Dutch Submitted Surnames

Dutch names are used in the Netherlands and Flanders. See also about Dutch names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Hageman Dutch
Combination of Middle Dutch haghe "hedge, enclosure" and #man "man".
Hageman Dutch
Variant of German Hagemann.
Hagen German, Dutch, Danish
from the ancient Germanic personal name Hagen a short form of various compound names formed with hag "enclosure protected place" as the first element.
Hager Dutch, North Frisian
From a Germanic personal name composed of hag 'hedge', 'enclosure' + hari, heri 'army'.
Hamel Yiddish, Dutch, German
The name Hamel has three origins.... [more]
Hans German, Dutch, Alsatian, Romansh
Derived from the given name Hans.
Harmse Dutch, Low German
The surname Harmse is derived from Harms or Harm, a Low-German / Niederdeutsch surname or name. In Plattdeutsch/Low Saxon the word sine is used as a possessive construction, hence Harmse indicates that it is the child of Harms, Harm, or Harmensze... [more]
Haverbus Yiddish, Dutch
From Yiddish/Hebrew Haver (חבר) and Baruch (ברוך), thus literally "blessed friend".
Haverkamp German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived on an oat field from Middle Low German haver "oats" and kamp "field".
Hay English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
Hazard English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
Hebert Dutch
From the personal name Egbert.
Hecht German, Dutch
From Middle High German hech(e)t, Middle Dutch heect, hecht "pike", generally a nickname for a rapacious and greedy person. In some instances it may have been a metonymic occupational name for a fisher and in others it may be a habitational name from a house distinguished by a sign depicting this fish.
Hee Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
A Danish habitational name from any of several places named from a word meaning ‘shining’ or ‘clear’, referencing a river.... [more]
Heemskerk Dutch
From the name of a small town in the province of North Holland in the Netherlands. It means "home church" in Dutch. Famous bearers of this surname include Jan Heemskerk (1818-1897) and his son Theo Heemskerk (1852-1932), both of whom were Dutch prime ministers... [more]
Hegeman Dutch
Habitational name for someone from a place called Hegge(n) or ter Hegge(n), derived from a word meaning ‘hedge’.
Heide German, Jewish, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Variant of German Heid, and Dutch Vanderheide. Danish and Norwegian surname from various places called Heide all from the German elements heida, heidr, haith all meaning "heath"... [more]
Heidrick Dutch
Variant of Heidrich
Heil German, Upper German, Dutch
1. German: from a pet form of Heinrich. ... [more]
Hein German, Dutch, Danish, Jewish
German, Dutch, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from a short form of the Germanic personal name Heinrich.
Heine German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from a short form of Heinrich.
Heineken Dutch, German
From the given name Hein 1, a Dutch diminutive of Hendrik... [more]
Helder Dutch, German, Upper German, English
1. Dutch and German: from a Germanic personal name Halidher, composed of the elements haliò “hero” + hari, heri “army”, or from another personal name, Hildher, composed of the elements hild “strife”, “battle” + the same second element... [more]
Hellwig German, Dutch
Curiously it started out life in ancient history as the baptismal name, Hell-wig. "luck" & "war;" this name literally translates to, "battle-battle."
Helmeier German, Dutch, Danish
Variant spelling of Helmeyer.
Helmeyer German, Dutch, Danish
From Hel in Norse mythology and Meyer meaning "higher, superior". It means ´blessed´ or ´holy´. The name is mostly found in Germany, but also in the Netherlands and some parts of Denmark.
Hendel Yiddish, German, Dutch
From the given name Hendel, a Yiddish diminutive of Hannah.
Hendryckx Dutch, Flemish
From the given name Hendrick
Hengst German, Dutch
metonymic occupational name for someone who worked with or bred horses or a nickname for a brave strong man from Middle High German and Middle Dutch hengest "stallion" also "gelding" derived from Old Germanic hangist "stallion"... [more]
Hennen German, Dutch
Patronymic of Henne.
Herd Dutch
Comes from Middle Dutch hert, herte ‘hart’, ‘stag’; probably a nickname for someone who was fleet of foot, or a habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a deer; variant of Heard.
Hermes German, Dutch
From a pet form of the name Herman.
Herold English, Dutch, German
From the given name Herold. This was the surname of David Herold, one of the conspirators in the Abraham Lincoln assassination plot.
Herrick Dutch
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements heri, hari 'army' + ric 'power', or from an assimilated form of Henrick, a Dutch form of Henry.
