Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Verville French
variant of Vervelle, which Morlet derives from a word denoting the metal keeper or ring through which a bolt is secured.
Vetter German
from a nickname from Middle High German veter(e) ‘uncle’, ‘nephew’. The word is from Old High German fetiro (a derivative of fater ‘father’), which was used more generally to denote various male relatives; the meaning of modern German Vetter is ‘cousin’.
Vianney French
The surname in origin is a variant of Viennet, a diminutive of Vien, a short form of Vivien. A famous bearer is Jean-Marie Vianney (1786-1859), a French saint.
Viceconte Italian
Means viscount in Italian, Originally for served as or worked for a viscount.
Vicino Italian
Italian form of Voisin.
Vierge French
French form of Virgo.
Vierling German
Derived from Middle High German vierlinc meaning "one-fourth of a measure", hence a status name or nickname for someone who had an annual tax liability of this amount.
Vilbig German
Unknown.
Villard German
Altered form of German Hilgard, from the female personal name Hildegard, composed of the Germanic elements hild "strife, battle" and gard "fortress, stronghold".
Villasurda German
Villasurda is a Germanic name dating back to the time of the Vikings. It, roughly translated from a Norse word, means, "the one who is fat."
Villein French
"Used in medieval England and France. Villein is another term used for the serfs in the lowest classes of the feudal system."
Villwock German
Of uncertain and much debated origin.... [more]
Vincente English, Italian
English variant of Vincent, otherwise from the given name Vincente
Vincenzo Italian
From the given name Vincenzo
Violet English, French
Derived from the given name Violet (English) or a variant of Violette (French).
Violette French
Perhaps a topographic name from a diminutive of viol "path", itself a derivative of vie "way". It is more likely, however, that this name is from the secondary surname Laviolette "the violet (flower)", which was common among soldiers in French Canada.
Viray Occitan, French, Catalan
Southern French (Occitan) and Catalan variant of Occitan Verai and Veray, nickname from Occitan verai ‘honest’... [more]
Virile Italian
It comes fron the Italian adjective virile that means 'manly, masculine' ultimately from Latin vir
Virtuoso English (American), Spanish, Italian
This Italian surname could possibly be connected to those whose ancestors were involved in playing a musical instrument or somehow connected to the musical instrument industry.
Visconti Italian
From visconte, a title of rank (medieval Latin vicecomes "deputy of a count").
Vitaliano Italian
From the given name Vitaliano
Vittorio Italian
From the given name Vittorio.
Vivenzio Italian
From the given name Vivenzio.
Viviano Italian
From the given name Viviano.
Vivier French
Derived from Latin vivarium, ultimately from Latin vivus "alive". This name is locational relating to living near a fish pond.
Voelker German
My maiden name Surname.
Vogelsang German
Means "bird song" in German. From the German words vogel (bird) and sang (song).
Vogler German
Occupational name for a birdcatcher.
Voisin French
English (of Norman origin) and French: from Old French voisin ‘neighbor’ (Anglo-Norman French veisin) . The application is uncertain; it may either be a nickname for a ‘good neighbor’, or for someone who used this word as a frequent term of address, or it might be a topographic name for someone who lived on a neighboring property... [more]
Volkmuth German
Volk: People... [more]
Volksmärchen German
A German surname meaning "folk tale".
Vollbrecht German
From a German personal name composed of the elements folk ‘people’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. In the U.S. this name is often Americanized as Fulbright and Fullbright.
Volpe Italian
Italian cognate of Fox.
Von Allmen German (Swiss)
Means "of Allmen."
Von Arx German (Swiss)
Means "from Arx."
Von Hammersmark Popular Culture, German (?)
Means "from Hammersmark" in German. Bridget von Hammersmark is a fictional character in Quentin Tarantino's film 'Inglourious Basterds' from 2009.
von Stauffenberg German
From the name of the former castle Burg Stauffenberg in Swabia, southwestern Germany.
Von Sydow Swedish, German
von Sydow is a German and Swedish noble family from Pomerania, an area in modern day Poland and Germany. Some members of the family immigrated to Sweden in 1724. The name literary means "from Sydow"... [more]
Vorac German
German: variant of Vorndran.
