Surnames Starting with P

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PABST German
From German Papst, a cognate of POPE.
PACE Italian
Derived from the Italian given name Pace meaning "peace".
PACHIS Greek
Means "fat, thick" in Greek.
PADDON English
Variant of PATTON.
PADMORE English
Originally indicated a person from Padmore in England, derived from Old English padde "toad" and mor "moor, marsh".
PADOVAN Italian
Regional variant of PADOVANO.
PADOVANO Italian
Originally denoted one who came from the city of Padua in Italy, from Italian Padova, itself from Latin Patavium, of unknown meaning.
PAGANI Italian
Italian cognate of PAYNE.
PAGANO Italian
Italian cognate of PAYNE.
PAGE English, French
Occupational name meaning "servant, page". It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδιον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
PAGET English, French
Diminutive of PAGE.
PAHLKE German
Low German cognate of PEEL.
PAIGE English
Variant of PAGE.
PAIN English
Variant of PAYNE.
PAJARI Finnish
Means "boyar", the Finnish form of the Russian noble title боярин (boyarin).
PAKULSKI Polish
Originally denoted a person from Pakuly, Poland.
PÁL Hungarian
Derived from the given name PÁL.
PALLADINO Italian
From Italian paladino meaning "knight, defender", from Late Latin palatinus meaning "palace officer".
PALLESEN Danish
Means "son of PALLE".
PALMEIRO Portuguese
Portuguese form of PALMER.
PALMER English
Means "pilgrim", ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
PALMISANO Italian
Locative name from the town of Palmi in the Calabria region of southern Italy.
PALOMER Provençal
Means "pigeon keeper" from Latin palumbes "pigeon".
PALOMO Spanish
Means "pigeon, dove", from Latin palumbes.
PALUMBO Italian
From Italian palombo meaning "pigeon" (also "dogfish"). This form is typical of southern Italy.
PAN (1) Provençal
Means "baker", from Latin panis meaning "bread".
PAN (2) Chinese
From Chinese (pān) meaning "water in which rice has been rinsed", and also referring to a river that flows into the Han River.
PANDER Dutch
Variant of PENDERS.
PANDERS Dutch
Variant of PENDERS.
PANDEV Macedonian
Means "son of Pande", Pande being a diminutive of PETAR.
PANOSSIAN Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Փանոսյան (see PANOSYAN).
PANOSYAN Armenian
Means "son of PANOS".
PANZAVECCHIA Maltese
From a nickname meaning "old stomach" in Italian.
PAPADOPOULOS Greek
Means "son of the priest", from Greek παπας (papas) combined with the patronymic suffix πουλος (poulos).
PAPE French
French cognate of POPE.
PAPKE Low German
Low German diminutive form of papa (see POPE).
PAPP (1) Hungarian
From a nickname meaning "priest, cleric" in Hungarian.
PAPP (2) German
Nickname perhaps related to Late Latin pappare meaning "to eat".
PAQUET (1) French
Occupational name for a firewood gatherer, from Old French pacquet "bundle".
PAQUET (2) French
From a diminutive of the given name PASCAL.
PAREDES Portuguese, Spanish
Denoted a person who lived near a wall, from Portuguese parede and Spanish pared meaning "wall", both derived from Latin paries.
PARENT English, French
Derived from Old French parent meaning either "notable" (from Latin pārēre meaning "to be apparent") or "parent" (from Latin parere meaning "to produce, to give birth").
PARISH (1) English
Originally denoted a person who came from the French city of Paris, which got its name from the ancient Celtic tribe known as the Parisii.
PARISH (2) English
Derived from the medieval given name Paris, an Old French diminutive form of PATRICK.
PARISI Italian
Italian form of PARISH (1).
PARK (1) Korean
From Sino-Korean 樸, 朴 (bak) meaning "plain, unadorned, simple".
PARK (2) English
From Middle English park, from Latin parricus, of Germanic origin. This was a name for someone who worked in or lived in a park.
PARK (3) English
From the medieval name Perkin, a diminutive of PETER.
PARKER English
Means "keeper of the park" in Middle English. It is an occupational name for a person who was a gamekeeper at a medieval park.
