Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
SCHÖMER German
Nickname for an offensive person, from Middle High German schemen "to insult."
SCHOMMER German
"one who was a gossip, a vagabond or rascal"... [more]
SCHÖN German, Swedish
Derived from Middle High German schoene "beautiful, friendly".
SCHÖNENBERGER German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places in Germany and Switzerland named Schönenberg.
SCHOPS German
Means "scoop maker"
SCHORR German
In the south a topographic name from Middle High German schor(re) 'steep rock', 'rocky shore'.
SCHOTTE German
From schotte, an ethnic name for a Scottish person or somebody of such descent.
SCHOTTLANDER German, Jewish, Dutch
From German Schottland, 'Scotland' and, in some cases, denoted an immigrant from Scotland or Ireland. Numerous Irish fled to continental Europe after the Anglo-Norman invasion in the 13th century.... [more]
SCHOTTLER German
Occupational name for a wood turner, Middle Low German scoteler (an agent derivative of scotel ‘wooden bowl’).
SCHRAM German, English, Yiddish
Derived from German Schramme (Middle High German schram(me)) and Yiddish shram, all of which mean "scar".
SCHROCK German
Some think that the last name Schrock comes from the German word which meant something along the lines of "Jump" or "Leaps" and was probably a nickname to someone who was a great jumper, or someone who was easily startled.
SCHRÖDINGER German
Denoted a person from Schröding, a old placename in Bavaria.
SCHUCH German
Likely derived from SCHUMACHER (Shoe Maker)
SCHUELER German
The surname Schueler was first found in southern Germany, where the name was closely identified in early mediaeval times with the feudal society which would become prominent throughout European history.
SCHUG American, German
From the German word Schuh "shoe". ... [more]
SCHUKNECHT German
Occupational name for a shoemaker’s assistant, from Middle High German schuoch meaning "shoe" + knecht meaning "journeyman", "assistant".
SCHULLER German
Possibly a habitational name from Schüller in the Eifel.
SCHUMER German
North German nickname for a person who wanders from place to place without a home or job, derived from Middle Low German schumer meaning "good for nothing, vagabond".
SCHUTZ German
Occupational surname for an archer or a watchman (from Middle High German schützen "to guard or protect"). Also a habitational name from Schutz, a place near Trier, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.
SCHWAAB German
The surname of German VfB Stuttgart footballer Daniel Schwaab, born in Waldkirch, Germany.
SCHWAB German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): regional name for someone from Swabia (German Schwaben), from Middle High German Swap, German Schwabe ‘Swabian’. The region takes its name from a Germanic tribe recorded from the 1st century BC in the Latin form Suebi or Suevi, of uncertain origin; it was an independent duchy from the 10th century until 1313, when the territory was broken up.
SCHWABE German
1. The name given to those who lived in Swabia
SCHWAN German
Means "Swan" in German.
SCHWANBECK German
Habitational name from any of several places so named, for example near Lübeck and near Anklam.
SCHWANDT German
Topographic name for someone who lived in a forest clearing, from Middle High German swant (from swenden "to thin out", "make disappear", causative from swinden "to disappear" modern German schwinden.
SCHWANDT German
Habitational name from any of the various places called Schwand or Schwanden, all in southern Germany, named with this element, from Middle High German swant (from swenden "to thin out", "make disappear", causative from swinden "to disappear" modern German schwinden.
SCHWANZ German
Form of Schwan. Also means tail in German.
SCHWARZKOPF German
Means "black head", from German Schwarz "black", and Kopf "head".
SCHWEDER German, Upper German
German: ethnic name for a Swede.... [more]
SCHWEHR German
German: relationship name, a variant of Schwäher, a variant of Schwager.
SCHWEIGERT German
Derives from an agent derivative of the German "schweigen", to be silent, and the nickname would have been given to a silent, quiet, taciturn person.
SCHWEINHARDT German
an occupational or nickname having to do with pigs
SCHWEINSTEIGER German
Means "Swine Climber". ... [more]
SCHWEITZ German
Ethnic name for a Swiss, from German Schweitz meaning "Swiss".
