Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Paulus German, Dutch
From the given name Paulus and variant of Paul.
Paustenbach German
Family name associated with the town Paustenbach, Germany
Pavese Italian
Means "one from Pavia". Pavia is an Italian town located in Lombardy, northern Italy. It can also derive from pavese, a kind of big, Medieval shield.... [more]
Payen French, French (Caribbean)
From the old French given names Pagen Paien from Latin paganus "pagan"... [more]
Paysen German, Frisian
Patronymic from the personal name Pay, the Frisian form of Paul.
Payson German, Frisian
German and Frisian variant spelling of Paysen, a patronymic from the personal name Paul.
Pazzi Italian
From Italian pazzo "crazy, insane, mad".
Pecchia Italian
Nickname, probably for an industrious person, from pecchia "bee".
Pêcheur French
French for "fisher."
Pechman German
"Pechman" means "man with bad luck" in many European languages (Polish, German, and Dutch predominantly), though in German, it originally referred to one who prepared, sold, or used pitch.
Pechtold German, Dutch, Jewish
From the Old German given name Pechtholt, which is composed of the elements pecht "rotation" and holdt "hero". As a Dutch-language surname, it is derived from the Middle Dutch given name Pechte combined with Old High German walt "power, authority"... [more]
Pecorella Italian
Diminutive of Pecora.
Pedemonte Italian
Variant of Piemonte, Means "at the foot of the mountains"... [more]
Pedretti Italian, Italian (Swiss), Romansh
Italian patronymic form of Pedretto, itself derived from the given name Peter.
Pedroli Italian (Swiss), Romansh
Derived from a diminutive form of the given name Peter.
Pedrussio Romansh
Derived from a diminutive form of the given name Peter.
Peer Romansh
Romansh form of Bayer.
Peia Italian
Village in Italy
Peik German
From Middle Low German pek ‘sharp, pointed tool or weapon’.
Peikert German
Probably an occupational name for a drummer.
Pelagatti Italian
Probably derives from an old expression meaning "cheat, scoundrel", literally a combination of pela "to skin" and gatti "cats".
Pelissier French
From Old French "Pelicier", (Meaning "Furrier", from an agent derivative of pelice, meaning "Fur cloak", from Late Latin "pellicia", from "pellis", meaning "skin fur". An occupational name of someone likely in the fur and hide trade.
Pelkey French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of French surnames Peltier and Pelltier.
Pelle Danish, German
From the personal name Pelle, a vernacular form of Peter.
Pelle German
From Middle Low German pelle "precious purple silk cloth", presumably an occupational name for a maker or seller of such cloth or for a maker of official and church vestments.
Pelle Italian
From the Italian word pelle "skin".
Pellegrin French
Unknown. Possibly a variant of Pellegrino. This surname was given to the Chilean named Raúl Alejandro Pellegrin Friedmann (1958-1988; nicknamed José Miguel).
Pellerin French
From Old French pellerin pelegrin "pilgrim" (from Latin peregrinus "traveler") applied as a nickname for a person who had been on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land or to a famous holy site elsewhere... [more]
Pellicano Italian, Sicilian
nickname from dialect pelecanò pelicanò "woodpecker" from modern Greek pelekanos "green woodpecker" (cognate with pelekan "pelican"; both come from pelekys "axe" the pelican because its beak is shaped like an axe the woodpecker because it uses its beak like an axe).
Pelliccia Italian
From Italian pelliccia "fur (of an animal)".
Pelosi Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Peloso.
Peloso Italian
Nickname for a man with long or unkempt hair and beard, from peloso "hairy", "shaggy".
Peltier French
Variant of Pelletier (from Old French pellet, a diminutive of pel "skin, hide").
Peltz German, Jewish
Occupational name for a furrier, from Middle High German bellez, (modern German pelz) "fur", "animal skin".
Pelz German, Jewish
Variant of Peltz.
Pelzer German
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative Middle High German bellez "fur".
