Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Linebaugh German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Leinbach.
Lineberry English, German, Dutch, West Frisian
Americanized spelling of Leinberg.
Ling English, German
Variant of Link.
Linn Scottish, Scots, English, Irish, German, Jewish, Finnish (Anglicized), Estonian
As a Scottish and Northern English surname, it is a variant of Lyne. Its usage as an English name is primarily by Scots living in Northern England.... [more]
Linzmeyer German, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Means "bailiff of Linz, Austria" in German, derived from Proto-Celtic *lentos (“bend”) and Middle High German meier meaning "bailiff, administrator", derived from Latin maior meaning "greater".... [more]
Liotta Italian
Variant form of Leotta. A famous bearer is American actor Ray Liotta (1954-).
Lipps German
Derived from Lippe, a place in Westphalia, Germany. The name is a variant of the first name Philipp.
Lipschitz German, Jewish
The name is derived from the Slavic "lipa," meaning "linden tree" or "lime tree." The name may relate to a number of different place names: "Liebeschitz," the name of a town in Bohemia, "Leipzig," the name of a famous German city, or "Leobschutz," the name of a town in Upper Silesia.
Liserani Italian
A famous bearer is Italian-born American actor Gino Corrado Liserani (1893 - 1982), who went by Gino Corrado on film
Lisle Norman, English, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: variant spelling of Lyle.
Listrat French
From Occitan "listrat" meaning "chopped off, striped" or from "Listrac", a commune in the Gironde department in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region of southwest France.
Littman German (East Prussian), German (West Prussian), German, Jewish
Derived from Germanized Czech personal names like Litomir (Czech: Ljutomir) and Litobor (Czech: Ljutobor) which ultimately go back to Old Slavic ljutu "grim; fierce; ferocious; wild". One theory suggests, however, that these given names might have been influenced by ljub- "love; dear".... [more]
Livengood German
The surname LIVENGOOD is the Americanized version of Leibendgut. Leibengut is Swiss-German in origin. It has been written as Livengood and Levengood in America. Records show the family name back to 1550, in Aarwangen, Canton of Berne, Switzerland... [more]
Lobianco Italian
Derived from the words lo "the" and bianco "white".
Loch German
From German Loch "hole", ultimately derived from Middle High German loch "hole, hollow, valley".
Lochner German
Means "a place where rivers meet with a partial obstruction from a wooden dam. "
Lock English, Dutch, German
Habitational name from any of various places called Loock, from look ‘enclosure’.
Locke English, Dutch, German
English, Dutch, and German: variant of Lock. ... [more]
Lockhart Scottish, German
Scottish: of uncertain origin, probably from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements loc ‘lock’, ‘bolt’ + hard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’. English: occupational name for a herdsman in charge of a sheep or cattlefold, from Old English loc ‘enclosure’, ‘fold’ + hierde ‘herd(er)’.
Lodovico Italian
From the given name Lodovico.
Loesch German
German metonymic occupational name from Middle High German lösch ‘fine leather’.
Loescher German
German variant of Löscher, an occupational name for a fireman, from Middle High German leschen ‘to extinguish’. Als a variant of Loesch and Lescher or a derivative of Loesche.
Löffler German
Derived from German löffel, it denotes a person who produces or trades spoons.
Loglisci Italian
My grandfather's family name who were from Gravina di Puglia
Loiseau French
Means "The Bird" in French.
Lo Màglio Italian
Literally means "the hammer." However, "the" would normally be represented as "il" in Italian, in this case.
Lombard French, English
French and English cognate of Lombardi.
Lomenzo Italian
From Sicilian "menzo" meaning middle.
Lonardo Italian
Variant of Leonardo, characteristic of central–southern Italy.
Lorain French
Occupational name for a saddler, derived from the Old French word lorain, meaning "a leather strap used on a horse's breastplate".
Lorang French
Surname of uncertain origin. Might be derived from:... [more]
Lord French
Nickname from Old French l'ord "the dirty one".
Lo Re Italian
Palermo,Sicily,Italy
Lorenzi Italian
“Laurel tree” or “decorated with laurel.” The English equivalent is Lawrence.
Lo Ricco Italian
Originally Spanish but of Italian origin for at least 7 generations. My branch of the family are residing in Australia but many remain in Italy and quite a few in the USA
Lorrain French
French and English: variant spelling of Lorraine.
Lorraine French
Indicates origin within Lorraine, in eastern France
Losano Italian
Italian form of Lozano.
