Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Metrejon Louisiana Creole (?), French (?)
Maiden surname of Constance Leto (nee Metrejon). She was born in Louisiana and has Cajun(French) ancestry. The Metrejon line is traced back to Joseph Marie Maitrejean, who was born c. 1778, in Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, an island off the coast of Brittany.
Mette German, Dutch
From a pet form of the female personal name Mechthild.
Metz German
From a short form of the female personal name Mechthild.
Miano Italian
Habitational name from Miano in Naples, Parma, and Teramo; Miane in Treviso; or Mian in Belluno.
Micale Italian
Popular in Italy.
Micelli Italian
Beacon, torch, light
Michaël Dutch, French
From the given name Michaël.
Michelet French (Latinized, Rare)
Its name comes from the name Michael, the angel.
Michels German, Dutch
Patronymic from the personal name Michel (see Michael). ... [more]
Michelson French
This surname means son of Michelle.
Mick German, Dutch, Irish
Short form of the given name Mikolaj or an occupational name from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch micke "(wheat or rye) bread"... [more]
Mickley French
It originated when an immigrant family named Michelet came to New York from Northern France. Because they had a foreign surname, they made up the names Mickley and Michelin. The originator was Jean Jacques Michelet (John Jacob Mickley), a private in the Revolutionary War... [more]
Micucci Italian
Italian: patronymic or plural form of a pet form of the personal name Mico, a short form of Michele.
Middendorf German
"middle of the village"
Miele Italian
It means "honey" in Italian.
Mieles Italian, Spanish, French
Meaning "honey".
Mielke Dutch, German
The name is derived from the personal name Miel, a diminutive of the name Aemilius, and means "son of Miel."
Mignano Italian
Possibly taken from the Mignano Monte Lungo commune in the Province of Caserta in the Italian region Campania.
Mignogna Italian
In part a Southern Italian a habitational name from Mignogna, a minor place in Foggia province.
Milan Italian, French
Habitational name from the Italian city of Milan (see Milano).
Milanese Italian
One who came from Milan.
Milesi Italian
Marco Milesi is an Italian racing cyclist.... [more]
Mimieux French
Unknown.
Minden German, English
Habitational name from any of various places so named, for example in Westphalia (German) or Shropshire (English).
Minella Italian
Southern Italian, from a pet form of the female personal name Mina, a short form of Guglielmina, Giacomina, etc.
Minelli Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Minello, a pet form of the personal name Mino, which is a short form of a personal name formed with the hypocoristic suffix -mino, such as Adimino, Giacomino, Guglielmino, etc.
Minervini Italian
Either a variant of or son of Minervino.
Minervino Italian
a habitational name from either of two places, Minervino di Lecce or Minervino Murge, in the provinces of Lecce and Bari, which take their names from ancient temples dedicated to the Roman goddess Minerva.
Minion French
French form of Miner, an occupational name for a someone working in a mine.
Minor English, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
Miola Italian
italian
Mirabella Italian, Sicilian
Italian (Campania and Sicily): habitational name from Mirabella Eclano in Avellino or Mirabella Imbaccari in Catania, or from various places with the name Mirabello, all named from medieval Latin mira, "viewpoint", and bella, "beautiful"... [more]
Miraglia Italian
From the Old Sicilian military title miraglia di mari meaning "admiral".
Miramon French
MIRAMON is a French name with Spanish origins. ... [more]
Miramond Medieval Occitan, Occitan, French
From Old Occitan mirar "look" and mond "world".
Mishler German
Americanized spelling of Swiss German Mischler .
Mittel German
Literally "middle", probably a topographic name from a farm occupying a middle position in a settlement. Compare Mitter.
Mittelmann German
From a byname from Middle High German mittelman "mediator, arbitrator".
Mitter German
Topographic name for someone who lived on or owned a property that was in the middle between two or more others, especially if the others were both held by men with the same personal name (for example, Mitter Hans), from the strong form of Middle High German mitte "mid, middle".
Möbius German
Patronymic surname derived from the given name Bartholomäus, the German form of Bartholomew.
Möbus German
Variant of Möbius.
Modaffari Italian
Nickname from Arabic muzaffar "victorious".
Modena Italian, Judeo-Italian
Italian and Jewish (from Italy) habitational name from the city of Modena in Emilia-Romagna.
Modigliani Italian
Used by Sepharditic Jews, this surname comes from the Italian town of Modigliana, in Romagna. Famous bearers of this surname include painter Amedeo Modigliani (1884–1920) and Nobel Prize in Economics recipient Franco Modigliani (1918–2003).