Pémonge French, Occitan
Meaning unknown.
Penna Italian
Possibly from Italian penna "feather, pen", a nickname for a scribe.
Penning Upper German
Shortened form of Panno, which is a personal given name.
Pensa Italian
Possibly from Italian pensa "think", indicating the bearer was known for being thoughtful or intelligent.
Pense French
Pense is, quite literally, a French word meaning "to think" or "thought", but is also a surname. Sometimes confused with the surname Pence, which is German.
Pepe Italian
From the given name Giuseppe.
Pepi Italian
Patronymic form of Pepe.
Pépin French
From the Old French name Pepis, itself a form of the given name Pépin. Alternatively, it may be derived from French pépin meaning "(fruit) seed", thus making it an occupational name for a gardener or someone who grew fruit-bearing trees.
Peppe Italian
From a short form of the personal name Giuseppe.
Perdue English, Irish, French
English and Irish from Old French par Dieu ‘by God’, which was adopted in Middle English in a variety of more or less heavily altered forms. The surname represents a nickname from a favorite oath... [more]
Peretti Italian
Patronymic from a pet form of the personal name Pero.
Perla Italian
From perla "pearl".
Perlman German
Occupational name for a person who makes or sells pearls.
Perna Italian
Meaning uncertain, possibly from the dialectic word perna "leg", denoting someone with a deformed or missing leg, or a variant of Perla.
Pernier Italian
A famous bearer is the Italian archaeologist Luigi Pernier (1874 - 1937), who discovered the mysterious Phaistos disc on the Greek island of Crete.
Perotti Italian
from the personal name Pietro.
Perre French (Rare), Jèrriais, Guernésiais
Derived from the given name Pierre.
Perseu Italian
Sardinian form of Perseo.
Persia Italian, Spanish
Ethnic name or regional name for someone from Persia (modern-day Iran) or some other country with Persian-speaking peoples or a nickname for someone who had visited or traded with one of these countries (see the given name Persis)... [more]
Peruzzi Italian
From the given name Piero.
Pesci Italian
Variant of Pesce.
Peterli German (Swiss)
Derived from the given name Peterli.
Petitjean French
Nickname for a small or little man, or ironically a large or tall man, derived from Old French petit meaning "small, little" combined with the given name Jean 1... [more]
Petito Italian, Judeo-Italian
Nickname for a small person, derived from a dialectal word ultimately from French petit meaning "small, little".
Petke German
German surname derived from a diminutive form for Peter.
Petrelli Italian
From the given name Pietro.
Petrillo Italian
From the given name Pietro. A famous user of this name is Sophia Petrillo, one of the main characters on the sitcom, The Golden Girls.
Petrocelli Italian
Pluralized variant of Petrosello, itself a variant of Petrosino.
Petrone Italian
Derived from the given name Pietro.
Petronio Italian
From the given name Petronio.
Petrosino Italian
Habitational name from Petrosino in Trapani, Sicily.
Petrosino Italian
From petrosino "parsley", a southern dialect variant of prezzemolo.
Petrucci Italian
From the given name Pietro.
Pettee French, Scottish, English
Meaning "Petit", a word meaning "small" in French.
Pettinati Italian
Diminutive form of Pettinato.
Pettinato Italian
Italian cognate of Peinado.
Petzold German
German. Derives from a pet form of a Slavic version of the given name Peter.
Peugeot French
Meaning unknown.
Peureux French
In the war there was a French resistance fighter named Maurice Peureux.
Peverelli Italian
Likely an altered form of Poverelli.
Peyron French
Unknown meaning. French surname. Famous bearer of this name is Bruno Peyron and the German princess Louise Peyron (1918-1989).... [more]
Pfarr German
From Middle High German pfarr 'district' 'parish' or pfarre(r) 'parish priest', hence an occupational name for a parson.
Pfarrer German
Means "Pastor" in German.
Pfautz German
It was originally given as a nickname for a chubby person.
