle High German, Middle Low German rise ‘veil’; perhaps an occupational name for someone who made veils.
Reisser Upper German
An occupational name for a woodcutter, Middle High German risser.
Remig Various
Derived form the given name Remigius.
Resen German
Unknown source.
Reusser Swiss, German, Upper German
In Switzerland, an occupational name for a fisherman or maker of fish traps, from an agent derivative of Middle High German riuse ‘fish trap’, ‘weir basket’. A nickname from an agent noun based on Middle High German riusen ‘to moan or complain’... [more]
Richers English, German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ric ‘power(ful)’ + hari, heri ‘army’. The name was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Richier, but was largely absorbed by the much more common Richard... [more]
Riechers German
German patronymic from Richard.
Rieser Swiss, German
Alemannic form of Reiser. A habitational name for someone from Ries near Passau. Alemannic variant of Rüsser and Rüser, a variant of Reusser... [more]
Rilo English
Transferred use of the surname derived from the Old English elements ryge (rye) and lēah (wood, clearing, meadow). See also Riley.
Rivet French, English
French: from a diminutive of Old French rive ‘(river) bank’, ‘shore’ (see Rives).... [more]
Rivett English, French
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a metalworker, from Middle English, Old French rivet ‘small nail or bolt’ (from Old French river ‘to fix or secure’, of unknown origin).... [more]
Roane Irish
Variant spelling of Rowan or possibly a variant of Ruane.
Rober German
Variant of Röber (see Roeber).
Robichaux French
An altered spelling of Robichon or Roubichou, pet forms of Robert.
Robuchon French
Robuchon is derived from the Old French personal name Robert.
Roeber Low German
Habitational name from a place named Roben, for example in Thuringia or Schleswig. From a Germanic personal name based on hrod ‘renown’, ‘victory’. Low German variant of Räuber and Rauber.
Rogan Irish
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ruadhagáin ‘son of Ruadhagán’, a personal name from a diminutive of ruadh ‘red’.
Rohme German
From the Germanic personal name Ruom (Old High German hruom ‘fame’), a short form of Ruombald and similar personal names containing this element.
Rohrsen German
Unknown source.
Roland French, German, Scottish
French, German, English, and Scottish: from a Germanic personal name composed hrod ‘renown’ + -nand ‘bold’, assimilated to -lant ‘land’. (Compare Rowland).... [more]
Roll Upper German, German, English
German: from Middle High German rolle, rulle ‘roll’, ‘list’, possibly applied as a metonymic occupational name for a scribe.... [more]
Rollin English, German
English: variant of Rolling.... [more]
Rollo Scottish
From a Latinized form, common in early medieval documents, of the personal name Rou(l), the usual Norman form of Rolf.
Rolston English
English habitational name from any of various places, such as Rowlston in Lincolnshire, Rolleston in Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, and Staffordshire, or Rowlstone in Herefordshire, near the Welsh border... [more]
Rommel Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for an obstreperous person, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rummeln, rumpeln to make a noise, create a disturbance (of imitative origin). Variant of Rummel.
Rosamel French
A French surname turned Spanish masculine given name, Rosamel likely derives from the combination of rose + Greek mel “honey”. As a surname, it was borne by a 19th century French naval officer with the wonderful name of Claude Charles Marie du Campe de Rosamel.
Roubichou English
Diminutive of Robert. Roubichou is a French surname that is probably an altered spelling of Robichon or Robicheaux, pet forms of Robert, from the Germanic name Hrodebert.
Rourke Irish
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ruairc ‘descendant of Ruarc’, Old Gaelic Ruadhrac, a personal name from Norse Hrothrekr (see Roderick)... [more]
Rowett English
English from a medieval personal name composed of the Germanic elements hrod ‘renown’ + wald ‘rule’, which was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the form Róaldr, and again later by the Normans in the form Rohald or Roald... [more]
Ruadhagin Irish
Meaning, ‘son of Ruadhagán.’
Rude Norwegian, German
German: From a pet form of a personal name formed with Old High German hrōd "fame", for example Rudolf or Rüdiger... [more]
Ruedig German
Variation of Rudig.
Ruge German
Nickname from Middle High German ruowe, ruge ‘quiet’, ‘calm’ or Low German rug ‘rough’, ‘crude’.... [more]
Ruhe German
Variant of Ruge. (Rühe) is also a nickname from Rüde ‘hound.’ Habitational name from places named Rühen, Rüden, Rhüden in northern Germany.
Ruhland German
Variation of Rüland.
Rummel German, Dutch
North German and Dutch: variant of Rommel.... [more]
Rydell Swedish
Combination of Swedish ryd "woodland clearing" and the common surname suffix -ell.
Rylo English
Variant of the surname Rilo.
Ryne German (Swiss)
Respelling of Swiss German Rhyn, a topographic name for someone living on the Rhine river, Middle High German Rin.
Salisbury English
Habitational name from the city in Wiltshire, the Roman name of which was Sorviodunum (of British origin). In the Old English period the second element (from Celtic dun ‘fortress’) was dropped and Sorvio- (of unexplained meaning) became Searo- in Old English as the result of folk etymological association with Old English searu ‘armor’; to this an explanatory burh ‘fortress’, ‘manor’, ‘town’ was added... [more]
Samet German, Jewish, Yiddish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of velvet, from Yiddish samet ‘velvet’ (German Samt, ultimately from Greek hexamiton, a compound of hex ‘six’ + mitos ‘thread’).
Savell English
English variant of Saville.
Sax Dutch
Dutch variant of Sas.
Sax English, Norwegian
English from an Old Norse personal name, Saxi meaning ‘sword’.
Sax Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant spelling of Sachs.
Schade German, Dutch, Scottish, English
German and Dutch: from schade ‘damage’, a derivative of schaden ‘to do damage’, generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others’ lands.... [more]
Schenkel German, Dutch, Jewish
German, Dutch, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for someone with long or otherwise notable legs, from Middle High German schenkel, Middle Dutch schenkel, schinkel ‘thigh’, ‘lower leg’, German Schenkel ‘thigh’.
Schink Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for someone with long or otherwise remarkable legs, from Middle High German schinke ‘thigh’, ‘leg’. Compare Schenkel. ... [more]
Schoen German, Jewish, Dutch
German (Schön) nickname for a handsome or pleasant man, from Middle High German schoene ‘fine’, ‘beautiful’; ‘refined’, ‘friendly’, ‘nice’. ... [more]
Schutte Dutch, Low German
Dutch and North German (Schütte) occupational name for an archer, from Middle Low German schutten ‘to shoot’. Compare German Schuetz.
Schweder German, Upper German
German: ethnic name for a Swede.... [more]
Schweer Low German
North German: variant of Schweder or Schwehr.
Schwehr German
German: relationship name, a variant of Schwäher, a variant of Schwager.
Schwer Upper German, German, Jewish
South German relationship name from Middle High German sweher ‘father-in-law’. ... [more]
Seager English, German (Modern)
English: from the Middle English personal name Segar, Old English S?gar, composed of the elements s? ‘sea’ + gar ‘spear’.... [more]