American Submitted Surnames

American names are used in the United States. See also about American names.
usage
source
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Reynold English
From the given name Reynold
Reynoldson English
Means "son of Reynold".
Rhett English, Dutch
Anglicized form of Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel".
Rhine German, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see Rhein). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
Rhode American
Comes from the state 'Rhode Island' in America
Rial English
Variant of Royle.
Ribchester English
This name originates from the small village in Lancashire that shares the same name. Interestingly, most people with the name 'Ribchester' are in Lancashire, but a lot are also found in Newcastle Upon Tyne.
Rich English
Patronymic derived from a short form of Richard.
Rich English
From a nickname of a wealthy person, ultimately derived from Germanic ric "powerful". A notable fictional bearer is Richie Rich who first appeared as a comic book character in 1953.
Rich English
Derived from the name of a (former) village in Lincolnshire, England named with the Old English element ric "stream, drainage channel".
Riche English, French
English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
Richer French, English, German
From the given name Richer.
Richers English, German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ric ‘power(ful)’ + hari, heri ‘army’. The name was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Richier, but was largely absorbed by the much more common Richard... [more]
Richie English (Rare), Italian
Diminutive form of Richard. It could also have been a nickname for one who was rich or wealthy, or, in Italy, a variant of Ricci... [more]
Richmond English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places so named, in northern France as well as in England. These are named with the Old French elements riche "rich, splendid" and mont "hill"... [more]
Rick English
1 English: variant of Rich 2.... [more]
Ricketson English
It was brought to England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. It comes from the Old German name Ricard, meaning "powerful" and "brave."
Rickman English
Means "son of Rick". A famous bearer was American Alan Rickman (1946-2016).
Riddell Scottish, English
Derived from the given name Ridel.
Rideout English
Means "outrider (a municipal or monastic official in the Middle Ages whose job was to ride around the country collecting dues and supervising manors)".
Ridges English
Variant of Ridge.
Ridgeway English
Comes from Middle English 'riggewey', hence a topographic name for someone who lived by such a route or a habitational name from any of various places so named, for example in Cheshire, Derbyshire, Dorset, and Staffordshire.
Ridgway English
Variant spelling of Ridgeway.
Ridout English
A variant of the other surname Rideout.
Rieley English
Variant of Reilly.
Right English
Variant spelling of Wright.
Rilo English
Transferred use of the surname derived from the Old English elements ryge (rye) and lēah (wood, clearing, meadow). See also Riley.
Rimes English
Originally denoted one who came from the city of Reims in the Grand Est region of France, or a topographic name for someone who lived in a thickly wooded area, derived from Old French ramel (a diminutive of raim) meaning "branch", ultimately from Latin ramus... [more]
Rinard English (American)
An Americanized version of the German Surname Reinhardt.
Ringer English
From the Norman name Reinger or Rainger derived from the Germanic elements ragin meaning "advice, counsel" and ger meaning "spear"... [more]
Ripper English
Means "maker, seller or carrier of baskets" (from a derivative of Middle English rip "basket").
Ripple English
From the word ripple. Could mean that they live near a river, lake, brook, stream, or ocean.
Riseborough English
Denoted a person hailing from any of the various places called Risborough, Riseborough or Risbury in England, derived from Old English hrīs meaning "brushwood" and beorg meaning "hill, mound", or from hrīs and burh meaning "fortification"... [more]
Risley English
It means "brushwood clearing".
Ritch English, German, German (Swiss)
1. English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
Ritchard English
Variant spelling of Richard that was altered by the diminutive Ritchie. Or possibly from a surname derived from Richard... [more]
Ritchings French, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
Rittman German, English
From Middle High German "riet" and "mann", riet meaning reed.
Rivet French, English
French: from a diminutive of Old French rive ‘(river) bank’, ‘shore’ (see Rives).... [more]
Rivett English, French
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a metalworker, from Middle English, Old French rivet ‘small nail or bolt’ (from Old French river ‘to fix or secure’, of unknown origin).... [more]
Rivette French, English (American, Rare), English (Canadian, Rare)
Topographic name derived from a diminutive of Old French rive, meaning "(river) bank, shore"; see also Rivet.
Ro English
Possibly a variant of Rowe.