Pfeffer German, Jewish
Occupational name for a spicer, or a nickname for a person with a fiery temper, for a small man, or for a dark-haired person. Derived from German Pfeffer "pepper".
Pfefferle German
South German diminutive of Pfeffer, and a nickname for a person who sells spices.
Pfeil German
From Middle High German pfil ‘arrow’ (from Latin pilum ‘spike’, ‘javelin’), either a metonymic occupational name for an arrowsmith or possibly a nickname for a tall thin man.
Pflüger German
Occupational name for a Ploughman, literally meaning "Ploughman/Plowman" in German.
Pfotenhauer German
High German, carpenter's and woodworker's main occupation. Actual old German translation is "paw slapper" or "large paw" as in an animal (bear).
Pfuhl German
a topographic name for someone who lived by a swamp or pond, Middle High German phuol.... [more]
Pfund German
metonymic occupational name for a sealer of weights, or for a wholesale merchant, from Middle High German pfunt ‘pound’ (as a measure of weight and a unit of currency).
Pfundt German
Unknown meaning of German origin
Pharamond French
From the given name Pharamond.
Philippi German (Latinized)
Latinized patronymic derived from the given name Philipp.
Piaget French (Swiss)
Of uncertain origin and meaning. This name was borne by Jean Piaget (1896-1980), a Swiss child psychologist noted for his studies of intellectual and cognitive development in children.
Piagnolo Italian (Anglicized, Modern)
It was borrowed from Italian chemist Giovenco Piagnolo
Piana Italian
Topographic name from piana ‘plain’, ‘level ground’, from Latin planus, or a habitational name from any of the places named with this word.
Piano Italian
Topographic name for someone who lived on a plain or plateau, Italian piano (Latin planum, from the adjective planus ‘flat’, ‘level’).
Pica Italian, Catalan
Nickname for a gossipy or garrulous person, from the central-southern Italian word pica ‘magpie’. Compare Picazo.Catalan: habitational name from any of the numerous places called Pica.Catalan: from either pica ‘pointed object’ (weapon, etc.) or a derivative of picar ‘to prick’.
Piccinini Italian
meaning- little one
Piccioni Italian
From Italian piccione, "pigeon".
Piccolo Italian
Nickname from piccolo "small".
Pickle German
Pickle is an Anglicized form of the North German word “pokel” and or the Dutch word “pekel”.
Picot French
From Old French picot "pointed object pickaxe" a nickname for someone who used such an implement.
Picquet French
A variant of Piquet of which it's meaning is of a military terminology of one soldier/small group of soldiers on a line forward of a postion to provide a warning of an enemy advance... [more]
Piedmont Italian (Americanized, Rare)
Means "foothill," coming from the Italian terms pied "foot" and monte "hill."
Piednoel French
Modern (and also more common) form of Piénoel.
Piemonte Italian
Denotes someone from Piedmont.
Piénoel French (Rare)
French surname that possibly refers to the buckled shoes that the original bearer was wearing, in which case it is derived from Old French pié meaning "foot" combined with Old French noiel meaning "buckle"... [more]
Pieper German, Dutch
Occupational name for a piper.
Pierrin French
From the given name Pierre.
Pies German
From a variant of the given name Pius.
Pietrafesa Italian
The derivation of the name Pietrafesa comes from the cracked aspect of the mountain on which it rose. In Italian "Pietra" mean Rock and "-fesa" comes from the Italian word fessura meaning cracked.... [more]
Pietrangelo Italian
Derived from the given name Pietrangelo, a variant of Pierangelo, formed from Pietro and Angelo.
Pigue French
French family last name may have been changed from the original French
Piketty French
Perhaps related to the English surname Pickett. A notable bearer is French economist Thomas Piketty (1971-).
Pili Italian
Sardinian form of Italian pelo "hair, hairy".
Pillot French
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from Middle French pilot or pillot both meaning "stake, pole". This is the name of a wealthy merchant family from Besançon, France.