Vosberg Dutch, German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hill frequented by foxes, from Middle Low German vos "fox" and berg "hill", "mountain".
Vossler German
Possibly related to Voss.
Vought German
The surname Vought originates in the Latin form "vocatus" or "advocatus," and referred to someone who appeared in court on another's behalf. As a surname, Vought is an occupational hereditary surname for a "bailiff" or "overseer of a nobleman's estate".
Vuitton French
Derived from the Old High German word "witu" and the Old English pre 7th century "widu" or "wudu", meaning a wood, and therefore occupational for one living by such a place.
Wachter German, Dutch
Occupational name for a watchman, from Middle High German wachtære, wehtære, Middle Dutch wacht(e)re. (cf. Waite).
Wachtmann German
Occupational name for a watchman.
Wacker German
From a nickname for a bold or energetic person, from Middle High German wacker meaning ‘fresh’, ‘lively’, ‘brave’, or ‘valiant’.
Wackerman English (American), German
From the Americanized spelling of German Wackermann, a variant of Wacker, with the addition of Middle High German man, meaning ‘man’.
Wagenmann German
Occupational name from Middle High German wagenman ‘hauler’, ‘wagoner’.
Waggoner German
German name; variant of Wagner
Wagmann German
Possibly derived from Swabian Wegman, meaning "herb".
Wahl German, Jewish
From Middle High German Walhe, Walch "foreigner from a Romance country", hence a nickname for someone from Italy or France, etc. This surname is also established in Sweden.
Wahlberg German, Swedish, Norwegian (Rare)
Composed of German wal "field, meadow" or Swedish vall "grassy bank" and berg "mountain, hill".
Walch German
From the personal name Walcho.
Wald German, English
Topographic name for someone who lived in or near a forest (Old High German wald, northern Middle English wald).
Walder German
Topographical name for someone who lived in or near a forest, derived from the Old English pre 7th Century "w(e)ald", and the Old High German "Wald", forest.
Waldstein German, Jewish
Habitational surname for a person from a place in Bohemia called Waldstein, which is derived from Middle High German walt "forest" + stein "stone".
Wallee German
Of French origin, denoting a person who lives in or is from a valley.
Waltrip German
Derived from the name of the father of the original bearer, indicating the "son of Waldrap." The Germanic personal name Waldrap, is a short form of Walraven, a name used mostly among nobles, knights, and patricians.
Warmbier German
Metonymic occupational name for a brewer, derived from Middle Low German warm meaning "warm" and ber meaning "beer".
Warnecke German
North German from a pet form of the personal name Warner, Low German form of Werner.
Warneke German
German variant spelling of Warnecke.
Warnke German
German variant of Warnecke.
Warns Dutch, German
Dutch habitational name from places so named in Friesland and Overijssel. The one in Friesland was the site of a famous victory of Frisians over the Hollanders in the 14th century. ... [more]
Warthen German
German: from a short form of the personal name Wartold, from Old High German wart ‘guardian’.
Wäscher German
Occupational surname for a washer, from Middle High German waschen, weschen "to wash".
Wasser German, Jewish
Topographic name from Middle High German wazzer "water".
Waterhouse German
Old German and Dutch locational name meaning “a house by water.”
Wechter German
Variant spelling of German Wächter
Weidmann German
Name meaning, "hunter".
Weigel German
Derived from the given name Wigand.
Weiher German
Meaning:... [more]
Weil German, Jewish
South German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of various places so named in Baden, Bavaria, and Württemberg, from Latin villa ‘country house’, ‘estate’ (later used of a group of houses forming a settlement).
Weiler German, Jewish
Habitational name from any of several places so named in southern Germany. Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Weil.
Weimar German
Habitational name from any of several places called Weimar in Hesse and Thuringia.... [more]
Weinbach German, Jewish
From the name of a commune in Hesse, Germany.
Weinberg German, Jewish
Weinberg means "Vineyard" in german.
Weinbrenner German
Occupational name for a distiller of brandy, literally 'wine burner'.
