Belgian Submitted Surnames

Belgian names are used in the country of Belgium in western Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Cossart English, French
From French, referring to "a dealer of horses" (related to the English word "courser"). This surname was brought to England in the wake of the Norman Conquest of 1066, and became one of the many Anglo-Norman words that made up Middle English.
Cotton English, French
English: habitational name from any of numerous places named from Old English cotum (dative plural of cot) ‘at the cottages or huts’ (or sometimes possibly from a Middle English plural, coten)... [more]
Cottrant French
Meaning unknown.
Cottrell English, French
First found in Derbyshire where the family "Cottrell" held a family seat and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege lord for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings, 1066CE... [more]
Courcel French
Variant of Courcelles.... [more]
Courcelles French
The name of several places in France, Belgium and Canada. In Middle French the word courcelle was used to describe a "small court" or a "small garden". The word is derived from the medieval Gallo-Romance and Gallo-Italian word corticella, which was formed from the Latin word cohors, meaning "court" or "enclosure", and the diminutive –icella.... [more]
Court English, French, Irish
A topographic name from Middle English, Old French court(e) and curt, meaning ‘court’. This word was used primarily with reference to the residence of the lord of a manor, and the surname is usually an occupational name for someone employed at a manorial court.... [more]
Courtier French, Medieval French, Medieval English
French: habitational name from places called Courtier (Seine-et-Marne, Aples-de-Haute-Provence), Courtié (Tarn), or Courtière (Loir-et-Cher). ... [more]
Courville French
Derived from either of two communes in the departments of Marne and Eure-et-Loir in France. It is named with Latin curba villa, denoting a settlement in the curve of a road.
Cousin English, French
Nickname derived from Middle English cousin and Old French cosin, cusin meaning "cousin".
Cousins French
"Relative" in Old French.
Covert English, French
The surname is probably topographical, for someone who either lived by a sheltered bay, or more likely an area sheltered by trees. The formation is similar to couvert, meaning a wood or covert, and originally from the Latin "cooperio", to cover... [more]
Crabb English, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
Crane English, Dutch
1. English: nickname, most likely for a tall, thin man with long legs, from Middle English cran ‘crane’ (the bird), Old English cran, cron. The term included the heron until the introduction of a separate word for the latter in the 14th century... [more]
Crauwels Flemish, Dutch, German
Derrives from the Middle Dutch (medieval Dutch) word "crauwel" and Middle High German word "kröuwel" which means "flesh hook", "curved fork" or "trident". The word is no longer used. The first person with this name was most likely a farmer, butcher or a person that runned an inn or a hostel that was named after this tool.
Crepeau French
From the Latin word, crispus, meaning "curly hair".
Crete French
French (adjectival form Crété ‘crested’): nickname for an arrogant individual, from Old French creste ‘crest (of a hill)’ (Late Latin crista), used with reference to the comb of a rooster... [more]
Crispin English, French
From the Middle English, Old French personal name Crispin.
Croese Dutch
Dutch variant of Cruz.
Cronkhite Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Dutch Krankheid, derived from an abstract noun meaning "weakness", hence probably a nickname for a sickly individual.
Cronkite Dutch (Anglicized)
Variant form of Cronkhite. A well-known bearer of this surname was the American broadcast journalist and anchorman Walter Cronkite (1916-2009).
Crozier English, French
English and French occupational name for one who carried a cross or a bishop’s crook in ecclesiastical processions, from Middle English, Old French croisier.
Cruzan Dutch
Americanized spelling of Cruyssen.
Culvért French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
Curie French
Occupational name for a farm hand, from Old French éscuerie "stable".
Cushing English, French (Anglicized)
Altered form of Cousin, or an Americanized spelling of Cauchon. The English actor Peter Cushing (1913-1994) was a famous bearer of this name.
Cuyler Dutch
Variant of Koole or Kuilart.
Cyprien French
From the given name Cyprien.
Cyr French
From the Latin personal name Quiricus or Cyricus, Greek Kyrikos or Kyriakos, ultimately from Greek kyrios 'lord', 'master'.