SCHWER Upper German, German, Jewish
South German relationship name from Middle High German sweher ‘father-in-law’. ... [more]
SCHWIMER German, Jewish
Occupational name meaning "swimmer" in German. As a Jewish name, it may be ornamental.
SCHWING German
Occupational name for someone whose job was to swingle flax, i.e. to beat the flax with a swingle in order to remove the woody parts of the plant prior to spinning, from Middle German swingen meaning "to swing" or swing meaning "swingle".
SCILLATO Italian, Sicilian
Comes from the commune of Scillato in Sicily, Italy, southeast of Palermo.
SCIUTO Italian
Meaning "thin"... [more]
SCORNAVACCHE Italian
Possibly deriving from Italian words scorno meaning shame, and vacca meaning cow. Sicilian variant of Scornavacca.
SEAGER English, German (Modern)
English: from the Middle English personal name SEGAR, Old English S?gar, composed of the elements s? ‘sea’ + gar ‘spear’.... [more]
SEBERT German, French
From a German personal name composed of the elements sigi meaning "victory" + berht meaning "bright", "famous".
SEDITA Italian
From Italian sei "six" + dita, plural of dito "finger", hence a nickname either for someone having six fingers or metaphorically for someone who was very dextrous.
SEE English, German
Topographic name for someone who lived by the sea-shore or beside a lake, from Middle English see meaning "sea", "lake" (Old English sǣ), Middle High German sē. Alternatively, the English name may denote someone who lived by a watercourse, from an Old English sēoh meaning "watercourse", "drain".
SEES German
Variant of SEESE.
SEESE German
Comes from a Germanic personal name, Sigizo, from a compound name formed with sigi ‘victory’ as the first element.
SEGALE English, Italian
Respelling of SEGAL. A famous bearer is Mario A. Segale, the inspiration for Nintendo's video game character Mario
SEIB German
Short form of SEIBOLD. Ultimately derived from names composed of the Germanic name element sigi "victory".
SEID German
From the Germanic given name Sito, a short form of a compound name formed with sigi "victory".
SEIDE German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from Middle High German side, German Seide ‘silk’ (from Late Latin seta, originally denoting animal hair), hence a metonymic occupational name for a manufacturer or seller of silk.
SEIDENBERG German, Jewish
Derived from several places with the same name. As an ornamental name, it is derived from German seide meaning "silk" and berg meaning "mountain".
SEIDER German
Originating in the region of Saxony. Name of a silk merchant, from the German word for silk: seide
SEIDMAN Jewish, German
Derived from SEID.
SEIF German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a soap maker, from Middle High German seife, German Seife 'soap'.
SEILER German
German and Jewish occupational surname for a rope maker.
SEIM Upper German
German: metonymic occupational name for a beekeeper, from Middle High German seim ‘honey’.
SEINFELD German, Jewish
From the German word sein "to be" and the word of German Jewish origin feld which means "field". It was a name given to areas of land that had been cleared of forest.
SEITZ Upper German
A mainly Bavarian surname, from a reduced form of the personal name Seifried, a variant of SIEGFRIED... [more]
SEITZER German
Variant of SEITZ.
SELMER German
Teutonic name meaning "hall master" for a steward or keeper of a large home or settlement.
SELVA Catalan, Italian
From any of various places in Catalonia, the Balearic Islands, or northern Italy named Selva, as for instance the Catalan district La Selva, from selva "wood", Latin silva.
SELZ German
The Selz is a river in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, and a left hand tributary of the Rhine. It flows through the largest German wine region, Rheinhessen or Rhenish Hesse. Also, Seltz (German: Selz) is a commune in the Bas-Rhin department of the Alsace-Champagne-Ardenne-Lorraine region in north-eastern France.... [more]
SENG German
1. Topographic name for someone who lived by land cleared by fire, from Middle High German sengen ‘to singe or burn’. ... [more]
SENN German
Derived from the Middle High German word senne meaning "dairy farmer".