Weingartner German
Derived from German weingärtner meaning "wine maker, vintner", which itself is derived from German weingarten meaning "vineyard". The latter is a composite word consisting of German wein "wine" combined with German garten "garden"... [more]
Weinheimer German
German: habitational name for someone from any of the places named Weinheim, for example in Baden and Hessen.
Weininger German (Swiss), Jewish
Denoted a person from Weiningen, a municipality in the Canton of Zürich, Switzerland. It is also a Jewish ornamental name derived from German wein meaning "wine" and the suffix -inger.
Weinkauf German
From "wein kaufen" meaning "buy wine" or "wine-buyer"
Weinmann German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) occupational name for a viticulturalist or wine merchant, Middle High German winman, German Weinmann.
Weinreich German
from the name "Winrich"... [more]
Weinstock English, German, Hebrew
This surname of WEINSTOCK is the English variant of the German surname WENSTOCK, an occupational name for a producer or seller of wine, derived originally from the Old German WEIN. The name was also adopted by Ashkenazic Jews, largely recollecting the prominence of wine in the Jewish Scriptures and its used in Jewish ceremonies... [more]
Weintraub German, Jewish
This surname translates into English as “grape”.
Weis German
Variant of Weiss.
Weisenburger German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of numerous places named Weissenburg "white fortress".
Weishuhn German
Derived from Middle High German wiz meaning "white" and huon meaning "hen, fowl", hence a metonymic occupational name for a poultry farmer or dealer, or perhaps in some instances a nickname.
Weisman German, German (Austrian), Jewish
A German surname meaning "white man"
Weissmuller German
Translates to "White Miller".
Weixel German
German: variant spelling of Weichsel, a topographic name for someone who lived near a sour cherry tree (St. Luce cherry), from Middle High German wīhsel (modern German Weichsel(n), pronounced ‘Weiksel’.
Welfing German
Name given to our family by our relative, a German king.
Welker German
Variant of Walker.
Welle German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a spring or stream, Middle Low German welle.
Weller English, German
Either from the Olde English term for a person who extracted salt from seawater, or from the English and German "well(e)," meaning "someone who lived by a spring or stream."... [more]
Wellspeak French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of Beauparlant.
Welsch German
From Middle High German welsch, walsch "person from a Romance country (especially Italy), foreigner", hence an ethnic name or in some cases perhaps a nickname for someone who had trading or other connections with the Romance countries.
Weltraum German
A German surname meaning "outer space".
Welty German (Swiss)
From a Swiss German diminutive of the German given name Walther. A literary bearer was the American writer Eudora Welty (1909-2001).
Wend German
Variant of Wendt.
Wendelin German
From the given name Wendelin.
Wendt German, Danish
Ethnic name for a Wend, Middle High German wind(e). The Wends (also known as Sorbians) once occupied a large area of northeastern Germany (extending as far west as Lüneburg, with an area called Wendland), and many German place names and surnames are of Wendish origin... [more]
Wenig German
From the German word “wenig”, meaning little.
Wentz German (Rare)
Originally a pet form of the given names Werner and Wenceslaw. Meaning "guard" or "army".
Wentzel German
Variant spelling of Wetzel.
Wenz German
Variant of Wentz
Wenzel German
Variant of Wentzel or from the given name Wenzel
Wepener South African, German
South African, German decent/history
Werdum German
Werdum is a municipality in the district of Wittmund, in Lower Saxony, Germany.
Wertheimer German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from Wertheim.
Wertz German
From a short form of the personal name Werner.
Weseloh German
German habitational name from a place so named near Hannover.
Wesner German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places named Wessen.
Wester German
From Middle High German wëster ‘westerly’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived to the west of a settlement, or a regional name for one who had migrated from further west.
Westernmeir German
Of German decent.
Wettstein German (Rare)
North German: variant of Wetzstein, from Middle Low German wetsten "whetstone".
Wick English, German
English: topographic name for someone who lived in an outlying settlement dependent on a larger village, Old English wic (Latin vicus), or a habitational name from a place named with this word, of which there are examples in Berkshire, Gloucestershire, Somerset, and Worcestershire... [more]
Widemann German
Derived from the given name Widiman, composed of Old High German witu "wood" or wit "wide" and man "man".