Mogasen German
meaning unknown
Mohler German, English
The Mohler surname is derived from the Low German word möhl which means mill. Thus the name originally denoted someone who live or worked near a mill. Variant of Müller.
Mohr German
From a short form of an old personal name, Morhart (see Morath).
Mohrbacher German
Likely arose as a name for those living near Morbach, Germany
Mohrenschildt German
From the surname Mohren and scilt "shield"
Moïse French
From the given name Moïse.
Molinaro Italian
Occupational name for a miller, derived from Italian mulino meaning "mill".
Molinarolo Italian
Probably from a person's occupation, with molino/mulino meaning "mill" in Italian. The second part may come from rullo, meaning "a roller" or "I roll."
Molyneux French
Possibly a habitational name from Moulineux, meaning "mill of the waters", or derives from the Old French name De Molines or De Moulins, meaning "mill". The surname has been linked to a large French family that settled in Lancashire from France.
Monaco Italian
Nickname for someone of monkish habits or appearance, or an occupational name for a servant employed at a monastery, from Italian monaco "monk" (from Greek monachos "monk", "solitary").
Moneta Italian
Possibly originating from a nickname given to those who lived near a temple dedicated to Juno Moneta. A famous bearer of this surname is Nobel Prize for Peace recipient Ernesto Teodoro Moneta (1833–1918).
Monique French
A notable bearer is Kylie Monique, a singer.
Monnier French
It means Miller, someone operating a mill; from "meunier" or "mounier" in Old French.
Montag German
It means Monday in German.
Montagnet French, Basque
Meaning "mountains," this name is commonly found in the Basque Pyrenees.
Montalbano Italian
Habitational name from Montalbano di Elicona in northeastern Sicily (earlier simply Montalbano), Montalbano Jonico (Matera province), or the district of Montalbano in Fasano, Brindisi.
Montale Italian
From Latin mons ("mountain"), this surname was originally given as a nickname to people who lived on hills and mountains. A famous bearer of this surname is Italian poet and writer Eugenio Montale (1896-1981), winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1975.
Montaperto Italian
My father tells me this name means "open mountain." It seems to have come from a small area around Agrigento in Sicily, Italy.
Monteblanco French, Spanish
Originally from France "Mont Blanc" but translated when arrived in Spain.
Montefiore Italian, Jewish
Derived from Montefiore, which is the name of several places in Italy. For example, there is Castle Montefiore in the town of Recanati (province of Macerata), the municipality of Montefiore Conca (province of Rimini) and the municipality of Montefiore dell'Aso (province of Ascoli Piceno)... [more]
Montesano Italian
From Italian monte meaning "mountain" and sano meaning "healthy".
Montesquieu French
From French montagne, meaning "mountain" and possibly also from queue, meaning "line". Charles Montesquieu was a 17th-century French aristocrat, philosopher and politician.
Monteverde Italian
Habitational name from any of various places called Monteverde, for example in Avellino province, from monte meaning "mountain" + verde meaning "green".
Monteverdi Italian
Derived from Italian monte meaning "mountain" and verdi meaning "green"; literally means "green mountain".
Montisci Italian
Originated in Sardinia, Italy in the 17th century given to fishermen
Montiverdi Italian
Green Mountain
Montville French
"Mountain town".
Monty French, English
Topographic name for a mountain dweller, from Old French mont 'mountain' (Latin mons, montis).
Monvoisin French
Married surname of a infamous 17th century fortune teller and poisoner, Catherine Monvoisin nee Deshayes, known as La Voisin. Executed for witchcraft in 1680 in the affair of the poisons. Her clients included the elite of Paris including a mistress of Louis XIV.
Monzo Italian
Possibly a variant of Monsu, which may be an occupational name for a cook, Calabrian munsu, or a nickname or title from Milanese monsu ‘sir’, ‘lord’, ‘gentleman’.
Mook German
This surname means 'flying insect' from a German word that is mauke. (I think it is mauke, I am SO not sure.)
Moralee English, French
First found in Norfolk where they were seated from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings.
Morant English, French
From the Old French personal name Morant, perhaps from a nickname meaning "steadfast", or alternatively of Germanic origin and meaning literally "courage-raven". A known bearer was the British-born Australian soldier and poet Breaker Morant, original name Edwin Henry Murrant (?1864-1902).
