Dutch Submitted Surnames

Dutch names are used in the Netherlands and Flanders. See also about Dutch names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Justus German, Dutch, Finnish
From the given name Justus
Kanssen Dutch, Flemish
Son of Kant
Kat Dutch, Frisian, Afrikaans, Jewish
Means "Cat" in Dutch, Frisian, and Afrikaans, perhaps originally a nickname for someone who owned a cat or somehow resembled a cat.
Katje Dutch
It means 'Little Kate' in Dutch. A fun nickname for anyone
Kemper German, Dutch
German: status name denoting a peasant farmer or serf, an agent noun derivative of Kamp ... [more]
Kentie Scottish, English, Dutch
Origin and meaning unknown. The name Kentie was spread in the Netherlands when a Scottish soldier, Alexander Kenti, settled at Woudrichem, the Netherlands around 1650. Alexander Kenti was born and raised in the Scottish highlands... [more]
Kesler German, Dutch, Jewish
It is an occupational name that means coppersmith. In alpine countries the name derived from the definition: the one living in the basin of a valley.
Kessel Dutch
Habitational name for someone originally from any of the various locations in the Netherlands named Kessel.
Keurig Dutch
Keurig is "derived from" a Dutch word meaning "excellence." A more accurate translation from the Dutch is "neat" or "tidy."
Kiel Dutch
Dutch from Middle Dutch kidel, kedel ‘smock’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who make such garments or perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore one. Also a dutch habitational name from a place so named in Antwerp or from the German city Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein.
Kilian German, Dutch, Polish, Czech
from the Irish personal name Cillín (see Killeen).
Kill German (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Perhaps derived from Kilian.
Kin Dutch
Nickname for someone with a pointed or jutting chin.
Kind English, German, Jewish, Dutch
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German kint, German Kind ‘child’, hence a nickname for someone with a childish or naive disposition, or an epithet used to distinguish between a father and his son... [more]
Kinne German, Dutch
German: From the female given name Kinne, a Silesian diminutive of Kunigunde.... [more]
Kleynen Flemish
Comes from the town in Belgium. Originally Van Klijnen
Klopp German, Dutch
Habitational name from a place called Kloppe.
Knickerbocker Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of the Dutch occupational name Knickerbacker "marble baker", i.e., a baker of children's clay marbles. This lowly occupation became synonymous with the patrician class in NYC through Washington Irving's attribution of his History of New York (1809) to a fictitious author named Diedrich Knickerbocker... [more]
Koetsier Dutch
"Coachman, Coachdriver"... [more]
Koev Dutch
1 Dutch: variant spelling of Coel, itself a variant of Kool .... [more]
Kok Dutch
It is a Dutch occupational surname, meaning cook.
Kolk Dutch
"Kolk is Dutch for either whirlpool or canyon. Probably the name refers to wild water."
Koonings Dutch
From the Dutch word "koning" meaning "king", thus meaning "of the king".
Koop Dutch (Modern)
Comes from the Biblical given name Jacob, meaning "he who supplants."
Krane Dutch, Low German
Dutch: nickname for a long-legged or tall thin man, from Middle Dutch crane ‘crane’. ... [more]
Kroll German, Dutch, Polish
Nickname for someone with curly hair, from Middle High German krol 'curly', Middle Low German krulle 'ringlet', 'curl', Middle Dutch croel, crul (apparently a loanword from German)... [more]
Kuba Dutch, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish
From Kuba, a pet form of the personal name Jakub.
Kues German, Dutch
Habitational name from Cues, now part of Bernkastel-Kues in the Rhineland Palatinate.
Kuijper Dutch
Variant of Kuiper
Kul German, Dutch
Derived from Old High German kol meaning "coal", perhaps an occupational name for a miner or coal seller.
Kunis German, Dutch
From a derivative of the personal name Konrad.
Kuyper Dutch
Variant of Kuiper
Kuypers Dutch
Variant of Kuiper
Lachtrup Dutch
Means 'laughing group' in Dutch. Also occurs in Germany, but mostly in the Netherlands.