PARKS English
Patronymic form of PARK (3).
PARMA Italian
From the city of Parma in northern Italy, the name of which is probably of Etruscan origin.
PARODI Italian
From the name of a village near Genoa in northern Italy.
PARRI Italian
From the given name GASPARE.
PARRINO Sicilian
From a Sicilian variant of Italian padrino meaning "godfather".
PARRY Welsh
Derived from ap Harry meaning "son of HARRY".
PARSAMYAN Armenian
Means "son of Parsam", possibly from an Assyrian name Barsauma meaning "fasting".
PARSONS English
Originally denoted a son of a parson, a derivative of Latin persona "person".
PARTANEN Finnish
Derived from Finnish parta meaning "beard".
PASCAL French
Derived from the given name PASCAL.
PASSERINI Italian
From Italian passero meaning "sparrow".
PASTERNACK Polish, Yiddish
Americanized form of PASTERNAK.
PASTERNAK Polish, Ukrainian, Russian, Yiddish
Means "parsnip" in various Slavic languages, ultimately from Latin pastinaca. A famous bearer was Boris Pasternak (1890-1960), author of 'Doctor Zhivago'.
PASTORE Italian
Means "shepherd" in Italian.
PASZEK Polish
Derived from a diminutive of PAWEŁ.
PÁSZTOR Hungarian
Means "shepherd" in Hungarian.
PATAKI Hungarian
Derived from Hungarian patak meaning "creek, brook". It was given to people who lived near a creek.
PATEL Indian, Gujarati
Means "landowner" in Gujarati.
PATERNOSTER English, Italian
Occupational name for a maker of rosaries, also called paternosters. They are derived from the Latin phrase pater noster "our Father", the opening words of the Lord's Prayer.
PATIL Indian, Marathi
Means "village chief" in Marathi.
PATRICK English
From the given name PATRICK.
PATRICKSON English
Means "son of PATRICK".
PATRIKSSON Swedish
Means "son of PATRIK".
PATTON English, Scottish
Diminutive of the medieval name Pate, a short form of PATRICK.
PAUL English, French, German, Dutch
From the given name PAUL.
PAULIS Dutch
From the given name PAUL.
PAULISSEN Dutch
Means "son of PAUL".
PAULSON English
Means "son of PAUL".
PAUWELS Dutch, Flemish
Means "son of PAUL".
PAVESI Italian
Variant of PAVIA.
PAVÍA Spanish
Spanish form of PAVIA.
PAVIA Italian
From the name of the city of Pavia in Lombardy, Italy. It is of unknown meaning.
PAVIĆ Croatian
Means "son of PAVLE".
PAVLETIĆ Croatian
Derived from a diminutive of the given name PAVLE.
PAVLOV Russian, Bulgarian
Means "son of PAVEL". A famous bearer of this surname was the Russian scientist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
PAVLOVSKI Macedonian
Means "son of PAVLE".
PAVLOVSKY Russian
Means "son of PAVEL".
PAVONE Italian
Means "peacock" in Italian. It was originally a nickname for a proud or haughty person.
PAVONI Italian
Variant of PAVONE.
PAWLITZKI German
From the given name PAUL.
PAXTON English
From an English place name meaning "Pœcc's town". Pœcc is an Old English name of unknown meaning.
PAYNE English
From a medieval given name or nickname derived from Latin paganus meaning "heathen, pagan" (from an earlier sense "rural, rustic") which was given to children whose baptism had been postponed or adults who were not overly religious.
PAYTON English
From the name of the town of Peyton in Sussex. It means "PÆGA's town".
PEACOCK English
From Middle English pecok meaning "peacock". It was originally a nickname for a proud or haughty person.
PEAK English
Originally indicated a dweller by a pointed hill, from Old English peac "peak". It could also denote a person from the Peak District in Derbyshire, England.
PEARCE English
From the given name PIERS.
PECHÁČEK Czech
From a diminutive of the given name PETR.
PECK (1) English
Variant of PEAK.
PECK (2) English
Occupational name for a maker of pecks (vessels used as peck measures), derived from Middle English pekke.