Lösch Low German, Upper German
North German metonymic occupational name for a maker of fine leather, from Middle Low German losche ‘fine leather’. South German variant of Lesch (see Loesch).
Losco Italian
Nickname from losco ‘sinister’.
Lotfi Italian
Italian: patronymic or plural form of the personal name Lotto .
Lothringer German
Indicates origin from Lothringen, German form of Lorraine
Lott French
From the Department (Region/State)in France, "Lot" and "Lot-et-Garrone"; also a river in France (Lot). Brought to the British Isles, Holland (Netherlands) and later the United States, Canada and South Africa, by French Huguenots.
Loudermilk German
In German the word “lauter” translates into English as “pure” and the German word “milch” translates into English as “milk”. This surname belonged to those who worked in the dairy industry.
Louise French
From the given name Louise or a variant of Louis.
Louisin French
From the given name Louis.
Lovato Italian
Northern Italian from the Late Latin personal name Lupatus, derivative of Latin lupus "wolf". This is one of several medieval personal names which became popular under the influence of Germanic compound personal names formed with wolf-.
Lovett English, French
From Ango-Norman French "louvet" meaning "young wolf".
Löwenstein German
Habitational name from any of several places called Löwenstein.
Löwenthal German
Habitational name from any of various places called Löwenthal.
Lubahn German
Germanized form of a Slavic or Old Prussian name formed with lub- "love", "dear".
Lubbe German, Slavic, Prussian
Variant of Lubben. Germanized form of a Slavic or Old Prussian name formed with lub- ‘love’, ‘dear’ (see Luba).
Luca Italian
Variant of De Luca.
Lucca Italian
A habitational name from Lucca Sicula in Agrigento province, Sicily, which was called simply Lucca until 1863. It was probably originally named with a Celtic element meaning ‘marshy.’
Lucchese Italian
Ethnic name for someone from Lucca, a city and comune (municipality) in Tuscany, central Italy, derived from an adjectival form of the place name.
Lucchesi Italian
Variant form of Lucchese.
Lucci Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Luccio, a reduced form of a personal name formed with this suffix.
Luchs German
meaning: lynx
Lucía Spanish, Italian
From the feminine personal name Lucia, feminine derivative of Latin lux meaning "light".
Luciano Italian
It is derived from Latin Lucianus, patronymic of Lucius ("Light"). The French form is Lucien.
Lucien French
From the given name Lucien.
Lucio Italian
From the given name Lucio.
Luckhardt German
Metronymic derived from the given name Liutgard.
Ludenberg German
From Latin ludere meaning "to play" and German berg meaning "mountain".
Lüdi German (Swiss)
Probably derived from the given name Ludwig
Ludovico Italian
From the Italian first name Ludovico.
Luigini Italian
Derived from the given name Luigi.
Luker German
Luker see also Lucher or Luchre, meaning money more specifically money obtained by nefarious means.
Lüll German
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names formed with liut- ‘people’ as the first element.
Lupin French
Lupin is a variant on the Latin word "lupus", meaning "wolf". Two important literary characters, Arsène Lupin, the famous French gentleman-burglar, and Professor Remus Lupin, from the world of Harry Potter, have this name... [more]
Lusa Italian
Used by people from Lusa, Italy, a town named after the Roman 'gens lusia'.
Lustig Swedish, German, Jewish, Dutch
From Swedish and German lustig ”humerous, funny, enjoyable” or Middle High German lustig ”merry, carefree”.
Lutter Dutch, English, German
Dutch and English: variant of Luter.... [more]
Lux German, Dutch
Patronymic from a vernacular form of Lucas.
Luxenberg German, Jewish, Luxembourgish, Belgian, French, Walloon
Habitational name from various places named Luxenberg, Luxemberg, Luxenburg, or Luxembourg, including the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.
Lyboult German
Famous Warrior... [more]
Lyday German (Anglicized)
Probably an Americanized form of German Leidig.
Lyé French
A habitational name from places named Lié located in Deux-Sèvres and Vendée.
Lyman English, German (Anglicized), Dutch
English: topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow or a patch of arable land (see Layman). ... [more]
Maag German
Comes from the Middle High German “mage”, meaning “relative” or “kinsman”.
Maatta Italian
1 Southern Italian: from a feminine form of Matto .... [more]
Macario Italian, Spanish
From the given name Macario
Macchia Italian
Topographic name from Italian macchia "thicket", "scrub" (from Latin macula) and Habitational name from any of various places named Macchia, as for example Macchia in Trapani province, Sicily.