Lakeman Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a lake or pond.
Landers Dutch
Patronymic from Lander.
Langhorn English, Danish, Dutch
Northern English: probably a habitational name from a minor place in Soulby, Cumbria, called Longthorn, from Old English lang ‘long’ + horn ‘projecting headland’, or a topographic name with the same meaning.... [more]
Lansing Dutch
Patronymic from Lans, Germanic Lanzo, a Dutch cognate of Lance.
Lavender English, Dutch
Occupational name for a washerman or launderer, Old French, Middle Dutch lavendier (Late Latin lavandarius, an agent derivative of lavanda ‘washing’, ‘things to be washed’)... [more]
Lawyer Dutch (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Dutch Lauwer, an occupational name for a tanner or leather worker.
Ledger English, Norman, French, Dutch
English: from a Norman personal name, Leodegar, Old French Legier, of Germanic origin, composed of the elements liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’ + gar, ger ‘spear’... [more]
Lefferts Dutch, North Frisian
From lefert meaning "Leopard."
Lems Dutch
"It is said that long ago there was a river in Holland named 'Lems'. Since then the river has dried up, but those who lived around the river were given the surname of 'Lems'.
Leonhardt German, Dutch
From the Germanic personal name Leonhard, composed of the elements leo "lion" and hard "hardy, brave, strong".
Lex German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Alexius, Alexis.
Liem Dutch
Habitual surname for Lieme in Eastphalia, which is from lim meaning "mire".
Lilandriz Dutch
Last name, supposedly from Hollad
Lilandroz Dutch
Last name from Holland
Linde German, Dutch, Jewish, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a conspicuous lime tree, from Middle High German, Dutch linde, Scandinavian lind. There are several places, especially in North Germany, named with this word... [more]
Lindenberg German, Jewish, Dutch
As a German and Jewish name, it is derived from any of numerous places called Lindenberg in Germany, composed of Middle High German linde meaning "lime tree" and berg meaning "mountain, hill"... [more]
Linders Dutch
Dutch name from the Linder tree.
Lindt German, Dutch
The Lindt surname comes from an Upper German word "lind," which meant "tender" or "gentle hearted." In some instances, especially in Saxony, the surname evolved from the personal name Lindemuth. In general, the similar phonetic name Linde comes from "Linden," which was a type of tree.... [more]
Lineberry English, German, Dutch, West Frisian
Americanized spelling of Leinberg.
Lock English, Dutch, German
Habitational name from any of various places called Loock, from look ‘enclosure’.
Locke English, Dutch, German
English, Dutch, and German: variant of Lock. ... [more]
Loepp Dutch
Variant of Loop.
Loewen Dutch
Dutch variant of Loewe.
Lokerson Dutch
May be derived from Locke, Dutch meaning enclosure.
Loop Dutch
Habitational name from de Loop (meaning "the watercourse"), in the province of Antwerp.
Losee Dutch (Anglicized)
Perhaps an Americanized spelling of Lossie, a vernacular derivative of the female personal name Lucia... [more]
Losey Dutch
Probably of Dutch origin. See Losee.
Lubben Low German, Dutch
Dutch and North German (Lübben) patronymic from German Lübbe, Dutch $Lubbe, short forms of the personal names Leopold and Lübbert (see Luebbert)... [more]
Lucius Dutch
From the personal name Lucius (Latin Lucius, an ancient Roman personal name probably derived from lux "light", genitive lucis).
Lustig Swedish, German, Jewish, Dutch
From Swedish and German lustig ”humerous, funny, enjoyable” or Middle High German lustig ”merry, carefree”.
Lutter Dutch, English, German
Dutch and English: variant of Luter.... [more]
Lux German, Dutch
Patronymic from a vernacular form of Lucas.
Lyman English, German (Anglicized), Dutch
English: topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow or a patch of arable land (see Layman). ... [more]
Maagd Dutch
Dutch form of Virgo.
