Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Grosch German
Either a metonymic occupational name for a moneyer or possibly a nickname for an avaricious person from Middle High German Middle Low German grosche "groschen" a medieval thick silver coin its name ultimately derived from medieval Latin denarius grossus literally "thick coin".
Grosjean French, French (Belgian)
Derived from French gros "large" and the given name Jean 1. As a nickname, it is sometimes applied to a person who is perceived as stupid.
Großkreutz German
From German "groß" meaning big and "kreutz" meaning cross.
Groulx French
French spelling, often found in Canada, of Groult, Grould, possibly reduced forms of Gréoul, a personal name of Germanic origin, composed of the elements gred "hunger" + wolf, wulf "wolf".
Grove German
Form of Grob.
Grove German
Name from any of several places named Grove or Groven, which derive their name from Middle Low Germany grove ‘ditch’, ‘channel’. In some cases the name is a Dutch or Low German form of Grube.
Grove German
Variation of Graf.
Grube German
Name for someone who lived in a depression or hollow, from Middle High German gruobe "pit", "hollow". See also Gruber.
Grube German
From the personal name Grubo.
Grullon Dominican, Mexican, French
Possibly from a derivative of Spanish grulla 'crane' presumably applied as a nickname for tall thin person; in Mexico however grulla denotes a crafty person
Grumbach German (Swiss), Alsatian
From the name of various places in Switzerland and Germany, for example the municipality of Grumbach in Rhineland-Palatinate.
Grün German, Jewish
from Middle High German gruoni "green fresh raw" hence a nickname for someone who habitually dressed in green a topographic name for someone who lived in a green and leafy place or a habitational name for someone from a place called with this word such as Gruna Grunau in Silesia... [more]
Grünbaum German, Jewish
from Middle High German gruoni "green" and boum "tree" probably a topographic or habitational name referring to a house distinguished by the sign of a tree in leaf... [more]
Grünfeld German, Jewish
Habitational name from any of several places in northern and central Germany named Grünfeld named with elements meaning "green open country" derived from the elements gruoni "green" and feld "field"... [more]
Grunwald German, German (Swiss), Jewish
German and Swiss German (Grünwald): habitational name from any of various places named Grün(e)wald, from Middle High German gruene ‘green’ + walt ‘wood’, ‘forest’. ... [more]
Guadagnino Italian
It came from Italian word guadagno which means "earnings" and has a diminutive suffix ino which is also an occupation suffix.
Gualtieri Italian
From the given name Gualtiero.
Guàrdia Catalan, Spanish, Italian
Catalan, Spanish, and Italian from Catalan guàrdia, Spanish and Italian guardia ‘guard’, ‘watch’, a topographic name for someone who lived by a watch place, an occupational name for a member of the town guard, or a habitational name from any of the numerous places named (La) Guardia.
Guarino Italian
From the given name Guarino.
Guarracino Italian
Nothing is known of this family name other then they grew up in Manhattan, New York, other states and cities too but most can from boats and had to be quertied at Ellis Island, New York
Guarracino Italian (Americanized, Modern)
from a diminutive of a personal name derived from Guerra ‘war’.
Guasti Italian
Meaning uncertain, may denote someone from the town of Guasto. Alternately, it may be an occupational name from gastaldo "chamberlain", from Latin gastaldus "manager, bailiff, steward", or be a nickname from guasto "broken, crippled".
Guay French
Variant of Guyet or Guet.
Guay French
Variant of Gay.
Gubler German (Swiss)
Means "Of the Mountains"... [more]
Gucci Italian
Patronymic or plural form of the given name Guccio, a late medieval Italian diminutive of various names ending in go, such as Arrigo (via Arriguccio) or Ugo (via Uguccio)... [more]
Gucciardo Italian
From the personal name Gucciardo, a revival of French Guichard, of Germanic origin, probably composed of the elements wig 'battle' or wisa 'experience' + hard 'strong', 'brave', 'hardy'.
Gucciardo Italian, Sicilian
from the given name Gucciardo a cognate of French Guichard of ancient Germanic origin probably composed of the elements wig "battle" or wisa "experience" and hard "strong brave hardy"... [more]
Guccione Italian, Sicilian
Derived from the given name Guccio, a diminutive of Arriguccio, Uguccio and other names ending in guccio.
Guengerich German (Americanized)
Potentially from German “junge” and “reich,” meaning “rich at a young age.” Anglicized by immigrants as either Guengerich or Gingrich.
Guenther German
German: from a Germanic personal name composed of gund ‘battle’ + hari, heri ‘army’.
Guercio Italian
Probably a variant of Guerzoni, though it may derive from a Germanic given name.