Maccini Italian
Patronymic from a diminutive of the given name Maccio.
Mace English, French
English: from a medieval personal name, a survival of Old English Mæssa, which came to be taken as a pet form of Matthew.... [more]
Machia Italian
Variant of Italian Macchia.
Mack Scottish, Irish, German, Dutch, French
Scottish (Berwickshire) and Irish: from the Old Norse personal name Makkr, a form of Magnus (Old Irish Maccus)... [more]
Macon French, German
French: See Maçon. An occupational name for a mason, French maçon. Habitational name from places so called in Saône-et-Loire, Allier, Aube, the Côte d’Or, Gers, and Deux-Sères... [more]
Macorig Italian
An italian surname that in fact comes from slovene minority near Udine, it should be written Macoric'... [more]
Macro Italian
Possibly a variant of Magro.
Maddaloni Italian
It should came from the toponym Maddaloni (Campany, South Italy) which name originates from the Arabic term "magdhal" meaning fortress, stronghold. The last name Maddaloni is typical of the area that includes the provinces of Naples, Caserta and Benevento.
Madonia Italian
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Madonia, or a regional name for someone from Madonie in Sicily.
Madonna Italian
From the person name Madonna, from donna meaning "lady", bestowed in honor of the Virgin Mary.
Maffia Italian
Variant of Mattia.
Maffione Italian
Possibly a derivative of the given name Maffeo. This surname is from the Puglia region of Barletta, southern Italy.
Maffret French
beleived to originated in{ NICE, france} in the late 19th century, emmigration from france to london,{stepney}, where the surname was mistakenly added an extra letter "T" resulting in the surname MAFFRETT
Maggio Italian
From a nickname or personal name from the month of May, maggio, from Latin Maius (mensis), from Maia, a rather obscure goddess of fertility, whose name is derived from the same root as maius "larger" and maiestas "greatness"... [more]
Maggiori Italian
Recorded in many spelling forms including the 'base' form of Maggi, and the diminutives and double diminutives Maggiore, Maggiori, Di Maggio, Maggorini, and many others, this is an Italian surname of Roman (Latin) origins... [more]
Mahler German
Variant of Maler, a German occupational surname meaning "painter", particularly a stained glass painter.... [more]
Maimeri Italian
Surname of italian painter and entrepreneur Giovanni (Gianni) Maimeri.
Main Scottish, English, French, Norman
Various origins explained include:... [more]
Maine French
French topographic name from Old French maine ‘dwelling’, ‘residence’, ‘abode’, or a habitational name from any of numerous places so named.
Maire French (Swiss)
French Swiss surname ... [more]
Maison French
Means "house" in French.
Maisonneuve French
Means "new house" in French.
Maitre French
occupational name for one who was the head of a craft or trade guild, from Old French maistre ‘master’ (Latin magister).
Makovoza Baltic (Latinized, Rare), German (Latinized, Rare), Russian (Rare)
There is no history of the name just a family name I on't know if some people have it as a first name too.
Maldini Italian
Possibly derived from an apheresis of the surname Grimaldi.
Malecuit French
Means "doughy," "soggy," or "undercooked" in French.
Malfait French
Derived from French mal fait, which literally means "poorly done, badly done". In the context of the surname, it refers to the first bearer being "malformed" or "deformed" (as it was in the eyes of people from older times), which means that he either was physically disabled or able-bodied but with a physical trait that deviated from the norm.
Malfitano Italian
Altered form of Amalfitano.
Malfoi French
Variant of Malfoy.
Malfois French
Variant of Malfoy.
Malfoy French
Malfoy is a French name roughly translating to "bad faith"
Malin English, French, Dutch
From the given name Malin (English), and from the given name Madalin composed of the Germanic element madal meaning "council" (French, Dutch).
Malizia Italian
Italian. Literal translation is the english noun: "Malice".... [more]
Mallet Anglo-Norman, Medieval English, French, Catalan
Originated in Norman France and spread to England following the Norman conquest of 1066. The surname comes from the given name Malle, an Old English diminutive of Mary or from the given name Malo, a popular form of the name of Saint Maclovius, a 6th-century Welsh monk who the church of Saint Maclou in Rouen is named for.... [more]
Mallow German
Variant spelling of Malow, a habitational name from Malow in Mecklenburg.
Maloret French
This surname comes from the French and means 'unfortunate' or 'luckless'.
