Belgian Submitted Surnames

Belgian names are used in the country of Belgium in western Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Branche French
From Old French branche meaning ‘branch’ (which is from Late Latin branca meaning ‘foot’, ‘paw’), the application of which as a surname is not clear. Compare Branch.
Braque French
Surname of cubist artist Georges Braque.
Bras Dutch, Low German
Dutch and North German: from Old French and Middle Dutch bras ‘arm’. This was probably a descriptive nickname for someone with some peculiarity of the arm, but the word was also used as a measure of length, and may also have denoted a surveyor.
Brashear French (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of French Brasseur or Brassier "brewer."
Brasseur French
French and English (of both Norman and Huguenot origin): occupational name for a brewer, from Old French brasser ‘to brew’. See also Brasher.
Braunershrither German, Dutch, English
This name mean Leather (Tanned) Knight, or a fighter of leather armor, or in Dutch, Leather writer, one who branded print on leather
Bremont French
A variant of Bremond.
Bresson French
From a pet form of the personal name Brès (see Brice).
Breton French, English
French and English: ethnic name for a Breton, from Old French bret (oblique case breton) (see Brett).
Brevard French
French: nickname from Old French bref ‘small’ + the derogatory suffix -ard.... [more]
Brian Irish, English, French
1) Variant spelling of Bryan. ... [more]
Briand French
Variant of Brian.
Briggs English, Flemish
This surname is a variant of the more common name Bridges, which, contrary to appearances, has two possible origins, one the perhaps obvious English topographical or occupational one, and the other locational, from Belgium... [more]
Brink Low German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish
The Dutch and Low German meaning is "village green". In Danish and Swedish, the name is thought to be a borrowing of Middle Dutch brinc / brink, meaning "grassy edge" or perhaps "slope",, and the Danish word now means "where the water runs deep".
Brinker German, Dutch
From the word brink "edge, slope". This indicated that the bearer of the surname lived near a prominent slope of land
Brizendine French, English, Jewish
Derived from a personal name, probably of Celtic origin (Latinized as Britus), which was borne by a 5th century saint, who succeeded St. Martin as bishop of Tours.
Brook German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a water meadow or marsh, from Low German brook, Dutch broek (cf. Bruch).... [more]
Brosseau French
Derived from a diminutive of Brusse.
Brousseau French
Southern French variant of Brosseau.
Brouwer Dutch
Dutch occupational name for a brewer of beer or ale, Middle Dutch brouwer.
Brouwers Dutch
Possibly means "brewer; brewers" relating to one who brews beer.
Brugman Dutch, Swiss
Dutch: topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge or a metonymic occupational name for a bridge keeper, from Dutch brugge ‘bridge’ (see Bridge); in some cases, it is a habitational name for someone from the Flemish city of Bruges (or Brugge), meaning ‘bridges’... [more]
Bruin Dutch
From a medieval Dutch nickname meaning "brown", from Middle Dutch bruun "brown", making this a cognate of German Braun, English Brown and Italian Bruno... [more]
Bruins Dutch
Patronymic from Bruin meaning "brown" in Dutch.
Bruinsma Dutch, West Frisian
Means "son of Bruin", the suffix -(s)ma indicating that it is of Frisian origin.
Bruneau French
Derived from a diminutive form of French brun "brown", a nickname for a person with brown hair or skin.
Bruns French
Bruns was first found in Poitou where this noble family held a family seat since ancient times. The Bruns surname derives from the French word "brun," meaning "brown"; possibly a nickname for someone who habitually dressed in the color brown.
Brusse French
Topographic name for someone living in a scrubby area of country, from Old French broce meaning "brushwood, scrub". It is also occupational name for a brush maker, from Old French brusse meaning "brush".
Brusseau French (Anglicized)
Probably an Americanized spelling of Brousseau.
Buford English, French (Anglicized)
English: most probably a variant of Beaufort.... [more]
Bur Swiss, Low German, Czech, French
Swiss and North German variant of Bauer. ... [more]
Burcy French
Denoting someone from the town of Burcy.
Burger English, German, Dutch
Status name for a freeman of a borough. From Middle English burg, Middle High German burc and Middle Dutch burch "fortified town". Also a German habitational name for someone from a place called Burg.
Burnette French
Descriptive nickname from Old French burnete ‘brown’ (see Burnett). Possibly also a reduced form of Buronet, from a diminutive of Old French buron ‘hut’, ‘shack’.
Bursey French
Variant of Burcy.