Guerino Italian
From the given name Guerino.
Guerlain French
Derived from the given name Guerlain.
Guerre French
French Cognitive of Guerra, from the element werra "war".
Guerrier French, Haitian Creole
Nickname for an aggressive person or occupational name for a soldier, from Old French guerrier "warrior". Cognate of Guerrero and Guerriero.
Guerry French
From the Germanic given name Wigric derived from the elements wig "battle" and ric "powerful".
Guertin French
A French surname that evolved from the Old Germanic given name Warin meaning "to guard" or "protection". This surname was often given as an occupational name for a guard, or someone who served as a protector in their community.
Guerzoni Italian
From guercio "cross-eyed, one-eyed; blind in one eye".
Guet French
French - From Old French guet "lookout, watchman".
Guglielmi Italian
From the given name Guglielmo.
Guglielmo Italian
From the given name Guglielmo.
Gugliuzza Italian
Derivative of the personal name Guglia.
Guichard French
From the medieval name Guichard derived form the Germanic name Wighard... [more]
Guidetti Italian
Derived from the given name Guido.
Guido Italian, German
From the given name Guido.
Guignard French
from the old Germanic name Winhard composed of the elements win "friend" and hard "hard strong".
Guilbeau French
Possibly from Ancient Germanic wil, meaning "will, power", and Latin bellus, meaning "beautiful".
Guilbert French, Guernésiais
Either from the given name Guilbert the French form of Wilbert or a variant of Gilbert.
Guiles French
Of uncertain origin; it could be a variant of French Guill or of English Guile or Giles .
Guillard French
From the given name Willihard and French cognitive of Willard.
Guilleaume French, German
Possibly related to the French given name Guillaume.
Guilliot French
From a pet form of the personal name Guille, itself a short form of Guillaume.
Guillotin French
From a diminutive of Guillaume and a variant of Guillot. A notable user is Joseph-Ignace Guillotin whom the guillotine was named after.
Guillou French, Breton
Possibly derived from the given name Guillaume.
Guimond French
from the medieval French name Guimond from the Germanic name Wigmund composed of the ancient Germanic elements wīg "battle combat" and mund "protection".
Guin French
From the given name Guin the French form of Wino a short form of names with the element win "friend".
Guion French
French: from the Germanic personal name Wido (see Guy 1).
Guiscard French
Derived from the Medieval French given name Guiscard.
Guitry French
Derived from the given name Witeric. A famous bearer of this name was Sacha Guitry (1885-1957), a French actor, playwright, screenwriter and director.
Gülden Dutch, German
from gulden "golden" derived from vergulden vergolden "to gild" a metonymic occupational name for a craftsman who gilds objects; compare Guldner. From gulden the name of the coin (English guilder) applied as a topographic or habitational name referring to a house name such as In den silvren Gulden ("In the Silver Guilder") or from related verb meaning "to gild" applied as a topographic or habitational name referring to a house name such as De Gulden Hoeve ("The Gilded Farmhouse") or De Gulden Zwaan ("The Gilded Swan").
Gullette French
Comes from Guillemme or William of Normandy. Reference 1066: The Battle of Hastings.
Gulotta Italian
Italian: from the female personal name, a pet form of Gulla.
Gum German
North German:... [more]
Guntli Romansh
Derived from Romansh cunt "count" in combination with the diminutive suffix -li.
Gunzenhauser German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from either of two places named Gunzenhausen, one in Württemberg and the other in Bavaria.
Gurney English, French, Norman
Originated from the region Normandy in France, is also a biospheric name from Gournay-en-Bray, a commune in France. It is also a fictional character's maiden name, Jacqueline "Jackie" Bouvier from the animated sitcom show, The Simpsons.
Gusmeroli Italian
Possibly from an alternate form of Cosma.
Gust German
German: from a short form of the personal name Jodocus, which is either a Latinized form of a Breton name, Iodoc, borne by a 7th-century Breton saint (compare Jost and Joyce) or from a reduced form of the personal name Augustus.... [more]
Gustavo Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From the given name Gustavo.
Gutfreund German
From the words gut freund, which means "good friend."
Gutjahr German, German (Swiss)
nickname for someone born on New Year's Day from a New Year's greeting meaning "Good year".
Gutknecht German, German (Swiss)
Status name for a page of noble birth (Middle High German guot kneht).
Gutknecht German, German (Swiss)
status name for a page of noble birth (Middle High German guot kneht). Derived from the elements guot "good" and kneht "servant, apprentice".
Gütlin German, Yiddish
Diminutive of GUTE and GUTA, recorded in Frankfurt, Germany throughout the 14th century.