Daane Dutch
From a pet form of the personal name Daniel.
D'abbadie French, English, Occitan
Means "of the Abbey" from the Occitan abadia. Variants Abadia, Abbadie, Abadie, Abada, and Badia mean "Abbey".
D'abbeville French
Means "of Abbeville" Abbeville is a commune in France. Takes its name from Latin Abbatis Villa meaning "Abbot's Village".
Dalebout Dutch
From the griven german name Dalbaldus
Daleiden German, Dutch (Rare)
Habitational name from a place in the Rhineland called Daleiden.
Dalmas French
Surname Dalmas was first found in Limousin. Literally means "of the sea."
Damas French
French form of DAMASCUS. Famous bearer Léon-Gontran Damas (1912-1978) was a French poet and politican from French Guiana, cofounder of the Négritude Mouvement and author of the collection "Black Label".
d'Amboise French
Denoted a person from Amboise, a commune located in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France.
Dame French, English
From the old French dame, "lady" ultimately from Latin domina, "mistress".
Dameron French
Nickname for a foppish or effeminate young man, Old French dameron, a derivative of Latin dominus "lord", "master" plus two diminutive endings suggestive of weakness or childishness.
Damian French, Spanish, Italian, Czech, Slovak, Polish
From the medieval personal name Damian, Greek Damianos (from damazein "to subdue"). St. Damian was an early Christian saint martyred in Cilicia in ad 303 under the emperor Domitian, together with his brother Cosmas... [more]
Damien French
From the given name Damien
D'amour French
French cognitive of D'Amore, derived from the given name Amour.
Dancy French, English
Denoted a person from Annecy, France.
Daniël Dutch
From the given name Daniël.
Dano French
Perhaps an altered spelling of French Danot or Danon, from pet forms of Jourdain or Daniel.
Danser German, French, English
German: variant of Danzer. Altered spelling of English Dancer.... [more]
D'aoust French
D'Aoust, denotes someone from Aoust(e) in France. Aouste is situated in the Ardennes department (Champagne-Ardenne region) in the north-east of France at 29 km from Charleville-Mézières, the department capital... [more]
D'arcy English, French, Norman
Originally a Norman French surname, meaning "from Arcy"... [more]
D'artagnan French, Literature
Surname given to a person from Artagnan, France. It is also used by Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the captain of the Musketeers from the novel, "The Three Musketeers".
Daudet French
Not available.
D'aurevalle French (Archaic)
This medieval surname literally means "from Aurevalle". Aurevalle can refer to any of the three French communes that are nowadays known by the more modern spelling Orival. All of them ultimately derive their name from Latin aurea vallis meaning "golden vale" or "golden valley".
D'auréville French
Variant spelling of D'aureville.
D'aureville French
This surname literally means "from Aureville". Aureville is a commune in southwestern France, which was established in late medieval times. It derives its name from Latin aurea villa or villa aurea which literally means "golden country-house, golden farm" but of course later came to mean "golden village".
D'aurevilly French
Variant form of D'aureville. A known bearer of this name was the French novelist Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly (1808-1889).
Dauterive French
Originally denoted a person hailing from any of the various places in France called Hauterive. This surname is no longer found in France. A famous fictional bearer is the character Bill Dauterive from the American animated series King of the Hill, starting 1997.
Davet French
Possibly derived from the given gave David.
Dawley English, French, Irish
"From the hedged glade" Originally, D'Awley (probably from D'Awleigh).... [more]
Deberry French
Habitational name for someone from Berry-au-Bac in Aisne, France.
DeBevoise French
Denoted someone from Beauvais, a city and commune in northern France.
Deblois French
French surname meaning "From Blois", a town in Mid-Western France. The origins of the surname started back in the 1600s when a man named Grégoire Guérard traveled to Flanders (Now Belgium) and immigrated to New France (Now Canada) in 1658... [more]
De Boer Dutch
Variant of Boer.
De Bonte Dutch
Bont is a word to describe something with many colours, originally used for spotted cows. So the name means: The one with many colours. Figuratively speaking this would mean: The one who acts crazy.