PECORA Italian
Means "sheep" in Italian, an occupational name for a shepherd.
PEDERSEN Danish, Norwegian
Means "son of PEDER".
PEDROTTI Italian
Drom a diminutive of the given name PIETRO.
PEEL English
Nickname for a thin person, derived from Old French pel, Latin palus meaning "stake, post" (related to English pole).
PEERENBOOM Dutch
From Dutch meaning "pear tree", referring to someone who lived or worked at a pear orchard.
PEETERS Dutch, Flemish
Dutch and Flemish variant of PETERS.
PÉK Hungarian
Means "baker" in Hungarian.
PEKKANEN Finnish
Derived from the given name PEKKA.
PELÁEZ Spanish
Means "son of PELAYO".
PELLÉ French
From French pelé meaning "bald".
PELLEGRINO Italian
Means "pilgrim, traveller" in Italian, ultimately from Latin peregrinus.
PELLETIER French
Derived from Old French pelletier "fur trader".
PELLEY French
Anglicized form of PELLÉ.
PEMBERTON English
From the name of a town near Manchester, derived from Celtic penn meaning "hill" combined with Old English bere meaning "barley" and tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town".
PEÑA Spanish
Originally denoted a person who lived near a jutting rock, from Spanish peña meaning "rock, cliff".
PENDER (1) English
From Middle English pind "to pen up". This was an occupational name for someone who penned animals.
PENDERS Dutch
From Middle Dutch paender meaning "brewer", derived from panne meaning "pan, pot", ultimately from Latin patina.
PENN (1) English
Derived from various place names which were named using the Brythonic word penn meaning "hilltop, head".
PENN (2) English
Occupational name for a person who kept penned animals, from Old English penn.
PENNERS Dutch
Variant of PENDERS.
PENNY English
Nickname meaning "penny, coin" from Old English penning.
PENSAK Yiddish
Variant of PENZIG.
PENTTI Finnish
Derived from the given name PENTTI.
PENZAK Yiddish
Variant of PENZIG.
PENZIG Yiddish
Denoted a person who came from Penzig, the German name for Pieńsk, a town in southwest Poland. It is derived from Polish pień meaning "stump, tree trunk".
PENZIK Yiddish
Variant of PENZIG.
PEREIRA Portuguese, Galician
From Portuguese and Galician pereira meaning "pear tree", ultimately from Latin pirum meaning "pear".
PÉREZ Spanish
Means "son of PEDRO" in Spanish.
PEREZ Spanish
Variant of PÉREZ.
PÉRIGORD French
From the name of a region in southern France, possibly of Gaulish origin.
PERKINS English
Means "son of Perkin", a medieval diminutive of PETER.
PERKO Slovene, Croatian
Derived from an archaic diminutive of PETER.
PERRAULT French
From a diminutive of the given name PIERRE.
PERREAULT French
From a diminutive of the given name PIERRE.
PERRIN French
From a diminutive of the given name PIERRE.
PERROT French
From a diminutive of the given name PIERRE.
PERRY (1) English
From Old English pirige meaning "pear tree", a derivative of peru meaning "pear", itself from Latin pirum. A famous bearer was Matthew Perry (1794-1858), the American naval officer who opened Japan to the West.
PERRY (2) Welsh
From Welsh ap Herry meaning "son of HERRY".
PERSSON Swedish
Means "son of PER".
PERUGIA Italian
From the name of the city of Perugia in Umbria, Italy. It was known as Perusia in the classical period, and it is of Etruscan origin.
PESARO Italian
From the name of the city of Pesaro, in the Marche region (Latin Pisaurum).
PESCE Italian
Means "fish" in Italian, referring either to a fisherman or to a person who resembled a fish in some way.
PEŠEK Czech
From a diminutive of the given name PETR.
PESTI Hungarian
Originally it indicated someone from Pest, one of the towns that were joined to make BUDAPEST.
PESTY Hungarian
Variant of PESTI.
PÉTER Hungarian
Derived from the given name PÉTER.
PETER English, German, Dutch
Derived from the given name PETER.
