Surnames Starting with C

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CABELLOSpanish
Means "hair" in Spanish, used as a nickname for a person with a large amount of hair.
CABRALPortuguese
From places named from Late Latin capralis meaning "place of goats", derived from Latin capra meaning "goat".
CABRERASpanish
From various place names derived from Late Latin capraria meaning "place of goats", from Latin capra meaning "goat".
CADWALLADERWelsh
From the given name CADWALADER.
CAIAZZOItalian
From the name of a city near Naples, originally Caiatia in Latin, a derivative of the given name CAIUS.
CAITOItalian
Occupational name from Sicilian càjitu "official, leader", ultimately from Arabic قاضي (qadi) "judge".
CAIVANOItalian
From the name of the town of Caivano near Naples, derived from Latin Calvianum, derived from the Roman cognomen CALVUS.
CALABRESEItalian
Originally given to a person who came from the region of Calabria in southern Italy.
CALDWELLEnglish
From various English place names derived from Old English ceald "cold" and well "spring, stream, well".
CALLAGHANIrish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Ceallacháin meaning "descendant of CEALLACHÁN".
CALLIGARISItalian
From Late Latin caligarius meaning "shoemaker".
CAMERONScottish
Means "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAMPANAItalian, Spanish
Occupational name from Late Latin campana meaning "bell", ultimately derived from the Italian region of Campania, where bells were produced.
CAMPBELLScottish
From a Gaelic nickname cam béul meaning "wry or crooked mouth". The surname was later represented in Latin documents as de bello campo meaning "of the fair field".
CAMPOSpanish, Italian
Means "field" in Spanish and Italian.
CAMPOSPortuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish variant of CAMPO.
CANNONEnglish
From the ecclesiastical usage of canon, referring to a church official or servant who worked in a clergy house.
CANTRELLEnglish
Originally a name for someone from Cantrell in Devon, from an unknown first element and Old English hyll meaning "hill".
CANTÚSpanish (Mexican)
Variant of CANTÙ, common in Mexico.
CANTÙItalian
From Cantù, an Italian town located in Lombardy, itself of uncertain origin.
CAOMHÁNACHIrish
Irish Gaelic form of KAVANAGH.
CAPELLO (1)Italian
From Late Latin cappa meaning "cloak, cape, hood". This was a name for one who made or wore cloaks.
CAPELLO (2)Italian
Nickname for a thin person, from Italian capello meaning "a hair", ultimately derived from Latin capillus.
CAPITANIItalian
Occupational name meaning "captain" in Italian, ultimately from Latin caput "head".
CARBONEItalian
From a nickname for a person with dark features, from Italian carbone meaning "coal".
CARDONACatalan
From the name of a town in Catalonia, of uncertain meaning.
CARDOSOPortuguese, Spanish
From a place name meaning "thorny" in Portuguese and Spanish, ultimately from Latin carduus.
CAREYIrish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of CIARDHA".
CARIDEOItalian
Originally denoted someone from San Pietro di Caridà, a town in Calabria. The town's name may be derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness".
CARLEnglish, German
From the given name CARL.
CARLEVAROItalian
Northern Italian variant of CARNEVALE.
CARLISLEEnglish
From the name of a city in northern England. The city was originally called by the Romans Luguvalium meaning "stronghold of LUGUS". Later the Brythonic element ker "fort" was appended to the name of the city.
CARLSENDanish
Means "son of CARL".
CARLSONSwedish
Means "son of CARL".
CARLSSONSwedish
Means "son of CARL".
CARMAN (1)English
Occupational name for a carter, from Middle English carre "cart" (of Latin origin) and man "man".
CARMAN (2)English
From an Old Norse byname derived from karlmann meaning "male, man".
CARMODYIrish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Cearmada which means "descendant of Cearmaid", a Gaelic given name.
CARNEVALEItalian
From an Italian nickname meaning "carnival", perhaps given to a festive person.
CAROSpanish, Italian
From Spanish and Italian caro meaning "beloved".
CARONFrench
Variant of CHARRON.