Maarschalkerweerd Dutch
Meaning "Keeper of the horses."
Mack Scottish, Irish, German, Dutch, French
Scottish (Berwickshire) and Irish: from the Old Norse personal name Makkr, a form of Magnus (Old Irish Maccus)... [more]
Mackin Dutch
Pet form of Macco.
Maker Dutch
From Dutch maken "to make or mend".
Malefeijt Dutch
A variant spelling of Malefeyt. This is also actually an archaic spelling (as the sound written as -eijt will be always be written as -eit or -ijt in modern times), but it has (barely) managed to survive into modern times... [more]
Malefeyt Dutch (Archaic)
Archaic Dutch surname that is now no longer in use (not in this exact spelling, that is): the spelling reflects the surname's origin from older times (as -eyt is an exclusively archaic spelling that has not survived into modern times like its counterparts -eit and -ijt did)... [more]
Malefijt Dutch
Modern form of Malefeyt, which is also the most common form of the surname. In The Netherlands, there were 24 bearers of the surname in 2007.
Malfeyt Dutch, Flemish
Generally a Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Malfait, with the spelling reflecting the surname's origin from older times (as -eyt is an exclusively archaic spelling that has not survived into modern times like its counterparts -eit and -ijt did)... [more]
Malin English, French, Dutch
From the given name Malin (English), and from the given name Madalin composed of the Germanic element madal meaning "council" (French, Dutch).
Manes Dutch
Variant of Magnus, MENNEN or a short form of Germanus.
Mark English, German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived on a boundary between two districts, from Middle English merke, Middle High German marc, Middle Dutch marke, merke, all meaning "borderland"... [more]
Markell Dutch, German, Slovene (Anglicized)
Dutch and German: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Markolf, composed of the elements marc, merc ‘boundary’ + wolf ‘wolf’... [more]
Marsman Dutch
Dutch surname meaning "man from the marsh". Created in combination with the Dutch words "mars", (meaning marsh), and "man", (meaning man). Rare.
Masse English, French, Dutch
English: variant of Mace ... [more]
Mast Dutch
Nickname for a tall, lanky man, from Middle Dutch mast "(ship's) mast".
Mast Dutch
Occupational name for a swineherd, from Middle Dutch mast "swine fodder", or a topographic name for someone from a place rich in animal fodder, for example acorns.
Mathias French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Dutch: from the personal name Mathias (see Matthew).... [more]
Matias Filipino, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Czech (Americanized)
Spanish (Matías), Portuguese, and Dutch: from the personal name (see Matthew).... [more]
Matthias German, Dutch, English, Welsh, Greek
German and Dutch: from the personal name Matthias (see Matthew).... [more]
Meijster Dutch
From the German word meister meaning "master".
Messiaen Dutch, French
Derived from Messiaen, the (archaic) Dutch form of the latinate first name Messianus, which itself is ultimately derived from the Roman praenomen Messus. The meaning of Messus is not wholly certain; it may be derived from the Latin verb meto "to reap, to harvest, to cut, to sever", or from the latinized form of Greek mesos or messos "(the) middle, (the) middle one"... [more]
Mette German, Dutch
From a pet form of the female personal name Mechthild.
Michaël Dutch, French
From the given name Michaël.
Michels German, Dutch
Patronymic from the personal name Michel (see Michael). ... [more]
Mick German, Dutch, Irish
Short form of the given name Mikolaj or an occupational name from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch micke "(wheat or rye) bread"... [more]
Middag Dutch
From the Dutch word for "Midday". The earliest/oldest records of the surname are found in the Netherlands (Holland).
Mielke Dutch, German
The name is derived from the personal name Miel, a diminutive of the name Aemilius, and means "son of Miel."
Mier Spanish, Dutch, English (American)
As a Spanish name relates to late summer and means "harvest" or "ripened".... [more]
Modderman Dutch
"Mud Man" was given to the people who built the dikes.
