Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Kolb German
Comes from Middle High German Kolbe.
Kolber German
From an agent derived from Middle High German kolbe "club, cudgel" an occupational name for someone who made wooden clubs later for an armorer, or a habitational name for someone from Kolben in Württemberg or Cölbe in Hesse.
Kolden German, Norwegian
From Middle Low German kolt, kolde ‘cold’, a nickname for an unfriendly person; alternatively, it may be a habitational name, a shortened form of Koldenhof ‘cold farm’ in Mecklenburg (standardized form: Kaltenhof, a frequent place name in northern Germany, East Prussia, Bavaria, and Württemberg).Norwegian: habitational name from a farm called Kolden, from Old Norse kollr ‘rounded mountain top’.
Kolesar Czech (Modern, Rare), German (Modern, Rare), German (Austrian, Modern, Rare)
Means either 'wheelwright' or 'coleminer' depending on the region.
Kolkmann German
Kolk is an old German word that means '' man who lives by the river'' and Mann is German for 'man'. The name Kolkmann comes from a man who lived by the North Rhine.
Koll German
From the given name Colo or Koloman. Alternatively derived from Middle Low German kolle "head".
Kollar German
Derived from the kolar "cartwright".
Kölle German
Variant of Koll.
Koller German
The name is derived from the Alemmanic word "Kohler," meaning "charcoal burner," and was most likely originally borne by a practitioner of this occupation.
Kölsch German
From German kölsch, denoting someone from Cologne (Köln in German).
Kömm Upper German
Possible East Franconian dialect variant of Kempf meaning "champion, warrior, fighter".
Konitzer German
A German habitational name for someone who lives in various places called Konitz in places like Thuringia, Pomerania, Moravia, or West Prussia.
Konrad German
From the given name Konrad.
Konzelman German
Orginating from Konrad, which is a variant of Conrad, meaning "brave counsel." The second half of the name indicates one who was a councilman or advisor to someone of importance or power.
Kopf German
Means "head" in German.
Koppen German
Patronymic from a reduced pet form of the personal name Jakob.
Koppen German
Habitational name from any of several places named Koppen.
Korb German
Means "basket" in German, denoting a basket maker or a basket vendor.
Korbeci German, Albanian
German name for Korb "basket" changed over time to Korbeci
Korbel German
Diminutive of Korb "basket".
Korn German
From Middle High German korn "grain", a metonymic occupational name for a factor or dealer in grain or a nickname for a peasant.
Kornfeld German, Jewish
Means "cornfield" in German.
Kosmas German, Greek
From the given name Kosmas.
Kossow German
unknown
Kot Polish, Slovak, Czech, Belarusian, Jewish, German
From a personal name or nickname based on Slavic kot "tom cat".
Koten German
Derived from German Kate / Kote, originally from Middle Low German kote "small house; hut".... [more]
Köth German
From Middle High German, Middle Low German kote ‘cottage’, ‘hovel’, a status name for a day laborer who lived in a cottage and owned no farmland.
Kott German, Polish, Czech
German: variant of Koth or Kotz.... [more]
Kraeft German
Possible variant of Kraft and Kräft
Kräft German, Jewish
Nickname for a strong man, from Old High German kraft, German Kraft ‘strength’, ‘power’.
Krah German
Nickname from Middle High German kra "crow" given to someone who resembles a crow.
Krahe German, Spanish
From the German word Krähe, meaning "crow".... [more]
Krähenbühl German (Swiss)
Combination of German Krähen "crow" and Bühl "hill".
Krahn German
German: nickname for a slim or long-legged person, from Middle Low German krane ‘crane’. Compare Kranich.
Krais German, Brazilian
Brazilian adaptation of the German surname Greis; altered for easier comprehension by the Portuguese-speaking population of Brazil.
Krakau German
Indicates familial origin from Krakau.
Krakauer German
Indicates familial origin from Krakau.
Kranich German
German: nickname for a long-legged or tall and slender person, from Middle High German kranech ‘crane’.
Kratochwil German
German cognate of Kratochvil.
Kratochwill German
Variant spelling of Kratochwil.
Kratt German
German metonymic occupational name for a ''basketmaker'', from Middle High German kratte ''basket''.
Kray German
Variant of Krah nickname for someone who resembled a crow from Middle High German kra "crow".