Heuvel Dutch
From Dutch meaning "hill".
Heyer English, German, Dutch
English variant of Ayer. ... [more]
Hick Dutch
From a pet form of a Germanic personal name, such as Icco or Hikke (a Frisian derivative of a compound name with the first element hild "strife", "battle").
Hickenlooper Dutch, German
This surname means hedge hopper.
Hieronymus Dutch, German
From the Greek given name ‘Ιερωνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name". (See Jerome.)
Hilbert English, French, Dutch, German
English, French, Dutch, and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.
Hilger German, Dutch
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild 'strife', 'battle' + gar, ger 'spear'.
Hinkebein Dutch, German
Nickname for someone with a limp, from Middle Low German hinken meaning "to limp" + bein meaning "leg".
Hoen German, Dutch
Nickname from hoen 'chicken', 'hen', perhaps denoting a silly person.
Holl German, Dutch, English
Short form of German HÖLD or a topographic name meaning "hollow" or "hole".
Hollander German, English, Jewish, Dutch, Swedish
Regional name for someone from Holland.
Holman Dutch
Topographic name for a dweller in a hollow
Hoogenboom Dutch
Topographic name for someone living by a tall tree, "tall tree", or a habitational name from places called Hoogboom and Hogenboom in the Belgian province of Antwerp, meaning "tall tree".
Hoogendijk Dutch
Derived from Dutch hoog meaning "high, elevated" and dijk meaning "dike, ditch, levee", referring to someone who lived near a high dyke or embankment.
Hoogerdijk Dutch
Variant of Hoogendijk meaning "higher dyke".
Hoogland Dutch
A Dutch toponoymic surname meaning 'high land'. A famous bearer of this surname is Duco Hoogland, a Dutch politician.
Hoot Dutch, German
The Dutch form is a habitation name for someone who lived in the hout or "woods" while the German form hoth is from an occupational name for a maker of hats.
Hoppe Dutch
Variant of Hopp.
Hosekin Dutch
Occupational name for a maker or seller of hose (garments for the legs), from Middle Low German hose "hose".
Hoskins Dutch
Variant of Hosekin.
Houtteman Flemish (Dutchified)
Flemish. Houtteman. Meaning: Woodsman. Our ancestors were wardens of the woods, protecting them for the king and royal family.
Hubertus German, Dutch
From the given name Hubertus.
Huck English, Dutch
From the medieval male personal name Hucke, which was probably descended from the Old English personal name Ucca or Hucca, perhaps a shortened form of Ūhtrǣd, literally "dawn-power".
Huijs Dutch
Variant of Huys.
Huisman Dutch
Dutch cognate of Houseman. Famous bearers include actor Michiel Huisman (1981-), television host and musician Henny Huisman (1951-) and speed skater Sjoerd Huisman (1986-2013), all from the Netherlands.
Huitema Dutch
The name is believed to come from the Dutch word 'hout', meaning wood. Thus, this was a name often given to woodcutters.
Humbert German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hun "Hun, giant" or hun "bear cub" and berht "bright, famous". This was particularly popular in the Netherlands and North Germany during the Middle Ages as a result of the fame of a 7th-century St... [more]
Huygens Dutch, Belgian
Means "son of Hugo". A notable bearer was Dutch mathematician, physicist and astronomer Christiaan Huygens (1629–1695).
Huys Dutch, Flemish
Derived from Huis, itself a variant of Huus and Huuchs, medieval Dutch genitive forms of the given name Hugo.
Inderrieden Dutch
means in the reeds because ancestors of name made reed houses.
Iwwerks Dutch
Ub Iwerks, born Ubbe Ert Iwwerks, was an American animator, cartoonist and character designer known best for the design of Mickey Mouse.
Jacobi Jewish, English, Dutch, German
From the Latin genitive Jacobi ‘(son) of Jacob’, Latinized form of English Jacobs and Jacobson or North German Jakobs(en) and Jacobs(en).
Janmaat Dutch
Famous bearer of this surname is Dutch footballer Daryl Janmaat.
Japenga Dutch
Means son of Jap "Yap" related to Jacobson in the Netherlands
Jesten Dutch
Variation of Joosten.
Johanneson German, Dutch
Variant of Johannessen which means "son of Johannes
Jonas Danish, German, Dutch, Norwegian
From the given name Jonas
Jongbloed Dutch
Nickname for a young person, derived from Middle Dutch jonc meaning "young" and bloet meaning "blood". A famous bearer of this surname was the Dutch soccer goalkeeper Jan Jongbloed (1940-2023).
