Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the meaning contains the keywords capital or city.
usage
meaning
See Also
city meaning
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Acton English, Northern Irish
"Oak Town" in Old English. Parishes in Cheshire, Suffolk, Middlesex. There is also a place that bears this name in Ulster.
Aimura Japanese
Ai can mean "together, join" and mura means "hamlet, village".
Akamura Japanese
Aka means "red" and mura means "hamlet, village".
Akimura Japanese
From Japanese 秋 (aki) meaning "autumn" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Akisato Japanese
秋 (Aki) means "autumn" and 里 (sato) means "village, ri: unit of measurement, league, parent's home". ... [more]
Alaküla Estonian
Alaküla is an Estonian surname meaning "village area".
Aldea Spanish
Topographic name meaning "village, hamlet" in Spanish, ultimately from Arabic الضيعة‎ (ad-day'a).
Alfstad Norwegian (Rare)
Possibly a combination of the given name Alf 1 and stad "city, town".
Alton English
From a place name meaning "town at the source of the river" in Old English.
Amai Japanese
This surname is used as 天井 or 甘井 with 天 (ten, ama-, amatsu, ame) meaning "heavens, imperial, sky", 甘 (kan, ama.i, ama.eru, ama.yakasu, uma.i) meaning "be content, coax, pamper, sugary, sweet" and 井 (shou, sei, i) meaning "community, town, well, well crib."
Ambrìz Spanish
" Probably a variant of Asturian-Leonese Ambres, a habitational name from a village in Asturies. Also a habitational name of Ámbriz a city in Angola, Africa, mainly of Portuguese descendants. "
Aniston English
"Town of Agnes, Agnes town"... [more]
Anniston English
"Town of Agnes".
Arimura Japanese
Ari means "exist" and mura means "village, hamlet".
Arlington English
Location name that refers to a settlement associated with a personal name reduced to Arl- plus the Anglo-Saxon patronymic element -ing- then the element -ton denoting a "settlement"... [more]
Aruküla Estonian
Aruküla is an Estonian surname meaning "grassland village".
Asamura Japanese
From Japanese 浅 (asa) meaning "shallow" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Asbury English
English location name with the elements as- meaning "east" or "ash tree" and -bury meaning "fortified settlement."
Astana Kazakh
Derived from Astana, the name of the capital city of Kazakhstan. Its name is derived from Persian آستانه (âstâne) meaning "capital".
Asuküla Estonian
Asuküla is an Estonian surname meaning "populated village".
Asula Estonian
Asula is an Estonian surname meaning "settlement".
Atherton English
Habitational name from a place near Manchester named Atherton, from the Old English personal name Æðelhere + Old English tun meaning "settlement".
Awamura Japanese
Awa means "millet" and mura means "hamlet, village".
Axton English
From Old English æsc(e) meaning "ash tree(s)" and Old English ton meaning "town".
Azahara Japanese
From Japanese 字 (aza) meaning "a section of a village" and 原 (hara) meaning "field, plain".
Babington English
Habitational name for someone from Babington in Somerset or Great or Little Bavington in Northumberland, named with the Old English personal name Babba + the connective particle -ing- meaning "associated with", "named after" + tūn meaning "settlement".
Baltimore English (American)
From the name of the American city of Baltimore, and an anglicisation of Irish Gaelic Baile an Tí Mhóir meaning "town of the big house".
Banville French, English, Irish
From a place in france derived from the Germanic name Bada and French ville "village, town".
Barnaby English
Either (i) means "person from Barnaby", Yorkshire ("Beornwald's settlement"); or (ii) from the medieval male personal name Barnaby, the English form of Barnabas, a biblical name ultimately from Aramaic Barnabia "son of Nabia".
Barrios Spanish
Habitational name from any of the numerous places named with Spanish barrio "outlying suburb (especially an impoverished one), slum", from Arabic barr "suburb, dependent village". It may also be a topographic name for someone originating from a barrio.
Barsby English
Derived from the Old Norse word barn, which occured as a byname and meant "child", and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement"
Barthorpe English
This surname originates from the village of the same name in the East Riding of Yorkshire, likely combining the Old Norse personal name Bǫrkr with Old Norse þorp meaning "village."
Baskerville English
Means "bush town", from Anglo-Norman French boschet (a little bush) and ville (town).
Battersby English
Derives from the place of Battersby in North Yorkshire, which is composed of Old Norse personal name Bǫðvarr and the Old Norse suffix býr "farm, settlement"... [more]
Bestauty Ossetian
Derived from Ossetian бистэ (biste) meaning "village, suburb" or from Persian به (beh) meaning "good, excellent, better". In the case of the former, it would have been used to indicate the place of residence of an ancestor.
Bøe Norwegian
Derived from Old Norse býr "farm, village, settlement" or búa "to reside".
Bøen Norwegian
Habitational name from the common farm name Bøen, simply meaning "the farm" (ultimately derived from Old Norse býr "farm, village, settlement" and the definite article -en).
Borges Portuguese, Spanish
Possibly from Old French burgeis meaning "town-dweller" (see Burgess). Alternately, it may have denoted someone originally from the city of Bourges in France.
Bourgeois French
from bourgeois "burgher" (from Old French burgeis from burc "fortified town") a status name for an inhabitant and (usually) freeman of a fortified town (see Bourg)... [more]
Bourget French
Possibly meaning "from the city, town" or given to wealthy families, (from bourgeois)
Braham English
From the name of a town called Braham, probably derived from Old English brom meaning "broom (a type of plant)" and ham meaning "home, settlement" or hamm meaning "river meadow".
