Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Giacinto Italian
From the given name Giacinto.
Giacomo Italian
From the given name Giacomo.
Giamatti Italian (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Giammattei. Famous bearers include brothers Paul Giamatti (1967-) and Marcus Giamatti (1961-), both American actors.
Giambattista Italian
From the given name Giambattista.
Giammattei Italian
Patronymic form of Giammatteo.
Giammatteo Italian
Derived from the given name Giammatteo.
Giampaolo Italian
From the given name Giampaolo.
Giancarlo Italian
From the given name Giancarlo.
Gianera Romansh
Derived from a diminutive form of the given name Gian.
Gianfrancesco Italian
From a compound personal name composed of Gianni + Francesco.
Gianiel Romansh
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Gian.
Gianni Italian, Romansh
Derived from the given name Gianni.
Giannone Italian
From a diminutive meaning "big Gianni" formed by combining the personal name Gianni with -one, a suffix used to form augmentatives.
Giano Italian
From the given name Giano.
Gianoia Romansh (Archaic)
Derived from a diminutive form of the given name Gian.
Gianola Italian, Italian (Swiss), Romansh
Derived from a diminutive form of Gianni and Gian.
Gianossi Romansh, Italian (Swiss)
Derived from a diminutive form of the given names Gian and Gianni.
Gianotti Romansh
Derived from a diminutive form of Gian.
Giardiniere Italian
Italian form of Gardener.
Giarratana Italian
Sicilian habitational name from a place so named in Ragusa.
Giarrizzo Italian
From the given name Giovanni and riccio "curly".
Giarrusso Italian
From the given name Giovanni and rosso "red", a nickname for someone with red hair.
Gienal Romansh
Variant of Jenal.
Gieriet Romansh
Derived from the given name Gieri in combination with the diminutive suffix -et.
Gierke German
A derivative of the personal names Gerard or Gerald. ... [more]
Giersch German
German from the female personal name Gerusch or Gerisch, pet forms of Gertrud (see Trude), with the Slavic suffix -usch or -isch.
Gieselman German
Variant spelling of Geiselman.
Gieselmann German
Variant spelling of Geiselman.
Giesinger German
Denoted a person from the town of Giesing in Germany. Or perhaps a variant spelling of Geisinger. A famous bearer of this surname is the German singer-songwriter Max Giesinger.
Gigante Italian
Means "giant" in Italian.
Giglio Italian
From the personal name Giglio, from giglio "lily" (from Latin lilium), a plant considered to symbolize the qualities of candor and purity.
Giguère French, French (Quebec)
Unclear, possibly from Middle French giguer ("to dance, to frolick") but could also refer to the gigue, a medieval three-string vielle, which would suggest a musical profession.
Gilardi Italian
Means "son of Gilardo", a rare Italian form of the Germanic given name Gerard.
Gilca Romanian, Italian
Meaning unknown.
Gildo Italian
From the given name Gildo.
Gilgen German, German (Swiss)
Derived from Middle High German gilge "lily", this was a habitational name from the inflected form of a house name meaning "at the lily".
Gilgen German (Swiss)
Derived from a short form of the given name Aegidius.
Gilio Italian
Tuscany. One variation of the surname Giglio meaning ""lily"". ... [more]
Gillard English, French, Swiss
English and French from an assimilated form of the personal name Gislehard, a compound of Old High German gisel ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble youth’ (see Giesel) + hard ‘hardy’... [more]
Gillette English, French
English: from a feminine form of Gillett.... [more]
Gilli Italian
Patronymic form of the personal name Gillio, a vernacular derivative of Aegilius, which itself is a later form of the given name Aegidius.
Gilli Romansh
Derived from the given name Gilli.
Gilliard French, Swiss
French and Swiss French from a derivative of Gillier, from the Germanic personal name Giselher, composed of gisil ‘hostage’, ‘pledge’, ‘noble offspring’ (see Giesel) + heri ‘army’.
Gilly French
Southern French variant of Gilles.
Gilly Romansh
Variant of Gilli.
Gimpel German, Jewish
German: from a pet form of the personal name Gumprecht (see Gombert)... [more]
Gindlesperger German
Possibly a topographic name for someone who lived on a mountain near the town of Gindels in Bavaria, Germany.
Gindt German, Alsatian
From the Germanic personal name Gundo, from gund meaning "war", "battle".