SENSENBACH German
A topographic name formed with an unexplained first element + Middle High German bach ‘creek’. Pretty common in Iowa and Pennsylvania.
SERRE French
Means 'greenhouse' in French.
SEUL French
From Fr. "only, alone"
SEUSS German, Jewish
Means "sweet", "pleasant", or "agreeable".
SÉVIGNY French
A kind of bush.
SEWINA German, Polish
The first available record of the Sewina family name is around 1620 in the province of Silesia, a mixed cultural region between Germany and Poland. Once part of the Prussian Empire and Germany. After World War Two, the area is now part of Poland... [more]
SEYLER German
Germanic surname
SFERRAZZA Italian
Occupational name for a scrap-metal merchant, from a derivative of Sferro in the sense ‘old and broken iron’. Habitational name from the district of Paternò in Catania, Sicily.
SFORZA Italian
Derived from the Italian verb sforzare meaning "to force, strain"; also compare the related word forza "force, strength". This was the surname of a dynasty of Milanese dukes, which held power in the 15th and 16th centuries.
SHADE English, German, Dutch, Scottish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary, from Old English scead ‘boundary’.nickname for a very thin man, from Middle English schade ‘shadow’, ‘wraith’.... [more]
SHADEL German (Anglicized, ?)
Derived from the German 'Schadle', meaning cranium or skull.
SHAFFNER German, German (Swiss)
Americanized version of German occupational name for a steward or bailiff, variant of SCHAFFNER and Schaffer.... [more]
SHAINWALD German
German for "beautiful forest", probably (?) related to SHEINFELD
SHATNER German (Anglicized), Jewish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of SCHATTNER. A notable bearer was Canadian actor William Shatner (1931-), who is known for his roles as Captain James T. Kirk in 'Star Trek', T.J. Hooker in 'T.J. Hooker', Denny Crane in 'Boston Legal', and the Priceline Negotiator in Priceline.com commercials.
SHIEMKE German, Polish, Slavic
Americanized spelling of Kashub Name: "Shiemke" Root Name: "Schimke" "Szymek" or "Szymko" ... [more]
SHOEN German (Anglicized), Jewish
Americanized spelling of German or Ashkenazic Jewish SCHÖN or SCHOEN.
SHROUT German
This surname is related to the German surname Schroder which means cut as in a wood cutter etc.
SIEBER German
The roots of the German surname Sieber can be traced to the Old Germanic word "Siebmacher," meaning "sieve maker." The surname is occupational in origin, and was most likely originally borne by someone who held this position
SIEBERN German
German. People known with this name are: Emelia Siebern, Hannah Siebern, Caleb Siebern.
SIECK German
The name is originally spelled "Siecke". Eric Siecke came from Norway and settled in Holstein, Germany in the year 1307. The final "e" was dropped by most of the family, though one branch still retains it... [more]
SIEGFRIED German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements sigi "victory" and fridu "peace". The German surname has also occasionally been adopted by Ashkenazic Jews.
SIEMENS German
Derived from the given name SIEM.
SIEVERTSEN German
Patronymic of SIEVERT.
SIEWERT German
Derived from the Frisian and Low German given name SIEVERT.
SILBER German, Jewish
From Middle High German "silber," meaning "silver." Metonymic occupational name for a silversmith, or often, in the case of the Jewish surname, an ornamental name.
SILBERMAN German, Jewish
Variant of SILBER, with the addition of Middle High German man meaning "man" or Yiddish man meaning "man".
SILBERSTEIN German, Jewish
From Middle High German silber "silver" and stein "stone"; a habitational name from a place so named in Bavaria, or a topographic name.... [more]
SILVESTRINI Italian
Means "Little Tree" or "Little Woods." Derived from the given name SILVESTER.
SILVIO Italian
From the personal name SILVIO (Latin SILVIUS, a derivative of silva "wood").
SIMBECK German
Originates from the German prefix sim meaning "of the head" and the German word becka meaning "bull". When combined in this order, the meaning was "bull-headed", meaning stubborn and obstinant.
SIMM German
A shortening of the given name Simon.