Cabaniss French
Variant spelling of Cabanis, a habitational name from any of various places in Gard named Cabanis, from Late Latin capannis ‘at the huts’, ablative plural of capanna 'hut'... [more]
Caderousse French, Literature
A character in the classic novel The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. In the novel, Caderousse is a tailor and inkeeper who aids in the arrest of Dantès.
Cadillac French
From the name of a city in France, of origin I am not sure of (anyone who knows the name's etymology edit this). This is most notably the name of the car company of the same name, named after Detroit, Michigan founder Antoine de la Mothe, Sieur de Cadillac.
Cadoret French, Breton
From an old Breton given name Catuuoret meaning "protector in combat".
Caillou French
Means "pebble" in French. Probably a nickname for a bald person.
Caine French, English
Originally from a French derogatory nickname for someone with a bad temper.
Calixte French
From the given name Calixte
Campion Norman, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: status name for a professional champion (see Champion, Kemp), from the Norman French form campion.
Camus French
Means "flat-nosed" in French.
Canada French, English
It derives from the Middle English "cane", a development of the Old French "cane", meaning cane, reed.
Canteloup French
Name of several places in France. The surname means "Song of the Wolf" from canta and loup as in "place where the wolves howl".
Capon French
A name for a person who worked as a poultry farmer.
Capricorne French
Derived from the Latin word (Capricornus) meaning "horned like a goat". Probably a nickname for an ambitious person.
Caramelle French
Name given to a chalumeau player, derived from the old French chalemel, calamel or chalemie, which in turn were derived from the Latin word calamus meaning "reed". Italian variations of the surname are: Caramella, Caramelli, Caramello (diminutive: Caramellino) and Caramelo.
Carlin French
From a pet form of Charles.
Carre French
French (Carré): from Old French carré "square", applied as a nickname for a squat, thickset man.
Carrel French
French: from Old French quar(r)el ‘bolt (for a crossbow)’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of crossbow bolts or a nickname for a short, stout man. The word also meant ‘paving slab’, and so it could also have been a metonymic occupational name for a street layer... [more]
Cartier French, Norman
Original Norman French form of Carter. A notable bearer was Breton-French explorer Jacques Cartier (1491-1557), who is known for discovering the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
Carville French, Irish
As a French location name it comes from a settlement in Normandy. As an Irish name it derives from a word for "warrior".
Casals Catalan, French
Plural form of Casal.
Casanabe French
CASANABE is a French name meaning New house.
Case French
Case. A hut, a hovel.
Cassatt French
Origin uncertain. This is not known as a surname in Britain. It may be an Americanized form of a French name such as Casault.
Casse French
Means "oak" in Gallo-Roman
Cassel English, French, German
A surname derived from the Latin military term castellum "watchtower, fort". A variant spelling of the word castle. Denoted someone hailing from the commune of Cassel in the Nord départment in northern France or the city of Kassel (spelled Cassel until 1928) in Germany... [more]
Castaignède French
Stéphane Castaignède is a French rugby player and coach.... [more]
Castille French
Regional name for someone from Castile in central Spain (see Castilla).
Castillon French
means "castle"
Cattell Anglo-Saxon, French, Ancient Scandinavian
Originated in Scandinavia as a patronym of the first name Thurkettle, a derivative of the Olde Norse name Arnkell, which is composed of arn meaning "eagle" and ketil meaning "a helmet" or "a helmeted warrior" as well as "cauldron", but helmet is the more likely translation... [more]
Cave Norman, French, English
A name of various possible origins. As a Norman French name Cave can mean "bald" from cauf or it can mean "worker in a wine cellar" or "one who dwelt in or near a cave". As an English name Cave refers to a Yorkshire river whose fast current inspired the name meaning "swift".
Célestin French
From the given name Célestin.
Cellier French
Means "storeroom" in French.
Cerfbeer French, Jewish
Combination of the Medieval French and Jewish given names Cerf and Beer.
Césaire French, Haitian Creole
From the given name Césaire. A notable bearer was Aimé Césaire (1913-2008), a Martiniquais politician and writer.
Chabot French
From chabot ‘bull-head’, a species of fish with a large head, hence a nickname for someone with a big head and a small body.
Chalamet French
Nickname for someone who played the reed or an occupational name for seller of torches, from a regional form of Old French chalemel meaning "reed" or "blowtorch". A notable bearer is American actor Timothée Chalamet (1995-).
Challoner French, Welsh
Derived from a town in France of the same name. This family derive their origin from Macloy Crum, of the line of chiefs in Wales, who resided several years in Challoner.
Chambon French
A very popular last name in France.
Champagne French
regional name for someone from Champagne, named in Latin as Campania (from campus 'plain', 'flat land'). This is also the name of various villages in France, and in some cases the family name may derive from one of these.