Bransby English (British)
English locational name from the village of Bransby in Lincolnshire. The place name is first recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as 'Branzbi' and later (1115) as 'Brandesby'. These recordings showing that the derivation is from the Old Norse personal name Brandr meaning "sword" and byr, the whole meaning being "Brand's village" or "homestead"... [more]
Braunschweig German, Jewish
Denoted a person from the city of Braunschweig in Lower Saxony, Germany, which is of Old Saxon origin meaning "Bruno's settlement".
Brayton English
Derived from the Old Norse name breithr meaning "broad", or the Old Norse personal name Breithi, combined with the Old English suffix tun meaning "town, farmstead".
Brenton English
habitational name primarily from Brenton near Exminster possibly named in Old English as Bryningtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Bryni" (a personal name from Old English bryne "fire flame") or "Bryni's town".
Brink Low German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish
The Dutch and Low German meaning is "village green". In Danish and Swedish, the name is thought to be a borrowing of Middle Dutch brinc / brink, meaning "grassy edge" or perhaps "slope",, and the Danish word now means "where the water runs deep".
Brinton English
English locational surname, taken from the town of the same name in Norfolk. The name means "settlement belonging to Brun" - the personal name coming from the Old English word for "fire, flame".
Brooksby English
Means "farm by a brook". From Old English broc "brook, small stream" and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement"
Broughton English
Habitational name from any of the many places so called in England. The first name element is derived from Old English broc "brook", burh "fortress", or beorg "castle". The second element is derived from Old English tun "settlement, dwelling".
Brumby English
English habitational name from a place in Lincolnshire named Brumby, from the Old Norse personal name Brúni or from Old Norse brunnr "well" + býr "farmstead, village".
Brunton English (Rare)
From Old English burna meaning "stream" and tun, settlement; hence, "settlement by a stream".
Burger English, German, Dutch
Status name for a freeman of a borough. From Middle English burg, Middle High German burc and Middle Dutch burch "fortified town". Also a German habitational name for someone from a place called Burg.
Burgio Italian
Denoting someone from a town of the same name, ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European word meaning "high, lofty", possibly by way of Arabic بُرْج (burj) "tower", German burg "castle, fortification; settlement", French bourg "burg, market town", or Latin burgus "watchtower, fortified town".
Burgmeier German
Occupational name for the tenant farmer of an estate belonging to a castle or fortified town, from Middle High German burc "(fortified) town, castle" and meier "tenant farmer" (see Meyer 1).
Burley English
English habitation name from the elements burh meaning "stronghold or fortified settlement" and leah meaning "field or clearing".
Busby English
Habitational name from a place in North Yorkshire, recorded in Domesday Book as Buschebi, from Old Norse buskr "bush, shrub" or an Old Norse personal name Buski and býr "homestead, village", or from some other place so called.
Buxton English
1. A habitational name for someone from Buxton in Derbyshire, from the Middle English Buchestanes or Bucstones (meaning "bowing stones"), from Old English būgan meaning "to bow" and stanes, meaning "stones".... [more]
Byberg Norwegian, Swedish (Rare)
Combination of Swedish and Norwegian by "village" and berg "mountain".
Bylin Swedish
A combination of Swedish by "village" and the suffix -in, derived from Latin -inus, -inius "descendant of"
Bylund Swedish
Combination of Swedish by "village" and lund "grove".
Bystedt Swedish
A combination of Swedish by "village" and German stedt "home, place".
Canterbury English
Habitational name from Canterbury in Kent, named in Old English as Cantwaraburg "fortified town (burgh) of the people (wara) of Kent".
Cartagena Spanish
From the name of the city of Cartagena in southeastern Spain, derived from Latin Carthāgō Nova meaning "New Carthage" (ultimately derived from Phonecian qrt-ḥdšt meaning "new city").
Castel French
Topographic name from a derivative of Late Latin castellum "castle" (a diminutive of Latin castrum "fort Roman walled city") or a habitational name from any of several places called (Le) Castel... [more]
Charlton English, Caribbean
Location last name from any of the numerous places called Charlton, from Old English Ceorlatun meaning "settlement of the peasants"... [more]
Chaugule Marathi
Derived from Marathi चौगुला (chaugula) meaning "village officer".
Chishiya Japanese
From Japanese 千 (chi) meaning "thousand", 地 (chi) meaning "earth, land", 智 (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect" 散 (chi) meaning "scatter", 梓 (shi) meaning "Japanese cherry birch", 塩 (shio) meaning "salt", 沙 (shi) meaning "sand", 司 (shi) meaning "to take charge of; to control; to manage", 史 (shi) meaning "history", 四 (shi) meaning "four", 士 (shi) meaning "samurai, warrior", 子 (shi) meaning "child", 市 (shi) meaning "market", 志 (shi) meaning "purpose, will, determination, aspiration, ambition", 氏 (shi) meaning "a family; a clan", 糸 (shi) meaning "thread", 紙 (shi) meaning "paper", 紫 (shi) meaning "purple; violet", 至 (shi) meaning "to reach; to arrive", 詩 (shi) meaning "poetry, poem", 資 (shi) meaning "money; fund; wealth; capital", 汐 (shi) meaning "evening tide; night tides; ebb", 心 (shi) meaning "heart, mind, soul" or 清 (shi) meaning "clear; limpid", and 也 (ya) meaning "also" or 哉 (ya), an exclamation... [more]
Clopton English
Habitational name from any of various places, for example in Essex, Suffolk, and Warwickshire, named Clopton from Old English clopp(a) meaning "rock", "hill" + tūn meaning "settlement".
