Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Kellen German
From the name of a place in Rhineland, which is derived from Middle Low German kel (a field name denoting swampy land) or from the dialect word kelle meaning "steep path, ravine".
Kellers German
Variant of Keller.
Kellner German, Dutch, Jewish, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, French
German, Dutch and Jewish (Ashkenazic) occupational or status name from the Middle Low German kelner, the Middle High German kelnære, the Middle Dutch kel(le)nare and the German kellner#, all meaning "cellarman"... [more]
Kelm German
Germanized form of Polish Chelm ‘peak’, ‘hill’, a topographic name for someone who lived by a hill with a pointed summit, or habitational name from a city in eastern Poland or any of various other places named with this word.
Kelner German, English, Vilamovian
Means "waiter" in German.
Kelsch German (Anglicized)
Partly Americanized form of German Koelsch.
Kemerer German
From the Old German word "kämmerer," which means "chamberlain." A chamberlain was the person in charge of the noble household; to him would fall the duty of ensuring that the castle and court of the noble ran smoothly.
Kemmer German
Kemmer is a surname. The surname Kemmer is an occupational surname. Further research revealed that the name is derived from the Old German word "kämmerer," which means "chamberlain." A chamberlain was the person in charge of the noble household; to him would fall the duty of ensuring that the castle and court of the noble ran smoothly... [more]
Kemper German, Dutch
German: status name denoting a peasant farmer or serf, an agent noun derivative of Kamp ... [more]
Kempes German, Dutch
German and Dutch variant of Kemp or Kamp. It could also be a habitational name for a person from any of the various places named Kempen on the border between Germany and the Netherlands (for example the town in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, close to the Dutch border), a status name for a peasant farmer or serf, or an occupational name for an official calibrator who marked the correct weight and measures for verification, derived from Middle Low German kempen... [more]
Kepler German
From Middle High German kappe meaning "hooded cloak". This was an occupational name for someone who made these kind of garments. A notable bearer was German astronomer and mathematician Johannes Kepler (1571–1630).
Keppler German
Variant of Kepler.
Kerbel English, German, Russian (Rare)
Means "chervil" in German, a parsley-related herb. The surname probably came into England via Germanic relations between the two languages, hence it being most common in German & English countries.
Kerbow French
Possibly derived from the French word 'corbeau', meaning "raven".
Kercher German
1 Southern German variant of Karcher .... [more]
Kergoat Breton, French
From Breton ker "Village" or "Area" and koad "Woods".
Kern German, Dutch, Jewish
from Middle High German kerne "kernel, seed pip"; Middle Dutch kern(e) keerne; German Kern or Yiddish kern "grain" hence a metonymic occupational name for a farmer or a nickname for a physically small person... [more]
Kerstein German
Derived from -kirsch "cherry" and -stein "stone", variant of Kirstein.
Kesler German, Dutch, Jewish
It is an occupational name that means coppersmith. In alpine countries the name derived from the definition: the one living in the basin of a valley.
Kess German (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Keß.
Kessel German
Occupational name for a maker of cooking vessels from Middle High German kezzel meaning "kettle, cauldron, boiler".
Kesselberg German
Habitational name for someone from any of various places in Rhineland, Bavaria and Baden called Kesselberg.
Kessenich German
Habitational name from Kessenich near Bonn.
Kessler German, Jewish
Denotes a coppersmith or maker of copper cooking vessels, derived from Middle High German kezzel meaning “kettle, cauldron”.
Kestenbaum German, Jewish
from German dialect Kästenbaum (from Latin Castanea) a topographic name for someone living near a horse-chestnut tree... [more]
Keuch German
Variation of Kuch.
Kiebler German
Comes from the Middle High German word "kübel" meaning a "vat," or "barrel." As such it was an occupational name for a cooper, or barrel maker.
Kiel German
German surname of several possible origins and meanings.... [more]
Kienbaum German, Jewish
from Low German kienbaum "Scots pine" originally denoting any species or variety of pine tree. Derived from kien "pine tree" and boum "tree".
Kiener German (Swiss)
Nickname derived from the dialect verb chienen 'to whimper'.