Gutmann German
German cognate of Goodman. from Middle High German guot man literally "good man, capable man" derived from the elements guot "good" and man "man"... [more]
Guttenberg German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of various places, for example in Bavaria, called Guttenberg, from the weak dative case (originally used after a preposition and article) of Old High German guot ‘good’ + berg ‘mountain’, ‘hill’... [more]
Gutting German
Of uncertain origin. Probably from a Germanic personal name formed with god "good" or god, got "god".
Gutwald f German
Gutwald is a surname of German origin, which can be derived from the German words ‘Gut’ meaning ‘good’ and ‘Wald’ meaning ‘woods’, thus creating the meaning ‘good woods’. The surname is also derived from the German personal name 'Gottwald', which was derived from the Old High German 'Gottwalt' meaning ‘rule of God’ or ‘God’s power’.
Guy English, French
From a French form of the Germanic personal name Wido, which is of uncertain origin. This name was popular among the Normans in the forms Wi, Why as well as in the rest of France in the form Guy.
Guyet French
Derived from Guy.
Guyon French
From a diminutive of Guy 1.
Haack German
One who lived at the bend or hook in the river. (See Hooker)
Habelt German
from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Habo, a short form of various compound names formed with had(u) ‘battle’, ‘strife’
Haberfeld German
Means "oat field". From the words habaro "oat" and feld "field
Haberfield German (Anglicized)
Partial anglicization of Haberfeld
Haberland German
Topographic name from Middle High German haber(e) "oats" and land "land", or a habitational name from any of various places so called.
Häberli German (Swiss)
Derived from Alemannic and Upper German Haber, a variant of Standard High German Hafer "oats" in combination with the diminutive suffix -li. This name denoted a young farmer of oats.
Habermann German, Jewish
Occupational name for a grower or seller of oats, composed of the elements Haber and the agent suffix -mann.
Habermehl German
metonymic occupational name for a producer or seller of oatmeal from Middle High German habaro "oats" and melo "flour".
Habsburg German
This surname may have been used by someone whose descendants originated from the House of Habsburg, which was one of the most important royal houses in Europe. It is assumed that the surname is derived from High German Habichtsburg meaning "hawk castle," but some historians and linguists believe that it may actually be derived from Middle High German hab/hap meaning "ford", as there is a river with a ford nearby.
Hack German
Variant of Haack.
Hackmann German, Jewish
Occupational name for a butcher or a woodcutter.
Hafer German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a grower of or dealer in oats, from German Hafer "oats". Compare Haber. As a Jewish surname, it is in many cases ornamental.
Hagedorn German
German cognate of Hawthorne. Topographic name from Middle High German hagedorn "hawthorn" from hac "hedge" and dorn "thorn".
Hagelberg German
From German hagel meaning "hail" and berg meaning "mountain".
Hagelstein German
nickname for a hot-headed irascible man from Middle High German hagelstein "hailstone" derived from the elements hagel "hail" and stein "stone"
Hagemann German, Danish
Combination of Middle Low German hage "enclosure, hedge" and mann "man".
Hagen German, Dutch, Danish
from the ancient Germanic personal name Hagen a short form of various compound names formed with hag "enclosure protected place" as the first element.
Hahm German
Metonymic occupational name for a sealer of weights and measures, from Middle High German hāme ‘(standard) measure’.
Hähner German
Pet form of Heinrich.
Hahner German
Occupational name for a poultry farmer, from an agent derivative of Middle High German hane "rooster".
Hahner German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Hahn or Hag.
Halart French
Derived from the Germanic given name Halhard.
Halberstadt German
Habitational name from any of various places so named, notably the city near Magdeburg and Halberstadt near Königstein in Saxony.
Ham English, German, Scottish, Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon meaning the home stead, many places in England. One who came from Hamm in North-Rhine Westphalia, or one who came from Ham in Caithness Scotland's most northerly county. In Scotland this surname devires from the Norse word "Hami", meaning homestead.
Hamberg German, Danish, Jewish
German, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from any of several places named Hamberg. Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Hamburg.
Hamberger German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name for someone from any of various places named Hamberg. Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Hamburger.
Hamburg German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from the great city and port at the mouth of the river Elbe, named with the Germanic elements ham ‘water meadow’ + burg ‘fortress’, ‘fortified town’.
Hamburger German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name for someone from Hamburg.
Hamel French
topographic name for someone who lived and worked at an outlying farm dependent on the main village Old French hamel (a diminutive from an ancient Germanic element cognate with Old English hām "homestead"); or a habitational name from (Le) Hamel the name of several places in the northern part of France named with this word.