Colston English
Colston means “Coal town settlement.” It is also a variant of Colton.
Colville Scottish, English
Derived from the place Colleville in Normandy, France. With the Scandinavian name Koli and French ville "town, village".
Compton English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places throughout England (but especially in the south) named Compton, from Old English cumb meaning "short, straight valley" + tūn meaning "enclosure", "settlement".
Condon Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Condún, itself a Gaelicized form of the Anglo-Norman habitational name de Caunteton... [more]
Córdoba Spanish
Indicates someone who was originally from the city of Córdoba (Cordova) in Andalusia, Spain. The name itself is derived from Phonecian Qʾrtuba meaning "Juba’s city", itself from Phonecian qʾrt meaning "city" and juba referring to King Juba I of Numidia.
Cranston Scottish
Combination of the Old English byname Cran "crane" and Old English tun "settlement".
Creighton English
From Irish 'crioch' meaning "border", and Old English 'tun' meaning "town".
Crofton English
Derived from a place name meaning "town with a small enclosed field" in Old English.
D'abbeville French
Means "of Abbeville" Abbeville is a commune in France. Takes its name from Latin Abbatis Villa meaning "Abbot's Village".
Dahlby Swedish (Rare)
Combination of Swedish dal "valley" and by "village".
Dalby English, Danish, Norwegian
From any of the locations call Dalby from the old Norse elements dalr "valley" and byr "farm, settlement" meaning "valley settlement". Used by one of the catholic martyrs of England Robert Dalby... [more]
Dangerfield English
Habitational name, with fused preposition d(e), for someone from any of the various places in northern France called Angerville, from the Old Norse personal name Ásgeirr and Old French ville "settlement, village"... [more]
D'aureville French
This surname literally means "from Aureville". Aureville is a commune in southwestern France, which was established in late medieval times. It derives its name from Latin aurea villa or villa aurea which literally means "golden country-house, golden farm" but of course later came to mean "golden village".
Davenport English
Habitational name from a place in Cheshire named Davenport, from the Dane river (apparently named with a Celtic cognate of Middle Welsh dafnu "to drop, to trickle") and Old English port "market town".
Deidda Sardinian
Sardinian cognate of Villani, from de "of, from" and bidda "town, hamlet".
Del Pueblo Spanish
Means "of the village" in Spanish.
Demura Japanese
The Japanese surname "Demura" (出村) consists of two kanji characters: "出" meaning "to go out" or "to leave" and "村" meaning "village" or "town." So, "Demura" could be interpreted as "from the village" or "originating from the village." However, as with many Japanese surnames, there may be variations in meaning and interpretation depending on the family's history and region.
Dennington English
Habitational name from a place in Suffolk, recorded in Domesday Book as Dingifetuna, from the Old English female personal name Denegifu (composed of the elements Dene meaning "Dane" + gifu meaning "gift") + Old English tūn meaning "enclosure", "settlement".
Denton English
The surname Denton means "valley town" in Old English. ... [more]
Digby English
Derived from the name of an English town, itself derived from a combination of Old English dic "dyke, ditch" and Old Norse býr "farm, town".
Dijkhuizen Dutch
Means "houses in the dike" in Dutch, derived from dijk meaning "dike, ditch, levee" and huizen meaning "houses, settlement", and so indicated a person who lived in a house close to a dyke or embankment.
Dorchester English
Derived from either the village in Oxfordshire, or the county town of Dorset, England (both of which have the same name). Both are named with a Celtic name, respectively Dorcic and Durnovaria combined with Old English ceaster meaning "Roman fort, walled city".
Dorsainvil Haitian Creole
Ornamental name derived from French d'or meaning "of gold" combined with saint "holy" and vil "settlement" (the Haitian Creole spelling of French ville).
Duhaylungsod Filipino, Cebuano
Means "having two hometowns" from Cebuano duha meaning "two" and lungsod meaning "town."
Dunstan English
Either from the given name Dunstan or habitational name from Dunston (Derbyshire Lincolnshire Norfolk) from the Old English personal name Dunn and tun "settlement"... [more]
Edamura Japanese
The kanji 枝 (Eda) means "Branch", while 村 (Mura) means "Town, Village". Combine the two and the surname means "Branching Town/Village".
Edgerton English
From a place name meaning either "settlement of Ecghere" or "settlement of Ecgheard" (see Ekkehard).
Edmiston Scottish
Habitational name from Edmonstone, near Edinburgh, so named from the Old English personal name Ēadmund + tūn meaning "settlement".
Everingham English
Means "homestead of the followers of Eofor". From Old English eofor "boar" inga, meaning "the people of, followers of" and ham meaning "home, estate, settlement".
Fanthorpe English
Fan means "From France" and Thorpe is a Middle English word meaning "Small Village, Hamlet"
Faucett English
Locational surname from various British places: Fawcett in Cumberland, Facit in Lancashire, Forcett in North Yorkshire, or Fa’side Castle in East Lothian, Scotland. The linguistic origins of the name arise variously from, in Cumberland and Lancashire, "multi-coloured hillside" in 7th century Old English fag or fah, "brightly coloured, variegated, flowery" with side, "slope"; in North Yorkshire from Old English ford, "ford", and sete, "house, settlement"; or, reputedly, in East Lothian, "fox on a hillside"... [more]
Felton English
A habitation name composed of the elements feld-, meaning "field or pasture" and -tun, meaning "settlement."
Fenton English
Originated from several place names in England, meaning “marsh town” from Old English fenn “marsh, fen” + tun “enclosure; settlement, town”.