Gingras French (Quebec), French
Western France variant of Gingreau, possibly derived from Old French ginguer ("to frolick, to dance")
Gingrich German (Americanized)
Potentially from German “junge” and “reich,” meaning “rich at a young age.” Anglicized by immigrants as either Gingrich or Guengerich.
Gino Italian
From the given name Gino.
Ginsburg German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone who came from Gunzberg in Bavaria, Günsburg in Swabia, or Gintsshprik (Königsburg) in East Prussia. Its origin is from the name of the river Günz, written in early Latin documents as Guntia, which was probably of Celtic origin, and Old High German burg meaning "Fortress, walled town".
Gioè Italian
This is a short form of given name Gioele used as surname.
Gioi Italian
Possibly from Sardinian angioi "lamb", a nickname for a shepherd, or from gioi "Thursday".
Gion Romansh
Derived from the given name Gion.
Giorgi Italian
From the given name Giorgio.
Giorgio Italian
From the given name Giorgio
Giorno Italian
From a short form of the name Bongiorno and means "day" in Italian.
Giovanera Romansh (Archaic)
Derived from a diminutive form of the given name Giovannes.
Giovanni Italian
From the given name Giovanni.
Giovanoli Romansh, Italian (Swiss)
Derived from a diminutive form of the given name Giovannes.
Giove Italian
From Giove ("Jupiter") the name of the chief Roman deity perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually swore per Giove "by Jove". From Sicilian ggiòve iòvi "Thursday" applied as a personal name for someone born or baptized on that day of the week... [more]
Giraldo Italian
From the given name Giraldo.
Girardot French
Diminutive of the given name Gérard.
Girau Romansh
Derived from Romansh girau "juryman".
Giresse French
Alain Giresse is a French footballer and manager... [more]
Girgenti Italian, Sicilian
Habitational name for someone from Agrigento in Sicily which was called Girgenti until 1927.
Girolamo Italian
From the given name Girolamo.
Gironda Italian
Possibly from a variant of Italian ghironda ‘barrel-organ’.
Giroud French
Variant of Giraud.... [more]
Gisbert German
From the given name Gisbert.
Giscard French
Variant spelling of Guiscard. A famous bearer was the French president Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (1926-2020).
Gish German
From a shortened form of the Germanic personal name Gisulf, literally "hostage wolf". It was borne by American actress Lillian Gish (?1893-1993), original name Lillian de Guiche.
Giudice Italian
Occupational name for an officer of justice, Italian giudice " judge" (Latin iudex, from ius "law" + dicere "to say"). In some cases it may have been applied as a nickname for a solemn and authoritative person thought to behave like a judge.
Giugno Italian
Derived from Italian giugno meaning "June", perhaps indicating a person who was baptized in that month.
Giuliano Italian
From the given name Giuliano
Giuntoli Italian
Comes from a derivative of Giunta.
Giusti Italian
Means "son of Giusto"
Giustino Italian
From the given name Giustino
Giusto Italian
From the given name Giusto
Glaessel German (Anglicized)
Anglicized spelling of German Gläßel.
Glandt German
Nickname from Middle High Geman glander meaning "gleam", "sparkle", "shine", for someone with such a temperament.
Glaus German (Swiss)
Derived from a late medieval short form of Niklaus.
Glauser German (Swiss)
Patronymic form of Glaus.
Gliott Romansh
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Gagl.
Glock German
Meant "person who lives by a church bell-tower or in a house with the sign of a bell", "bell-ringer" or "town crier" (German Glocke "bell"). It was borne by Sir William Glock (1908-2000), a British music administrator.
Gloff German
German and Swiss German: from the Germanic personal name Egilolf, composed of the elements agi(l) ‘edge’, ‘point’ (of a sword) + wolf ‘wolf’, cognate with Old English Ecgwulf. This was the name of several Lombard kings (ancestors of the Bavarian ducal line of the Agilolfinger), who introduced the name to Italy.
Glorioso Spanish (Philippines), Italian
Means "glorious" in Spanish and Italian.
Gmelin German
German nickname for an unhurried person from Middle High German gmēle, based on the adjective gemach meaning "comfortable calm".
Gober English, French
The surname Gober was first found in Warwickshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Norman influence of English history dominated after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed.
Gobert French, German, English
From the given name Gobert a compressed form of Godebert composed of the ancient Germanic elements god "good" or god/got "god" and berht "bright famous".