Widman German
Altered spelling of German Widmann.
Widmann German
Variant of Wiedmann ‘huntsman’ and Wideman.
Wiebe German
From a short form of any of various Germanic personal names beginning with wig ‘battle’, ‘war.’
Wiedemann German
Variation of Wideman.
Wiederspahn German
Carpenter or roofer who applied wooden shingles from Wied, Wieden, or Wieda. Associated with the German-speaking minority that lived along the Volga River in Russia from 1764 to 1941.
Wiedmann Upper German
North German variant of Widemann (see Wideman).
Wiegel German
From a pet form of any of the various Germanic personal names beginning with the element wig 'battle', 'war'.
Wieland German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the given name Wieland.
Wielandt German
From the given name Wieland.
Wiese German
Derived from the Old German word wisa, which means meadow.
Wiesel German, Jewish
Means "weasel" in German.
Wiesenthal German
Habitational name from any of various places called Wiesent(h)al.
Wiesner German
German: habitational name for someone from a place called Wiesen, or topographic name for someone who lived by a meadow, a derivative of Middle High German wise ‘meadow’.
Wild Medieval English, English, German, Jewish
English: from Middle English wild ‘wild’, ‘uncontrolled’ (Old English wilde), hence a nickname for a man of violent and undisciplined character, or a topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of overgrown uncultivated land.... [more]
Will Scottish, English, German
Scottish and northern English from the medieval personal name Will, a short form of William, or from some other medieval personal names with this first element, for example Wilbert or Willard... [more]
Wille German
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names beginning Willi-, as for example, Willibrant, Willihart.
Wills German
Patronymic from any of the Germanic personal names beginning with wil "will, desire".
Wimmer German
Occupational last name, meaning "wine maker," using a derivation of the element Wein (meaning "wine") and likely another derivation from -macher (meaning "maker"). It's possible as well that it is derived from Weimann.
Wind English, German, Danish
Nickname for a swift runner, from Middle English wind "wind", Middle High German wint "wind", also "greyhound".
Wind German
Variant of Wendt.
Windenburg German, Ancient Germanic
Means "Windy Castle" in German.
Winehouse Jewish, German
Anglicized variant of German and Yiddish 'Weinhaus'. From German wein, 'vine, grapevine' and haus 'house, building, home', likely indicating a house with a vineyard. ... [more]
Winkel German, Jewish, Dutch, Belgian
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner of land in the country or a street corner in a town or city, from Middle High German winkel, German Winkel ‘corner’... [more]
Winkelmann German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner or kept a corner shop (see Winkel), with the addition of Middle High German man, German Mann ‘man’... [more]
Winninger German
Probably denoted a person from the municipality of Winningen in the state of Rhineland-Palatinate in western Germany.
Winterberg German
Habitational name from any of several places named with Middle High German winter "winter" and berg "mountain".
Winters English, German
Patronymic form of Winter.
Wirtz German
One who acted as host in a tavern or inn.
Wirz German
Variant of Wirtz.
Wissmach German
I think it is German
Witt German
Either from the given name Wittigo or from Middle Low German witte "white", a nickname for a pale person or someone with white hair.
Witter German
From a Germanic personal name, composed of the elements widu "wood" and hari "army".
Wittman German
Wittman was first found in the Palatinate in the Rhineland valley. The surname Wittman was given to someone who lived in the area that was referred to as widem which was originally derived from the German word denoting church property.
Witz German, Jewish
From the medieval personal name Witzo, a short form of any of several Germanic compound names beginning with wig ‘battle’... [more]
Witzel German
The German surname is of patronymic origin, deriving from the name of the father of the original bearer.
Witzig German
German: nickname from Middle High German witzic ‘clever’, ‘prudent’, ‘knowing’.
Woelk German
German variant spelling of Wölk (see Wolk).
Woelke German
German variant spelling of Wölke, itself a variant of Wolk.
Wohl German, Yiddish
Meaning "pleasant" in both Middle German and Ashkenazic Yiddish
Wolfgang German
From the given name Wolfgang.
Wolfmeyer German
From German wolf "wolf" and meyer "tenant farmer".