Filkins English
Means either (i) "person from Filkins", Oxfordshire ("settlement of Filica's people"); or "son of Filkin", a medieval personal name meaning literally "little Phil", from Philip.
Fleetwood English
Means "From the town of Fleetwood, in Lancaster".
Formby English
From the name of a town in Merseyside, England, meaning "Forni's village". The second part is derived from Old Norse býr meaning "farm, settlement". A famous bearer is George Formby (1904-1961), English comedian and entertainer.
Forton English
Habitational name from any of the places in Hampshire Lancashire Shropshire and Staffordshire named Forton from Old English ford "ford" and tun "settlement enclosure".
Fujisato Japanese
藤 (Fuji) means "wisteria" and 里 (sato) means "hamlet, village".
Fukamachi Japanese
From Japanese 深 (fuka) meaning "deep" and 町 (machi) meaning "town".
Fukumura Japanese
It means "Happy Village" in Japanese.
Fullerton English
Habitational name from a place in Scotland. Derived from Old English fugol "bird" and tun "settlement, enclosure".
Futamura Japanese
From Japanese 二 (futa) meaning "two" or 双 (futa) meaning "pair", and 村 (mura) meaning "village, hamlet".
Gamage Sinhalese
Means "of the village", from Sinhala ගම (gama) meaning "village" and the locative suffix -ගේ (-ge) meaning "home, house".
Gamanayake Sinhalese
Derived from Sanskrit ग्राम (grama) meaning "village" and नायक (nayaka) meaning "hero, leader".
Gatenby English
Derives from the place of Gatenby in North Yorkshire, which comes from an Old Norse personal name "Gaithen", likely from Old Norse geitin "goats" (later influenced by Old English gāt "goat") and the suffix býr "farm, settlement", referring to a settlement with goats... [more]
Gaunt English
This name is believed to have derived "from the town of Gaunt, now Ghent, in Flanders."... [more]
Gavazansky Belarusian
Means "from the town of Gavezhno". Gavezhno is a town in Belarus.
Gawthrop English
habitational name from any of several places in Yorkshire and Lancashire called Gawthorpe or Gowthorpe all of which are named from Old Norse gaukr "cuckoo" and þorp "enclosure" meaning "village where cuckoo's frequented".
Gilstrap English (British, Anglicized, Rare)
This is a place name acquired from once having lived at a place spelled Gill(s)thorp(e), Gilsthorp(e), Gill(s)throp(e) or Gil(s)throp(e) located in the Old Danelaw area of England.... [more]
Ginsburg German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone who came from Gunzberg in Bavaria, Günsburg in Swabia, or Gintsshprik (Königsburg) in East Prussia. Its origin is from the name of the river Günz, written in early Latin documents as Guntia, which was probably of Celtic origin, and Old High German burg meaning "Fortress, walled town".
Glock German
Meant "person who lives by a church bell-tower or in a house with the sign of a bell", "bell-ringer" or "town crier" (German Glocke "bell"). It was borne by Sir William Glock (1908-2000), a British music administrator.
Gloster English
habitational name from the city of Gloucester. The place originally bore the British name Glevum (apparently from a cognate of Welsh gloyw "bright") to which was added the Old English element ceaster "Roman fort or walled city" (from Latin castrum "legionary camp")... [more]
Gloucester English
habitational name from the city of Gloucester. The place originally bore the British name Glevum (apparently from a cognate of Welsh gloyw "bright") to which was added the Old English element ceaster "Roman fort or walled city" (from Latin castrum "legionary camp")... [more]
Görlitz German
The name of a small town in Saxony. Derived from old Sorbian word "Zgorelc" meaning "settlement on a burned-out forest."
Grainville French
Original French form of Granville, from locations in France called Grainville from the given name Guarin and ville "town" meaning "Guarin's town".
Haliburton Scottish
Means "town fortified in stone". It comes from a combination of the Old Norse element hallr meaning rock (as in Halle 1) and of the Old English place name Burton, denoting a fortified town... [more]
Hamamura Japanese
From Japanese 浜, 濱 (hama) meaning "beach, seashore" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Hamill Scottish
Habitational name from Haineville or Henneville in Manche, France, named from the Germanic personal name Hagano + Old French ville "settlement".
Hanamura Japanese
From Japanese 花 (hana) meaning "flower" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Hausknecht German
occupational name from Middle High German hus "house" and kneht "boy servant" also "town-hall, messenger".
Hauteville French
From French haute "high" and ville "town, estate".
Hayling English
Either (i) "person from Hayling", Hampshire ("settlement of Hægel's people"); or (ii) from the Old Welsh personal name Heilyn, literally "cup-bearer" (see also Palin).
Heaton English
Comes from "town (or farmstead) on a hill".... [more]
Heimburger German, Jewish
Status name for a village head, derived from Middle High German heim meaning "homestead, settlement" and bürge meaning "guardian". It could also be a habitational name for someone from numerous places called Heimburg or Heimberg in Germany.
Helton English (American)
Habitational name from Helton in Cumbria, named in Old English probably with helde "slope" and tun "farmstead, settlement", or possibly a variant of Hilton... [more]
Hermaküla Estonian
Hermaküla is an Estonian surname possibly derived from "Herman's village".
Heston English, Irish
Derived from Heston, a suburban area in West London (historically in Middlesex), or Histon, a village and civil parish in Cambridgeshire, England. It is either named with Old English hǣs meaning "brushwood" and tūn meaning "farmstead, settlement, estate", or from hyse "shoot, tendril, son, youth" and tūn... [more]
Hinton English (Archaic)
Comes from Old English heah meaning "high" and tun meaning "enclosure" or "settlement." A notable person with the surname is female author S.E Hinton.