Hamel Yiddish, Dutch, German
The name Hamel has three origins.... [more]
Hamer English, German
From the town of Hamer in Lancashire from the old english word Hamor combining "Rock" and "Crag". It is also used in Germany and other places in Europe, possibly meaning a maker of Hammers.
Hammer German, English, Jewish
From Middle High German hamer, Yiddish hamer, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or user of hammers, for example in a forge, or nickname for a forceful person.
Hammerschmidt German, Jewish
Occupational name for a blacksmith, from German hamer, 'hammer' and schmidt, 'smith. See Hammersmith.
Hammersmith German, English
Normally an anglicization of German Hammerschmidt. Perhaps also from Norwegian Hammersmed.... [more]
Hamon Breton, French, English
From the given name Hamon.
Hamp English, German
English: unexplained; compare Hemp.... [more]
Händel German
Derived from Hans or Heinrich.
Handschuh German
Occupational name for a maker or seller of gloves or perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore gloves from Middle High German hantschuoch "glove" literally "hand shoe" from the elements hant "hand" and schuh "shoe".
Häner German
Variant of Hanner.
Haner German
Altered spelling or variant of Hahner.
Hang German (Swiss)
From the given name Hank
Hänner German
Pet form of Heinrich.
Hanner German
From a pet form of Hann, short form of Johann.
Hans German, Dutch, Alsatian, Romansh
Derived from the given name Hans.
Hansli German (Swiss), Romansh
Derived from a diminutive form of the given name Hans.
Hantel German (Rare)
Rare Bukovina German variant of Händel.
Har German
Variant of Har.
Harbach German
Habitational name from any of several places named Harbach.
Harcourt French
This name is of locational origin either from the town and ancient chateau of Harcourt near Brionne in Normandy.
Hardekop German (Rare)
Derived from Middle High German hart "hard" and kopf "head". As a surname, it was given to a hard-headed, stubborn person.
Harduin French
From the given name Harduin.
Hargier French
Known back to the 15th or 16th century in France.... [more]
Harlacher German
Habitational name for someone from Ober- or Unter-Harlachen, near Überlingen.
Harless English, German
English: probably a variant spelling of Arliss, a nickname from Middle English earles ‘earless’, probably denoting someone who was deaf rather than one literally without ears.
Harmel French
Derived from the given name Armel.
Harnar German
Given to one who was noisy
Harold English, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name Hereweald, its Old Norse equivalent Haraldr, or the Continental form Herold introduced to Britain by the Normans... [more]
Harpe German
Derived from a short form of the given name Harprecht.
Harrett French
France, England
Hartnagel German
Occupational name for a nailsmith from the Middle High German elements hart "hard" and nagal "nail".
Hartranft German
descriptive nickname for a pauper from Middle High German harte "hard" and ranft "rind crust".
Hartung German
German, Dutch, and Danish: from a Germanic personal name, a derivative (originally a patronymic) of compound names beginning with hart ‘hardy’, ‘strong’.
Hartwig German
From the given name Hartwig.
Harvick German
Possible anglicized version of Herwig or Hartwig. Also possible anglicized version Harwick.
Hasard French
Variant of Hazard.
Haselbauer German
Translates to 'hazel farmer'
Hassdenteufel German
A German Satzname, from the expression "Hass den Teufel" meaning "hate the devil".
Hasselbach German
Habitational name from any of the places in various parts of Germany called Hasselbach.
Hasselhof German
Derived from a village named "Hasselhof" near Frankfurt.
Hasslacher German
hass=hate; lacher=laughter... [more]
Hässli German (Swiss), French (Rare)
Swiss German diminutive form of Haas. This is a French surname via Alsace-Lorraine. A notable bearer is French footballer (soccer player) Eric Hassli (1981-).
Hattendorf German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from places called Hattendorf, near Alsfeld and near Hannover. The element hatt, had means ‘bog’
Hattler German
Occupational name for someone who raises goats.
Hauck German
Derived from the first name Hugo.
Haueis German
Derived from Middle High German houwen "to beat" and isen "iron". This surname denoted a smith.
Hauptman German
Variant spelling of Hauptmann.
Hauptmann German
Derived from German hauptmann, a word used for a German military rank meaning "Captain".
Haus German
Topographic and occupational name for someone who lived and worked in a great house, from Middle High German, Middle Low German hus "house" (see House).
Hausch German
From the Germanic personal name Huso, a short form of a compound name composed with hus ‘house’, ‘dwelling’ as the first element.
Hauschild German
Possibly from German haus "house" or hauen "to chop, to hack" combined with schild "shield".