CARPENTEREnglish
From the occupation, derived from Middle English carpentier (ultimately from Latin carpentarius meaning "carriage maker").
CARRScottish
Variant of KERR.
CARRANIrish
Variant of CURRAN.
CARRARAItalian
From the name of a city in Tuscany famous for its marble quarries. It is probably derived from Late Latin quadreria meaning "quarry".
CARROLLIrish
From the given name CEARBHALL. A famous bearer was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'.
CARSONScottish
Meaning uncertain, possibly from the town of Courson in Normandy.
CARSTENSENDanish
Means "son of CARSTEN".
CARTEREnglish
Occupational name for a person who operated a cart to transport goods, from Norman French caretier.
CARTWRIGHTEnglish
Occupational name indicating one who made carts.
CARUSOItalian
Means "close-cropped hair" in Italian, also having the secondary sense "boy, yound man".
CARVEREnglish
Occupational surname for a carver, from Middle English kerve "cut".
CARYIrish
Variant of CAREY.
CASALSpanish
From the Spanish word casal meaning "house", ultimately from Late Late casalis and Latin casa.
CASALEItalian
Italian cognate of CASAL.
CASEYIrish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH".
CASSANOItalian
Indicated a person from any of the various towns named Cassano in Italy.
CASSIDYIrish
From Irish Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of Caiside". Caiside is a given name meaning "curly haired".
CASTELLCatalan
Catalan cognate of CASTLE.
CASTELOPortuguese
Portuguese cognate of CASTLE.
CASTILLASpanish
Originally indicated a person from Castile, a region (and medieval kingdom) in Spain. The name of the region is derived from Late Latin castellum meaning "castle".
CASTILLOSpanish
Spanish cognate of CASTLE.
CASTLEEnglish
From Middle English castel meaning "castle", from Late Latin castellum, originally indicating a person who lived near a castle.
CASTROSpanish, Portuguese
Means "castle" in Spanish and Portuguese, and referred to one who lived near a castle.
CATALÁNSpanish
Originally indicated a person who came from Catalonia, a region of eastern Spain.
CATALANOItalian
Italian form of CATALÁN.
CATTANEOItalian
Variant of CAPITANI used in Lombardy.
CAULFIELDEnglish
From a place name meaning "cold field", from Old English ceald "cold" and feld "pasture, field".
CAUSEREnglish
Occupational name for one who made leggings, derived from Old French chausse "leggings".
CAUSEYEnglish
Indicated a person who lived near a causeway, from Old French caucie.
CAVALCANTEItalian
Derived from Italian cavalcare "to ride".
CAVALLOItalian
Means "horse" in Italian, an cccupational name for a horseman.
CAVANIrish
Anglicized form of the Irish Ó Caoimháin meaning "descendant of CAOMHÁN".
CAVEYIrish
Possibly an Anglicized form of MAC DAIBHÉID.
ČECHCzech
Means "Czech". The name was used to differentiate a native of Bohemia from the natives of Silesia, Moravia and other regions that are now part of the Czech Republic.
CECILWelsh
From the Welsh given name Seisyll, which was derived from the Roman name Sextilius, a derivative of SEXTUS.
CEELENDutch
Derived from the given name CEEL.
ČERMÁKCzech
Means "redstart (bird)" in Czech.
CERMAKCzech
Anglicized form of ČERMÁK.
ČERNÝCzech
Means "black" in Czech.
ČERVENYCzech
Means "red" in Czech.
CHADWICKEnglish
From the name of English towns meaning "settlement belonging to CHAD" in Old English.
CHAIKINYiddish
From a diminutive of the given name CHAYA.
CHALUPACzech
Means "cottage" in Czech.
CHALUPNÍKCzech
Derived from Czech chalupa meaning "cottage". The name referred to a peasant farmer who owned a very small piece of land.
CHAMBERLAINEnglish
Occupational name for one who looked after the inner rooms of a mansion, from Norman French chambrelain.
CHAMBERSEnglish
From Old French chambre "chamber, room", an occupational name for a person who worked in the inner rooms of a mansion.
CHANChinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of CHEN.