Champin French
It is the french form of Chapman
Champlain French
Name given to those who live in or around fields. Known barrer of the name is Samuel de Champlain who founded Quebec, Canada and after whom the lake is named.
Champlin Belgian, English
Means Champion, was a family name in Belgium, a status and influence that was envied by the princes of the region.... [more]
Chapdelaine French
Compound name derived from Old French chape meaning "hooded cloak, cape, hat" and de laine meaning "of wool", probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for a maker of such apparel, or as a nickname for someone who wore a distinctive cloak or hat.
Chapel French
Occupational name for a maker of cloaks or a nickname for a person who wore a distinctive cloak, from a diminutive of Old French chape meaning "cape, cloak".
Chapin French, Spanish
From a reduced form of French eschapin or Spanish chapín, a term for a light (woman's) shoe; perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore this type of footwear or possibly a metonymic occupational name for a shoemaker.
Chardin French
Meaning uncertain, possibly of Norman origin.
Charisse French
Of unknown meaning. It was used as a given name in honour of American actress and dancer Cyd Charisse (1921-2008).
Charlotte French, English
From the feminine given name Charlotte.
Charmian English, French
from the given name Charmian
Charretier French
French form of Carter.
Charrue French
French for "cartwright."
Chase French
Topographic name for someone who lived in or by a house, probably the occupier of the most distinguished house in the village, from a southern derivative of Latin casa "hut, cottage, cabin".
Chasseur French
From French meaning "hunter".
Chastang French
Derived from Olde French castanh meaning "chestnut". Possibly a location or occupation name.
Chaudron French
From french meaning "cauldron".
Chaux French
French / Switzerland.... [more]
Chell French
Probably a respelling of the French habitational name Challe, from any of the various places so named from Late Latin cala ‘rock shelter’.
Chénier French
French surname which indicated one who lived in an oak wood or near a conspicuous oak tree, derived from Old French chesne "oak" (Late Latin caxinus). In some cases it may be from a Louisiana dialectical term referring to "an area of shrub oak growing in sandy soil" (i.e., "beach ridge, usually composed of sand-sized material resting on clay or mud... [more]
Chiere French (Rare)
Possibly derived from the Old French chiere, from chier, meaning "dear, dearest".
Choate English, Dutch
The names of Choate and Chute are believed to have been of common origin and derived from the residence of their first bearers at a place called Chute in Wiltshire, England. Certain historians, however, state that the name of Choate was of Dutch origin and was taken by its first bearers from their residence at a place of that name in the Netherlands.
Chopin French
French and English: nickname for a heavy drinker, from Old French chopine, a large liquid measure (from Middle Low German schopen "ladle"). The derived Old French verb chopiner has the sense 'to tipple’, ‘to drink to excess’... [more]
Choquette French
Altered spelling of French Choquet, a Picard form of Old French soquet, which was the term for a tax on wines and foodstuffs, hence a metonymic occupational name for a collector of such taxes.
Christoffel Dutch
From the given name Christoffel.
Chrysanthe French
From the Greek Χρύσανθος (Chrysanthos), meaning "golden flower". This surname was first given to children found on October 25, the feast day of Saint Chrysanthos.
Clair French
From the given name Clair.
Claude French
From the first name Claude.
Claudel French
From the given name Claudel.
Clavel French
Metonymic occupational name for a nail maker, ultimately from Latin clavellus "nail", but in some cases possibly from the same word in the sense "smallpox, rash". A fictional bearer is Miss Clavel, a nun and teacher in Ludwig Bemelmans's 'Madeline' series of children's books (introduced in 1939).
Clavell French
The first documented records of the surname Clavell appear in Catalunya between 1291 and 1327. The word clavell traces back to the Indo-European words "kleu", later "klawo" meaning a metal tool. In Latin "clavus", it eventually became a surname "Clavell".
Cleland Belgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of McClelland. ... [more]
Clem English, Dutch
From the given name Clem.
Clemenceau French
Probably derived from the French given name Clément. A famous bearer was Georges Clemenceau (1841-1929), the 54th Prime Minister of France during the First World War.
Cloud French
From the Germanic personal name Hlodald, composed of the elements hlod "famous, clear" and wald "rule", which was borne by a saint and bishop of the 6th century.
Clute Dutch
From kluit, meaning "lamp"
Clutterbuck English, Dutch (Anglicized, ?)
English surname of unknown origin, possibly a corrupted form of a Dutch surname derived from Dutch klateren "to clatter" and beek "brook". The original surname may have been brought to England by Flemish weavers whom Edward III brought to England in the 14th century to teach their techniques to the English, or by Huguenots who fled the Netherlands in the 16th century to escape religious persecution... [more]
Coach French
Possibly an altered spelling of French Coache, from the Norman and Picard term for a damson, probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of plums.