Mol Dutch
Habitational name for someone from Mol in Antwerp province.
Molenaar Dutch
Occupational name from molenaar "miller".
Molnar Dutch
Variant of Molenaar.
Moretz German, Dutch
Variant spelling of Moritz.
Most Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived in a place where moss grew.
Musch Dutch, German
From a nickname meaning "house sparrow".
Nathaniël Dutch
From the given name Nathaniël.
Neeson Irish, Dutch, German
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Naois ‘son of Naois’, usually Anglicized as Mcneese. Can also be an altered form of Dutch or German Niesen... [more]
Neisingh South Slavic, Ukrainian, Russian, Dutch
The surname Neisingh is of Dutch and Slavic origin, It's derived from the English last name Nelson meaning son of Neal.
Netjes Dutch
Netjes is from the Dutch word for "tidy, neat" or "decent, proper."
Niedermeyer German, Dutch
Distinguishing name for a farmer (see Meyer) who had a farm lower (Middle High German nider(e)) than the neighboring one(s).
Niesen Dutch, German
Dutch: patronymic from the personal name Nijs, a reduced form of Denijs (see Dennis)... [more]
Niessen Dutch
Thought to be found most commonly in Limburg... [more]
Nieuwenhuis Dutch
Means "new house" in Dutch. Indicated that the bearer lived in a new house or lived in a village of the same name
Nieuwman Dutch
Dutch cognate of Neumann.
Nikkel German, Dutch
Possibly an altered spelling of Dutch Nikel, from the personal name, a Dutch form of Nicholas.
Niswonger Dutch
"One who dwells in the clearing"
Nolf German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Arnolf, composed of the Germanic elements arn 'eagle' + wulf 'wolf'. Dutch: from a reduced form of Nodolf, derived from the personal name Odolf by transfer of the final -n in a preceding personal name such as Jan, Simoen
Nyhuis Dutch
Variant of Nijhuis
Oeltjenbruns Dutch (Archaic)
Unexplained Dutch surname.
Olin English, Dutch
English or Dutch name meaning either "from a low lying area" or from the word Hollander meaning "one from the Netherlands" a country well known for a low lying landscape.
Ooms Dutch
Derived from Dutch oom "uncle".
Oort Dutch
From Middle Dutch oort "edge, corner".
Oortwijn Dutch
Patronym of Oort meaning "place" or "location"
Oosterhuis Dutch
Oosterhuis is a Dutch surname meaning "eastern house".
Oostwal Dutch
From the Dutch words oost meaning "East" and wal meaning "shore" or "bank".
Oranje Dutch
means "orange" in Dutch, in reference to the Dutch Royal Family
Orley Dutch, Flemish, English
A surname of uncertain origin found among the Dutch, Flemish and English. In England the name is primarily found in Yorkshire and Devon. Orley may be an adapted form of a French name D'Orley or a nickname for Orlando... [more]
Osterhout Dutch
From the town of Oosterhout,, meaning "East Wood", as it is located nearby forests in the east of the Netherlands. Primary modern usage is in the United States can be traced back to Jan Jensen van Oosterhoudt, who immigrated to New Amsterdam in the 17th Century, and has been generally been simplified to Osterhout, where the O is pronounced as "AW"... [more]
Ostrander Dutch
Translated as "from the east border." The name may have been originally borne by one who lived near the eastern border of a town, province, or country.
Oudenhoven Dutch
Derived from Dutch oude "old" and hoeve "farm; farmstead; manor". As a surname it is derived from one of the many places of this name, for example in Menen, Passendale, Steenvoorde, Steenwerk, Broekburg or Godewaardsvelde.
Overbeeke Dutch
Means "over/on brook" or "over/on stream" or "over/on creek"... [more]
Palmberg Dutch (Rare), German (Rare)
Derived from any of the various places in Germany named Palmberg.