Hisamura Japanese
From Japanese 久 (hisa) meaning "long time ago" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Hiyama Japanese
From the Japanese hi, meaning "red, scarlet", and mura, meaning "town, village".
Homura Japanese
This surname is used as 保村, 甫村 or 穂村 with 保 (ho, hou, tamo.tsu) meaning "guarantee, keep, preserve, protect, support, sustain", 甫 (fu, ho, haji.mete, suke) meaning "for the first time, not until", 穂 (sui, ho) meaning "crest (of wave), ear, ear (of grain), head" and 村 (son, mura) meaning "town, village."... [more]
Hookham English
This surname may derive from Old English hóc meaning "hook, angle" and hám meaning "village, hamlet, dwelling."
Hornby English
A habitational name from locations called Hornby in northern England, though predominantly associated with Lancashire. Derived from the Norse horni meaning "horn" and býr meaning "farm" or "settlement".
Hoshii Japanese
From Japanese 星 (hoshi) meaning "star, spot" combined with 井 (i) meaning "well, town".
Hoshimura Japanese
From Japanese 星 (hoshi) meaning "star" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Huffington English
Means "Uffa's town". A famous bearer is Arianna Huffington, born Αριάδνη-Άννα Στασινοπούλου
Hun Khmer
Means "capital, investment" in Khmer, also referring to a unit of weight for precious metals.
Hutabalian Batak
From Batak huta meaning "village, area" and balian meaning "rice field, farm, outside".
Hutabarat Batak
From Batak huta meaning "village, area" and barat meaning "west".
Hutagalung Batak
From Batak huta meaning "village, area" and galung meaning "embankment, dike, cleared field".
Hutagaol Batak
From Batak huta meaning "village, area" and gaol meaning "banana".
Hutajulu Batak
From Batak huta meaning "village, area" and julu meaning "upstream".
Hutapea Batak
From Batak huta meaning "village, area" and pea meaning "marsh, swamp, reservoir, lowland".
Hutauruk Batak
From Batak huta meaning "village, area" and uruk meaning "upper, above" or "bone leaves (a type of plant)".
Ibba Italian
Meaning uncertain, possibly from Sardinian v-ibba "settlement" (compare Deidda), or from Latin ibi "that place, there".
Ichihara Japanese
This surname combines 一 (ichi, itsu, hito-, hito.tsu) meaning "one" or 市 (shi, ichi) meaning "city, market, town" with 原 (gen, hara) meaning "field, meadow, original, plain, prairie, primitive, tundra, wilderness".... [more]
Ichiko Japanese
From Japanese 市 (ichi) "city" and 子 (ko) "child".... [more]
Ichimura Japanese
Ichi can mean "one" or "market" and mura means "hamlet, village".
Ichimura Japanese
From Japanese 市 (ichi) meaning "market" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Ichimura Japanese
From Japanese 一 (ichi) meaning "one" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Ichinomiya Japanese
This surname is used as 一宮, 一の宮, 一ノ宮, 一之宮 or 市之宮 with 一 (ichi, itsu, hito, hito.tsu) meaning "one," 市 (shi, ichi) meaning "city, market, town," 之 (shi, oite, kono, kore, no, yuku) meaning "of, this" or 宮 (kyuu, ku, kuu, guu, miya) meaning "constellations, palace, princess."... [more]
Ichinose Japanese
From japanese 市 (ichi) meaning "city", 一 (ichi) meaning "one", 之 (no) as in the particle の, and 瀬 (se) meaning "rapids,current". ... [more]
Iimura Japanese
Ii means "cooked grains" and mura means "village, hamlet".
Imamura Japanese
From Japanese 今 (ima) meaning "now, present" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Imari Japanese (Rare)
This surname is used as 今利, 伊万里 or 伊萬里 with 今 (kon, kin, ima) meaning "now", 利 (ri, ki.ku) meaning "advantage, benefit, profit", 伊 (i, kare) meaning "Italy, that one", 万/萬 (ban, man, yorozu, ma) meaning "ten thousand/10,000" and 里 (ri, sato) meaning "league, parent's home, ri (unit of distance - equal to 3.927 km), village."... [more]
Imura Japanese
From Japanese 井 (i) meaning "well, mine shaft, pit" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Inamura Japanese
From Japanese 稲 (ina) meaning "rice plant" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Ingoldsby English
Habitational name from Ingoldsby in Lincolnshire, named from the Old Norse personal name Ingjaldr + bý meaning "farmstead", "settlement".
Iori Japanese
This surname is used as 庵, 井居, 井折, 井織, 伊折 or 伊織 with 庵 (an, iori, io) meaning "hermitage, retreat", 井 (sei, shou, i) meaning "well, well crib, town, community", 伊 (i, kare) meaning "Italy, that one", 居 (kyo, ko, i.ru, -i, o.ru) meaning "reside, to be, exist, live with", 折 (setsu, o.ru, ori, o.ri, -o.ri, o.reru) meaning "fold, break, fracture, bend, yield, submit" and 織 (o.ri) meaning "fabric, weave."... [more]
Iriarte Basque
Topographic name for someone who lived between two or more settlements, from Basque iri meaning ‘"settlement", "village" + arte meaning "between".
Irribarren Basque
From the basque surname that means "Inside the village".
Isomura Japanese
From Japanese 磯 (iso) meaning "seashore, beach" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Itamura Japanese
Ita means "plank, board" and mura means "village, hamlet".
Iwamura Japanese
Iwa means "stone " and mura can mean "village, hamlet" or "town".