Moreschi Italian
Nickname for a dark-skinned person, derived from the Medieval Latin word moro, actually from the Latin Maurus, meaning, "dark-skinned".
Moretz German, Dutch
Variant spelling of Moritz.
Mori Slovene, Italian
Variant of Moro.
Morreale Italian
Habitational name from the town of Monreale in Sicily, derived from Italian monte regale meaning "royal mountain".
Morticelli Italian
Means "died small" in Italian.
Mosbrucker German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a bridge over a swamp, from Middle High German mos meaning "bog", "swamp" + brucke meaning "bridge".
Moscatelli Italian
The name Moscatelli has its origins in a type of grape called Moscatel. This grape has its origin in ancient Egypt or Greece, but it was in Italy that it became famous. Here the farmers that planted the grape became known as the Moscatelli.
Moscati Italian
Possibly a variant of Moscato.
Moscato Italian
Variant of the personal name Muscato, also Americanized spelling of Greek Moskatos, a metonymic occupational name for a grower of muscat grapes.
Mosele Italian, German (Austrian)
This surname is to be found in north-eastern Italy, more specifically in the Vicenza and Verona provinces. Families with this name are certain to be originally from the mountain town of Asiago, situated on a plateau north of Vicenza and now a well-known skiing resort... [more]
Most German
Metonymic occupational name for a producer or seller of must, i.e. unfermented grape juice, from Middle High German most, ultimately derived from Latin mustum vinum meaning "young (i.e. fresh) wine"... [more]
Motel French
Topographic name from a derivative of Old French motte ‘fortified stronghold’.
Motz German
Meaning "dirty" or "grubby".
Mozart German
The surname was first recorded in the 14th century as Mozahrt, and later as Motzhardt in Germany. It is a compound word, the first part of which is Middle High German mos, also spelt mosz, and meaning “bog, marsh” in southern dialects (compare modern German Moos)... [more]
Mucciarone Italian
From an augmentative form of the dimunitive suffix -muccio short form of pet names ending in -muccio such as Anselmuccio or Giacomuccio.
Muccio Italian
Short form of pet names ending in -muccio such as Anselmuccio or Giacomuccio.
Mühlfeld German
Variant form of Muhlfeld.
Mullinix French
A locational name "of de Moloneaux" probably from the noble family who trace their descent from William the Conqueror, from Molineaux-sur-Seine, near Rouen. The name came to England during the wake of the Norman Conquest... [more]
Munch Danish, French, Norwegian (Rare)
Either a variant of Münch or Munk, both meaning "monk". A notable bearer was Norwegian painter Edvard Munch (1863-1944), whose best known work is 'The Scream'.
Müsch German
Either a habitational name from a place named Müsch in Germany, or a topographic name meaning "bog", perhaps given to someone living near a bog.
Musch Dutch, German
From a nickname meaning "house sparrow".
Muskow French (Archaic)
French Variant of Moscow.
Musso Italian
Nickname for someone with some peculiarity of the mouth.
Mustafi Albanian, German (Rare)
Means "the chosen one"
Mutter German
(also Mütter): occupational name for an official employed to measure grain, from Middle High German mutte, mütte 'bushel', 'grain measure' (Latin modius) + the agent suffix -er.
Muzio Italian (Rare)
Northern Italian from a medieval personal name derived from the Latin personal name Mucius or Mutius.
Nabrotzky German
Supposedly means "lived near water". Originated from Prussia.
Nachtigall German, Jewish
Nickname from Middle High German nachtegal "nightingale" from Old High German galan "to sing". Cognate to Nightingale.
Nachtrieb German
It possibly comes from the German name of a nachtrab, which is a "night bird like the owl". Another possible meaning is "night tribe".
Nadeau French
Variant of Nadal, which can be a name or the meaning "Christmas".... [more]
Nadel German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a maker of needles, or in some cases for a tailor, from Middle High German nadel(e), German Nadel "needle".
Naegele German
Variant of Nagel.
Nagelschmidt German
Means "nail smith" in German
Nagler German
Form Middle High German nagel "nail".
Nantz German
From a pet form of a Germanic compound name formed with Nant- (for example, Nantwig, Nantger); its meaning is reflected in Middle High German nenden 'to dare'.
Napello Italian
a nickname taken from the plantname Aconitum napellus, possibly for someone with a 'venerous' character (because the plant is venerous)
Napolitano Italian
Originally indicated a person from Napoli (Naples) in Italy.
Narciso Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From the given name Narciso.