De Brún Irish, French
Derived from Brun, meaning brown in French
Debs French
From the given name Debus, a variant of Thebs or Thebus, which was an altered short form of Mattheus. This was borne by American union leader Eugene V. Debs (1855-1926).
Debussy French
This surname dates back to the Middle Ages. Unknown meaning.
De Caters Dutch
Nickname for someone thought to resemble a tomcat, derived from Middle Dutch cater, kater meaning "tomcat".
Decatur Dutch
Variant spelling of De Caters. A notable bearer was Stephen Decatur Jr. (1779-1820), an American naval officer and commodore during the War of 1812, the Barbary Wars and the Quasi-War.
Decazes French
The surname Decazes was first found in Gascony (French: Gascogne), an area of southwest France bordering Spain, that was part of the "Province of Guyenne and Gascony" prior to the French Revolution, where the family held a family seat in ancient times.... [more]
De Champagne French
Meaning "Of Champagne" in French.
De Clermont French
Means "of the bright hill" from the French de meaning "of" and clair, cler 'bright', 'clear' + mont 'hill'
Decock Belgian
Belgian form of De Kock.
Dedeaux French
Meaning uncertain. Probably a habitual surname for someone from Deaux in Gare.
Defoor Dutch
Given to someone who lived near a castle or citadel
Deford French
Variant of Dufort meaning "son of the strong" from French de-, "of" and fort, "strong". Notable namesake is author Frank Deford.
De Forest French
Alternative spelling of Deforest.
Deforge French
This is a surname of French origins. Introduced into England after the famous Invasion and Conquest of 1066, it is residential, but also possibly occupational. It is a surname which in its different forms is widely recorded heraldically, and particularly in the French regions of Brittany and Normandy... [more]
Defrain French
Variant of Frain combined with the French de "from".... [more]
De Geer Dutch, Swedish
The name is possibly derived from the town of Geer near Liège, Belgium. The town lies along the course of the river Jeker, which is called Geer in French.
Degelos Jewish (Rare), French
Most probable origin - Jewish adapting French sounding names... [more]
De Goede Dutch
From a nickname meaning "the good" or "the kind".
De Graaf Dutch
Means "the count", derived from Dutch.
De Graaff Dutch
Means "the count", derived from Dutch.
De Groeve Dutch (Modern)
De Groeve is a surname meaning stone.
De Kok Dutch
Literally means "the cook" in Dutch.
De La Boulaye French
This indicates familial origin within the Bourgignon commune of La Boulaye.
Delacour French
Probably based off the term "de la cœur", meaning "on the court".
Delafoy French
From Old French de la foy meaning "of the faith". This is probably a name given to a cleric or a very pious person among the French Catholics.
Delagardelle French
Habitational name for someone from Lagardelle, a place in Haute Garonne.
Delalande French
French surname, pronounced /dølalɑ̃də/, which means "from the moor", "from the heath". Famous bearer Michel-Richard Delalande (1657-1726), French baroque composer and organist nicknamed "the Latin Lully", changed its spelling in "de Lalande" in order to give it aristocratic looks.
De La Montagne French
Means "of the mountain" in French.
Delaplaine French
Means "of the Plain" in French
Delbert English, Dutch
From the given name Delbert
Delbozque French
French Variant of Del Bosque
Deleeuw Dutch
Found in the North Brabant region of the Netherlands
De Leeuw Van Weenen Dutch
Means "Lion of Vienna" in Dutch.
Delevingne French, English
Means "of the vine" in French. It is the surname of Poppy Delevingne and Cara Delevingne, both English actresses and models; it is also the surname of French-born photojournalist Lionel Delevingne
De Lévis French
This indicates familial origin within the Orléanais commune of Lévis-Saint-Nom.
De Liniers French
This indicates familial origin within the Poitevin commune of Liniers.
Delorey French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of Deslauriers, a topographic name for someone living among laurels, a combination of the fused preposition and plural definite article des ‘from the’ + the plural of Old French lorier ‘laurel’.
de Maagd Dutch
Derived from Middle Dutch maech, mage "a member of one's kin, a blood relative".