Hauser German, Jewish
From Middle High German hus "house", German haus, + the suffix -er, denoting someone who gives shelter or protection.
Hausknecht German
occupational name from Middle High German hus "house" and kneht "boy servant" also "town-hall, messenger".
Hausmann German
From Middle High German hus "house" (see Haus) + man "man".
Hauswirth German
From Middle High German haus 'house' and wirt 'owner' or 'master'.
Hauteville French
From French haute "high" and ville "town, estate".
Haverkamp German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived on an oat field from Middle Low German haver "oats" and kamp "field".
Havertz German
Variant of Ritz.
Havner German
Variant of Hafner.
Hay English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
Haydn German
Meaning "heathen". Famous bearer is Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).
Haydt German
Varient of Heid.
Hazard English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
Heartfield German (Anglicized)
Anglicised spelling of Herzfeld.
Heartman German (Anglicized)
Americanised spelling of Hartmann.
Hebel German
1 German: metonymic occupational name for a baker, from Middle High German hebel ‘yeast’.... [more]
Heber German
Occupational name for a carrier (someone who loaded or transported goods), from an agent derivative of Middle High German heben "to lift".
Hebert German
Variant of Heber.
Hecht German, Dutch
From Middle High German hech(e)t, Middle Dutch heect, hecht "pike", generally a nickname for a rapacious and greedy person. In some instances it may have been a metonymic occupational name for a fisher and in others it may be a habitational name from a house distinguished by a sign depicting this fish.
Hecker German
German form of Hatcher.
Hefler German
Derived from the Old German and German word hof, which means settlement, farm or court.
Hefner German, Jewish
Recorded in several spellings including Hafner, Haffner, and Hevner, this is as surname of early Germanic origins. ... [more]
Heid German, Jewish
Topographic name from Middle High German heide, German Heide ‘heath’, ‘moor’. Compare Heath.... [more]
Heide German, Jewish, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Variant of German Heid, and Dutch Vanderheide. Danish and Norwegian surname from various places called Heide all from the German elements heide, heidr, haith all meaning "heath"... [more]
Heidel German
Possibly derived from the given name Heidi.
Heidemann German, Jewish
Topographic name for a heathland dweller from heida "heath" (see Heid) and mann "man".
Heidenreich German
From the medieval personal name Heidenrich, ostensibly composed of the elements heiden 'heathen', 'infidel' (see Heiden 2) + ric 'power', 'rule', but probably in fact a variant by folk etymology of Heidrich.
Heider German
Combination of German Heide "heath, headland" and the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant. The surname can be either topographic for someone living on or near a heath, or habitational for someone from any place named with the element Heide.
Heigl German
Derived from the given name Hugo.
Heil German
Most recognisably known for meaning ‘Salvation’, it was also one used as an indication of a doctor or healer.
Heil German, Upper German, Dutch
1. German: from a pet form of Heinrich. ... [more]
Heiland German
South German: from Middle High German heilant ‘savior’, ‘Christ’, presumably either a name given to someone who had played the part of Christ in a mystery play or an occupational name for a healer, from Middle High German heilen ‘to heal’, ‘save’.
Heiliger German
Heiliger means "Holy" or "Holy One" in German.
Heilmann German
Variant of Heil.
Heimbach German
Town / City in Germany
Heimberger German, Jewish
Variant spelling of Heimburger.
Heimburg German
German for "home". Originates in the German village of Heimburg (not to be confused with Hamburg) and the nearby castle of the same name.
Heimburger German, Jewish
Status name for a village head, derived from Middle High German heim meaning "homestead, settlement" and bürge meaning "guardian". It could also be a habitational name for someone from numerous places called Heimburg or Heimberg in Germany.
Heimlich German
Nickname for a secretive person from Middle High German heimelich German heimlich "confidential secret".
Hein German, Dutch, Danish, Jewish
German, Dutch, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from a short form of the Germanic personal name Heinrich.
Heinbokel German
(Hein) is a short form of the name Heinrich, (the German form of the name Henry) & Bokel is a place name in Lower Saxony, Schleswig-Holstein & North Rhine-Westphalia.
Heine German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from a short form of Heinrich.
Heineken Dutch, German
From the given name Hein 1, a Dutch diminutive of Hendrik... [more]
Heinemann German, Jewish
Combination of Heine, a short form of Heinrich, and Mann "man".
Heiner German
From the given name Heiner.
Heinisch German
From a pet form of the personal name Heinrich.
Heinl German
South German variant of Heinle.
Heinle German
This surname is derived from what may be a pet form of Heinrich.