Pannebakker Dutch
A Dutch name that literally means “producer of tiles.” the earliest trace of the name in the Netherlands is in the year 1568, associated with Herr Jan de Pannebakker and his wife Nancy who were accused of heresy and killed by the Spaniards at Utrecht.... [more]
Pauw Dutch, Flemish
Means "peacock" in Dutch.
Pauwels Dutch
Means "son of Pauwel".
Pavek Dutch
Americanized spelling of Pávek.
Pelt Dutch
Dutch: shortened form of Van Pelt.
Pelter Dutch
This surname is occupational in origin. It comes from the Latin word "pellis," meaning "skin" or "hide," and would have originally been born by someone who tanned or sold hides and pelts for a living.
Pennebaker Dutch (Anglicized)
Coming from the Dutch name Pannebakker. The name is of occupational origin and is traceable to a term literally translated as "producer of tiles." Legend has it that the family imigrated from central Europe in the mid 1300’s to the Netherlands to escape the wars and plague that were common in the area at that time.
Penning English, Dutch, Low German
From early Middle English penning, Low German penning, and Middle Dutch penninc, all meaning "penny". It was used as a topographic surname or a nickname referring to tax dues of a penny.
Peppe Dutch
From Peppo, a pet form of a Germanic personal name.
Persoon Dutch, Flemish
Derived from Dutch persoon, meaning "person".
Pfannebecker Dutch (Germanized)
The Germanic spelling of the Dutch sername Pannebakker
Pieper German, Dutch
Occupational name for a piper.
Pieters Dutch
"Pieter's son"
Pin French, Dutch
A topographic name for someone living by a pine tree or in a pine forest, or a habitational name from a place named with the Old French word pin, meaning ‘pine’.
Plumer German, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
Poppe German, Dutch, English
German and Dutch variant of Popp 1 and English variant of Popp 2.
Posthumus Dutch, Low German
From a personal name which was given to a posthumous child, i.e., one born after the death of his father, derived from Latin postumus "last, last-born" (superlative of posterus "coming after, subsequent") via Late Latin posthumus, which was altered by association with Latin humare "to bury", suggesting death (i.e., thought to consist of post "after" and humus "grave", hence "after death"); the one born after the father's death obviously being the last.
Prins Dutch, Jewish
Means "prince" in Dutch, but almost never a surname for a prince. Instead, it's an occupational surname for someone in the service of a prince or a nickname for someone who acted in a regal manner. The surname is also Jewish Dutch and is used as an ornamental adoption of Dutch prins still meaning "prince".
Puddephatt Dutch
Form of Cooper, meaning barrell maker
Pyle Dutch
Metonymic occupational name for a marksman or an arrowsmith, from pijl meaning "arrow".
Quackenbush Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Dutch Quackenbosch, a topographic name from Dutch quaak ‘swamp’ (cognate with the English word quagmire) + bosch ‘woodland’, ‘wilderness’.
Raad Dutch
Metonymic occupational name for an adviser, counselor, or member of a town council, from raad ‘advice’, ‘counsel’.
Raat Dutch
''Somebody who gives good advice'', ''counsel'' Raad = advice.... [more]
Raimond Estonian, Dutch, French, Croatian
From the given name Raimond.
Redding English, German, Dutch
English variant spelling of Reading. In 1841 Redding was the most commonly used surname in all of Buckinghamshire. A famous bearer is Otis Redding.... [more]
Redig Dutch, Upper German
Dutch and North German variant of Redding.
Reese Low German, Dutch, German
Nickname for a very big man, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rese ‘giant’.... [more]
Reisz Dutch
Patronymic from a pet form of one of the Germanic compound names formed with ragin "counsel" as the first element.
Remis Greek, Dutch, German, Asturian
Greek from a medieval Greek personal name, Remis, a vernacular form of the personal name Remigius (see French Remy)... [more]
Rens Dutch
From a reduced form of the personal name Laurens.