CHANCEEnglish
From a nickname for a lucky person or a gambler.
CHANCELLOREnglish
Occupational name for an administrator, a chancellor, from Norman French chancelier.
CHANDLEREnglish
Occupational surname meaning "candle seller" or "candle maker" in Middle English, ultimately derived from Old French.
CHAPMANEnglish
Occupational name derived from Old English ceapmann meaning "merchant, trader".
CHAPUTFrench
From a diminutive of the Old French word chape meaning "cloak, hood". The name referred to a person who made, sold or often wore cloaks.
CHARBONNEAUFrench
Derived from a diminutive form of French charbon "charcoal", a nickname for a person with black hair or a dark complexion.
CHARMCHIPersian
Means "leather worker" in Persian, from چرم (charm) "leather" combined with چی (chi), denoting an occupation.
CHARPENTIERFrench
French cognate of CARPENTER, derived from Old French charpentier.
CHARRONFrench
Meant "cart" in Old French, used to denote a carter or a cartwright.
CHASEEnglish
Occupational name for a hunter, from Middle English chase "hunt".
CHASTAINFrench
From Old French castan "chestnut tree" (Latin castanea), a name for someone who lived near a particular chestnut tree, or possibly a nickname for someone with chestnut-coloured hair.
CHAUDHARIIndian, Marathi, Gujarati
Variant transcription of CHAUDHARY.
CHAUDHARYIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Nepali
From a title meaning "holder of four", from Sanskrit चतुर् (chatur) meaning "four" and धुरीय (dhuriya) "bearing a burden".
CHAUDHRIIndian, Hindi
Variant transcription of CHAUDHARY.
CHAUDHURIBengali
Variant transcription of CHOWDHURY.
CHAVESPortuguese, Spanish
From the name of a Portuguese city, derived from the Roman name FLAVIUS (being named for the emperor Vespasian, whose family name was Flavius).
CHÁVEZSpanish
Variant of CHAVES. A famous bearer was the labour leader César Chávez (1927-1993).
CHAYKAUkrainian
Means "seagull" in Ukrainian.
CHAYKOVSKYRussian
Russian form of CHAYKA. A famous bearer was the Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Chaykovsky (1840-1893), with the surname commonly Romanized as Tchaikovsky.
CHENChinese
From Chinese (chén) meaning "exhibit, display, old, ancient" and also referring to the former state of Chen, which existed in what is now Henan province from the 11th to 5th centuries BC.
CHESHIREEnglish
Originally indicated a person from the county of Cheshire in England. Cheshire is named for its city CHESTER.
CHESTEREnglish
From the name of a city in England, derived from Latin castrum "camp, fortress".
CHEUNGChinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of ZHANG.
CHEVALIERFrench
From a nickname derived from French chevalier meaning "knight", itself from cheval meaning "horse", ultimately from Latin caballus.
CHEVROLETFrench
From a diminutive of chèvre meaning "goat", indicating a person who cultivated goats.
CHEYKhmer
Means "victory" in Khmer, from Sanskrit जय (jaya).
CHILIKOVBulgarian
Patronymic derived from Bulgarian челик (chelik) "steel" (of Turkish origin).
CHLEBEKPolish
From Polish chleb "bread", used to denote a baker.
CHMELACzech
Derived from Czech chmel "hops", referring to a person who grew hops, a plant used in brewing beer.
CHMIELPolish
Polish cognate of CHMELA, from Polish chmiel.
CHOKorean
Korean form of ZHAO, from Sino-Korean (jo).
CHOEKorean
Variant romanization of CHOI.
CHOIKorean
From Sino-Korean (choe) meaning "high, lofty, towering".
CHONGChinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of ZHANG.
CHOUChinese
Variant transcription of ZHOU.
CHOUDHARYIndian, Hindi, Marathi
Variant transcription of CHAUDHARY.
CHOUDHURYBengali
Variant transcription of CHOWDHURY.
CHOWChinese
Variant transcription of ZHOU.
CHOWDHURYBengali
Bengali form of CHAUDHARY.
