Belgian Submitted Surnames

Belgian names are used in the country of Belgium in western Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Violet English, French
Derived from the given name Violet (English) or a variant of Violette (French).
Violette French
Perhaps a topographic name from a diminutive of viol "path", itself a derivative of vie "way". It is more likely, however, that this name is from the secondary surname Laviolette "the violet (flower)", which was common among soldiers in French Canada.
Viray Occitan, French, Catalan
Southern French (Occitan) and Catalan variant of Occitan Verai and Veray, nickname from Occitan verai ‘honest’... [more]
Vivier French
Derived from Latin vivarium, ultimately from Latin vivus "alive". This name is locational relating to living near a fish pond.
Voisin French
English (of Norman origin) and French: from Old French voisin ‘neighbor’ (Anglo-Norman French veisin) . The application is uncertain; it may either be a nickname for a ‘good neighbor’, or for someone who used this word as a frequent term of address, or it might be a topographic name for someone who lived on a neighboring property... [more]
Voogd Dutch
Name for a bailiff, farm manager, or other personal with supervisory authority, Middle High German voget, Late Latin vocatus, from Latin advocatus, past participle of advocare ‘to call up (to help)’... [more]
Voorhees Dutch
Habitational name from a place in Drenthe called Voorhees.
Vos Dutch
From the word vos meaning "fox", it may have been a nickname for someone with fox-like characteristics.
Vosberg Dutch, German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a hill frequented by foxes, from Middle Low German vos "fox" and berg "hill", "mountain".
Vreeland Dutch
Habitational name for a person from a place bearing the same name in the province of Utrecht, which is itself derived from the Middle Dutch word vrede, meaning "legal protection against armed violence".
Vreeswijk Dutch
Possibly a habitational name from a former village and municipality in the province Utrecht, Netherlands. A notable bearer was Dutch-Swedish singer-songwriter and poet Cornelis Vreeswijk (1937-1987).
Vrieze Dutch
Ethnic name for a Frisian.
Vuitton French
Derived from the Old High German word "witu" and the Old English pre 7th century "widu" or "wudu", meaning a wood, and therefore occupational for one living by such a place.
Wachter German, Dutch
Occupational name for a watchman, from Middle High German wachtære, wehtære, Middle Dutch wacht(e)re. (cf. Waite).
Warns Dutch, German
Dutch habitational name from places so named in Friesland and Overijssel. The one in Friesland was the site of a famous victory of Frisians over the Hollanders in the 14th century. ... [more]
Weg Dutch
Proper non: Way/road/path
Wellspeak French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of Beauparlant.
Wessel Frisian, Dutch
From the given name Wessel.
Westbroek Dutch
Dutch form of Westbrook.
Westhouse Dutch
West of the House, originating from the name VeistHuis
Weston Dutch
Diminutive of Westenberg
Wijngaard Dutch
Means "vineyard" in Dutch.
Win Dutch, English
Dutch: variant of Winne. ... [more]
Winkel German, Jewish, Dutch, Belgian
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner of land in the country or a street corner in a town or city, from Middle High German winkel, German Winkel ‘corner’... [more]
Winne Dutch, English
Dutch: occupational name for an agricultural worker, Middle Low German winne ‘peasant’. ... [more]
Wit Dutch
From Dutch meaning "white".
Witte Dutch
Nickname for someone with white or blonde hair or an unusually pale complexion, from Middle Dutch witte "white".
Wolkers Dutch
Dutch from Walker.
Woltring Dutch
Derived from the German or Germanic name "Woltering".... [more]
Wondergem Dutch
gem cutter or gem setter-jewler
Woodlock Irish, French, English
From an Old English personal name, Wudlac, composed of the elements wudu ‘wood’ + lac ‘play’, ‘sport’.
Wriedt German, Dutch
Nickname from Middle Low German wrēt, wrede meaning "fierce", "evil", "angry".
Wyckoff Dutch
name for someone living at the main farm in a district, from Dutch wijk ‘district’ + hof ‘farmstead’, ‘manor farm’.
Xavier English, French
Derived from the Basque place name Etxaberri meaning "the new house". This was the surname of the Jesuit priest Saint Francis Xavier (1506-1552). He was a missionary to India, Japan, China, and other areas in East Asia, and he is the patron saint of the Orient and missionaries.
Yaun Dutch (Americanized)
Americanized form of Jahn.
Yost American, Dutch, Afrikaans
Americanized spelling of Dutch surname Joost or German surname Jost
Zavattari Italian, French, Spanish, Romanian
A derivation of the Old French word 'savate'... [more]
Zay French
Frenchified form of German See.
Zee Dutch
Reduced form of Dutch Van der Zee.
Zeller German, Dutch, English, Jewish
Originally denoted someone from Celle, Germany or someone living near a hermit's cell from German zelle "cell". It is also occupational for someone employed at a zelle, for example a small workshop.
Zylstra Dutch, Frisian, English
Derived from Dutch zijl "canal" or "sluice". Originally indicated someone who lives near a canal or sluice.