Reus Dutch, German, Catalan
Dutch: nickname for a big man, from Middle Dutch reuse(n) 'giant'. German: topographic name from Middle High German riuse 'fish trap' (Middle Low German ruse) or from a regional term reuse 'small stream', 'channel'... [more]
Rhett English, Dutch
Anglicized form of Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel".
Robben French, Dutch
It is a French surname that was originally derived from the Germanic name Robert, which is composed of the elements hrod, meaning famous, and berht, meaning bright.
Roel English, Spanish, Dutch, German
From the name Roeland, meaning "famous country".
Roelfs Dutch
Means "son of Roelf".
Roelofs Dutch
Variant of Roelfs, meaning "son of Roelof".
Rolloos Dutch
Possibly derived from the given name Rollo.
Romine English, Dutch
From Rome
Rommel Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for an obstreperous person, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rummeln, rumpeln to make a noise, create a disturbance (of imitative origin). Variant of Rummel.
Ronde Dutch
Means "round" in Dutch, originally a nickname for a plump person, ultimately from Latin rotundus.
Roop Dutch
Dutch: from a short form of the Germanic personal name Robrecht.
Roos Estonian, Swedish, Danish, Dutch, German (Swiss), Low German
Means "rose" in Estonian and Dutch. Swedish and Danish variant of Ros, also meaning "rose". This could be a locational name for someone living near roses, an occupational name for someone who grew roses, or a nickname for someone with reddish skin.
Root English, Dutch
English: nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English rote ‘glad’ (Old English rot). ... [more]
Rosenboom Dutch
Comes from Dutch "rosenboom" meaning "rose tree"
Roudebush Dutch (Americanized), Belgian (Americanized)
Americanized form of Dutch and Belgian Ronderbosch or Rondenbosch, a habitational name for someone from Ronderbos in Dilbeek, Brabant, or Ronden Bos in Maldegen, East Flanders.
Ruiter Dutch
Derived from the Dutch noun ruiter meaning "rider, horseman".
Rumfelt German, Dutch
Altered spelling of German Romfeld, derived from Middle Low German rüm- meaning "to clear (land)" and feld meaning "open country, field". It is a topographic name or possibly a metonymic occupational name for a person engaged in clearing woodland, or in some cases a habitational name for someone from Romfelt in the Ardennes... [more]
Rummel German, Dutch
North German and Dutch: variant of Rommel.... [more]
Samis Dutch, German
From a pet form of the personal name Samuel.
Sax Dutch
Dutch variant of Sas.
Schade German, Dutch, Scottish, English
German and Dutch: from schade ‘damage’, a derivative of schaden ‘to do damage’, generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others’ lands.... [more]
Schaden German, Dutch
From schade 'damage', a derivative of schaden 'to do damage', generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others' lands.
Schaumburg German, Dutch, Belgian
Habitational name from any of the places called Schaumburg or Schauenburg in Germany, or Schauwberg in Brabant, Belgium.
Schellekens Dutch
A Dutch patronymic surname of Germanic names like Schalk and Godschalk, meaning "God's Servant".
Schenkel German, Dutch, Jewish
German, Dutch, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for someone with long or otherwise notable legs, from Middle High German schenkel, Middle Dutch schenkel, schinkel ‘thigh’, ‘lower leg’, German Schenkel ‘thigh’.
Schild German, Dutch
Occupational name for a maker or painter of shields, from Middle High German, Middle Dutch schilt "shield".
Schimmelpenninck Dutch, Flemish
White horse penny. An old family, whose origin is uncertain, but who have for centuries ranked among the nobles of Gelderland and Zutphen. One of the name was also a burgomaster of Cologne in 1409; and, the same year, another held the office of alderman of Brussels.
Schink Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for someone with long or otherwise remarkable legs, from Middle High German schinke ‘thigh’, ‘leg’. Compare Schenkel. ... [more]
Schoen German, Jewish, Dutch
German (Schön) nickname for a handsome or pleasant man, from Middle High German schoene ‘fine’, ‘beautiful’; ‘refined’, ‘friendly’, ‘nice’. ... [more]
Schoenmaker Dutch
Dutch word for "shoemaker."