CHRISTIANFrench, German, English
Derived from the given name CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTIANSEnglish
Derived from the given name CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTOPHEREnglish
Derived from the given name CHRISTOPHER.
CHRISTOPHERSEnglish
Derived from the given name CHRISTOPHER.
CHUChinese
Variant transcription of ZHU.
CHUNGKorean
Korean form of ZHENG, from Sino-Korean (jeong).
CHURCHEnglish
From the English word, probably referring to a person who lived close to a church.
CHVÁTALCzech
Derived from chvátat meaning "to hurry".
ČIERNIKSlovak
Slovak cognate of ČERNÝ.
CINEGEHungarian
Means "titmouse bird" in Hungarian.
CINGOLANIItalian
From Cingoli, a town in the Marche region of Italy. It is derived from Latin cingo "surround, ring".
CINOItalian
From the given name Cino, a short form of names ending in cino.
CIPRIANIItalian
From the given name CIPRIANO.
CISTERNINOItalian
From the name of the town of Cisternino, near the city of Bari in southern Italy.
ČÍŽEKCzech
Means "siskin" in Czech, referring to a type of bird in the finch family.
ČÍŽIKSlovak
Slovak cognate of ČÍŽEK.
CLAASENDutch
Means "son of KLAAS".
CLACHERScottish
From Scottish Gaelic clachair meaning "stonemason".
CLAESFlemish
From the given name KLAUS.
CLAESSONSwedish
Means "son of CLAES".
CLARKEnglish
Means "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec meaning "priest", ultimately from Latin clericus. A famous bearer was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America.
CLARKEEnglish
Variant of CLARK.
CLARKSONEnglish
Patronymic form of CLARK.
CLAUSENDanish
Means "son of CLAUS".
CLAYEnglish
Means simply "clay", originally referring to a person who lived near or worked with of clay.
CLAYTONEnglish
From the name of various places meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
CLEARYIrish
From Irish cléireach meaning "clerk" (see CLARK).
CLEMENSEnglish
Derived from the given name CLEMENT. This was the surname of the author Samuel Clemens (1835-1910), also known as Mark Twain.
CLEMENSENDanish
Means "son of CLEMENS".
CLÉMENTFrench
Derived from the given name CLÉMENT.
CLEMENTEnglish
Derived from the given name CLEMENT.
CLERYIrish
Variant of CLEARY.
CLIFFORDEnglish
Derived from various place names which meant "ford by a cliff" in Old English.
CLIFTONEnglish
Derived from various place names meaning "settlement by a cliff" in Old English.
CLINEGerman, Jewish
Anglicized spelling of KLEIN.
CLINTONEnglish
Derived from the place name Glympton meaning "settlement on the River Glyme" in Old English.
CLOETDutch
Variant of KLOET.
CLOSEEnglish
From Middle English clos meaning "enclosure", a topographic name for someone who lived near a courtyard or farmyard.
CLOUTIERFrench
Derived from French clou meaning "nail", referring to someone who made or sold nails.
COBBEnglish
From a medieval English byname meaning "lump".
COCKEnglish
Derived from the medieval nickname cok which meant "rooster, cock". The nickname was commonly added to given names to create diminutives such as Hancock or Alcock.
COCKBURNScottish, English
Originally indicated someone who came from Cockburn, a place in Berwickshire. The place name is derived from Old English cocc "rooster" and burna "stream".
COCKSEnglish
Patronymic form of COCK.
CODYIrish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Cuidighthigh meaning "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
COELHOPortuguese
From the Portuguese word for "rabbit", either a nickname or an occupational name referring to a hunter or seller of rabbits.
COELLOGalician
Galician cognate of COELHO.
COEMANDutch
Variant of KOOPMAN.
COENENDutch
Derived from the given name COENRAAD.
COGHLANIrish
Anglicized form of Ó COCHLÁIN.
COHENJewish
Means "priest" from Hebrew כֹּהֵן (kohen). It originally denoted one of the priestly tribe of Levi.
COIROItalian
From Italian cuoio meaning "leather", ultimately from Latin corium. This was an occupational surname for a leather worker or tanner.