Robards English
Altered form of Roberts. A famous bearer was American actor Jason Robards (1922-2000), as well as his father Jason Robards Sr. (1892-1963) and son Sam Robards (1961-), also noted actors.
Robbs English
This possibly means "Son of Rob(ert)".
Roberta English
One of the n middle name
Robertshaw English
habitational name from a lost place Robertshaw in Heptonstall (Yorkshire) from the Middle English Old French personal name Robert and Middle English shaue shaghe "wood grove thicket" (Old English sceaga) meaning "Robert's wood".
Robertssen English
English variant of Robertsson.
Robeson English
This is possibly a variant of Robson.
Robey English
From a medieval diminutive form of the given name Robert.
Robins English
Southern English patronymic from the personal name Robin.
Roby English
From a medieval diminutive form of the given name Robert.
Rochester English
Means "person from Rochester", Kent (probably "Roman town or fort called Rovi"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Mr Rochester, the Byronic hero of Charlotte Brontë's 'Jane Eyre' (1847).
Rock English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a notable crag or outcrop, from Middle English rokke "rock" (see Roach), or a habitational name from a place named with this word, as for example Rock in Northumberland.
Rockford English
An altered spelling of English Rochford; alternatively it may be an Americanized form of French Rochefort or Italian Roccaforte.
Rockwell English
Means "person from Rockwell", Buckinghamshire and Somerset (respectively "wood frequented by rooks" and "well frequented by rooks"). Famous bearers include American illustrator Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) and Utah pioneer Porter Rockwell (1813-1878).
Rodd English
Locational name for someone "at the rod" of land, from Middle English rodde. Also could come from the given name Rod, or the parish of Rodd in Herefordshire, England.
Rodericks English
From the given name Roderick.
Rodewald German, English (American)
From the Old German elements hruod "fame" and walt "power, authority".
Rodger English
From the given name Rodger.
Rodham English
From Roddam in Northumberland. The name is thought to have derived from Germanic *rodum, meaning 'forest clearing'.
Rodman English
The surname Rodman is an ancient English surname, derived from a trade name, "men who were by the tenure or customs of their lands to ride with or for the lord of the manor about his business". The most famous bearer of this name is the basketball player Dennis Rodman.
Rodrick English
Derived from the given name Roderick.
Rodwell English
Rodwell, a name of Anglo-Saxon origin, is a locational surname deriving from any one of various places in Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire, and Kent, England. In English, the meaning of the name Rodwell is "Lives by the spring near the road".
Roe English
Nickname for a timid person, derived from the Middle English ro meaning "roe"; also a midland and southern form of Ray.
Roel English, Spanish, Dutch, German
From the name Roeland, meaning "famous country".
Roffey English
There are two small villages named "Roffey". One in England, near Horsham, and one in France, Burgundy. The name is of Norman orgin. First mentioned in (surviving English documents) in 1307 when a George Roffey buys a house... [more]
Rohrlach German (Rare), American
Form a place name, e.g., Rohrlach (Kreis Hirschberg) in Silesia (now Trzcińsko, Poland)
Rolf English, German
Derived from the given name Rolf.
Rolfe English
Variant of Rolf.
Roll Upper German, German, English
German: from Middle High German rolle, rulle ‘roll’, ‘list’, possibly applied as a metonymic occupational name for a scribe.... [more]
Rolle English
Variant of Roll.
Rollin English, German
English: variant of Rolling.... [more]
Rolls English
Possibly derived from the Latin word rotus, meaning "wheel". It would indicate one who built wheels as a living. A famous bearer was American inventor and entrepreneur Charles Rolls (1877-1910), founder of the Rolls-Royce Ltd along with Henry Royce (1863-1933).
Rolston English
English habitational name from any of various places, such as Rowlston in Lincolnshire, Rolleston in Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, and Staffordshire, or Rowlstone in Herefordshire, near the Welsh border... [more]
Romana Catalan, French, Italian, Polish, English (Rare), German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
From the feminine form of the Latin personal name Romanus, which originally meant "Roman".
Romine English, Dutch
From Rome
Romney English
English: habitational name from a place in Kent, so called from an obscure first element, rumen, + Old English ea ‘river’ (see Rye).