PETERS English, German, Dutch
Means "son of PETER".
PETERSEN Danish, Norwegian
Means "son of PETER".
PETERSON English
Means "son of PETER".
PETERSSON Swedish
Means "son of PETTER".
PETHES Hungarian
Derived from Pete, a diminutive of PÉTER.
PETIT French, Catalan, English
Means "small, little" derived from Old French and Catalan petit. It was perhaps used for a short, small person or to denote the younger of two individuals.
PETŐ Hungarian
Derived from an old diminutive of PÉTER.
PETŐCS Hungarian
Derived from Pető, an old Hungarian diminutive of PÉTER.
PETŐFI Hungarian
Means "son of Pető", an old diminutive of PÉTER.
PETRAN Romanian
From the Romanian given name PETRE.
PETRESCU Romanian
Means "son of PETRE" in Romanian.
PETRI Italian
Derived from the given name PIETRO.
PETRIĆ Croatian
Means "son of PETAR".
PETROSYAN Armenian
Means "son of PETROS" in Armenian.
PETROV Russian, Bulgarian
Means "son of PETER" in Russian and Bulgarian.
PETROVSKI Macedonian
Means "son of PETAR".
PETTERSEN Norwegian
Means "son of PETTER".
PETTERSSON Swedish
Means "son of PETTER".
PETTIGREW English
Derived from Norman French petit "small" and cru "growth".
PEURA Finnish
Means "deer" in Finnish.
PEUSEN Dutch
Derived from the given name PASCAL.
PEYNİRCİ Turkish
From Turkish peynir meaning "cheese".
PEYTON English
Variant of PAYTON.
PFAFF German
From a nickname meaning "priest, cleric" from Old High German pfaffo, from Latin papa.
PFENNING German
From Old High German pfenning meaning "penny, coin". It was used in reference to feudal tax obligations.
PHẠM Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of FAN, from Sino-Vietnamese (phạm).
PHAN Vietnamese
Vietnamese form of PAN (2), from Sino-Vietnamese (phan).
PHELPS English
Means "son of PHILIP".
PHERIGO French
Anglicized form of PÉRIGORD.
PHILIPS English, Dutch
Means "son of PHILIP". Famous bearers of this surname were Frederick Philips (1830-1900) and his son Gerard (1858-1942), the Dutch founders of the company Philips.
PHILLIPS English
Means "son of PHILIP".
PIĄTEK Polish
Means "Friday" in Polish, derived from the word piąty meaning "fifth".
PIAZZA Italian
Means "plaza" in Italian, indicating that the residence of the original bearer was near the town square.
PICASSO Italian
From Italian pica meaning "magpie". This probably denoted someone who was talkative or prone to stealing, although it may have described someone's unusual colouring. The Spanish painter and sculptor Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) was a famous bearer of this name.
PICCIRILLO Italian
From Neapolitan piccerillo meaning "small, young".
PICCOLI Italian
Nickname for a short person, from Italian piccolo "small".
PICKERING English
From the name of a town in Yorkshire, derived from Old English Piceringas, the name of a tribe.
PICKLE English
Derived from Middle English pighel meaning "small field".
PIERCE English
From the given name PIERS.
PIERNO Italian
From the name of the small town of Pierno in southern Italy near Potenza.
PIERRE French
From the given name PIERRE.
PIERSON English
Means "son of PIERS".
PIETRI Italian
Derived from the given name PIETRO.
PILGRIM English
Nickname for a person who was a pilgrim, ultimately from Latin peregrinus.
PILKVIST Swedish
From Swedish pil "willow" and qvist "twig, branch".
PINHEIRO Portuguese
Means "pine tree" in Portuguese.
PINHO Portuguese
Habitational name meaning "pine" in Portuguese.
PINI Italian
Name for a person who lived near a pine tree, from Italian pino, Latin pinus.
PIONTEK Polish
Germanized or Americanized form of PIĄTEK.
PIOTROWSKI Polish
Name for a person from a town named Piotrów, Piotrowo or Piotrowice, all derived from the given name PIOTR.
PIOVENE Italian
From the name of the town of Piovene Rocchette in Veneto, Italy.