COJOCARURomanian
From Romanian cojoc meaning "sheepskin coat". This was an occupational name for a maker of these coats.
COKEEnglish
Variant of COOK.
COKESEnglish
Variant of COOK.
COLAItalian
From the given name NICOLA (1).
COLBERTEnglish, French
Derived from the given name COLOBERT.
COLEEnglish
From the Old English byname COLA.
COLEMANIrish, English
From the given name COLMÁN.
COLIJNDutch
From the given name NICOLAAS.
COLLINGWOODEnglish
From a place name, itself derived from Old French chalenge meaning "disputed" and Middle English wode meaning "woods".
COLLINS (1)Irish
Anglicized form of Ó COILEÁIN. A famous bearer was Michael Collins, an Irish nationalist leader who was assassinated in 1922.
COLOMBERAItalian
From a derivative of Italian colomba "dove" indicating a house where doves were held.
COLOMBOItalian
Either from Italian colomba "dove" indicating a dove keeper, or from the given name COLOMBO which is derived from the same word. This was the Italian surname of the 15th-century explorer Christopher Columbus.
COLÓNSpanish
Spanish form of COLOMBO.
COLQUHOUNScottish
From a place name meaning "narrow corner" or "narrow wood" in Gaelic.
COLTONEnglish
From a place name meaning "COLA's town".
COMBSEnglish
Variant of COOMBS.
COMO (1)Italian
From the given name GIACOMO.
COMO (2)Italian
From the name of the city of Como in Lombardy, the rival city of Milan during the Middle Ages. Its name may come from a Celtic root meaning "valley".
COMSTOCKEnglish
Possibly from the name of the River Culm in Devon, England. This name is seen in the Domesday book as Culmstoke or Colmstoke.
COMTOISFrench
Indicated a person from Franche-Comté, a province in eastern France, which translates to "free county".
CONFORTOLAItalian
From the old Italian given name Conforto meaning "comfort".
CONNELLIrish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Conaill meaning "descendant of CONALL".
CONNEREnglish
From Middle English connere meaning "inspector", an occupational name for an inspector of weights and measures.
CONNOLLYIrish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Conghalaigh, which means "descendant of Conghalach". Conghalach is a nickname meaning "valiant".
CONSTABLEEnglish
From Old French conestable, ultimately from Latin comes stabuli meaning "officer of the stable".
CONSTANTINRomanian
From the given name CONSTANTIN.
CONTIItalian
From the Italian noble title conte meaning "count", derived from Latin comes. It denoted a person who worked for a count or, in rare cases, was a count.
COOKEnglish
Derived from Old English coc meaning "cook", ultimately from Latin coquus. It was an occupational name for a cook, a man who sold cooked meats, or a keeper of an eating house.
COOKEEnglish
Variant of COOK.
COOKSONEnglish
Patronymic form of COOK.
COOLENDutch
From the given name NICOLAAS.
COOMBSEnglish
From Old English cumb meaning "valley", the name of several places in England.
COONEYIrish
From Irish Ó Cuana meaning "descendant of Cuana". Cuana probably means "handsome, elegant". The Cooney sept originated in County Tyrone.
COOPEREnglish
Means "barrel maker", from Middle English couper.
CORCORANIrish
From Irish Ó Corcráin meaning "descendant of Corcrán", a given name derived from the Gaelic word corcair "purple".
COREYEnglish
Derived from the Old Norse given name Kóri, of unknown meaning.
CORNAItalian
Derived from the names of places in northern Italy, especially Lombardy, from a word which means "crag, cliff" in the Lombard dialect.
CORNELLEnglish
Derived from the given name CORNELIUS.
CORNETTEnglish
Derived from Old French cornet meaning "horn", referring to one who worked as a horn blower.
CORRÀItalian
From a short form of the given name CORRADO.
CORTIItalian
From Italian corte meaning "court, yard".
CORVIItalian
Nickname derived from Italian corvo meaning "crow".
CORWINEnglish
Derived from Old French cordoan "leather", ultimately from the name of the Spanish city of Cordova.