Godefroy French
From the given name Godefroy.
Gödel German
From an Old German personal name, Godilo, Godila.German (Gödel): from a pet form of a compound personal name beginning with the element god ‘good’ or god, got ‘god’.Variant of Godl or Gödl, South German variants of Gote, from Middle High German got(t)e, gö(t)te ‘godfather’.
Godenzi Romansh
Derived from the given name Gaudentius.
Godet French
From Old French godet, meaning "glass, tumbler", used as a nickname for a maker or seller.
Godoy French, Spanish
It is derived from the personal name Gaudi.
Godrich German
German form of Goodrich.
Goebbels German, History
Originally an occupational name for a brewer. Paul Joseph Goebbels was a German politician and Reich Minister of Propaganda in Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945.
Goedel German
Variant of Gödel.
Goeman German
Patronym from a Germanic name: good or god + man.
Goertze German
Probably a variant of Göretz, a reduced form of Gerhards (see Gerhardt), or a variant of Goertz.
Goertzen German
German: probably a variant of Göretz, a reduced form of Gerhards (see Gerhardt), or a variant of Goertz.
Goethe German
From a short form of the personal name Godo, formed with the Germanic element god, got 'god', or from Middle High German göte 'godfather'.
Goettel German
From a pet form of Gottfried, or any of the other personal names formed with Got(t)-.
Goettems German, Brazilian
Brazilian adaptation of the German surname Goedems; altered for easier comprehension by the Portuguese-speaking population of Brazil. All members of the Goettems family in Brazil are descendants of Johann Goedems, born in Oberlöstern, Saarland, on September 17, 1798.
Goetz German
Originally a hypocorism of the given name Gottfried. Variants include the surnames Getz, Götz and the given name Götz.
Goetzinger German
Originally denoted a person who came from an place called Götzing, Götzingen or Goetzingen.... [more]
Goffredo Italian
From the given name Goffredo.
Goglia Italian
Nickname or a metonymic occupational name for a person who used leaves from a kind of plant to bind grafts, derived from the Italian dialectal goglia.
Gognon French, Occitan
Nickname for an aggressive or belligerent man, from Old French Gagnon ‘ mastiff’, ‘guard dog’. Possibly from Occitan ganhon ‘young pig’, applied as an offensive nickname. See also Gonyeau.
Gohrband German (Rare)
Contained in a Latin land deed granted to a German for a castle-keep dated February 21, 1308. It is believed to be the first written record and original spelling of the name, generally understood to mean in German, "he who lives by the marsh"... [more]
Gola Italian
Topographic name from gola "mountain hollow, cavity".
Goldberg German, Jewish, Danish
From German gold 'gold' and -berg, meaning 'gold-mountain'.
Golder German
Meaning "gold worker, jeweller".
Goldfarb English, German, Jewish
Goldfarb is a Jewish occupational name that was originally derived from the Old German word gold.
Goldman German, Jewish
Possibly meaning goldsmith in German, from Gold and Mann.... [more]
Goldmann German, Jewish
occupational name for someone who worked with gold denoting anything from a gold-miner to a maker of gold jewelry or a gilder (someone skilled in decorating surfaces with a very thin layer of gold leaf)... [more]
Goldner German
"Gold maker, gilder".
Goldring German, English, Jewish
This surname was probably given to someone who wore a gold ring.
Goldschmid German
Variant spelling of Goldschmidt.
Goldschmitt German
Variant of Goldschmidt, meaning "gold smith" in German.
Goldschneider German
Means "gold cutter" in German, from the elements gold "gold" and snidan "to cut".
Goldwasser German
German form of the anglicised surname Goldwater.
Goldwater German (Anglicized), Jewish (Anglicized)
This name is an Anglicized form of the German or Ashkenazic ornamental surname 'Goldwasser', or 'Goldvasser'. The name derives from the German or Yiddish gold', gold, with 'wasser', water, and is one of the very many such compound ornamental names formed with 'gold', such as 'Goldbaum', golden tree, 'Goldbert', golden hill, 'Goldkind', golden child, 'Goldrosen', golden roses, and 'Goldstern', golden star.
Gombert French, German
French and German: from Gundbert, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements gund ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’... [more]
Gonella Italian
Means "short skirt," in Italian, as in a piece of armor.
Gonthier French
Derived from the given name Gonthier.