Jost Dutch, German
Dutch and German: from a personal name, a derivative of the Breton personal name Iodoc (see Joyce), or from the personal name Just.
Justus German, Dutch, Finnish
From the given name Justus.
Kaag Dutch
Named after the Dutch town of Kaag.
Kalk German, Dutch
Occupational name for a lime burner from Middle High German kalc and Middle Dutch calk "lime" (both a loanword from Latin calx).
Kamp German, Dutch, Danish
From the German element kamp (from Latin campus) "field".
Kanssen Dutch, Flemish
Son of Kant
Kat Dutch, Frisian, Afrikaans, Jewish
Means "Cat" in Dutch, Frisian, and Afrikaans, perhaps originally a nickname for someone who owned a cat or somehow resembled a cat.
Katje Dutch
It means 'Little Kate' in Dutch. A fun nickname for anyone
Kellner German, Dutch, Jewish, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, French
German, Dutch and Jewish (Ashkenazic) occupational or status name from the Middle Low German kelner, the Middle High German kelnære, the Middle Dutch kel(le)nare and the German kellner#, all meaning "cellarman"... [more]
Kemper German, Dutch
German: status name denoting a peasant farmer or serf, an agent noun derivative of Kamp ... [more]
Kempes German, Dutch
German and Dutch variant of Kemp or Kamp. It could also be a habitational name for a person from any of the various places named Kempen on the border between Germany and the Netherlands (for example the town in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, close to the Dutch border), a status name for a peasant farmer or serf, or an occupational name for an official calibrator who marked the correct weight and measures for verification, derived from Middle Low German kempen... [more]
Kentie Scottish, English, Dutch
Origin and meaning unknown. The name Kentie was spread in the Netherlands when a Scottish soldier, Alexander Kenti, settled at Woudrichem, the Netherlands around 1650. Alexander Kenti was born and raised in the Scottish highlands... [more]
Kern German, Dutch, Jewish
from Middle High German kerne "kernel, seed pip"; Middle Dutch kern(e) keerne; German Kern or Yiddish kern "grain" hence a metonymic occupational name for a farmer or a nickname for a physically small person... [more]
Kesler German, Dutch, Jewish
It is an occupational name that means coppersmith. In alpine countries the name derived from the definition: the one living in the basin of a valley.
Kessel Dutch
Habitational name for someone originally from any of the various locations in the Netherlands named Kessel.
Keurig Dutch
Keurig is derived from a Dutch word meaning "excellence." A more accurate translation from the Dutch is "neat" or "tidy."
Kiel Dutch
Dutch from Middle Dutch kidel, kedel ‘smock’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who make such garments or perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore one. Also a dutch habitational name from a place so named in Antwerp or from the German city Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein.
Kilian German, Dutch, Polish, Czech
from the Irish personal name Cillín (see Killeen).
Kill German (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Perhaps derived from Kilian.
Kin Dutch
Nickname for someone with a pointed or jutting chin.
Kind English, German, Jewish, Dutch
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German kint, German Kind ‘child’, hence a nickname for someone with a childish or naive disposition, or an epithet used to distinguish between a father and his son... [more]
Kinne German, Dutch
German: From the female given name Kinne, a Silesian diminutive of Kunigunde.... [more]
Kleynen Flemish
Comes from the town in Belgium. Originally Van Klijnen
Klomp German, Dutch
from Middle Dutch and Low German klomp "lump block compact heap ball" used as a nickname for someone with a squat physique or a clumsy or uncouth manner . Dutch metonymic occupational name for a clog maker from Middle Dutch clompe "clog wooden shoe".
Klopp German, Dutch
Habitational name from a place called Kloppe.
Kluivert Dutch, Dutch (Surinamese)
Nickname perhaps related to Dutch kluiven meaning "to gnaw, to bite, to nibble". A notable bearer is Dutch former soccer player Patrick Kluivert (1976-).
Knecht German, German (Swiss), Dutch
From the occupation of a servant and a journeyman from Middle High German kneht Middle Low German and Middle Dutch knecht "knight's assistant" also "lad, servant"... [more]
Knickerbocker Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of the Dutch occupational name Knickerbacker "marble baker", i.e., a baker of children's clay marbles. This lowly occupation became synonymous with the patrician class in NYC through Washington Irving's attribution of his History of New York (1809) to a fictitious author named Diedrich Knickerbocker... [more]
Koetsier Dutch
"Coachman, Coachdriver"... [more]
Kolk Dutch
"Kolk is Dutch for either whirlpool or canyon. Probably the name refers to wild water."