Kiesler German
Topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of gravelly land, derived from Middle High German kisel or Old High German kisil meaning "pebble, gravel".
Kiestler German
Possibly a form of Kistler an occupation name for a joiner or cabinet maker.
Kiff German
Topographic name from a Westphalian dialect Kiff "outhouse, tied cottage, shack".
Kilburg German, Luxembourgish
"Kyll castle," from German burg (castle) near the Kyll river in Germany. Also "wedge mountain" in Swedish: kil (wedge) and berg (mountain).
Kilian German, Dutch, Polish, Czech
from the Irish personal name Cillín (see Killeen).
Kill German (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Perhaps derived from Kilian.
Kill German (Rare)
A habitational name for someone from a place named Kill.
Killian Irish (Anglicized, Modern), German
Meaning "little church". From cill (Irish for "church") and -ín, a Gaelic diminutive.
Kilmester German
Kilmester is attested as a surname near Rostock in the 13th century.
Kimmel German, Jewish
Derived from Middle High German kumin and German kümmel meaning "caraway" (related to Latin cuminum, a word of Oriental origin, like the plant itself), hence a metonymic occupational name for a spicer, literally a supplier of caraway seeds... [more]
Kimmich German
The surname hence a metonymic occupational name for a spicer.
Kind English, German, Jewish, Dutch
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German kint, German Kind ‘child’, hence a nickname for someone with a childish or naive disposition, or an epithet used to distinguish between a father and his son... [more]
Kinderknecht German
Occupational name for a servant in charge of the children at a manor, derived from kinder (plural of kind) meaning "child" and knecht meaning "servant".
Kindermann German, Jewish
occupational name for a schoolteacher literally "children man", from the elements kind "child" and man "man".
Kindleberger German
One who lights bergs
Kinkle German
Derived from the Middle High German word "kunkel," which meant "spindle." It is thus supposed that the first bearers of this surname were spindle makers in occupation.
Kinne German, Dutch
German: From the female given name Kinne, a Silesian diminutive of Kunigunde.... [more]
Kippenberger German, French, Scottish
Mainly means "Shepard".
Kipping German
German: habitational name from a place named with Middle High German kip ‘point’, ‘peak’ or from Kippingen in the Rhineland.
Kipps German
Topographical name for someone living on a hill, from Kippe 'edge', 'brink'.
Kircher German
from Middle High German kirchner "minister, sexton patron" hence an occupational name for a priest or a church assistant.
Kirchhoff German
An old Norse origin surname. Combination of Norse word Kirkr and Hoff means 'garden'.
Kirchmann German
From Middle High German kirihha "church" and man "man" hence an occupational name for someone working in the service of the church or possibly a topographic name for someone living near a church... [more]
Kirchofer German
German topographic name for someone living near a churchyard, or habitational name for the proprietor or tenant of a farm named as "Church Farm", from Middle High German kirche "church" + hof "farmstead", "manor farm".
Kirsch German
Means 'cherry' in German, short form of Kirschstein or other surnames starting with Kirsch.
Kirschbaum German, Jewish
topographic name from kirschbaum "cherry tree" derived from the elements kirsch "cherry" and boum "tree"... [more]
Kirschenbaum German
From German means "cherry tree".
Kirschenmann German
from Middle High German kirsche "cherry" and man "man" an occupational name for a grower or seller of cherries or a topographic name.
Kirschstein German
German surname meaning "cherry stone".
Kirshenbaum German
Means "cherry tree".
Kirstein German
Derivative of the Latin personal name Christianus, also an Americanized spelling of Kirschstein.
Kiser German
Variant of Kaiser.
Kissel German
From a pet form of the Germanic personal name Gisulf.
Kissinger German
HouseofNames.com: The Kissinger surname derives from the Old High German word "kisil," meaning "pebble," or "gravel." The name may have been a topographic name for someone who lived in an area of pebbles or gravel; or it may have evolved from any of several places named with this word.
Kitt English, German
English: From the Middle English personal name Kit, a pet form of Christopher... [more]
Kittell German (Anglicized), English
English: variant of Kettle. ... [more]
Kitz German
Meaning "kid".
Kitzmüller German
Meaning "kid miller".