Narcisse French
From the given name Narcisse.
Narr German
Nickname for a foolish or silly person, from Middle High German narr ‘fool’, ‘jester’.
Nasers German
Habitational, derived from any of several places called Nesse in Oldenburg and Friesland.
Nasser German
Someone from any of the places called Nassen, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Hesse, and Bavaria.
Nast German
Topographic name for someone who lived in a thickly wooded area, or a metonymic occupational name for a woodcutter, from Middle High German nast meaning "branch", a regional variant of ast, resulting from the misdivision of forms such as ein ast meaning "a branch".
Natalino Italian
From the given name Natalino.
Natti Italian
from the Latin name Nattius
Nau German
A variant of Neu; meaning "ship" or "boat."
Nault French
From a short form of various medieval personal names derived from Germanic personal names formed with wald 'rule' as the final element, in particular Arnold.
Navarre French
The name means "By the sea". Originally a country of its own, located between Spain and France, Navarre became a part of France in 1284 when the Queen of Navarre married King Philip IV of France. After much war, becoming independent once again, and falling into Spanish rule, the Kingdom of Navarre is now split between Spain and France.
Nazaire French
From the given name Nazaire.
Neeson Irish, Dutch, German
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Naois ‘son of Naois’, usually Anglicized as Mcneese. Can also be an altered form of Dutch or German Niesen... [more]
Neff German, German (Swiss)
From Middle High German neve 'nephew', hence probably a distinguishing name for a close relation or familiar of a prominent personage.
Negley German (Swiss)
Altered spelling of Swiss German Nägele, Naegeli, or Nägeli, variants of Nagel.
Negro Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Jewish
Nickname or ethnic name from negro "black" (Latin niger), denoting someone with dark hair or a dark complexion.
Negro Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Jewish
From a medieval continuation of the Latin personal name Niger.
Negro Italian, Spanish, Galician, Portuguese, Jewish
Nickname or ethnic name from negro "black" (continuation of Latin niger), denoting someone with dark hair, dark eyes, a dark complexion, someone who wore dark clothes, someone who worked a job in the night, or was otherwise associated with the night.
Negron Spanish, Italian
This surname is a most likely variant of the word and name Negro.
Neher German
An occupational name for a tailor from a deritive of Middle Low German, 'nehen' which means 'to sew' or 'to embroider'
Nein German
Unexplained. Perhaps from a short form of a Germanic personal name formed with an element cognate with Old High German niuwi meaning "new".
Neinstein German, Jewish
Means “nine stones” in German
Nenninger German
Habitational name for someone from Nenningen in Württemberg.
Nerio Italian
From the given name Nerio.
Nerz German
From the German word Nerz meaning "Mink".
Nestle German
Variant of Nestler.
Nestler German
Derived from the middle high German word nesteler meaning "maker of string or thread".
Nettesheim German
"nice home"
Nettuno Italian
From the given name Nettuno.
Neu German (Modern)
The name Neu is a common German last name.
Neuber German
Contracted form of Neubauer.
Neuberger German
German surname meaning 'new mountaineer'
Neubert German
German (mainly Saxony): reduced form of Neubauer with excrescent -t. Compare Neuber .
Neuburg German
From the name of various places in Germany and Austria.
Neuenfeldt German
Habitational name for someone from places so named in Brandenburg and Pomerania, or from places in Lower Saxony or Westphalia called Neuenfelde.
Neuer German
Inflicted form of Neu meaning "new man" see Neumann
Neufeld German, English
Neufeld is a surname of German origin, meaning "new field". It is not seldom in Germany and it is common among German speaking Mennonites from Russia.
Neuger German, French (?)
Was popularized by the German community. Famous bearers include investors Win Neuger and Dan Neuger, author Christie Cozad Neuger.
Neuhaus German, Jewish
Topographical name for someone who lived in a new house, Middle High German niuwe hus, modern German neu Haus, or a habitational name for someone from any of several places named Neuhaus ('new house') in various parts of Germany and Austria, also in Bohemia.
Neuhauser German, German (Austrian)
Means "new house" in German.
Neujahr German
nickname for someone who owed feudal dues at the New Year, or sometimes a name given to someone born on that day
Neumeyer German
German: distinguishing name for a newly appointed steward or tenant farmer, or one who was a newcomer to an area, from Middle High German niuwe ‘new’ + meier ‘steward’, ‘tenant farmer’ ( see Meyer 1)... [more]
Neuser German (Rare)
Person who had ancestors that lived in Germany near Dusseldorf in the town called Neuss.