Demar French, English
Combination of the French word de, meaning "from" and the Old French word maresc, meaning "marsh".
Demaree French (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of French Desmarais.
Demers French
From French meaning "of the seas". A famous bearer of this surname was Modeste Demers, a bishop in 18th century Vancouver.
Demestre French
It's an occupational word coming from Latin. It means "master". It is of French origin.
De Michele Italian, French
An Italian and French patronymic surname, meaning "son of Michele 1".
DeMille French (Belgian)
Denoted a person from Hamme-Mille, a section of the municipality of Beauvechain, in the province of Walloon Brabant in Wallonia, Belgium. This surname was borne by the American filmmaker and producer Cecil B. DeMille (1881-1959).
Denaut French (Rare, ?)
Possibly a variant of Denault.
Déodat French
From the given name Déodat.
Depardieu French
Means "of by God" in French, derived from French pardieu meaning "by God", hence a nickname for a person who blasphemously uttered the name of God. It could also indicate a person who came from various places in France called Part-Dieu or Pardieu, for example the Lyon-Part-Dieu Business District in the city of Lyon... [more]
Depaul French
Son of Paul
De Pauw Dutch, Flemish
Variant spelling of Pauw.
De Praetere Flemish
Means "The Prattler", from or related to Middle Dutch praten "to chatter" (c. 1400), from a Proto-Germanic imitative root.
Deremer Dutch
From an old personal name Terrimar, which is probably from Old High German dart ‘spear’ + mari ‘famous’
Dernier French
Means Last in French
De Robespierre French
From the combined given name Robert and Pierre.
Deroboam French
unknown possibly french, family has french origins
De Roos Dutch
From Dutch roos "rose" (see Roos).
De Rozen Dutch
A Dutch surname meaning "the roses".
Deruelle French
Habitational name for someone who lived near a place called (la) Ruelle, for example Ruelle-sur-Touvre.
Desanges French (Rare)
Means "from the angels", possibly connected to the French title of the Virgin Mary Notre Dame des Anges, meaning "Our Lady of the Angels". Bearers of this surname include Louis William Desanges (1822-1905), an English artist of French descent, and French historian Jehan Desanges (1929-).
Descatoire French
Alexandre Descatoire was a French sculptor (1874-1949)... [more]
Deschain French, Literature
Of French origin. This is the last name of the character of the Gunslinger Roland in Stephen King’s The Dark Tower series.
Deschanel French
Derived from eschamel meaning "stepladder", or des chanels meaning "from the channels, from the little jugs". An occupational nickname for a trader, it supposedly originated in the Ain department, in Lyon, France... [more]
Deschenes French
"Chenes" is French for "oak tree". In French, "Des" means more than one. "Des"+ "Chenes"= Deschenes meaning "Many oak trees."
Desmarais French
Habitational name for someone from any of various places named with Old French mareis, maresc ‘marsh’, as for example Les Marets, in Seine-et-Marne, Centre, Nord, and Picardy.
De Soye French
Meaning "From Soye" in French.
Des Roches French
Either a topographic name for someone living among rocks or a habitational name from any of several places named with this word, meaning "from the rocks" in French.
Desrouleaux French, Haitian Creole
Means "of the scrolls" in French. It is a occupational name for a scribe, a person who serves as a professional copyist, especially one who made copies of manuscripts before the invention of automatic printing... [more]
Desruisseaux French, French (Quebec)
Topographic name for someone who lived in an area characterized by streams, from the fused preposition and plural definite article des meaning "from the" and ruisseaux (plural of ruisseau) meaning "stream".
d'Estaing French
Derived from Estaing, a commune in the Aveyron department in southern France. A famous bearer was the French president Valéry Giscard d'Estaing (1926-2020).
d'Estienne French
From the given name Estienne, a Medieval French form of Stephen.
De Talleyrand French
A French noble surname. A cadet branch of the family of sovereign counts of Périgord, they took their name from the estate of Périgord owned by these counts, and date back to Boso I, count of la Marche... [more]
De Thomas French
Derived from the given name Thomas.