Krebsbach German
From a place name meaning "crab stream" in German.
Krechter German
Possibly derived from Krämer
Kreger German
Mercenary or warrior for hire.
Kreisel German, Jewish
Jewish family name and originally a nickname for an active or disorganized person, derived from German kreisel meaning "spinning top, top", ultimately from kreis "circle". Alternatively, it could've be used as a nickname for a person with curly hair in the context of "spiral" or "curl".
Kreisler German, Jewish
Derivative of Kreisel with the agent suffix -er.
Kremer German
Variant of Krämer.
Krengel German, Jewish
An occupational name for a pastry chef from Middle High German krengel German kringel "(cake) ring doughnut". As a Jewish name this may also have been adopted as artificial name.
Krepp German
topographic name for someone living in a hollow
Kress German
From Middle High German kresse "gudgeon", hence probably a nickname for someone thought to resemble the fish in some way or an occupational name for a fisherman.
Kress German
From Old High German krassig, gratag "greedy".
Kress German
From a much altered pet form of the personal name Erasmus.
Kretzer German
Occupational name for a basketmaker or a peddler, from an agent derivative of Middle High German kretze 'basket'.
Kreutz German
Topographical name for someone who lived near a cross set up by the roadside, in a marketplace, or as a field or boundary marker, from Middle High German kriuz(e) 'cross'.
Kreutzer German
Variant of Kreutz otherwise it indicated that the bearer of the surname lived in Kreitz near Neuss in Germany
Kreuz German
From German meaning "cross".
Krey German
Nickname from Middle Low German krege "crow".
Krieg German
German word meaning "war"
Krieger German
Noun to kriegen, kämpfen meaning "to fight (with words)". Describes a person who likes to argue. A wrangler, a quarreler, a brawler. Literal translation "warrior", from the German noun krieg "war" and the suffix -er.
Kriegshauser German
Probably a habitational name for someone from an unidentified place called Kriegshaus, literally "war house".
Krier German, Luxembourgish
Occupational name from Middle High German krier "herald".
Kries German
From Middle High German kriese "cherry" hence an occupation for someone who sold soft fruits or a locational surname for some who lived by a cherry tree.
Kritzman German, Jewish
German (Kritzmann): topographic name for someone living near a cross.... [more]
Kroll German, Dutch, Polish
Nickname for someone with curly hair, from Middle High German krol 'curly', Middle Low German krulle 'ringlet', 'curl', Middle Dutch croel, crul (apparently a loanword from German)... [more]
Kronen German
From German Krone 'crown', probably as an ornamental name. Or a nickname for a slender, long-legged individual, from a dialect form of Kranich.
Kronstadt German
Means "crown state" (i.e., capital city) in German
Kroos German
Unknown
Krug German
Means "tavern keeper"
Krumbach German, German (Austrian)
From the name of various places in Austria and Germany, for example the town of Krumbach in the state of Bavaria.
Krumholz Jewish, German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Krumbholz ‘bent timber’, ‘mountain pine’, hence probably a metonymic occupational name for a cartwright or wheelwright. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
Krumm German
From a nickname, which in turn is from the Middle High German word krum, meaning "crooked" or "deformed".
Krumreihn German
Possibly derived from Middle High German krum(b) meaning "crooked" and rein meaning "border of a field, margin", and hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a field with a crooked edge, or perhaps a nickname for a farmer who plowed a crooked furrow... [more]
Krumwiede German
Location-based name for people who lived by a gnarled old willow tree.... [more]
Kuch German
German metonymic occupational name for a pastry cook, from German kuchen ‘cake’, or simply a variant of Koch ‘cook’.
Kuchenmeister German
Occupational name for a master cook (literally "kitchen master"), a court official.
Kucher German
Occupational name for a pastry cook from an agent derivative of Middle High German kuoche "cake pastry".
Kuchler German (Rare)
Often confused with Küchler a name for a cookie baker, Kuchler is a noble name for an old german family. Kuchler is origined in a city named Kuchl at the border of todays german bavaria... [more]
Kues German, Dutch
Habitational name from Cues, now part of Bernkastel-Kues in the Rhineland Palatinate.
Kühl German, Low German
The spelling Kühl results from a folk-etymological association with High German kühl ‘cool’ (Middle High German küel(e), a nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’... [more]
Kuhlman German
Nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm.’