Neustädter German
Habitational name for someone from any of many places in Germany and Austria called Neustadt.
Neuwirth German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a new innkeeper, from Middle High German niuwe ‘new’ + wirt and German neu + Wirt ‘master of a house’, ‘innkeeper’.
Nevel German
1 German: variant of Nebel .... [more]
Ney German, English
A dialectal form of the common German word neu "new".... [more]
Nibbe German
Nickname meaning ‘beak’, or from a short form of a Germanic personal name Nippo, composed of Old High German nit ‘hostility’, ‘eagerness’ + boto ‘messenger’.
Nicasio Italian, Spanish
From the given name Nicasio.
Nice French
From Nice, in France.
Nichter German, Yiddish
Possibly means "negator, negate" from Middle High German nicht meaning "not", or "sober", from Middle High German nüchter. Perhaps it originally denoted a person who was a philosopher, judge, or bartender.
Nickal German
Variant of Nickel
Nickel German
From the German word "kupfernickel" meaning Devil's copper or St Nicholas's (OLd Nick's) copper.
Nicks English, German
From the nickname of Nicholas.
Nicolay German, French
From the given name Nicolay, a form of Nicholas through Russian Nikolay... [more]
Nicoletti Italian
From the given name Nicola 1.
Nicolin French
From the given name Nicolas.
Nicolini Italian
patronymic from Nicolino, a pet form of Nicola
Nied Upper German
South German: habitational name from Nied in Hesse.
Niederhäuser German, Swiss
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Niederhaus or Niederhausen, denoting the lower of two dwellings or settlements or one in a low-lying position.
Niedermeier German, German (Austrian)
Occupational name for a farmer who had a farm lower than the neighboring one(s). This surname and its variant spellings are common to Austria and Bavaria, Germany.
Niedermeyer German, Dutch
Distinguishing name for a farmer (see Meyer) who had a farm lower (Middle High German nider(e)) than the neighboring one(s).
Niehaus German
North German: topographic name from Middle Low German nie ‘new’ + hus ‘house’; or a habitational name from a common North German and Westphalian farm name with the same meaning.
Nies German
German: from a reduced form of the personal name Dionys (see Dennis), which was stressed on the last syllable; this was a popular personal name as a result of the influence of the French Saint Denis... [more]
Niesen Dutch, German
Dutch: patronymic from the personal name Nijs, a reduced form of Denijs (see Dennis)... [more]
Nietzsche German, German (Silesian)
Derived from a Silesian diminutive for the given name Nikolaus. A famous bearer was Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), a German philologist and philosopher.
Nigg German, German (Swiss)
From a short form of the personal name Niklaus, a German form of Nicholas.
Nikkel German, Dutch
Possibly an altered spelling of Dutch Nikel, from the personal name, a Dutch form of Nicholas.
Nipper German
1. habitational name for someone from Nippe in Hesse. ... [more]
Noble English, Scottish, Irish, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French noble "high-born, distinguished, illustrious" (Latin nobilis), denoting someone of lofty birth or character, or perhaps also ironically someone of low station... [more]
Noce Italian
Topographic name for someone who lived where nut trees grew, from noce "nut" (Latin nux, genitive nucis).
Nocella Italian
Diminutive of Noce.
Noël French
Means "Christmas".
Noir French
Means "black" in French, originally used in Northern France as an ethnic nickname for someone from Southern France, Spain, Italy or North Africa. It also may have been used for someone who wore dark clothing or for someone who had an occupation during the night or was associated with the night.
Noisette French
This is a French surname meaning "hazelnut".
Noland Irish, French
Irish: variant of Nolan.... [more]
Nolf German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Arnolf, composed of the Germanic elements arn 'eagle' + wulf 'wolf'. Dutch: from a reduced form of Nodolf, derived from the personal name Odolf by transfer of the final -n in a preceding personal name such as Jan, Simoen
Noll German
From a short form of any of various medieval personal names derived from Germanic personal names ending in -n + wald 'rule', for example Arnold and Reinwald.
Nonnenmacher German
Occupational name for a gelder of hogs, from Middle High German nunne, nonne meaning "nun", and by transfer "castrated hog" + an agent derivative of machen meaning "to make".
Noons French
From the Portuguese name Nunes.
Nora Italian, German
Italian and German: from a short form of the feminine personal names Eleonora or Leonora.
Normand French
Means North Man, meaning vikings