Klaarwater German
"Clear water."
Klapp German
Nickname for a gossip or a slanderer, derived from Middle High German klapf, klaff meaning "prattle, malicious gossip".
Klarerstein German
German surname meaning "Clear stone".
Klarwasser German
"Clear water."
Klass German
The name is patronymic and it comes from the German first name "Clausen" which is a variant of the name "Nicholas".
Kleber German, English (American)
Derived from German kleben "to bind, to stick", hence an occupational name for someone who applied clay daub or whitewash on buildings.
Kleehammer German
Means "Cloverleaf hammer"
Kleffner German
Topographic name from Middle Low German clef, cleff "cliff", "precipice".
Kleffner German
Nickname for a prattler or gossip, from Middle High German, Middle Low German kleffer(er).
Kleiber German
Derived from an agent Middle High German kleben "to stick or bind" an occupational name for a builder working with clay or in Swabia for someone who applied whitewash. in Bavaria and Austria an occupational name for a shingle maker from Middle High German klieben "to split (wood or stone)".
Kleinfeld German
Means "small field" in German
Kleinknecht German
A combining of the German word klein "small" and knecht "servant", originally an occupational name for a secondary hired hand. A famous historic figure who bore this surname was Jakob Friedrich Kleinknecht (8 April 1722 in Ulm - 11 August 1794 in Ansbach), a German composer of many works of chamber music and symphonies, flutist and Kapellmeister (chapel master).
Kleinman German
Nickname meaning Small Man.
Kleinschmidt German
Occupational surname which means "small smith", that is, a maker of small forged items and metal hand tools.
Kleinstein Romansh
Corruption of Klein's Thöni, itself a calque of Thöni Pitschen.
Kleis Upper German, Romansh
Derived from the given name Kleis, a South German variant of Klaus. The Kleis settled in Romansh-speaking areas after the Napoleonic Wars.
Kliebert German
Occupational name for a woodsman or woodworker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German klieben meaning "to cleave or split".
Kliewer German, German (West Prussian), Mennonite
Germanized form of Dutch Kluiver, an occupational name for a court official, originally a hangman or torturer.
Klingbeil German
From Middle High German klingen "to ring or sound" and bīl "axe", literally "sound the axe", an occupational nickname for a journeyman, carpenter, shipwright (or any occupation involving the use of an axe)... [more]
Klingemann German
Occupational surname for a knife maker, literally meaning "knife maker, weapons smith". It is derived from German klinge meaning "blade".
Klinger German
Klinger is a German surname meaning ravine or gorge in Old German. The English variant of Klinger is Clinger.
Klingler German
Occupational name for a bladesmith.
Klomp German, Dutch
from Middle Dutch and Low German klomp "lump block compact heap ball" used as a nickname for someone with a squat physique or a clumsy or uncouth manner . Dutch metonymic occupational name for a clog maker from Middle Dutch clompe "clog wooden shoe".
Klopfenstein German
It means striking stones
Klopp German, Dutch
Habitational name from a place called Kloppe.
Klose German, Silesian
From a Silesian short form of the given name Nikolaus. A notable bearer is the German former soccer player Miroslav Klose (1978-).
Klostermann German
Combination of "kloster" meaning "monastery," and common German suffix Mann.
Kluge German
Variant of Klug
Klumpp German
Variant of Klump.
Klutz German
The ancient and distinguished German surname Klutz is derived from the old Germanic term "Klotz," meaning "awkward, clumsy." The name was most likely initially bestowed as a nickname, either on someone who was clumsy or in an ironic way on someone who was exceptionally graceful.
Kluver German
From the word kluven meaning "split wooden block". It used to refer to bailiffs.
Knab German
Variant of Knabe.
Knabe German
German status name for a young man or a page, from Middle High German knabe (English knave). In aristocratic circles this term denoted a page or squire (a youth destined to become a knight), while among artisans it referred to a journeyman’s assistant or (as a short form of Lehrknabe) ‘apprentice’... [more]
Knape German
Variant of Knapp.