Jaxton English
Means "Jack's town" in English
Kakimura Japanese
Kaki means "persimmon" and mura means "village, hamlet".
Kallweit German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "smith; blacksmith; farrier", derived from Old Prussian kalt "to forge; to hammer" and Old Prussian kalweitis "the village smith".
Kamachi Japanese
Kama means "honeysuckle" and chi means "ground, soil", or it could be spelled as ka meaning "add, increase" and machi meaning "town".
Kamimura Japanese
Kami means "god" or "top, upper" and mura means "village, hamlet "
Kanō Japanese
From Japanese 加 (ka) meaning "add, increase" and 納 (nō) meaning "settlement, obtain, reap".
Kanō Japanese
From Japanese 加 (ka) meaning "add, increase" and 納 (nō) meaning "settlement, obtain, reap".
Kashimura Japanese
From Japanese 樫 (kashi) meaning "oak" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Kawamura Japanese
From Japanese 川 or 河 (kawa) meaning "river, stream" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Keeton English
Habitational name from a place called Ketton in Durham or one in Rutland or from Keaton in Ermington, Devon. The first is named from the Old English personal name Catta or the Old Norse personal name Káti and Old English tūn "settlement"; the second is probably from an old river name or tribal name Cētan (possibly a derivative of Celtic cēd "wood") and Old English ēa "river"; and the last possibly from Cornish kee "hedge, bank" and Old English tūn.
Kekke Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese 結解 (kekke), a variant reading of 結解 (ketsuge) meaning "account settlement", referring to someone who would deal with settlement of accounts.
Kempton English
From the name of a place in Shropshire meaning "Cempa's town" or "warrior town", from a combination of either the Old English word cempa "warrior" or the byname derived from it and tun "farmstead, settlement".
Kensington English
English surname meaning "Cynesige's town", from the Old English personal name Cynesige and ton 'town'.
Kenton English
habitational name from any of various places so named Kenton, for example in Devon, Greater London (formerly Middlesex), Northumberland, and Suffolk... [more]
Kergoat Breton, French
From Breton ker "Village" or "Area" and koad "Woods".
Kerhervé Breton
From Breton ker "Village" or "Area" and the name Hervé.
Kerjean Breton
Possibly derived from a Breton place name, apparently composed of Breton kêr "city" and the name Jean 1.
Kesküla Estonian
Kesküla is an Estonian name, derived from "kesk" ("central") and "küla" ("village").
Kestel English
Habitational name from Kestle, a place in Cornwall, so named from Cornish castell "castle, village, rock".
Kidamura Japanese
This surname could be made up of 木 (Ki) meaning "Tree, Wood", 貴 (Ki) meaning "Valuabele", or 喜 (Ki) meaning "Rejoice", with 田 (Da) meaning "Rice Paddy, Field", and 村 (Mura) means "Hamlet, Village"... [more]
Kikyo Japanese
This surname is used as 桔梗, 喜京, 木京 or 鬼京 with 桔 (kitsu, ketsu, ki), which is used in plant names, 梗 (kyou, kou, oomune, fusagu, yamanire) meaning "close up, flower stem, for the most part", 喜 (ki, yoroko.basu, yoroko.bu) meaning "rejoice, take pleasure in", 木 (boku, moku, ki, ko-) meaning "tree, wood", 鬼 (ki, oni, oni-) meaning "devil, ghost" and 京 (kyou, kin, kei, miyako) meaning "capital."... [more]
Kington English
Variant of Kingston meaning "King's Town".
Kirimura Japanese
Kiri means "paulownia" and mura means "hamlet, village".
Kirouac French (Quebec)
From an unidentified place name in Brittany, France, derived from Breton kaer, caer, ker meaning "fortified settlement" and an unknown given name.
Kitamura Japanese
From Japanese 北 (kita) meaning "north" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Knighton English
English surname which was derived from a place name composed of the Old English elements cnihta meaning "servant, retainer" (genitive plural of cniht) and tun "enclosure, settlement".
Kohlstedt Medieval German (Modern)
Likely derived from the German word Kohl, meaning “Cabbage,” and a Variation of the word Stadt, meaning “City, town, and/or place.”
Kōmura Japanese
From Japanese 高 (kō) meaning "tall, high" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Komura Japanese
Ko means "small" and mura means "village, hamlet".
Komura Japanese
From Japanese 小 (ko) meaning "small" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Kotomura Japanese
Koto means "flute" and mura means "village".
Küla Estonian
Küla is an Estonian surname meaning "village".
Külaots Estonian
Külaots is an Estonian surname meaning "village end".
Kunimura Japanese
Kuni means "country, large place" and mura means "village, hamlet".
Kuramura Japanese
Kura means "storehouse" and mura means "village, hamlet".
Kwak Korean
From Sino-Korean 郭 (gwak) meaning "outer city" (making it the Korean form of Guo) or 霍 (gwak) meaning "quickly, suddenly".
Kyoguchi Japanese
From Japanese 京 (kyo) meaning "capital" and 口 (guchi) meaning "mouth, entrance".
Kyōō Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese 京 (kyō) meaning "capital city" and 応 (ō) meaning "to comply; to respond; to accord".
Lancaster English
From the name of a city in northwestern England derived from Middle English Loncastre, itself from Lon referring to an ancient Roman fort on the River Lune combined with Old English ceaster meaning "city, town".
Laudrup Danish
Possibly from the name of homesteads in Denmark, most likely derived from Old Norse laut meaning "barn", combined with the Danish suffix -drup (itself from Old Norse thorp) meaning "outlying farmstead, village, settlement"... [more]
Lazenby English
From a place name which was derived from leysingi and byr, two Norse words meaning "freedman" and "settlement" respectively.