SIMONETTI Italian
The name Simonetti originated from the personal name Simon, itself a derivative of the Hebrew name "Sim'on," from the verb "sama" meaning "to listen." Thus, the name Simonetti means "God has listened," referring to the gratitude of the parents who, having wished for a child, had their prayers answered.... [more]
SIMONI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Simone
SINATRA Italian
Comes from a personal name in Sicily and souther Calabria. The name was apparently in origin a nickname from Latin senator member of the Roman senate, Latin senatus, a derivative of senex ‘old’... [more]
SING German, Chinese (Cantonese), Indian
German: probably a variant of SENG. ... [more]
SINGER German
variant of Sänger, in the sense of ‘poet’
SIRTORI Italian
Perhaps a habitational name from a comune (municipality) in Northern Italy.
SIVELLE French
A rare surname.
SKELTON English, German, Norwegian (Rare)
Habitational name from places in Cumbria and Yorkshire, England, originally named with the same elements as SHELTON, but with a later change of ‘s’ to ‘sk’ under Scandinavian influence.
SLYVESTRE Italian
Derived from the given name SYLVESTER.
SMOKE English, German, German (Austrian)
Possibly a variant of English SMOCK or an altered form of German SCHMUCK.
SNYDER Dutch, English, German, Yiddish, Jewish
Means "tailor" in Dutch, an occupational name for a person who stitched coats and clothing.... [more]
SOLARI Italian
Habitational name from any of various places called "Solaro" or "Solara", from solaro 'site', 'plot', 'meadow', literally "land exposed to the sun".
SOLDNER German
German surname meaning mercenary. German spelling has umlaut over the O, but American spelling is Soldner or Soeldner.
SOLEBELLO Italian
Means, "beautiful sun". Derived from "bello", meaning beautiful, and "sole", meaning sun.
SOLITAIRE French
the card game
SONNENBLUME German
Means "sunflower" in German.
SONNENSCHEIN German
Surname meaning "sunshine".
SONTAG German, Jewish
"sunday;" usually given to a person who was born on a sunday.
SOPRANO Italian
For soprano "higher, situated above", a topographic name for someone who lived at the top end of a place on a hillside.
SORDINO Italian (Rare), Literature
Derived from Italian sordino, referring to a mute for musical instruments. It is ultimately from Italian sordo "deaf" or "muffled (sound), silent, hidden, voiceless". American author Laurie Halse Anderson uses this for her novel Speak (1999), on high school rape victim MELINDA Sordino... [more]
SOTTILE Italian
Southern Italian: nickname from sottile ‘delicate’, ‘refined’, also ‘lean’, ‘thin’ (from Latin subtilis ‘small’, ‘slender’).
SOULE English, French, Medieval English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps derived from the vocabulary word soul as a term of affection.... [more]
SOULIER French
Metonymic occupational name for a shoemaker, from Old French soulier ‘shoe’, ‘sandal’.... [more]
SOVEREIGN French
Translation of the French surname Souverain which is derived from Old French souverain meaning "high place".
SOYER French
French surname (Alexis Benoist Soyer is a famous bearer).
SOZIO Italian
Nickname from socio "companion", "ally".
SPADAFORA Italian
Variant form of SPATAFORA. Spadafora is the younger out of the two surnames and yet the most common of the two, which might partly be because it is a little bit more italianized... [more]
SPANGLER German
Spangler is an occupational surname for "metal worker" having derived from the German word spange, meaning a clasp or buckle of the sort such a craftsman might have designed.
SPARK English, German
Northern English: from the Old Norse byname or personal name SPARKR ‘sprightly’, ‘vivacious’.... [more]
SPATAFORA Italian
This surname originates from the Italian island of Sicily, where it was first borne by a noble family of Byzantine origin, which had settled on the island in the 11th century AD. Their surname was derived from the Greek noun σπάθη (spathe) "blade, sword" (akin to Latin spatha "broad sword with a double edge") combined with Greek φορεω (phoreo) "to carry, to bear", which gives the surname the meaning of "he who carries the sword" or "sword-bearer"... [more]
SPAUGH German
Was originally "Spach," was changed when first introduced into America
SPECK German
Variant of Specker as well as a locational surname from one of various places called Speck, Specke and Specken in northern Germany and Spöck in southern Germany, as well as an occupational surname derived from German Speck "bacon" denoting a butcher who sepcialized in the production of bacon, as well as a derisive nickname for a corpulent person.