Malpass English, Scottish, French
Habitational name from any of various places named Malpas, because of the difficulty of the terrain, from Old French mal pas "bad passage" (Latin malus passus). It is a common French minor place name, and places in Cheshire, Cornwall, Gwent, and elsewhere in England were given this name by Norman settlers... [more]
Mameli Italian
Possibly from latin surname Mamelius. A famous bearer was Goffredo Mameli, author of the italian national anthem.
Manchin Italian
derived from the surname Mancini
Mancio French
Mancio derives from the surname Venâncio and Amâncio, being an unusual French variation.
Mandato Italian
mandato is the past tense of send in italian-such as "i sent a letter or message"
Mandia Italian
Southern Italian (Campania): unexplained.
Mandrisch Polish, German
Upper Silesia
Manfredo Italian
From the given name Manfredo.
Mangani Italian
Possibly an Italian variant of Mangan.
Manhart German (Modern)
From the Germanic personal name Manhard, composed of the Germanic elements man "man", "human" + hard "hardy", "brave", "strong"... [more]
Maniscalco Italian
It means 'blacksmith' in Italian. The variant Maniscalchi is the plural.
Mannazzu Sardinian (Archaic), Sicilian (Rare, Archaic), Corsican (Modern, Rare), Italian (Rare)
It came from the Ancient Nuraghi people. the Nuraghi people inhabited southern Corsica and northern and central Sardinia.
Mansell Anglo-Norman, French
A status name for a particular type of feudal tenant, Anglo-Norman French mansel, one who occupied a manse (Late Latin mansa ‘dwelling’), a measure of land sufficient to support one family... [more]
Mansueto Italian
From the given name Mansueto
Mantey German, Polish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Manthei in Schwerin province. This name is also established in Poland.
Manuel Spanish, Portuguese, French, German
Derived from the given name Manuel.
Manville French
A locational surname deriving from any of the various places in France called "Manneville or Magneville", named, from the Old Germanic personal name "Manno" or the Old French adjective "magne", great, with the word "ville", meaning a town or settlement.
Manzoni Italian
Of uncertain origin: could be derived from a nickname given to those who raised and took care of bullock, or from the medieval terms manso or mansueto, denoting a gentle person.... [more]
Mar Swiss
The surname Mar has roots from Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, France, Germany, Portugal and Spain. MAR: topographic name for someone living by the sea, from mar ‘sea’ (Latin mare). German: nickname from Middle High German mar(w) ‘tender’, ‘delicate’.
Marano Italian
Habitational name from any of various places named with the Latin personal name Marius and the suffix -anu.
Marant English, French
Probably a variant of Morant.
Marc French
Derived from the French given name Marc.
Marcato Italian, Venetian
From the given name Marchino.
Marceau French
From the given name Marcel.
Marcel French
From the given name Marcel
Marcelin French, Haitian Creole
From the given name Marcelin.
Marcellin French
From the given name Marcellin
Marcellino Italian
From the given name Marcellino
Marcello Italian
From the given name Marcello
Marchant French, English, Spanish
Variant of Marchand, from French marchand meaning "merchant, mercantile". Though it is of French origin, it was transferred into the Spanish-speaking world, especially Chile, by French invasion of the Iberian Peninsula.
Marchi Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Marco.
Marchione Italian
Nickname from marchione ‘marquis’, from medieval Latin marchio, genitive marchionis, from Germanic marka ‘borderland’
Marciano Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Derived from the given name Marciano
Marco Spanish, Italian
From the personal name Marco, from Latin Marcus (see Mark).
Mariano Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From the personal name Mariano
Marigliano Italian
From the town of Marigliano (near naples)
Marinelli Italian
Means “son of Marino”.
Marinetti Italian
Variant of Marino. A famous bearer of this surname is Italian poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti (1876-1944), considered to be the founder of Futurism.
Mark English, German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived on a boundary between two districts, from Middle English merke, Middle High German marc, Middle Dutch marke, merke, all meaning "borderland"... [more]
Markell Dutch, German, Slovene (Anglicized)
Dutch and German: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Markolf, composed of the elements marc, merc ‘boundary’ + wolf ‘wolf’... [more]
Marker German
Status name for someone who lived on an area of land that was marked off from the village land or woodland, Middle High German merkære.
Marois Norman, Picard, French
topographic name from the Old French words "mareis", "maresc", mareis, marois meaning "marsh" ‘marshy ground’.
Marotzke German
Germanized form of Polish Marocki, itself derived from the personal given name Marcin, the Polish form of Martin.