Lester English
Habitational name from Leicester which is recorded as Ligeraceastre in the 10th century. The placename derives from an Old English folk name Legore "the dwellers by the river Legor (a lost river name)" and Old English ceaster "city Roman fortification" (from Latin castrum) "camp fortress".
Lindstedt Swedish
Combination of Swedish lind "lime tree" and stad "town, city" (spelling possibly influenced by German Stadt, also meaning "town, city").
Linn Scottish, Scots, English, Irish, German, Jewish, Finnish (Anglicized), Estonian
As a Scottish and Northern English surname, it is a variant of Lyne. Its usage as an English name is primarily by Scots living in Northern England.... [more]
Linna Estonian
Linna is an Estonian surname meaning (urban) "town" or "city".
Linnamäe Estonian
Linnamäe is an Estonian surname meaning "urban (city) mountain".
Livingston English, Scottish
This surname is thought to be derived from Middle English Levingestun meaning "Leving's town" or "Leving's settlement."
Lumbanbatu Batak
From Batak lumban meaning "village, hamlet" and batu meaning "stone".
Lumbangaol Batak
From Batak lumban meaning "village, hamlet" and gaol meaning "banana".
Lumbantobing Batak
From Batak lumban meaning "village, hamlet" and tobing meaning "riverbank, edge".
Lumbantoruan Batak
From Batak lumban meaning "village, hamlet" and toruan meaning "lower (area or place), below".
Lundstedt Swedish
Combination of Swedish lund "grove" and stad "town, city" (spelling possibly influenced by German Stadt, also meaning "town, city").
Machida Japanese
From Japanese 町 (machi) meaning "town" and 田 (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Madani Arabic
Indicated a person from the city of Medina, itself from Arabic مدينة (madinah) meaning "city".
Mäehans Estonian
Mäehans is an Estonian surname, a corruption meaning "mountain/hill city".
Magbanua Filipino, Cebuano
From Cebuano magbanwa meaning "townsperson", derived from Cebuano bánwa meaning "city, town".
Majerle Slovene
Slovene surname Majerle, a variant of the Polish, Czech, and Slovak Majer, which was a status name for "steward, bailiff, tenant farmer, or village headman", from the German Meyer 1.
Makimura Japanese
Maki can mean (牧) "shepherd" and mura can be spelled like this (村) meaning "hamlet, village".
Manchester English
Habitational name from the city in northwestern England, formerly part of Lancashire. This is so called from Mamucio (an ancient British name containing the element mammā "breast", and meaning "breast-shaped hill") combined with Old English ceaster "Roman fort or walled city" (Latin castra "legionary camp").
Manningham English
Means "Manning's estate" from Old English ham "home, estate, settlement".
Marigo Italian
Either from Venetian marigo "mayor of a rural village", or from the given name Amerigo.
Marvel English
Either (i) from a medieval nickname (often ironic) for someone regarded as a prodigy; or (ii) "person from Merville", the name of two places in northern France ("smaller settlement" and "settlement belonging to a man with a Germanic name beginning with Meri-, literally 'famous'")... [more]
Maxton English
From a place name meaning "Maccus' settlement".
Merton English
From a place name meaning "town on a lake" in Old English.
Middendorf German
"middle of the village"
Mimura Japanese
From Japanese 三 (mi) meaning "three" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Mitamura Japanese
From Japanese 三 (mi) meaning "three", 田 (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy", and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Mitcham English
Habitational name from Mitcham in Surrey so named from Old English micel "big" and ham "village homestead" or ham "water meadow" meaning either "the great homestead" or "the great meadow".
Miyako Japanese (Rare)
Miyako means "capital" in vocabulary, but as a last name, it's written in the same characters as Kyoto.
Miyasato Japanese
From Japanese 宮 (miya) meaning "temple, shrine, palace" and 里 (sato) meaning "village".
Miyazato Japanese
From Japanese 宮 (miya) meaning "temple, shrine, palace" and 里 (sato) meaning "village".
Mizumura Japanese
Mizu means "water" and mura means "village, hamlet".
Montville French
"Mountain town".
Moranville French
Habitational name from Moranville, probably derived from the personal name Morand + Old French word ville "settlement".
Morimura Japanese (Rare)
From Kanji "森" (Mori) meaning "Forest" and "村" (Mura) meaning "Village".
Morisato Japanese
Mori means "forest" and sato means "village".
Motomura Japanese
Moto means "origin, source" and mura means "village, hamlet".
Moulton English
Derived from various places with the same name, for example in the counties of Cheshire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Suffolk and North Yorkshire in England. It is either derived from the Old English given name Mūla, the Old Norse name Múli or Old English mūl meaning "mule" and tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town".
Mueangkhot Thai
From Thai เมือง (mueang) meaning "city, town" and โคตร (khot) meaning "ancestry, clan, family".
Mura Japanese
Mura means "village, hamlet".
Murahama Japanese
Mura means "hamlet, village" and hama means "seashore, veach".
Murahashi Japanese
Mura means "village, hamlet" and hashi means "bridge".
Murahayashi Japanese
Mura means "village, hamlet" and hayashi means "forest, grove".
Murai Japanese
From Japanese 村 (mura) meaning "town, village" and 井 (i) meaning "well, mine shaft, pit".
Muraiwa Japanese (Rare)
Mura means "town, hamlet" and iwa means "stone".
Muraji Japanese
Mura can mean "village, hamlet" or "town", and ji can mean "road" or "ground".