SPEISER German
German form of SPENCER.
SPENGLER German
Occupational surname literally meaning “metal worker” or “tin knocker”.
SPEZIA Italian
Means "spice, drug" in Italian. It was used to denote someone who worked as a spicer or apothecary.
SPIEGEL German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of mirrors, from Middle High German spiegel, German Spiegel "mirror" (via Old High German from Latin speculum, a derivative of specere "to look").
SPIEGLER German, Jewish
Occupational name for a maker or seller of mirrors, from Middle High German spiegel, German Spiegel "mirror" and the agent suffix -er.
SPIELBERG Jewish, German
From Old High German spiegel "lookout point" or German Spiel "game, play" and berg "mountain". Locational surname after a town in Austria. A famous bearer is American director Steven Spielberg (1946-present).
SPIES German
While it translates to the plural of "spy" in English, Spies is a semi-common name found throughout Germany and the surrounding nations. This surname is also popular throughout states with a high German population.
SPINAZZOLA Italian
From a place named Spinazzola in Italy.
SPINDLER English, German, Jewish
Occupational name for a spindle maker, from an agent derivative of Middle English spindle, Middle High German spindel, German Spindel, Yiddish shpindl "spindle, distaff".
SPINOLA Italian
Italian (Liguria) diminutive of SPINA. Italian topographic name for someone living by Monte Spinola in the province of Pavia.
SPOHR German
Occupational name for a maker of spurs, from Middle High German spor ‘spur’, or a topographic name, from Middle High German spor ‘spoor’, ‘animal tracks’.... [more]
SPRENGER German
German form of the surname Springer
SPRING German
From Middle High German sprinc, Middle Low German sprink "spring, well", hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a spring or well, or habitational name from Springe near Hannover.
SPRINGER German, English, Dutch, Jewish
Nickname for a lively person or for a traveling entertainer. It can also refer to a descendant of LUDWIG der Springer (AKA LOUIS the Springer), a medieval Franconian count who, according to legend, escaped from a second or third-story prison cell by jumping into a river after being arrested for trying to seize County Saxony in Germany.
STADTMUELLER German
From Middle High German stet meaning "place", "town" + müller meaning "miller", hence an occupational name for a miller who ground the grain for a town.
STAHL German
Metonymic occupational name for a smith or armorer, from Middle High German stahel "steel, armor".
STÄHLE German
Variant of STAHL.
STAHLER German
Occupational name for a foundry worker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German stal 'steel'.
STAHLING German (Rare)
Denoted a person who worked with steel. Derived from the name "Stähling", which was derived from "Stalin."
STALLMAN German
Variant of Staller. German: topographic name for someone who lived in a muddy place, from the dialect word stal. English: habitational name from Stalmine in Lancashire, named probably with Old English stæll 'creek', 'pool' + Old Norse mynni 'mouth'.
STANCEL German
Probably an altered spelling of STANCIL or possibly of German STENZEL.
STANDFUß German
It literally means "pedestal".
STANG German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German stang, German Stange ‘pole’, ‘shaft’, hence a nickname for a tall, thin person, a metonymic occupational name for a maker of wooden shafts for spears and the like, or a metonymic occupational name for a soldier.
STANISLAW Polish, German
Polish from the personal name Stanislaw, composed of the Slavic elements stani ‘become’ + slav ‘glory’, ‘fame’, ‘praise’... [more]
STANTZ German
Possibly an altered spelling of German Stanz, a habitation name from places called Stans or Stanz in Austria and Switzerland (see also Stentz).