Deutschlander Dutch
Name given to a person from Germany.
Devall French, English
Devall (also DeVall) is a surname of Norman origin with both English and French ties.Its meaning is derived from French the town of Deville, Ardennes. It was first recorded in England in the Domesday Book.In France, the surname is derived from 'de Val' meaning 'of the valley.'
Deveaux French, Bahamian Creole
Means "of the valleys", derived from French val "valley".
Deveraux English, French
Variant spelling of Devereux.
De Vignerot French, French (Belgian)
The surname Vignerot was first found in Belgium, where the name became noted for its many branches in the region, each house acquiring a status and influence which was envied by the princes of the region... [more]
Devil French
Variant of De Ville, De Vill,etc.
Deville French
French surname meaning, 'The Village', from French De- 'the' and Ville- 'Village'.
Devooght Belgian
The origin of the surname DeVooght is unknown.... [more]
Devore French
French: variant of De Var, a habitational name for someone from a place named Var, for example in Charente. Respelling of French Devors, a habitational name, with the preposition de, for someone from Vors in Aveyron.
De Winter Dutch
Nickname for a cold or gloomy man, from Middle Dutch winter 'winter' + the definite article de.
Dewolf Dutch
A nickname for one identified with the animal or from a place noted for a sign showing a picture of a wolf. Signs with easily understood pictographs communicated the names of locations in preliterate Europe.
De Zeeuw Dutch
Nickname for someone from the Dutch provence Zeeland
Diede Dutch
From the given name Diede.
Dieudonné French
From the given name Dieudonné.
Dieulafoy French
From Old French Dieu la foy meaning "God the faith". Famous bearers were the married couple of French archeologists Marcel Dieulafoy (1844-1920) and Jane Dieulafoy (1951-1916). A medical condition of the stomach causing gastric bleeding called "Dieulafoy's lesion" was named after Dr... [more]
Digne French
From French digne "dignified, worthy" perhaps a nickname for a hardworking person.
Dion French
Meaning uncertain. It may be a habitational name from any of various locations called Dion or Dionne, derived from the Gaulish element divon- meaning "(sacred) spring" or Celtic dēwos meaning "god, deity"... [more]
Dior French
May be derived from French d'or meaning "of gold", but a relation to a first name of Greek origin that contains the element dios "of Zeus" (such as Dionysius) is also possible.... [more]
Dirk Dutch, German
From the given name Dirk.
Disharoon French (Americanized)
Americanized form of an unidentified French name, possibly de Charente. This name was established in MD by the end of the 17th century.
Distel German, Low German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a patch of ground overgrown with thistles, or perhaps a nickname for a "prickly" person, from Middle High German, Middle Low German, Middle Dutch distel "thistle".
Dominique French
From the given name Dominique
Donadieu French
Meaning “given to God”, surname given to a child because they were given to a priest or monastery or either an orpan.
Donatien French
From the given name Donatien.
D'orevalle French (Archaic)
Variant form of D'aurevalle. A known bearer of this surname was the medieval bishop Hugh d'Orevalle (d. 1084 or 1085).
D'orival French
Variant form of D'oreval. This is also one of the very few forms (of what is ultimately the D'aurevalle surname) that is still in use nowadays.
Dorn German, German (Austrian), Dutch, Flemish, English
Means "thorn" in German.
Dorsay French
French form of Dorsey.
Dortmundt Dutch
Dutch form of Dortmund.
d'Orves French
Denoted someone from Orve, a commune in the Doubs department in eastern France.
Doster German, Belgian
A German surname, which is from an agent derivative of the Middle High German words 'doste' and 'toste' (meaning ‘wild thyme’, ‘shrub’, ‘bouquet’). It is a topographic surname which was given to someone whose land abutted an uncultivated piece of land, or possibly an occupational name for someone who dealt herbs.... [more]
Douillard French
Nickname for a softie, possibly derived from Old French do(u)ille meaning "soft, tender".
Doux French
From French meaning "sweet". Probably a nickname for someone who's gentle and kind-hearted.