Pin French, Dutch
A topographic name for someone living by a pine tree or in a pine forest, or a habitational name from a place named with the Old French word pin, meaning ‘pine’.
Pineau French
Either a diminutive of Pin from Old French pin "pine" or a habitational name from (Le) Pineau the name of several places in the western part of France of the same origin.
Pingitore Italian, Sicilian
occupational name from pittore "painter".
Pininfarina Italian
A combination of "pinin", Piedmontese for youngest/smallest brother, and Farina, the Italian variant of Miller. This is the name of the Italian coachbuilder, founded by Battista "Pinin" Farina, later Battista Pininfarina.
Pink English, German
Nickname, possibly for a small person, from Middle English pink penkg ‘minnow’ (Old English pinc).English (southeastern): variant of Pinch .Variant spelling of German Pinck, an indirect occupational name for a blacksmith, an onomatopoeic word imitating the sound of hammering which was perceived as pink(e)pank... [more]
Pinn English, German
Derived from Middle English pin and Middle Low German pinne, both meaning "peg" or "pin". This was an occupational name from a maker of these things. The German name can in some cases be an occupational name for a shoemaker.
Pino Spanish, Galician, Italian
Spanish and Galician habitational name from any of the places in Galicia (Spain) named Pino from pino "pine" or a topographic name for someone who lived by a remarkable pine tree. Italian habitational name from Pino d'Asti in Asti province Pino Torinese in Torino or Pino Solitario in Taranto all named with pino "pine’... [more]
Pinochet Basque, French, Spanish
Derived from Basque pinoche meaning "pine cone". Alternately, it could be derived from the name of the hamlet of Pinouchet, located in the Gironde department in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region of France... [more]
Pinsker German, Prussian
Habitational name from any of several places named near Posen (Polish Poznan) and in West Prussia.
Pinson French
From Old French pinson "finch" a nickname applied to someone who whistles or sings like a finch or to a bright and cheerful person.
Pionke German, Polish
Germanized form of Slavic Pinoek, which is a nickname from pionek ‘puppet’.
Piquet French
Occupational name for someone who dealt with picks from a diminutive of pic ''pick, pickax''.
Piredda Italian
From Sardinian piredda "small pear". Compare Piras.
Pirelli Italian
From an altered form of the given name Piero.
Pirovano Italian
Probably from a place in Lombardy, itself possibly deriving from Ancient Greek πυρο- (pyro-) "fire" and -γενής (-genes) "born of".
Pirro Italian
Pirro is a nickname for Peter.
Pisa Italian
Habitational name from the city of Pisa in Tuscany. The city was probably founded by Greek colonists, but before coming under Roman control it was in the hands of the Etruscans, who probably gave it its name... [more]
Pisano Italian
Variant of Pisani.
Piscopo Italian
From a reduced form of episcopo "bishop" (Greek episkopos "bishop", literally "overseer"), hence a metonymic occupational name for someone in the service of a bishop, or perhaps a nickname for a pompous person.
Pisoni Italian
patronymic "from Pisone", from a derivative of Piso, from Latin pisum "pea"
Pistario Greek, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pistario is a surname, mainly used in the Greek, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese languages.
Pitcher English, German
From an agent derivative of Middle English pich ‘pitch’, hence an occupational name for a caulker, one who sealed the seams of ships or barrels with pitch. English variant of Pickard... [more]
Pitschen Romansh
Derived from Romansh pitschen "small, little".
Pitsenbarger German
Probably an altered spelling of Bezzenberger, which is derived from Boizenburg, a municipality in the Ludwigslust-Parchim district in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany.
Pittau Italian
Sardinian diminutive of Sebastiano.
Pittler French
A surname which originally belonged to a person who lived by a pit or hollow. Meaning "King of the Pit" or "King of the Hollow".
Pittsenbarger German
Variant spelling of Pitsenbarger.
Pitz Romansh
Variant of Pitsch.
Pizzuto Italian
Italian surname derived from a nickname meaning ‘malicious’.