Kuhlmann German
German (also Kühlmann) nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’ (see Kuhl).
Kul German, Dutch
Derived from Old High German kol meaning "coal", perhaps an occupational name for a miner or coal seller.
Kulp German
anglicized version of Kolbe
Külper German
German cognate of Culpeper.
Kummerer Upper German (Germanized, Rare)
Kummerer means ""bringer of sorrow""
Kummerow German
Habitational name from any of various places in Brandenburg and Mecklenburg called Kummerow.
Kunfermann Romansh
Younger form of Gufermann, which was derived from Romansh gufer "rubble, shingle" combined with German Mann "man". This name was given to someone who lived near a place filled with rubble.
Kunis German, Dutch
From a derivative of the personal name Konrad.
Künnen German
Metronymic from the given name Kunigunde.
Künzi German, Swiss, German (Austrian)
From a pet form of the personal name Kuntz.
Künzler German
Nickname for a flatterer, from an agent derivative of Middle High German künzen "to flatter".
Kupfer German, Jewish
German (Küpfer) and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a worker or trader in copper, Middle High German kupfer, German Kupfer ‘copper’... [more]
Kürschner German
Occupational name for a furrier, Middle High German kürsenære, from Middle High German kürsen meaning "fur coat".
Kurth German
From the given name Kurt
Kurtz German
Variant of Kurz.
Kurzberg German, Yiddish, Jewish
From a location name meaning "short mountain" in German, from Middle High German kurz meaning "short" and berg meaning "mountain". As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
Kurzhals German
Short Neck
Kuschmann German, Jewish
Probably derived from a Germanized form of the Ancient Greek given name Kosmas.
Kushman German, Jewish
Variant spelling of Kuschmann.
Küster German
It literally means "sexton".
Kutch German (Anglicized)
Americanized variant of German Kutsch.
Kutsch German
Topographic name of Slavic origin, from Sorbian kut ‘corner’, ‘nook’. Variant of Kutsche, metonymic occupational name for a coachman or coachbuilder, from the Hungarian loanword kocsi (see Kocsis).
Kutschera German
German cognate of Kučera.
Kuttelwascher German
Surname given to those who had the occupation of cleaning tripe. Combines the words kuttel meaning "tripe" and washer meaning "washer". Bearers of the surname typically live in Austria.
Kuttner German
Originally from a nickname for someone wearing monk robes from Middle High German kuttner "robe wearing monk".
Kutz German
From a pet form of the personal name Konrad.
Kutz Italian
Habitational name for someone from Kuhz, near Prenzlau.
Kutzer German
Occupational name for a coachman or coach builder from old high German kutsche from Hungarian kocsi "coach". Variant of Kutscher.
Kutzler German
This is the surname of my great-grandfather, of German ancestry.
Labeau French
Variant of Lebeaux.
Label French
Variant of Labelle.
Laborde French
Occupational or status name for a tenant farmer, from borde "small farm" (from Frankish bord "plank") and the definite article la.
Labossiere French
Norman habitational name from a common village name La Boissière, meaning 'wooded area', from bois 'wood'. possibly a metronymic, from a feminine derivative of Bossier 'cooper', denoting the 'wife of the cooper'.
Labrie French
Topographic name from l’abri meaning "the shelter", or a habitational name from a place named with this word.
LaBrie French
Referred to a person who came from various places named Brie in France, for example Brie-sous-Matha, a commune in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region in southwestern France.
Lacasse French
Means "box maker"
Lackyard French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of French surname, Lacaillade.
Lacombe French
French (western and southwestern): topographic name for someone living in or near a ravine, from la combe ‘the ravine’ (a word of Gaulish origin, related to English Combe).... [more]
Lacour French
topographic or occupational name for someone who lived at or was employed at a manorial court (see also Court).
Ladouceur French
french canadian
Ladstetter German
JEWS AND GREMAM
Laemmle German, Jewish
Variant spelling of Lämmle. A famous bearer was the German-American film producer Carl Laemmle (1867-1939).
Lafayette French
The name of Marquis de Lafayette; a famous French man during the revolutionary war.
Lafitte French
French: topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary mark, Old French fitte (Late Latin fixta petra ‘fixed stone’, from the past participle of figere ‘to fix or fasten’), or habitational name from any of several places in western France named with this word
Lafontaine French
Means" The fountain" in French.