Knapke German
A relative of mine has said this surname means “over the hill” and that it is of German origin.... [more]
Knapp German
Occupational name from the German word Knapp or Knappe, a variant of Knabe "young unmarried man". In the 15th century this spelling acquired the separate, specialized meanings "servant", "apprentice", or "miner"... [more]
Knappe German
German variant of Knapp.
Knaus German
Comes from Middle High German knuz ‘proud’, ‘arrogant’, ‘daring’, hence a nickname for a haughty person. In Württemberg knaus (and in Switzerland knus) also meant ‘gnarl’, hence a nickname for a short, fat, gnarled person; topographic name for someone living on a hillock, from knaus ‘hillock’ in the Swabian and Alemannic dialects of German
Knauss German
A variant of Knaus.
Knecht German, German (Swiss), Dutch
From the occupation of a servant and a journeyman from Middle High German kneht Middle Low German and Middle Dutch knecht "knight's assistant" also "lad, servant"... [more]
Knick German
German: from Knick “hedge”, “boundary”, hence a topographic name for someone living near a hedge or hedged enclosure or a metonymic occupational name for someone who lays hedges. Hedging is a characteristic feature of the pastureland of Holstein, Mecklenburg, Westphalia, and Lower Saxony.
Knie Swiss
A famous bearer is the Knie family, a Swiss circus dynasty that founded it in 1803. Today the circus is an enterprise with about 200 employees, operated by Frédy and Franco Knie and it is famous worldwide.
Knobel German, German (Swiss), Yiddish
Derived from the Middle High German knübel probably a nickname for a fat person or in the sense "ankle". However the term also denotes a rounded elevation and may therefore also be a topographic name for someone who lived by a knoll... [more]
Knodel German
dweller near a hilltop; descendant of Knut (hill, or white-haired); a lumpish, thickset person.
Knoedler German
Occupational name, probably for someone who made dumplings, from an agent derivative of Middle High German knödel.
Knoll English, German, Jewish
English and German topographic name for someone living near a hilltop or mountain peak, from Middle English knolle ‘hilltop’, ‘hillock’ (Old English cnoll), Middle High German knol ‘peak’... [more]
Knopfler English, German
Derived from Knopf (German for "button"), this surname was originally given to button makers or button sellers. A famous bearer of this surname is English musician Mark Knopfler (1949-).
Knorr German
From a nickname for a gnarly person, derived from Middle High/Low German knorre "knot, protruberance".
Knuth German
From the given name Knut.
Knutz German
Variant of Kuntz
Koboldt German (Rare)
Derived from German Kobold (Middle High German kobolt) "kobold; hobgoblin; puck; imp".
Kochendorfer German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Kochendorf, in Württemberg, Schleswig-Holstein, and Bohemia.
Köcher German
It literally means "quiver".
Koehl German
Variant of Köhl
Koehnline German
Anglicized form of the German name Köhnlein used by people who moved to the US from Germany during the 19th Century.
Koell Upper German (Rare)
(Koell) named used when came1880s to 1905 in America changed to( Kohl)... [more]
Koelsch German
German from the adjective kölsch, denoting someone from Cologne (German Köln).
Koelzer German
From a noun derived from kolzen "ankle boots" (from Latin calceus "half-boot walking shoe") hence an occupational name for a boot maker or a cobbler. Or a habitational name for someone from Kölzen near Merseburg.
Koerner German
Koerner is an occupational name for a grain merchant or possibly an administrator of a granary. ... [more]
Koeth German
Variant of Köth
Koger German
South German: occupational name for a knacker, from an agent derivative of koge ‘carrion’.
Kohlhaas German
Apparently a nickname from Middle Low German kōlhase, literally "cabbage rabbit".
Kohlman German
This surname comes from the Middle High German word kol which translates into English as coal. However, German Kohl, kol or Kohle also translate into English as cabbage. Middle High German man and German Mann translate into English as man... [more]
Köhn German
From the given name Köhn.
Köhnlein German
From the personal name Köhn + the diminutive suffix -lein
Kohr German
1. occupational name for a guard or watchman on a tower, Middle Low German kure.... [more]
Kolb German
Comes from Middle High German Kolbe.
Kolber German
From an agent derived from Middle High German kolbe "club, cudgel" an occupational name for someone who made wooden clubs later for an armorer, or a habitational name for someone from Kolben in Württemberg or Cölbe in Hesse.