PIPER English
Originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute).
PIRAINO Italian
From the name of the town of Piraino on Sicily.
PISANI Italian
From Italian pisano, the name for an inhabitant of the city of Pisa, Italy. The city's name is of unknown meaning.
PITTALUGA Italian
Originally a nickname for somebody who steals grapes from vineyards. In the Genoese dialect pittà means "to pick" and uga means "grapes" (uva in Italian).
PITTS English
Indicated a person who lived by a pit or hollow, from Old English pytt. It could also indicate a person from Pitt (Hants) or Pett (East Sussex) in England.
PLAMONDON French
Derived from French plat "flat" and mont "mountain", referring to someone who lived near a flat-topped mountain.
PLANCHE French
French form of PLANK.
PLANCK German
German variant of PLANK.
PLANK German, English
Means "plank", from Old French, itself from Late Latin planca. This could have referred to a person who lived by a plank bridge over a stream, someone who was thin, or a carpenter.
PLANQUE French
French form of PLANK.
PLASKETT English
Originally denoted a dweller by a swampy meadow, from Old French plascq meanig "wet meadow".
PLATT English
From Old French plat meaning "flat, thin", from Late Latin plattus, from Greek πλατυς (platys) meaning "wide, broad, flat". This may have been a nickname or a topographic name for someone who lived near a flat feature.
PLEŠKO Slovene
Nickname for a bald person, from Slovene pleša meaning "bald patch".
PLETCHER German
Anglicized form of PLETSCHER.
PLETSCHER German
Possibly from the name of a field where cattle fodder was grown, from German Bletsch.
PLOURDE French
Possibly derived from French palourde, a type of a shellfish.
PODSEDNÍK Czech
Means "one who sits behind" in Czech, an equivalent to Zahradník mainly used in the region of Moravia.
POGGI Italian
Variant of POGGIO.
POGGIO Italian
Means "hillock, small hill" in Italian, a derivative of Latin podium meaning "balcony, platform".
POINDEXTER English
From the Jèrriais surname Poingdestre meaning "right fist".
POINGDESTRE Jèrriais
Jèrriais form of POINDEXTER.
POIRIER French
Means "pear tree" in French, originally a nickname for someone who lived close to such a tree.
POKORNI Hungarian
Hungarian variant of POKORNY.
POKORNY Polish
Polish form of POKORNÝ.
POKORNÝ Czech, Slovak
Means "humble" in Czech and Slovak.
POLÁK Czech
Means "Pole, person from Poland" in Czech.
POLETTI Italian
From a diminutive of the given name PAOLO. This name is typical of northern and central Italy.
POLLEY English
From Old French poli meaning "polite, courteous".
POLOLÁNÍK Czech
Derived from Czech polo "one half" and lán, a medieval Czech measure of land (approximately 18 hectares). The name denoted someone who owned this much land.
POLZIN German
From the name of a town in Pomerania, Poland (formerly part of Germany). In Polish it is called Połczyn.
POND English
Originally referred to one who lived near a pond.
PONTECORVO Italian, Jewish
From the name of a town in central Italy, home to an old Jewish community. The town's name is derived from Italian ponte "bridge" and curvo "curved".
POOLE English
From Old English pol meaning "pool", referring to a person who lived by a small body of water.
POPE English
From a nickname which originally designated a person who played the part of the pope in a play or pageant. Otherwise the name could be used as a nickname for a man with a solemn, austere, or pious appearance. It is derived from Latin papa, ultimately from Greek παππας (pappas) meaning "father".
POPESCU Romanian
From Romanian popă "priest", from Slavic pop.
POPŁAWSKI Polish
From Polish poplaw meaning "flowing water, flood".
POPOV Russian, Bulgarian
Means "son of the priest", derived from Russian and Bulgarian поп (pop).
POPOVSKI Macedonian
Means "son of the priest" in Macedonian.
PORCHER English, French
Means "swineherd" from Old French and Middle English porchier, from Latin porcus "pig".
PORRA Catalan
Variant of PORRAS.