Romp English, German
Likely a variant of Rump.
Romwe English
likes to dress up
Ronald English
Derived from the given name Ronald.
Ronalds English
This surname is derived from the given name Ronald.
Ronaldson English
This surname means “son of Ronald”.
Rondelli Italian, English, French
From the medieval name "Rondello" derived from French "rondel" meaning "go around, round" or "rondel", a French old nickname for a round, plump man.
Ronson English
Means "son of Ron"
Rood English
Designating someone who lived near a cross, rood in Middle English
Rook English
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a rook (e.g. in having black hair or a harsh voice).
Roome English
Variant of Rome.
Roose English, Dutch, German
Variant spelling of Rose 1, Rose 2, Roos or Ross.
Root English, Dutch
English: nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English rote ‘glad’ (Old English rot). ... [more]
Roper English
English: occupational name for a maker or seller of rope, from an agent derivative of Old English rāp ‘rope’. See also Roop.
Rosco English
Variant of Roscoe.
Roseland English
Americanized form of Norwegian Røys(e)land; a habitational name from about 30 farmsteads, many in Agder, named from Old Norse reysi ‘heap of stones’ + land ‘land’, ‘farmstead’.
Roseman English
From the Norman feminine name Rosamund.
Rosemary English
From the plant, meaning "dew of the sea".
Rosevear Cornish, English
From the name of a Cornish village near St Mawgan which derives from Celtic ros "moor, heath" and vur "big".
Rosewood English
Denoting someone who came from a rose wood or grove.
Rosseau French, American
Variant spelling of Rousseau. Comes from the Old French word rous meaning "red", likely a nickname for someone with red hair or a particularly rosy complexion.
Rossie English
Possibly a variant of Rossi.
Rothwell English
An English surname meaning 'Lives by the red spring"
Roubichou English
French surname that is probably an altered spelling of Robichon or Robicheaux, pet forms of Robert.
Rough English
A topographic name referring to a dwelling with uncultivated ground, ultimately deriving from Olde English ruh meaning "rough".
Round English
Variant of Rounds.
Roundtree English
Variant spelling of Rowntree.
Rouse English
nickname for a person with red hair, from Middle English, Old French rous ‘red(-haired)’
Routh English
From the village and civil parish of Routh in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England (recorded in the Domesday book as Rutha). The place name may derive from Old Norse hrúedhr meaning "rough shaly ground"... [more]
Rover English, German (Anglicized)
This surname is derived from Middle English roof (from Old English hrof) combined with the agent suffix (i)er, which denotes someone who does/works with something. Thus, the surname was originally used for a constructor or repairer of roofs.... [more]
Rowell English
From a diminutive of Rowland or Rolf or a location name meaning "rough hill".
Rowett English
English from a medieval personal name composed of the Germanic elements hrod ‘renown’ + wald ‘rule’, which was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the form Róaldr, and again later by the Normans in the form Rohald or Roald... [more]
Rowlands English
Derived from the given name Rowland.
Rowley English
Anglo Saxon Name- locational, comes from several places in England such as in Devonshire, Yorkshire, County Durham and Staffordshire. It means ' rough wood or clearing', from the Old English 'run' meaning rough and 'leah', meaning clearing in a wood.
Rowling English
From diminutives for the given names Rollo or Rolf. Famous bearer is the author of the Harry Potter series, J. K. Rowling whose initials stand for Joanne Kathleen.
Royal English
From the given name Royal.
Roys English
From the given name Roy.
Royse English
From the medieval female given name Royse the medieval form of Rose. Variant of Rose 2.
Rudd English
The surname Rudd is derived from the Old English root "rud-," a component in the words "rudig," which means "ruddy," and "ruddoc," which means "red-breast." The surname was originally a nickname for a ruddy complexioned or red-haired person, or perhaps for someone who habitually wore the color red.
Rudel English
Derived from the location of Ryedale or Rydal
Rudyard English
From the location Rudyard (Staffs) which is recorded as Rudegeard in 100 The place-name probably derives from Old English rude "rue" and geard "enclosure yard".