CORYEnglish
Variant of COREY.
COSTAPortuguese, Italian, Catalan
Means "riverbank, slope, coast" in Portuguese, Italan and Catalan, ultimately from Latin meaning "side, edge".
COSTANTINIItalian
From the given name COSTANTINO.
COSTANZOItalian
From the given name COSTANZO.
COSTEFrench
French form of COSTA.
CÔTÉFrench
French form of COSTA.
COTTERILLEnglish
Derived from Middle English cotter meaning "cottager", referring to a small tenant farmer.
COUCHCornish
From Cornish cough "red", indicating the original bearer had red hair.
COUGHLANIrish
Anglicized form of Ó COCHLÁIN.
COUGHLINIrish
Anglicized form of Ó COCHLÁIN.
COUPEEnglish
From Middle English coupe meaning "barrel", a name for a barrel maker or cooper.
COURTEMANCHEFrench
Means "short sleeve" in French.
COURTENAY (1)English
From the name of towns in France which were originally derivatives of the Gallo-Roman personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short".
COURTENAY (2)English
From the Old French nickname court nes meaning "short nose".
COUSINEAUFrench
Derived from Old French cosin meaning "cousin".
COUTTSScottish
From the name of the town of Cults in Aberdeenshire, derived from a Gaelic word meaning "woods".
COUTUREFrench
Means "tailor" in Old French.
COWDENEnglish
From various English place names, which meaning either "coal valley", "coal hill" or "cow pasture" in Old English.
COXEnglish
Patronymic form of COCK.
COYEnglish
Means "quiet, shy, coy" from Middle English coi.
CRACCHIOLOItalian
Derived from Italian cracchiola, referring to a chicory-like vegetable.
CRAIGScottish
Derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag, rocks", originally belonging to a person who lived near a crag.
CRAWFORDEnglish
From a place name derived from Old English crawa "crow" and ford "river crossing".
CREMASCHIItalian
From the name of the city of Crema in Lombardy, northern Italy.
CREMONAItalian
From the Italian city of Cremona, south of Milan, in Lombardy.
CREMONESIItalian
From the name of the Italian city of Cremona in Lombardy.
CRESPOSpanish, Portuguese, Italian
Referred to a person with curly hair, from Latin crispus meaning "curly".
CREWEEnglish
Originally denoted someone from Crewe in Cheshire, which is from Welsh criu "weir, dam, fish trap".
CRISPEnglish
English cognate of CRESPO.
CRNČEVIĆSerbian, Croatian
Derived from Serbian and Croatian црн (crn) meaning "black".
CROCEItalian
Italian form of CROSS.
CROCETTIItalian
Italian diminutive form of CROCE.
CROFTEnglish
From Old English croft meaning "enclosed field".
CROPPEREnglish
Occupational name derived from Middle English croppe "crop", referring to a fruit picker or a crop reaper.
CROSSEnglish
Locative name meaning "cross", ultimately from Latin crux. It denoted one who lived near a cross symbol or near a crossroads.
CROUCHEnglish
Variant of CROSS.
CRUICKSHANKScottish
From a nickname meaning "bent leg" in Scots.
CRUSANDutch
Anglicized form of CRUYSSEN.
CRUYSSENDutch
From the name of a place in the Netherlands, derived from kruis "cross".
CRUZSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese cognate of CROSS.
CSÁSZÁRHungarian
Hungarian form of KAISER.
CSEHHungarian
Means "Czech" in Hungarian.
CSINTALANHungarian
Means "mischievous, naughty" in Hungarian.
CSIZMADIAHungarian
Means "bootmaker" in Hungarian.
CSONKAHungarian
Means "maimed, mutilated" in Hungarian.
CSORBAHungarian
From a nickname meaning "chipped, jagged" in Hungarian.
ČTVRTNÍKCzech
Derived from Czech čtvrtlán meaning "one quarter of a lán", where a lán is a medieval Czech measure of land (approximately 18 hectares). The name denoted someone who owned this much land.
CUCINOTTAItalian
Derived from a diminutive of Italian cucina meaning "kitchen".