Kolden German, Norwegian
From Middle Low German kolt, kolde ‘cold’, a nickname for an unfriendly person; alternatively, it may be a habitational name, a shortened form of Koldenhof ‘cold farm’ in Mecklenburg (standardized form: Kaltenhof, a frequent place name in northern Germany, East Prussia, Bavaria, and Württemberg).Norwegian: habitational name from a farm called Kolden, from Old Norse kollr ‘rounded mountain top’.
Kolesar Czech (Modern, Rare), German (Modern, Rare), German (Austrian, Modern, Rare)
Means either 'wheelwright' or 'coleminer' depending on the region.
Kolkmann German
Kolk is an old German word that means '' man who lives by the river'' and Mann is German for 'man'. The name Kolkmann comes from a man who lived by the North Rhine.
Koll German
From the given name Colo or Koloman. Alternatively derived from Middle Low German kolle "head".
Kollar German
Derived from the kolar "cartwright".
Kölle German
Variant of Koll.
Koller German
The name is derived from the Alemmanic word "Kohler," meaning "charcoal burner," and was most likely originally borne by a practitioner of this occupation.
Köln German
German form of Cologne.
Kölsch German
From German kölsch, denoting someone from Cologne (Köln in German).
Kömm Upper German
Possible East Franconian dialect variant of Kempf meaning "champion, warrior, fighter".
Konitzer German
A German habitational name for someone who lives in various places called Konitz in places like Thuringia, Pomerania, Moravia, or West Prussia.
Konrad German
From the given name Konrad.
Könz Romansh
Variant of Chönz.
Konzelman German
Orginating from Konrad, which is a variant of Conrad, meaning "brave counsel." The second half of the name indicates one who was a councilman or advisor to someone of importance or power.
Kopf German
Means "head" in German.
Koppen German
Patronymic from a reduced pet form of the personal name Jakob.
Koppen German
Habitational name from any of several places named Koppen.
Korb German
Means "basket" in German, denoting a basket maker or a basket vendor.
Korbeci German, Albanian
German name for Korb "basket" changed over time to Korbeci
Korbel German
Diminutive of Korb "basket".
Korn German
From Middle High German korn "grain", a metonymic occupational name for a factor or dealer in grain or a nickname for a peasant.
Kornfeld German, Jewish
Means "cornfield" in German.
Kosmas German, Greek
From the given name Kosmas.
Kossow German
unknown
Kot Polish, Slovak, Czech, Belarusian, Jewish, German
From a personal name or nickname based on Slavic kot "tom cat".
Koten German
Derived from German Kate / Kote, originally from Middle Low German kote "small house; hut".... [more]
Köth German
From Middle High German, Middle Low German kote ‘cottage’, ‘hovel’, a status name for a day laborer who lived in a cottage and owned no farmland.
Kott German, Polish, Czech
German: variant of Köth or Kotz.... [more]
Kraeft German
Possible variant of Kraft and Kräft
Kräft German, Jewish
Nickname for a strong man, from Old High German kraft, German Kraft ‘strength’, ‘power’.
Krah German
Nickname from Middle High German kra "crow" given to someone who resembles a crow.
Krahe German, Spanish
From the German word Krähe, meaning "crow".... [more]
Krähenbühl German (Swiss)
Combination of German Krähen "crow" and Bühl "hill".
Krahn German
German: nickname for a slim or long-legged person, from Middle Low German krane ‘crane’. Compare Kranich.
Krais German, Brazilian
Brazilian adaptation of the German surname Greis; altered for easier comprehension by the Portuguese-speaking population of Brazil.
Krakau German
Indicates familial origin from Krakau.
Krakauer German
Indicates familial origin from Krakau.
Kranich German
German: nickname for a long-legged or tall and slender person, from Middle High German kranech ‘crane’.
Kratochwil German
German cognate of Kratochvil.
Kratochwill German
Variant spelling of Kratochwil.
Kratt German
German metonymic occupational name for a ''basketmaker'', from Middle High German kratte ''basket''.
Kraut German
metonymic occupational name for a market gardener or a herbalist from Middle High German krūt "herb plant; cabbage".