Koonings Dutch
From the Dutch word "koning" meaning "king", thus meaning "of the king".
Koop Dutch (Modern)
Comes from the Biblical given name Jacob, meaning "he who supplants."
Krane Dutch, Low German
Dutch: nickname for a long-legged or tall thin man, from Middle Dutch crane ‘crane’. ... [more]
Kroll German, Dutch, Polish
Nickname for someone with curly hair, from Middle High German krol 'curly', Middle Low German krulle 'ringlet', 'curl', Middle Dutch croel, crul (apparently a loanword from German)... [more]
Kuba Dutch, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish
From Kuba, a pet form of the personal name Jakub.
Kues German, Dutch
Habitational name from Cues, now part of Bernkastel-Kues in the Rhineland Palatinate.
Kuijper Dutch
Variant of Kuiper
Kuijt Dutch
Occupational name for a brewer of beer, derived from Dutch kuit, koyt literally meaning "beer". A famous bearer of this name is retired Dutch soccer player Dirk Kuijt (1980-), also known as Dirk Kuyt.
Kul German, Dutch
Derived from Old High German kol meaning "coal", perhaps an occupational name for a miner or coal seller.
Kunis German, Dutch
From a derivative of the personal name Konrad.
Kuyper Dutch
Variant of Kuiper
Kuypers Dutch
Variant of Kuiper
Kuyt Dutch
Variant of Kuijt, notably borne by the Dutch former soccer player Dirk Kuyt (1980-).
Lachtrup Dutch
Means 'laughing group' in Dutch. Also occurs in Germany, but mostly in the Netherlands.
Lakeman Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a lake or pond.
Landers Dutch
Patronymic from Lander.
Langhorn English, Danish, Dutch
Northern English: probably a habitational name from a minor place in Soulby, Cumbria, called Longthorn, from Old English lang ‘long’ + horn ‘projecting headland’, or a topographic name with the same meaning.... [more]
Lannoy French, Walloon, Flemish
From the various locations in northern France and Belgium called Lannoy. Variant of Delannoy.
Lansing Dutch
Patronymic from Lans, Germanic Lanzo, a Dutch cognate of Lance.
Lavender English, Dutch
Occupational name for a washerman or launderer, Old French, Middle Dutch lavendier (Late Latin lavandarius, an agent derivative of lavanda ‘washing’, ‘things to be washed’)... [more]
Lawyer Dutch (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Dutch Lauwer, an occupational name for a tanner or leather worker.
Ledger English, Norman, French, Dutch
English: from a Norman personal name, Leodegar, Old French Legier, of Germanic origin, composed of the elements liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’ + gar, ger ‘spear’... [more]
Leeuwenkamp Dutch
Possibly from an unknown place name meaning "lion's camp" in Dutch.
Lefferts Dutch, North Frisian
From lefert meaning "Leopard."
Lemm Low German, Dutch
Derived from the given name Lambert.
Lems Dutch
It is said that long ago there was a river in Holland named 'Lems'. Since then the river has dried up, but those who lived around the river were given the surname of 'Lems'.
Leonhardt German, Dutch
From the Germanic personal name Leonhard, composed of the elements leo "lion" and hard "hardy, brave, strong".
Leopold English, German, Dutch
From the given name Leopold and French variant of Léopold.
Lex German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Alexius, Alexis.
Liem Dutch
Habitual surname for Lieme in Eastphalia, which is from lim meaning "mire".
Lieshout Dutch
Originally indicated a person from the village of Lieshout in the province of Noord-Brabant in the Netherlands. It is derived either from Dutch lies meaning "great manna grass" (a grasslike plant that grows near riverbanks and ponds) or Middle Dutch lese meaning "track, furrow", combined with hout meaning "forest".
Lilandriz Dutch
Last name, supposedly from Hollad
Lilandroz Dutch
Last name from Holland
Linde German, Dutch, Jewish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from Middle Hugh German, Dutch linde or Scandinavian lind "lime tree". Almost exclusively ornamental in Swedish, otherwise probably habitational. There are also a number of feminine names containing the element lind, for example Linda, Dietlinde and Gerlinde, and it's possible that the surname is derived from any of those names.