Wolford German
Means where the wolves cross the river/stream. Wolf meaning the animal and Ford meaning crossing a body of shallow water.... [more]
Wolfram English, German
From the given name Wolfram.
Wolk German, American
Surname derived from a northern German short form of the given name Walter.
Wolken German
Surname derived from a diminutive of the given name Wolter, a Low German form of Walter.... [more]
Wollschläger German
Occupational name for someone who prepared wool for spinning by washing and combing or carding it, from Middle High German wolle(n)slaher, -sleger, Middle Low German wullensleger (literally ‘wool beater’).
Woodlock Irish, French, English
From an Old English personal name, Wudlac, composed of the elements wudu ‘wood’ + lac ‘play’, ‘sport’.
Woolever German
Morphed from the German surname Wohleber which means well-liver
Wozzek German
Germanized form of Voytek.
Wriedt German, Dutch
Nickname from Middle Low German wrēt, wrede meaning "fierce", "evil", "angry".
Wulfhart German
Could mean "brave wolf" from the German elements "wulf" (variant of "wolf") and "hard" (meaning "brave, hardy").
Wunder German
Miracle
Wunderlich German
A nickname for an eccentric or moody person, derived from the word wunderlich meaning "whimsical" in German.
Wünsche German
Probably denoted a person from Wendland, a region in Germany on the borders of the states of Brandenburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Lower Saxony and Saxony-Anhalt. Alternatively, the name could have been derived from Wendling, a municipality in the Grieskirchen District, Upper Austria, Austria.
Würdemann German
From the German "Würde"-honour or dignity, and "Mann"-man or person. "Man of Honour" or "Person of Dignity".
Wurdemann German (Rare)
This is a German surname, also spelled WÜRDEMANN (original) and often rendered as WUERDEMANN in English. It come from the German "würde", "dignity" or "honor" and "mann", meaning "man" or "person".... [more]
Wurnig German
German origin from the place name am Virgen originally meaning a person from the town of Virgen in Tyrol. Construed as a family name in 1501.
Wurst German
Variant of Wurster.
Wurster German
Derived from German Wurst (Middle High German wurst) "sausage" and thus either denoted a butcher who specialized in the production of sausages, or was used as a nickname for a plump person or someone who was particularly fond of sausages.
Württemberg German
Württemberg is an historical German territory. Together with Baden and Hohenzollern, two other historical territories, it now forms the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg.
Wurtz German
A metonymic occupational name for a greengrocer or grower or seller of herbs, from Middle High German würz, meaning ‘herb’.
Wurz German
Variant of Wurtz
Wuttke German
Originally denoted a person from Wutike, a district near the town of Neuruppin in Brandenburg, Germany.
Wyandt German
Americanized form of German WIEGAND... [more]
Xander German
From a short form of the personal name Alexander.
Xanders German
Variant of Xander.
Xavier English, French
Derived from the Basque place name Etxaberri meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries.
Yaeger German
Yaeger is a relatively uncommon American surname, most likely a transcription of the common German surname "Jaeger/Jäger" (hunter). The spelling was changed to become phonetic because standard English does not utilize the umlaut.
Yager German
Americanized form of JÄGER, meaning "hunter."
Yantorno Italian
Derived from the word torno which in Italian means "around".
Yerkes German (Americanized)
Americanized spelling of German and Dutch Jerkes, a patronymic from the personal name Jerke.
Yoakam German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Joachim.
Yocum German (Anglicized), English
Americanized form of Jochum, a Low German form of the given name Joachim.
Yuengling German
"youngling" or a "young person"
Zabel German
The surname has multiple meanings. It may come from a Slavic given name, or the High German word zabel, meaning "board game" - given, perhaps, as a nickname to those who played many board games.
Zachow German
Meaning unknown. A notable bearer of this name is Friedrich Wilhelm Zachow, a organist, musician, and composer who lived from 1663 to 1712. Zachow, Wisconsin is an unincorporated community named after a local landowner, William Zachow.
Zackert English, German
An Americanization of the German surnames Zacher and Zachert. It comes from a vernacular form of the personal name Zacharias.