Murakami Japanese
From the Japanese 村, 邑 or 邨 (mura) "village" and 上 (kami, kan or ue) "upper," "above," 神 (kami, kan or shin) "god" or 守 (kami or mori) "guard," "protect," "defend."
Murakami Japanese
From Japanese 村 (mura) meaning "town, village" and 上 (kami) meaning "start, high place, top".
Murakawa Japanese
Mura means "village" and kawa means "river".
Muraki Japanese
Mura means "hamlet, village" and ki means "tree, wood".
Muraki Japanese
From Japanese 村 (mura) meaning "town, village" and 木 (ki) meaning "tree, wood".
Murakita Japanese
From 村 (mura) meaning "village, hamlet" and 北 (kita) meaning "north".
Murako Japanese (Rare)
Mura means "village, hamlet" and ko means "child, sign of the rat".
Muramatsu Japanese
From Japanese 村 (mura) meaning "town, village" and 松 (matsu) meaning "pine tree, fir tree".
Muramori Japanese
Mura means "village, hamlet" and mori means "forest".
Muramoto Japanese
Mura means "village" and moto means "origin".
Muranaka Japanese
From Japanese 村 (mura) meaning "village" combined with 中 (naka) meaning "inside, middle".
Murano Japanese
Mura means "village, hamlet" and no means "wilderness, plain, field."
Murao Japanese
From 村 (mura) meaning "village, hamlet" and 尾 (o) meaning "tail".
Muraoka Japanese
From 村 (mura) meaning "village, hamlet" and 岡 (oka) meaning "hill, ridge".
Murase Japanese
From Japanese 村 (mura) meaning "town, village" and 瀬 (se) meaning "rapids, current".
Murashima Japanese
Shima means "island" and mura means "hamlet, village".
Murata Japanese
From Japanese 村 (mura) meaning "town, village" and 田 (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Murayama Japanese
From Japanese 村 (mura) meaning "town, village" and 山 (yama) meaning "mountain, hill".
Murayoshi Japanese
Mura means "village, hamlet" or "town" and yoshi means "good luck".
Muston English
Habitational name from places so named, from Old English mus "mouse", or must, "muddy stream or place" combined with tun "enclosure, settlement". Another explanation could be that the first element is derived from an old Scandinavian personal name, Músi (of unknown meaning), combined with tun.
Nakasato Japanese
From Japanese 中 (naka) meaning "middle" and 里 (sato) meaning "village".
Nakasato Japanese
From Japanese 仲 (naka) meaning "relationship" and 里 (sato) meaning "village".
Nakazato Japanese
From 中 (naka) meaning "center, middle" and 里 (sato) meaning "village."
Naughton English
Habitational name from a place in Suffolk, named in Old English with nafola meaning "navel" + tūn meaning "enclosure", "settlement", i.e. "settlement in the navel or depression".
Needham English
From a place name derived from Old English ned meaning "need, constraint" and ham meaning "home, estate, settlement".
Netherton English
The Netherton surname is derived from the Old English "neothera," meaning "lower," and "tun," meaning "enclosure," or "settlement." It is a habitational name derived from any of several places so named, such as one in Northumberland, and one in Worcestershire.
Newby English
Means "person from Newby", Newby being a combination of the Middle English elements newe "new" and by "farm, settlement" (ultimately from Old Norse býr "farm"). British travel writer Eric Newby (1919-2006) bore this surname.
Nimura Japanese
From Japanese 二 (ni) meaning "two" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Nomura Japanese
From Japanese 野 (no) meaning "field, wilderness" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Nonomura Japanese
From Japanese 野 (no) meaning "field" and 村 (mura) meaning "village".
Northam English
habitational namefrom Northam (Devon) Northam Farm in Brean (Somerset) Northam in Southampton (Hampshire) or a lost Northam in Redbridge Hundred Hampshire. The place names derive from Old English norþ "north northern" and ham "village homestead" or ham "water meadow".
Novosel Croatian
Derived from nov, meaning "new", and selo, meaning "village", so the possible meaning is "the one who's new to the village".
Novoselec Croatian
Derived from nov, meaning "new", and selo, meaning "village", so the possible meaning is "the one who's new to the village".
Novoselić Croatian
Derived from nov, meaning "new", and selo, meaning "village", so the possible meaning is "the one who's new to the village".... [more]
Nugent English, Irish, French
An English, Irish (of Norman origin) and French habitational surname derived from any of several places in northern France (such as Nogent-sur-Oise), From Latin novientum and apparently an altered form of a Gaulish name meaning "new settlement".
Oglethorpe English
From Oglethorpe Hall in Bramham (WR Yorks) which is recorded as Ocelestorp in 1086 and Okelesthorp in 124 The place-name derives from the Old Scandinavian personal name Oddkell and Old Scandinavian or Old English þorp "secondary settlement outlying farmstead" meaning "Oddkell's village" the surname derived from oddr "point of a weapon" and ketill "cauldron".
Ōmura Japanese
From Japanese 大 (ō) meaning "big, great" and 村 (mura) meaning "town, village".
Omura Japanese
O means "big, huge, great" and mura means "bamlet, village". ... [more]
Orbison English
From a village in Lincolnshire, England originally called Orby and later Orreby that is derived from a Scandinavian personal name Orri- and the Scandinavian place element -by which means "a farmstead or small settlement."
Osato Japanese
O means "big" and sato means "hamlet, village, town".
Osbaldeston English
From a town from England called Osbaldeston derived from the name of a king named Osbald and tun "town".
Østby Norwegian
Habitational name from farmsteads in Norway named Østby or Austby. Derived from Old Norse aust "east" and býr "farm, village".