Lindenberg German, Jewish, Dutch
As a German and Jewish name, it is derived from any of numerous places called Lindenberg in Germany, composed of Middle High German linde meaning "lime tree" and berg meaning "mountain, hill"... [more]
Linders Dutch
Dutch name from the Linder tree.
Lindt German, Dutch
The Lindt surname comes from an Upper German word "lind," which meant "tender" or "gentle hearted." In some instances, especially in Saxony, the surname evolved from the personal name Lindemuth. In general, the similar phonetic name Linde comes from "Linden," which was a type of tree.... [more]
Lineberry English, German, Dutch, West Frisian
Americanized spelling of Leinberg.
Lock English, Dutch, German
Habitational name from any of various places called Loock, from look ‘enclosure’.
Locke English, Dutch, German
English, Dutch, and German: variant of Lock. ... [more]
Loepp Dutch
Variant of Loop.
Loewen Dutch
Dutch variant of Loewe.
Lokerson Dutch
May be derived from Locke, Dutch meaning enclosure.
Loop Dutch
Habitational name from de Loop (meaning "the watercourse"), in the province of Antwerp.
Loos Dutch, German
Patronymic from a short form of either Dutch Lodewijk or German Nikolaus, or the name of a place in northern France.
Losee Dutch (Anglicized)
Perhaps an Americanized spelling of Lossie, a vernacular derivative of the female personal name Lucia... [more]
Losey Dutch
Probably of Dutch origin. See Losee.
Lubben Low German, Dutch
Dutch and North German (Lübben) patronymic from German Lübbe, Dutch $Lubbe, short forms of the personal names Leopold and Lübbert (see Luebbert)... [more]
Lucht Dutch
nickname from Middle Low German lucht 'clumsy left-handed'. German and Dutch: topographic name from Lucht 'cleared area garden' related to Middle High German liuhten 'to shine be bright'. North German: topographic name from Middle Low German lucht 'elevated spot loft'.
Lucius Dutch
From the personal name Lucius (Latin Lucius, an ancient Roman personal name probably derived from lux "light", genitive lucis).
Lustig Swedish, German, Jewish, Dutch
From Swedish and German lustig ”humerous, funny, enjoyable” or Middle High German lustig ”merry, carefree”.
Lutter Dutch, English, German
Dutch and English: variant of Luter.... [more]
Lux German, Dutch
Patronymic from a vernacular form of Lucas.
Lyman English, German (Anglicized), Dutch
English: topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow or a patch of arable land (see Layman). ... [more]
Mack Scottish, Irish, German, Dutch, French
Scottish (Berwickshire) and Irish: from the Old Norse personal name Makkr, a form of Magnus (Old Irish Maccus)... [more]
Mackin Dutch
Pet form of Macco.
Maker Dutch
From Dutch maken "to make or mend".
Malefeijt Dutch
A variant spelling of Malefeyt. This is also actually an archaic spelling (as the sound written as -eijt will be always be written as -eit or -ijt in modern times), but it has (barely) managed to survive into modern times... [more]
Malefeyt Dutch (Archaic)
Archaic Dutch surname that is now no longer in use (not in this exact spelling, that is): the spelling reflects the surname's origin from older times (as -eyt is an exclusively archaic spelling that has not survived into modern times like its counterparts -eit and -ijt did)... [more]
Malefijt Dutch
Modern form of Malefeyt, which is also the most common form of the surname. In The Netherlands, there were 24 bearers of the surname in 2007.
Malfeyt Dutch, Flemish
Generally a Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Malfait, with the spelling reflecting the surname's origin from older times (as -eyt is an exclusively archaic spelling that has not survived into modern times like its counterparts -eit and -ijt did)... [more]
Malin English, French, Dutch
From the given name Malin (English), and from the given name Madalin composed of the Germanic element madal meaning "council" (French, Dutch).
Manes Dutch
Variant of Magnus, MENNEN or a short form of Germanus.
Mark English, German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived on a boundary between two districts, from Middle English merke, Middle High German marc, Middle Dutch marke, merke, all meaning "borderland"... [more]
Markell Dutch, German, Slovene (Anglicized)
Dutch and German: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Markolf, composed of the elements marc, merc ‘boundary’ + wolf ‘wolf’... [more]
Marsman Dutch
Derived from Middle Dutch marsch, mersch (Southern Dutch meers), meaning "marsh". In some cases, however, it can also be a variant of Meersman.