La Forge French
This is my Grandmother's maiden name
Laframboise French, French (Quebec)
Derived from La Framboisière, a commune in the Eure-et-Loir department in northern France.
Lafrenière French
Topographic name derived from French frenière meaning "place of ash trees". It is often Americanised as Freeman.
Lagarde French
Habitational name from Lagarde or La Garde names of several places in various parts of France named in Old French with garde "watch protection" (see Garde).
Lagasse French
French: nickname from Old French agace, agasse ‘magpie’ + the definite article l’.
Laghi Italian
Possibly originated to denote someone from the Italian town of Laghi.
Lagrange French
French: topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, a variant of Grange, with the definite article la.
Laguerre French
Nickname for a belligerent person or a valiant soldier from old French guerre "war" (from Latin werra) with fused article la.
Lahaie French
Locational name for someone who lived near a hedge or large bush, from old French "La" the and "Haie" hedge.
Lahaye French, Walloon
topographic name with the definite article la from Old French haye "hedge" (see Haye ) or a habitational name from La Haye the name of several places in various parts of France and in Belgium (Wallonia) named with this word... [more]
Lahm German, Jewish
From middle-high German lam "slow, lame".
Lahner German, Hungarian
Habitational name for someone from any of various places called Lahn in Hungary and Germany. In southern Germany and Austria, Lahn denotes a place where there had been an avalanche or landslide, from Middle High German laen, lēne meaning "avalanche".
Laico Italian
Means that is not part of the Catholic Church.
Lajoie French
From a nickname for a happy cheerful person from joie "joy" with fused feminine definite article la.
La Liveres French
Means 'the books' in French
Lalonde French
French (Normandy): habitational name from any of various places in Normandy, so named from Old Norse lundr ‘grove’, with the definite article la.
Lamantia Italian
Italian:vail, the last name of a general in Palrmo, Sicily, Italy.
La Marca Italian
Means 'the mark' in Italian.
Lamarche French
French: topographic name or habitational name, a variant of LaMarque.
Lamarr French, English
Variant form of Lamar.
Lamberg German
Derived from any of several places so named in Germany.
Lambers French
Means "illustrious land", variant of Lambert
Lamberto Italian
From the given name Lamberto.
Lambillotte French (Modern)
Currently, a common name in Wallonia, Belgium with some descendants in USA. Believed to be derived from three terms..."lamb" "ill" "otte". The first term has remained unchanged from early Germanic term; the second is latin for "of the" and the third a dimiuative or feminine form suffix... [more]
Lamborghini Italian
Probably from Germanic landa "land" and burg "fortress, castle".
Lämmle German, Jewish
Derived from German lamm meaning "lamb", a nickname for a meek and inoffensive person or a shepherd.
Lamont Scottish (Modern), Northern Irish, French
Scottish and northern Irish: from the medieval personal name Lagman, which is from Old Norse Logmaðr, composed of log, plural of lag ‘law’ (from leggja ‘to lay down’) + maðr, ‘man’ (genitive manns).... [more]
L'amoreaux French
French surname meaning "The Lovers"
Lamoree French
From the nickname "the loved one" derived from the French word amour meaning "love" from (Latin amor).
Lamour French
From Old French l'amour "(the) friendship bond" used as a nickname for a kindly individual. the French word amour "love" (from Latin amor).
Lamoureaux French
Means "the lover" in French. It would be the nickname of an amorous person.
Lampe German
From German meaning "lamp".
Lampert German, English
German & English variant of Lambert.... [more]
Lana Italian, Spanish
Means "wool" in Spanish and Italian.
Lancia Italian
From Latin lancea, meaning "spear", given to those who made, sold or used spears. A famous bearer of this surname is Vincenzo Lancia (1881-1937), who established the Lancia car brand in 1906.
Land English, German
Topographic name from Old English land, Middle High German lant, "land, territory". This had more specialized senses in the Middle Ages, being used to denote the countryside as opposed to a town or an estate.
Lande French, Norwegian, Jewish
French: topographic name for someone living on a heath, lande (from Gaulish landa ‘space’, ‘land’), or a habitational name from any of numerous minor places named La Lande from this word.... [more]
Landis German, German (Swiss)
German and Swiss German nickname for a highwayman or for someone who lays waste to the land, from Middle High German landoese.