STAR German, Dutch, Jewish, English
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname from German Star, Middle High German star, ‘starling’, probably denoting a talkative or perhaps a voracious person.... [more]
STATE German
Nickname from Middle High German stæt(e) meaning "firm", "steadfast", "constant".
STAUB German (Swiss), German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) occupational nickname for a miller, from Middle High German stoup, German Staub ‘dust’. The Jewish surname may also be ornamental.
STAUBER German, Jewish
An occupational name from STAUB, with the addition of the German agent suffix -er.
STAUCH German
From Middle High German stuche, a term used to denote both a type of wide sleeve and a headcovering. Also a habitational name from a place called Staucha, near Dresden.
STAUFFER German
This surname refers either to various towns named Stauffen or else it might be derived from Middle High German stouf "high rock/cliff/crag".
ST CLAIR French, English
From the place name St CLAIR
STEENKAMP German
Variant spelling of STEINKAMP.
STEFANI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of STEFANO.
STEGALL German
Grandmother marian name
STEGER German
Means "head miner" or "overman" from the German verb "steigen" meaning "to climb" or in this case "to lead a climb".
STEGER German
From a derivative of Middle High German stec "steep path or track, narrow bridge". The name was likely given to someone living close to a path or small bridge.
STEHR German
From Middle High German ster ‘ram’, hence probably a nickname for a lusty person, or possibly a metonymic occupational name for a shepherd.
STEIER German
Variant of STEIGER.
STEIERT German
Variant of STEIGER and STEIER.
STEIGER German
Occupational name from Middle High German stiger 'foreman', 'mine inspector'
STEINBACH German, Jewish
German habitational name from any of the many places named Steinbach, named with Middle High German stein ‘stone’ + bach ‘stream’, ‘creek’. ... [more]
STEINBECK German
Denotes a person hailing from one of the many places in Germany called Steinbeck or Steinbach, from Middle High German stein "stone" and bach "stream, creek". In some cases it is a South German occupational name for a mason... [more]
STEINBERG German
From stony mountain. From "stein" meaning stone, and "berg" meaning mountain.
STEININGER German
an occupational name for a stone cutter.
STEINKAMP German
North German topographic name for someone living by a field with a prominent rocky outcrop or boulder in it, and derived from Middle Low German sten meaning "rock, stone" and kamp meaning "enclosed field".
STEINMETZ German, Jewish
Occupational name from Middle High German steinmetze, German steinmetz "stonemason", "worker in stone".
STEINWEDEL German
From the German word "stein" and "wedel" which mean "stone frond", which was a name given to someone who lived near a stone wall covered in plants.
STELLRECHT German
Occupational name for a cartwright, from Middle High German stel "framework" and reht (from Old High German wurht-) "maker". Compare English -wright.
STELTER German
nickname for a disabled person; from Middle Low German stelte, stilt "wooden leg"
STELZNER German
Variant of Stelzer, probably an occupational name for a stilt-maker. Also, a habitational name for anyone from any of the places named Stelzen.
STEM German
Tis is my Surname, of German ancestry.
STEMPFER German
Derived from occupation means 'Stump remover'
STENZEL German
German from a reduced pet form of the Slavic personal name Stanislaw (see Stencel, STANISLAW).
ST GEORGES French
“Saint George.”
STIEGLITZ German
Meaning goldfinch, Stiglitz was borrowed into German from a Slavic language, probably Old Czech stehlec. Several possible origins: of the surname can be: ... [more]
STIFTER German
Unknown History of Stifter. Stifter means Founder in German
STIGLITZ German
Variant of Stieglitz
ST LOUIS French, English
In honor of Saint Louis.
STLOUIS French
Habitational name from any of several places named with a religious dedication to a St. Louis.
STOEHR German
From Middle Low German store ‘sturgeon’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who caught or sold sturgeon, or a nickname for someone with some supposed resemblance to the fish... [more]
STOHR German
North German (Stöhr): see STOEHR.... [more]
STOLLER German, Jewish, English
Habitational surname for someone from a place called Stolle, near Zurich (now called Stollen).... [more]
STOLLERMAN German
A man from Stoll, a province of Germany.