Masse Dutch
Derived from Middle Dutch masse "clog; cudgel", this name might have been a metonymic occupational name for someone who wielded a club. In some cases, however, it may also have been a patronymic of Maas.
Mast German, Dutch
Derived from Middle High German and Middle Dutch mast "mast (fodder made of acorns and beechnuts); the process of fattening livestock", this used to be an occupational name for a pig farmer or a swineherd... [more]
Mast Dutch
Derived from Middle Dutch mast "(ship's) mast; pole", this was a nickname for a tall, lanky man.
Mastin French, Flemish, Walloon
occupational name for a household servant or guard from Old French mastin "watchdog, manservant" (from Latin mansuetudinus "domestic"). The Old French word had the further sense of a bad-tempered dog and was used as an adjective in the sense of "bad cruel".
Mathias French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Dutch: from the personal name Mathias (see Matthew).... [more]
Mathis German, German (Swiss), Flemish, Alsatian, English
Derived from the given name Matthias.
Matias Filipino, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Czech (Americanized)
Spanish (Matías), Portuguese, and Dutch: from the personal name (see Matthew).... [more]
Matten Flemish
One possibility of origin is of the French word motte which means a hill or mound. to this were added several tiny suffix of -et, and -ot, to give motet or motton meaning "small motte" or "son of motte" or to describe one who lived for a place- mottier.
Matthias German, Dutch, English, Welsh, Greek
German and Dutch: from the personal name Matthias (see Matthew).... [more]
Matthijs Dutch
From the given name Matthijs.
Meester Dutch, Flemish, German
Occupational name for a teacher, lecturer or a master craftsman, or a nickname for someone who had a bossy demeanor, derived from Dutch meester meaning "master". A famous bearer of this surname is the American actress, singer and model Leighton Meester (1986-).
Melchior Dutch, German
Derived from the given name Melchior.
Melker Dutch, Swedish (Rare), Afrikaans
Derived from Dutch melker "milker (one who milks)". In some cases, however, it can also be derived from the given name Melchior.
Messiaen Dutch, French
Derived from Messiaen, the (archaic) Dutch form of the latinate first name Messianus, which itself is ultimately derived from the Roman praenomen Messus. The meaning of Messus is not wholly certain; it may be derived from the Latin verb meto "to reap, to harvest, to cut, to sever", or from the latinized form of Greek mesos or messos "(the) middle, (the) middle one"... [more]
Mette Dutch
Truncated form of Demetter.
Michaël Dutch, French
From the given name Michaël.
Michels German, Dutch
Patronymic from the personal name Michel (see Michael). ... [more]
Mick German, Dutch, Irish
Short form of the given name Mikolaj or an occupational name from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch micke "(wheat or rye) bread"... [more]
Middag Dutch
Of debated origin and meaning.
Mier Dutch
Derived from Dutch mier "ant", perhaps denoting an industrious person.
Modderman Dutch
Derived from Middle Dutch modder "mud", this name used to denote a dustman, a garbage man.
Mol Dutch
Habitational name for someone from Mol in the Antwerp province, Belgium.
Molenaar Dutch
Derived from Dutch molenaar "miller".
Molnar Dutch
Variant of Molenaar.
Morshuis Dutch
'Mors' is 'swamp' in old Dutch and 'huis' is 'home', so the name is basically Swamphouse. It is thought that the person who registered the name when Napoleon ruled the Netherlands they lived in a swamp.
Motte French, Walloon, Flemish, German
from old French motte "motte" a word of Gaulish origin denoting a man-made protective mound or moat surrounding a castle or other fortified strongholds; or a habitational name from any of the various places in France and in Belgium named with this word.... [more]
Muis Dutch, Indonesian
From Dutch muis meaning "mouse". Common in Indonesia.
Mullens Flemish
A name referring to someone who lived at or by a mill.
Münster German, Dutch
habitational name from any of the places called Münster (in Germany) or Munster derived from Latin monasterium "monastery" or a topographic name for someone living near a monastery.
Musch Dutch, German
From a nickname meaning "house sparrow".
Nassau German, Dutch, Jewish
From the name of the town of Nassau in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany (formerly the seat of an independent duchy in the 19th century), derived from Old High German naz meaning "damp, wet" and ouwa meaning "water meadow"... [more]
Nathaniël Dutch
From the given name Nathaniël.