Landon French
From the given name Landon the French cognitive of Lando.
Landry French, English
From the Germanic personal name Landric, a compound of land "land" and ric "powerful, ruler".
Lanese Italian
Habitational name from a place called Lana from an adjectival form of the placename.
Lanfranchi Romansh, Italian
Italian variant of Lanfranco.
Langevin French
From French l'Angevin meaning "the Angevin", denoting a person from the French province of Anjou.
Langhans German
German and Dutch: distinguishing nickname for a tall man (see Lang) called Hans.
Langhofer German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Langhof.
Langwiesner German
Derived from location means 'Long field'
Lanier French, English
Occupational name designating one who worked in the wool trade (see Lane 2), derived from Old French lanier (ultimately from laine) meaning "wool", or for a keeper of donkeys, from Old French asnier literally "donkey keeper, donkey driver"... [more]
Lannoy French, Walloon, Flemish
From the various locations in northern France and Belgium called Lannoy. Variant of Delannoy.
Lansdowne French, English
The first marquis lansdowne, land owners for there lords and farmers also know as tenants.
Lansel Romansh
Derived from the given name Angelus.
Lanthier French
From the given name Lantier derived from German elements Land "land" and Hari "army".
Lantz German
Habitational name from places called Lanz or derived from the given name Lanzo.
Lanza Italian, Spanish
From the places named "Lanzada".
Lanzo English (?), German (?)
From the given name Lanzo
Lapetina South American, Italian (?)
Possibly from Italian La Petina, the meaning of which is uncertain.
Lapin French
Means "Rabbit" in French.
Lapo Italian
From the given name Lapo.
Laporte French
Topographic name for someone who lived near the gates of a fortified town (and often was in charge of them; thus in part a metonymic occupational name), from Old French porte "gateway", "entrance" (from Latin porta, "door", "entrance"), with the definite article la... [more]
Lapp German
From Middle High German lap(pe) ‘cloth’, ‘patch’, ‘rag’; a metonymic occupational name for a mender of clothes or shoes, or a nickname for a simple-minded person.... [more]
Larcella Italian
Variation of Lauricella, from a pet form of Laura.
Large French, English
Originally a nickname derived from Middle English and Old French large "generous".
Larivière French (Modern)
From the region of Bourgoigne, in France, meaning 'the river'. The name is likely a topographic reference to the physical location, likely a river in this case.
La Rosa Italian
Derived from Italian rosa meaning "rose", used as a name for someone who lived by a rose bush.
Larose Italian
Topographic name for someone who lived at a place where wild roses grew; or a habitational name from a town house bearing the sign of a rose. It may also have been a nickname for a man with a ‘rosy’ complexion, as well as a nickname of a soldier... [more]
Lars Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare), German
Patronymic from the given name Lars.
Larusso Italian
Derived from the Italian word "Rosso," which comes from the Latin words "Rubius and Rossius," which mean "red." As a surname, larusso was originally a nickname for a person with red hair or a reddish complexion.
Lasagna Italian
From Italian (lasagna) denoting a popular Italian dish made of stacked layers of thin flat pasta alternating with fillings such as ragù and other vegetables, cheese, seasonings and spices.
Lasalle French
1. French: local name or occupational name for someone who lived or worked at a manor house, from Old French sal(e) ‘hall’ (modern French salle; see also Sale), with the definite article la... [more]
Lascelles French
French location name from Lacelle in Orne, northern France and referring to "small rooms or cells inhabited by monks".
Latendresse French
From Letendre, thus meaning "tenderness".
Latina Italian
From a feminine form of Latino.
Latino Italian
From the medieval personal name Latino, originally an ethnic name for someone of Latin as opposed to Germanic, Byzantine or Slavic descent.
Latour French
Either a topographic name for someone who lived near a tower usually a defensive fortification or watchtower from Old French tūr "tower"; or a habitational name from any of various places called Latour or La Tour named with this word.
Lattanzio Italian
My great-great grandmother's name was Patrizia Maria Lattanzio. After she passed and my Great-grandmother sent my grandmother to America, the officials mis-spelled her name on her documents and the last name was shortened to Lattanzi... [more]
Lau German
nickname for a physically strong person from Middle High German louwe lauwe "lion". In some cases the surname may have been a topographic or habitational name referring to a house or inn distinguished by the sign of a lion... [more]