Scholten Dutch (Surinamese)
Schout "sherif"(he who punishes), Son of Scholte (also from Schout)
Schottlander German, Jewish, Dutch
From German Schottland, 'Scotland' and, in some cases, denoted an immigrant from Scotland or Ireland. Numerous Irish fled to continental Europe after the Anglo-Norman invasion in the 13th century.... [more]
Schouten Dutch
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Schouten (disambiguation))... [more]
Schroot Dutch
Nickname for a person who collects scraps of food,from the Dutch word "schroot" meaning "scrap". Name was usually given to someone who was impoverished.
Schutte Dutch, Low German
Dutch and North German (Schütte) occupational name for an archer, from Middle Low German schutten ‘to shoot’. Compare German Schuetz.
Scroggins Dutch
From Holland
Seger Swedish, English, Dutch
Means "victory" in Swedish. It is also a variant of the English surname Seager or derived from the Germanic given name Sigiheri "victory army".
Seivert Dutch
Derived from the given name Sivert.
Shade English, German, Dutch, Scottish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary, from Old English scead ‘boundary’.nickname for a very thin man, from Middle English schade ‘shadow’, ‘wraith’.... [more]
Sievert Low German, Dutch, Swedish
Derived from the given name Sievert. A Sievert (Sv) is a unit measuring the effect of ionizing radiation on the human body (called equivalent absorbed radiation dose)... [more]
Sikkema Dutch
Most prevalent in the Netherlands.
Sikkens Dutch (Modern)
Son of Sikke (or Sikko)
Sim Scottish, Dutch
Scottish and Dutch: from the personal name Sim, a short form of Simon.
Sivertsen Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Patronymic of Sivert.... [more]
Sjoerdsma Frisian, Dutch
Derived from the Frisian given name Sjoerd combined with the Frisian surname suffix -(s)ma, which is most likely derived from Old Frisian monna meaning "men".... [more]
Slack English, Dutch, Scottish
English and Dutch: nickname for an idle person, from Middle Dutch slac, Middle English slack, ‘lazy’, ‘careless’. ... [more]
Sluiter Dutch
Occupation name for a porter, or gatekeeper. Also an occupational name for someone who made and poured alcohol. "The one who pours the alcohol." - Middle Dutch Sluter. Compare to English Porter.
Smet Flemish
One who is a blacksmith
Smidt Dutch
A Dutch corruption of the German Schmidt which means smith.
Snyder Dutch, English, German, Yiddish, Jewish
Means "tailor" in Dutch, an occupational name for a person who stitched coats and clothing.... [more]
Southard English, Dutch
Possibly derived from the English surname Southworth.
Springer German, English, Dutch, Jewish
Nickname for a lively person or for a traveling entertainer. It can also refer to a descendant of Ludwig der Springer (AKA Louis the Springer), a medieval Franconian count who, according to legend, escaped from a second or third-story prison cell by jumping into a river after being arrested for trying to seize County Saxony in Germany.
Staal Dutch (Modern)
From Middle High German stal meaning "steel". May have been a occupational name, for a steelworker or blacksmith.
Star German, Dutch, Jewish, English
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname from German Star, Middle High German star, ‘starling’, probably denoting a talkative or perhaps a voracious person.... [more]
Steenbok Afrikaans, Dutch
Dutch and Afrikaans form of Steinbock.
Sterken Dutch, English
Means "strong". Derived either from the Old English term sterċan, meaning "to make rigid", or from the Old Saxon sterkian and Old High German sterken, both meaning "to strengthen."
Steven Scottish, English, Dutch, Low German
From the personal name Steven, a vernacular form of Latin Stephanus, Greek Stephanos "crown". This was a popular name throughout Christendom in the Middle Ages, having been borne by the first Christian martyr, stoned to death at Jerusalem three years after the death of Christ... [more]