Kray German
Variant of Krah nickname for someone who resembled a crow from Middle High German kra "crow".
Krebsbach German
From a place name meaning "crab stream" in German.
Krechter German
Possibly derived from Krämer
Kreger German
Mercenary or warrior for hire.
Kreh German
Meaning: Crow. A variant of Krah and Kray
Kreisel German, Jewish
Jewish family name and originally a nickname for an active or disorganized person, derived from German kreisel meaning "spinning top, top", ultimately from kreis "circle". Alternatively, it could've be used as a nickname for a person with curly hair in the context of "spiral" or "curl".
Kreisler German, Jewish
Derivative of Kreisel with the agent suffix -er.
Kremer German
Variant of Krämer.
Krengel German, Jewish
An occupational name for a pastry chef from Middle High German krengel German kringel "(cake) ring doughnut". As a Jewish name this may also have been adopted as artificial name.
Krepp German
topographic name for someone living in a hollow
Kress German
From Middle High German kresse "gudgeon", hence probably a nickname for someone thought to resemble the fish in some way or an occupational name for a fisherman.
Kress German
From Old High German krassig, gratag "greedy".
Kress German
From a much altered pet form of the personal name Erasmus.
Kretzer German
Occupational name for a basketmaker or a peddler, from an agent derivative of Middle High German kretze 'basket'.
Kreutz German
Topographical name for someone who lived near a cross set up by the roadside, in a marketplace, or as a field or boundary marker, from Middle High German kriuz(e) 'cross'.
Kreutzer German
Variant of Kreutz otherwise it indicated that the bearer of the surname lived in Kreitz near Neuss in Germany
Kreuz German
From German meaning "cross".
Krey German
Nickname from Middle Low German krege "crow".
Krieg German
German word meaning "war"
Krieger German
Noun to kriegen, kämpfen meaning "to fight (with words)". Describes a person who likes to argue. A wrangler, a quarreler, a brawler. Literal translation "warrior", from the German noun krieg "war" and the suffix -er.
Kriegshauser German
Probably a habitational name for someone from an unidentified place called Kriegshaus, literally "war house".
Krier German, Luxembourgish
Occupational name from Middle High German krier "herald".
Kries German
From Middle High German kriese "cherry" hence an occupation for someone who sold soft fruits or a locational surname for some who lived by a cherry tree.
Kritzman German, Jewish
German (Kritzmann): topographic name for someone living near a cross.... [more]
Kroll German, Dutch, Polish
Nickname for someone with curly hair, from Middle High German krol 'curly', Middle Low German krulle 'ringlet', 'curl', Middle Dutch croel, crul (apparently a loanword from German)... [more]
Kronberg German, Swedish
German habitational name from any of the places called Kronberg near Frankfurt in Hesse and in Bavaria from the elements krone "crown" and berg "mountain, hill". Swedish ornamental name from kron "crown" and berg "mountain hill".
Kronen German
From German Krone 'crown', probably as an ornamental name. Or a nickname for a slender, long-legged individual, from a dialect form of Kranich.
Kronenberg German, German (Swiss)
Habitational name from a place called Kronenberg (there is one near Wuppertal) or possibly from any of the places called Kronberg (see Kronberg ) from German Krone "crown" and German Berg "mountain, hill".
Kronstadt German
Means "crown state" (i.e., capital city) in German
Kroos German
Unknown
Krug German
Means "tavern keeper"
Krumbach German, German (Austrian)
From the name of various places in Austria and Germany, for example the town of Krumbach in the state of Bavaria.
Krumholz Jewish, German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Krumbholz ‘bent timber’, ‘mountain pine’, hence probably a metonymic occupational name for a cartwright or wheelwright. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
Krumm German
From a nickname, which in turn is from the Middle High German word krum, meaning "crooked" or "deformed".
Krumreihn German
Possibly derived from Middle High German krum(b) meaning "crooked" and rein meaning "border of a field, margin", and hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a field with a crooked edge, or perhaps a nickname for a farmer who plowed a crooked furrow... [more]
Krumwiede German
Location-based name for people who lived by a gnarled old willow tree.... [more]