Gonyeau French
Respelling of French Gagnon, found predominantly in New England, possibly also of Gagneau, from a diminutive of Gagne.
Gonzaga Spanish, Portuguese, Italian (Archaic)
Habitational name for someone from a location called Gonzaga in Mantua, Italy. This was the name of an Italian family that ruled Mantua from 1328 to 1708.
Gonzague French (Rare)
Gallicized form of Italian Gonzaga.
Gonze French
My family surname originated in southern French-speaking Belgium. There is a tiny village called Gonzeville in northern France near the Belgian border which you can find on Wikipedia. Many surnames from French speaking Belgium have 5 or 6 letters and end in -ze, such as Gonze and Meeze... [more]
Goodbar German (Anglicized), English
Possibly an altered spelling of English Godber, derived from the medieval given name Godebert, or an occupational name for a beer brewer and a nickname for a toper... [more]
Goos German, Flemish, Dutch
Either a metonymic occupational name for a breeder or keeper of geese, from Middle Low German gōs and Middle Dutch goes "goose", or a short form of an Old German personal name containing Gote "Goth" or got "god", particularly Goswin or Gozewijn (a compound name with the second element wini "friend").
Gorga Italian
Topographic name from Sicilian gorga, Catalan gorg(a) ‘place where water collects’, ‘mill pond’, ‘gorge’.
Göring German
German surname most commonly associated with Nazi Party leader, Hermann Göring.
Görlitz German
The name of a small town in Saxony. Derived from old Sorbian word "Zgorelc" meaning "settlement on a burned-out forest."
Göschen German, Low German
Patronymic from the German given name Gottschalk.
Gottfried German, Jewish
Derived from the given name Gottfried. A famous bearer was the American comedian and actor Gilbert Gottfried (1955-2022).
Göttgen German
From a Rhenish pet form of the given name Gottfried.
Gottlob German
From the given name Gottlob.
Gottstein German
Topographic name from a field name meaning literally "God's rock" derived from the elements got "god" and stein "stone"... [more]
Götz German
Originally a hypocorism of Gottfried, which is derived from an Old High German given name. Variants include the surnames Getz and Goetz, as well as the given name Götz.
Götze German
From the given name Götz.
Goudier German
Germanic patronym from "godhari" meaning "army of God".
Goulet French (Quebec), French
Of uncertain origin and meaning. Theories include a derivation from Old French goule "mouth" (combined with a diminutive suffix), in which case this name would have been a nickname for a glutton.
Goupil French
nickname for someone with red hair or for a cunning person from Old French goupil "fox" Late Latin vulpiculus a diminutive of classical Latin vulpes a distant cognate of Wolf . This was replaced as a vocabulary word during the Middle Ages by Renard originally a personal name.
Gourmaud French
A famous bearer is a journalist well known from the educational TV, Jamy Gourmaud
Gousset French
It is derived from the Old French word gousset, which means "purse" or "wallet". It is likely that this surname was originally given to someone who was a purse maker or a merchant who dealt in small items.
Gozzi Italian, Venetian
Meaning unknown.
Grabe German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a dike or ditch, or habitational name from either of two places in Thuringia named with this word: Grabe and Graba.
Grabenstein German
Habitational name from Grafenstein near Wohlau, Silesia.
Grable German
Means "digger of ditches or graves" (from a derivative of Middle High German graben "ditch"). A famous bearer was US actress, dancer and singer Betty Grable (1916-1973).
Graceffa Italian
Meaning uncertain, possibly from a southern Italian place name in the comune of Aragona in the province of Agrigento, Sicily, Italy.
Graef Dutch, German
Name used to denote the chairman of a town council. Compare Graf.
Grainville French
Original French form of Granville, from locations in France called Grainville from the given name Guarin and ville "town" meaning "Guarin's town".
Grämlich German
Nickname for an irascible person, derived from Middle High German gramelich, gremlich meaning "angry".
Grammer German, English
Variant of Krämer or a habitational name for someone possibly from German places called Gram or Grammen. It can also be an English occupational name for a scholar or an astrologer, derived from Old French gramaire meaning "grammarian, scholar, astrologer"... [more]
Granarolo Italian
It means bread baker.
Granata Italian
Granata is an Italian word for a shade of red (maroon), and the Latin name of the city of Granada.
Granato Italian
Occupational name for a jeweler or lapidary, from granato "garnet".