STOLTENBERG German, Norwegian
Habitational name from places so called in Pomerania and Rhineland. A famous bearer is Jens Stoltenberg (b. 1959), Prime Minister of Norway 2000-2001 and 2005-2013.
STOLTZFUS German
Stoltzfus is a surname of German origin. It is common among Mennonites and Amish. All American Stoltzfuses are descended from Nicholas Stoltzfus (1719–1774), an Amish man who migrated from Germany to America in 1766.
STONEMAN German
Longer version of STONE.
STORCH German, Jewish
From Middle High German storch "stork", hence a nickname for someone thought to resemble the bird.
STORCK German
German. from the meaning the House of the Storks. ... [more]
STORM English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian (Rare)
Nickname for a man of blustery temperament, from Middle English, Middle Low German, storm, Old Norse stormr meaning "storm".
STORR German
Nickname for a crude man, from Middle High German storr 'tree stump', 'clod'.
STOSS German, Jewish
Nickname for a quarrelsome person, from Middle High German stoz 'quarrel', 'fight'.
STRANDHEIM German, Jewish
From a location name meaning "beach home" in German, from Middle High German strand meaning "beach" and heim meaning "home". As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
STRASBURG German
It is derived from the Old Germanic phrase "an der Strasse," which literally means "on the street." Thus, the original bearer of this name was most likely someone whose residence was located on a street.
STRASSE German
It derives either from the ancient Roman (Latin) word "straet" meaning a main road, and hence somebody who lived by such a place, or from a German pre-medieval word "stratz" meaning vain.
STRASSMANN German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone living on a main street, from Middle High German strasse, German Strasse "street, road" and man "man".
STRAUSS German, Jewish
From the German word strauß, meaning "ostrich." In its use as a Jewish surname, it comes from the symbol of the building or family that the bearer occupied or worked for in the Frankfurter Judengasse... [more]
STRAUß German, Jewish
An older spelling of STRAUSS, which is only used in Germany and Austria.
STREITER German
Topographic name from Middle High German struot 'swamp', 'bush', 'thicket' + -er, suffix denoting an inhabitant.
STRIGL German
Name given in 1056 a.d. Meaning- Keeper of the Royal Horses.
STROH English, German
Means "straw" when translated from German, indicating a thin man, a person with straw-colored hair, or a dealer of straw.
STRUBEL German
German (also Strübel): from a diminutive of Middle High German strūp (see Strub).... [more]
STUHR German, Danish, German (Austrian)
A nickname for an inflexible, obstinate person.
STULTS German
The Stults surname is derived from the German word "stoltz," which means "proud," and as such, it was most likely originally a nickname, which became a hereditary surname.
STURTZ German
Sturtz comes from an alpine village in Germany. It literately means "to stumble".
SUDAN Arabic, Italian, Spanish
Ethnic name or regional name for someone from Sudan or who had traded with Sudan. The name of the country is ultimately derived from Arabic سُود (sud) meaning "black", referring to the darker skin of the inhabitants.
SUGAR German (Rare)
Sugar is the surname of talented storyteller, writer, and composer Rebecca Rae Sugar (creator of animated series Steven Universe).
SUHR German
Nickname for a bitter or cantankerous person, from Middle Low German sūr meaning "sour".
SULLENBERGER German
Derived from an unknown place called Sullenberg or from Schallenberg in Baden, Switzerland. A famous bearer is Chesley Burnett "Sully" Sullenberger III (1951-), an American retired Air Force fighter pilot and airline captain who is best known for saving all 155 people aboard in the 2009 ditching of US Airways Flight 1549 in the Hudson River off Manhattan, after both engines were disabled by a bird strike.
SUMMER English, German
From Middle English sum(m)er, Middle High German sumer "summer", hence a nickname for someone of a warm or sunny disposition, or for someone associated with the season of summer in some other way.
SUMMERLIN English, German, Scottish
An English surname.... [more]
SUR German
Variant of SAUER.
SURDI Italian
Meaning "deaf" in Latin.
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