PORRAS Spanish, Catalan
From a nickname meaning "club" in Spanish and Catalan, ultimately from Latin porrum meaning "leek".
PORSCHE German
Derived from the given name BORIS.
PORTELLI Italian
Diminutive form of PORTO.
PORTER English
Occupational name meaning "doorkeeper", ultimately from Old French porte "door", from Latin porta.
PORTNER Low German
Low German cognate of PORTER.
PORTO Italian
Designated a person who lived near a harbour, from Italian porto, Latin portus.
PORTOGHESE Italian
Means "Portuguese" in Italian.
POSPÍŠIL Czech
Nickname for a person in a hurry, from Czech pospíšit "hurry".
POTENZA Italian
From the name of the southern Italian city of Potenza, called Potentia in Latin, meaning "power, force".
POTTER English
Occupational name for a potter, one who makes earthen vessels.
POTTINGER English
Occupational name, either for an apothecary, from Old French potecaire, or a seller of stew, from Old French potagier.
POULIN French
Derived from Old French poule meaning "chicken". It was most likely used to denote a person who raised or sold poultry.
POULSEN Danish
Means "son of POUL".
POUND English
Occupational name for a person who kept animals, from Old English pund "animal enclosure".
POWELL Welsh
Derived from Welsh ap Hywel meaning "son of HYWEL".
POWER (1) English, Irish
From Old French Poier, indicating a person who came from the town of Poix in Picardy, France.
POWER (2) English
From Middle English povre meaning "poor", via Old French from Latin pauper. It could have been a nickname for someone who had no money or a miser.
POZZI Italian
From Italian pozzo meaning "well, pit", derived from Latin puteus.
PRATT English
From Old English prætt meaning "trick, prank". This was a nickname for a trickster.
PRAŽAK Czech
Means "from PRAGUE" in Czech.
PRESCOTT English
From the name of various English places meaning "priest's cottage" in Old English.
PRESLEY English
Variant of PRIESTLEY. This name was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PRESTON English
Originally derived from various place names meaning "priest town" in Old English.
PRETORIUS Southern African, Afrikaans
From Latin praetor meaning "leader". This name was adopted in the 17th century by Wesselius Praetorius as a Latin translation of his previous surname Schulte. It is now common in South Africa.
PRICE Welsh
Derived from Welsh ap Rhys, which means "son of RHYS".
PRIDDY Welsh
From Welsh prydudd meaning "bard".
PRIESTLEY English
From a place name meaning "priest clearing", from Old English preost and leah.
PRIETO Spanish
From a nickname meaning "dark" in Spanish, referring to a person with dark hair or skin.
PRIFTI Albanian
From Albanian prift meaning "priest".
PRINSEN Dutch
Means "son of the prince", the term prince would have denoted someone who acted in a regal manner.
PRINZ German, Jewish
Means "prince", used as an ornamental name by Jews or as a nickname for someone who acted in a princely manner.
PRITCHARD Welsh
From Welsh ap Richard meaning "son of RICHARD".
PROBERT Welsh
Derived from Welsh ap Robert, which means "son of ROBERT".
PROCHÁZKA Czech
Means "walk, wander, stroll" in Czech. This was an occupational name for a travelling tradesman.
PROFETA Italian
From Italian profeta meaning "prophet". It probably came from a nickname indicating a person who wanted to predict the future. It is typical of southern Italy.
PROHÁSZKA Hungarian
Hungarian form of PROCHÁZKA.
PROSDOCIMI Italian
From the given name Prosdocimo, Italian form of PROSDOCIMUS.
PROTZ German
From a nickname meaning "showy, pompous", derived from an old southern German word meaning "toad".
PROUDFOOT English
Nickname for a person with a proud step.
PROULX French
Derived from Old French preu meaning "valiant, brave".
PROVENZA Italian
From the name of the Provence region of southern France (in Italian Provenza). It is derived from Latin provincia "province", a territorial division.
PROVENZANO Italian
Variant of PROVENZA typical of southern Italy, namely Sicily and Calabria.
PRYCE Welsh
Variant of PRICE.
PRYOR English
Originally belonged to one who was a prior (a religious official), or one who worked for a prior.