Grand French, Romansh
Derived from Old French grand, grant and Romansh grand "tall; large".
Grande Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Means "tall, large" in Spanish, Italian and Portuguese, used as a nickname for a person of large stature.
Grandin French
Diminutive of Grand.
Grandin Italian
Derived from Grande.
Grandjean French, French (Swiss)
Derived from French grand meaning "tall, large" and the given name Jean 1, hence possibly a nickname for a tall or large person.
Grandpierre French
Derived from French grand meaning "tall, large" and the given name Pierre.
Grange English, French
English and French topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, from Middle English, Old French grange (Latin granica ‘granary’, ‘barn’, from granum ‘grain’)... [more]
Granier French
French for a grain merchant (from Latin granarius), a topographic name for someone who lived by a granary (from Latin granarium) or a metonymic role name for someone who monitors or owned one.
Grano Italian, Spanish
from grano "grain" (from Latin granum) probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for a farmer or grain merchant.
Gras French
Means "fat" in french.
Grass English, German
Topographic name for someone who owned or lived by a meadow, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who made or sold hay, from Middle English gras, Middle High German gras "grass, pasture, grazing".
Grass Romansh
Derived from Romansh grass "fat".
Grässli Romansh
Derived from Romansh grass "fat" in combination with the diminutive suffix -li.
Gratz German
From a short form of a Germanic personal name reflected by Old High German gratag 'greedy'
Grau German, Jewish
Nickname for someone with gray hair or a gray beard, from German grau "gray".
Graue German
Habitational name from a place so named near Hannover.
Graue German
Variant of Grau.
Graupman German
Occupational name for someone who produced or dealt with grits and legumes, from early modern German graupe "pot barley" (bohemian krupa) and man "man".
Grave French
Topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of gravelly soil, from Old French grave "gravel" (of Celtic origin).
Grave German
Either from the northern form of Graf, but more commonly a topographic name from Middle Low German grave "ditch", "moat", "channel", or a habitational name from any of several places in northern Germany named with this word.
Gravelotte French
Derived from a commune (town) in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France, near Metz.
Graves English, French
English: patronymic from Grave.
Graves French, English
Topographic name from the plural of Old French grave "gravel"
Graves English, French, German
Derives from someone who had an occupation as a grave digger or a caretaker for a graveyard.
Graziano Italian
From the given name Graziano.
Grebenstein German
Means "stone from the cliff or ridge" from German greben, (cliff or ridge) and stein (stone).... [more]
Greenberger German, Jewish
Anglicized form of the German surname Grünberger, which is formed from the words grün "green", Berg "mountain", and the habitational suffix -er. This name indicated a person who lived on or near a forest-covered mountain.
Greenburgh German, Jewish
The surname Greenburgh is anglicized for the German Jewish surname Greenberg which translates into English as green mountain.
Greet German
Americanized form of German Fried.
Grégoire French, Belgian
Derived from the given name Grégoire.
Gregori Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Gregorio.
Greif German
Means "Griffin" in German. From the mythological creature.
Greiner Upper German, German (Swiss)
Nickname for a quarrelsome or cantankerous person, derived from Middle High German grīner meaning "squabbler, quarreler" (ultimately an agent derivative of grīn meaning "loud, cry, screaming, shouting")... [more]
Grell German
Nickname for an irritable or irascible person, from Middle High German, Middle Low German grellen "to be angry".
Grell German
Habitational name from a place named Grelle.
Grelle German
Variant of Grell.
Grenier French
Occupational name for a grain merchant (from Latin granarius), or a topographic name for someone who lived by a granary (from Latin granarium) or a metonymic occupational name for someone who supervised or owned one.
Gretzinger German
Habitational name for someone from any of three places named Grötzingen (Old High German Grezzingun) in Baden-Württemberg.
Grewe German, Low German
Low German form of Graf via Middle Low German grave / greve.
Griebe German
Occupational name for a butcher or fat dealer from Middle High German griebe griube "rendered bacon pieces crackling".
Grieser Upper German
topographic name for someone living on a sandy site, from Middle High German griez ‘sand’ + -er suffix denoting an inhabitant.
Griezmann German (Rare)
This is the surname of French professional footballer Antoine Griezmann.
Griffo Italian
From grifo "gryphon" (Latin gryphus, Greek gryps, of Assyrian origin), hence a nickname for someone thought to resemble the mythical beast.