Plain French
from Old French plain an adjective meaning "flat" and a noun meaning "plain" hence a topographic name denoting e.g. a dwelling on a flat terrain.
Pláňsker Czech (Rare, Archaic), Slovak (Rare, Archaic), German (Rare, Archaic)
Originating from Bohemia, a region between The Czech Republic and Germany. The name means "forest clearing", Pláň: forest, sker: clearing. It is a very rare last name with only about 20 holders of it.
Planta Romansh
Derived from Romansh planta "tree; plant".
Plante French
French cognate of Plant.
Plate German, Dutch
metonymic occupational name for a maker of plate armor from Middle High German blate plate Middle Dutch plate "plate armor plating".
Platini Italian
Occupational name for a person who coats objects with platinum, derived from Italian platinare literally meaning "to platinize, to coat with platinum". A notable bearer is the former French soccer star Michel Platini (1955-).
Plato German, Dutch, Polish, English
From the Given name Plato the Latinized form of Platon. English variant of Plater.
Platon French, German, Romanian, Spanish (Philippines)
From the given name Platon. Spanish variant of Pláton more common in the Philippines.
Platte French
From Old French plat, meaning "flat."
Plemmons English, Irish, German
Altered spelling of Fleming.
Plemons English, Irish, German
Variant form of Plemmons. A famous bearer is American actor Jesse Plemons (1988-).
Plescia Italian
From Albanian plesht "flea".
Plouffe French
Altered form of Blouf, which is no longer found in France. It's meaning is unknown.
Plum English, German, Jewish
English and North German: from Middle English plum(b)e, Middle Low German plum(e) ‘plum’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a plum tree, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower... [more]
Plumer German, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
Plumier French, Belgian
Possibly an occupational name for a dealer in feathers and quills, from an agent derivative of Old French plume "feather, plume" (compare English and Dutch Plumer)... [more]
Po Italian
Derived from Po the longest river in Italy (651,8 km). It flows eastward across northern Italy starting from the Cottian Alps across the regions: Piemonte, Lombardia, Emilia-Romagna and Veneto... [more]
Pobanz German
Nickname for a braggart or bogeyman, of uncertain Slavic origin.
Pochettino Italian (Modern)
Famous Argentine soccer manager named Mauricio Pochettino (Born 1972)
Podda Italian
From Sardinian podda "flour", or pudda "chicken".
Poehler German
German (Westphalian): topographic name for someone who lived by a muddy pool, from an agent noun derived from Middle Low pol ‘(muddy) pool’.
Pöge German
German cognate of Page.
Poh German
From a dialect word for standard German Pfau ‘peacok’, a nickname for a vain person or for someone with a strutting gait.
Pointe French
Derivation of the name is from the pre 10th century Old French "pointe" meaning a sharp or pointed end, and ultimately from the Latin "puncta", to pierce.
Poisson French
Poisson is the French word for fish, and was given to one who was a fishmonger, fisherman, or could be a nickname for one who had the appearance similar to a fish.
Poitier French
Evidently an altered spelling of Pothier. A famous bearer of this surname was the Bahamian-American actor Sidney Poitier (1927-2022).
Poland English, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
Poley French, German, Jewish
French: variant of Polet, Paulet, pet forms of Paul.... [more]
Poli Italian
From the given name Polo, medieval variant of Paolo.
Polidore Italian (Americanized), French
Americanized form of Polidoro and French variant of Polydore from the given name Polydore.
Polidori Italian
Means "son of Polidoro". Famous bearers include John William Polidori (1795-1821), a physician to Lord Byron and author of 'The Vampyre' (1819), and his sister Frances Polidori (1800-1886), the mother of painter and poet Dante Gabriel Rossetti, poet Christina Rossetti, critic William Michael Rossetti, and author Maria Francesca Rossetti.
Polito Italian
Reduced form of Ippolito. Compare French Hypolite, Greek Politis... [more]