Ruffin English
From the medieval French male personal name Ruffin, from Latin Rūfīnus, a derivative of Rūfus (literally "red-haired one")... [more]
Rugby English
From Rugby, Warwickshire. Originally named *Rocheberie, from Old English *Hrocaburg, 'Hroca's fort', the name was altered due to influence fort Danish settlers, with the second element being replaced with Old Norse byr, 'farm'.... [more]
Rugg English
Nickname for a person associated with the color red, whether through hair color, clothing, or complexion. Accordingly, the name is derived from the Old French word ruge, meaning red.
Rule Scottish, English
Scottish name from the lands of Rule in the parish of Hobkirk, Roxburghshire. The derivation is from the River Rule which flows through the area, and is so called from the ancient Welsh word "rhull" meaning "hasty or rushing".... [more]
Rumbelow English
Means "person from Rumbelow", the name of various locations in England ("three mounds").
Rumble English
Descended from the personal name Rumbald/Rombold, which is composed of the Germanic elements hrom "fame, glory" and bald "bold, brave".
Rumford English
From the parish of Romford in Essex, England. The name means "the wide ford" from Old English rúm "wide".
Rumney English
Variant of Romney.
Rumpole English
A different form of Rumbold (from the Norman personal name Rumbald, of Germanic origin and probably meaning literally "fame-bold"). A fictional bearer of the surname is Horace Rumpole, the eccentric QC created by John Mortimer (originally for a 1975 television play).
Runcie English, Scottish
Derived from Latin runcinus, and related to the Old French "roncin", for a horse of little value. Middle English, Rouncy, as in Chaucer's Cantebury Tales.... [more]
Rundell English
Nickname derived from a diminutive of Middle English and Old French rond, rund meaning "fat, round" (see Rounds), or derived from Rundale, a local place in the village and civil parish of Shoreham in Kent, England, named with Old English rum(ig) meaning "roomy, spacious" and dæl meaning "valley".
Rundle English
Cornish surname of unknown origin, possibly related to Arundel.
Runner English (American)
Probably an altered spelling of German Ronner, annoccupational name for a runner or messenger, a lightly armed mounted soldier. Compare Renner. UK The surname Runner was first found in Lancashire. One of the first records of the family was found in the year 1246 when Alan de Runacres held estates in that shire... [more]
Rusby Scottish, English
Alternative spelling of Busby, a parish in Renfrewshire. A name well represented in the Penistone, and Cawthorne districts of the West Riding of Yorkshire.
Rushe English, Irish
Variant of Rush
Rushen English
Originally denoted a person who lived near a marsh, noted for its rushes (see Rush). A famous bearer of this surname is the American singer Patrice Rushen (b. 1954).
Russ English
Variant of Rouse.
Rust English, Scottish
A nickname to someone with reddish hair or a ruddy complexion.
Ruth English, German (Swiss)
English: from Middle English reuthe ‘pity’ (a derivative of rewen to pity, Old English hreowan) nickname for a charitable person or for a pitiable one. Not related to the given name in this case.... [more]
Ruthven English, Scottish
From the name of a barony in Perthshire, Scotland, which comes from Scottish Gaelic Ruadhainn "Dun uplands".
Rutledge English, Scottish
Origin unknown
Rutt English, German
English: variant of Root.... [more]
Rutter English
Either (i) "player of the rote (a medieval stringed instrument played by plucking)"; or (ii) from a medieval nickname for a dishonest or untrustworthy person (from Old French routier "robber, mugger")... [more]
Ryall English
From any of several places in England named from Old English ryge "rye" + hyll "hill".
Ryals English
English occupational surname.
Ryans English
Variant of Ryan.
Rycroft English
Derived from Rycroft, in the parish of Birstall, Yorkshire
Rydell English (Rare)
Possibly a variant of Riddell.
Ryerson English (American)
Americanized spelling of Swedish Reierson or of any of its cognates, for example Dutch Ryerse, Ryersen or Norwegian and Danish Reiersen.
Ryle English
Habitational name from Royle in Lancashire (see Royle).
Rylo English
Variant of the surname Rilo.
Rymer English
Occupational name for a poet.
Ryser English
Variant of Reiser based on the English word riser.
Sadile English
1 English (mostly Lancashire): probably a variant of Sale .... [more]
Saffeels English (Rare), German (Rare)
Used as a last name a minimum of 82 times in (USA, Germany).