Coers German, Dutch
Derived from the given name Konrad
Coit Medieval Welsh, French, English
The surname Coit was first found in Carnarvonshire, a former country in Northwest Wales, anciently part of the Kingdom of Gwynedd, and currently is divided between the unitary authorities of Gwynedd and Conwy, where they held a family seat... [more]
Collard English, French
English and French: from the personal name Coll + the pejorative suffix -ard.
Collet French
From a pet form of Colle.
Collines French
French for "hillbanks".
Cologne French
Habitational name from a place in France called Cologne.
Comeau French, French (Acadian), Louisiana Creole
French: from a Gascon diminutive of Combe.
Commander Anglo-Saxon, French
From Middle English comander, comandor and comandour and also from Old French comandeor, all meaning "commander", "leader" or "ruler". The first recorded use of the name is through a family seat held in Somerset.
Condom French
Regional name for someone who lives in a French province named "Condom".
Conklin Irish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish Coughlin.
Constance English, French
From the given name Constance
Constant French, Dutch, English
From the given name Constant or from the word "constant"
Coonrod Dutch
Americanized spelling of Dutch Coenraet or Koenraadt or German Kühnrat (Konrad).
Corbin English, French
Derived from French corbeau meaning "raven," originally denoting a person who had dark hair.
Corday French
Either from the French word corde meaning "cord/rope/string", or from the Latin word cor meaning "heart." This was the surname of Charlotte Corday, the assassin who killed Jacobin leader Jean-Paul Marat during the French revolution.
Corder French (Anglicized, Archaic), English (American)
Linked to both English, French and Spanish origin. Cordier, Cordero, Corder- one who makes cord. Can refer to both the act of making cords (rope), cores of fire wood, or actual location names.... [more]
Cordonnier French
An occupational surname for a cordwainer or shoemaker, and derived from Old French cordouanier, literally meaning "cobbler".
Cormier French
French topographic name for someone who lived near a sorb or service tree, Old French cormier (from corme, the name of the fruit for which the tree was cultivated, apparently of Gaulish origin).
Corsaut French
Possibly a variant of Cossart.
Cossart English, French
From French, referring to "a dealer of horses" (related to the English word "courser"). This surname was brought to England in the wake of the Norman Conquest of 1066, and became one of the many Anglo-Norman words that made up Middle English.
Cotton English, French
English: habitational name from any of numerous places named from Old English cotum (dative plural of cot) ‘at the cottages or huts’ (or sometimes possibly from a Middle English plural, coten)... [more]
Cottrant French
Meaning unknown.
Cottrell English, French
First found in Derbyshire where the family "Cottrell" held a family seat and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege lord for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings, 1066CE... [more]
Courcel French
Variant of Courcelles.... [more]
Courcelles French
The name of several places in France, Belgium and Canada. In Middle French the word courcelle was used to describe a "small court" or a "small garden". The word is derived from the medieval Gallo-Romance and Gallo-Italian word corticella, which was formed from the Latin word cohors, meaning "court" or "enclosure", and the diminutive –icella.... [more]
Court English, French, Irish
A topographic name from Middle English, Old French court(e) and curt, meaning ‘court’. This word was used primarily with reference to the residence of the lord of a manor, and the surname is usually an occupational name for someone employed at a manorial court.... [more]
Courtier French, Medieval French, Medieval English
French: habitational name from places called Courtier (Seine-et-Marne, Aples-de-Haute-Provence), Courtié (Tarn), or Courtière (Loir-et-Cher). ... [more]
Courville French
Derived from either of two communes in the departments of Marne and Eure-et-Loir in France. It is named with Latin curba villa, denoting a settlement in the curve of a road.
Cousins French
"Relative" in Old French.
Covert English, French
The surname is probably topographical, for someone who either lived by a sheltered bay, or more likely an area sheltered by trees. The formation is similar to couvert, meaning a wood or covert, and originally from the Latin "cooperio", to cover... [more]
Crabb English, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
Crane English, Dutch
1. English: nickname, most likely for a tall, thin man with long legs, from Middle English cran ‘crane’ (the bird), Old English cran, cron. The term included the heron until the introduction of a separate word for the latter in the 14th century... [more]
Crauwels Flemish, Dutch, German
Derrives from the Middle Dutch (medieval Dutch) word "crauwel" and Middle High German word "kröuwel" which means "flesh hook", "curved fork" or "trident". The word is no longer used. The first person with this name was most likely a farmer, butcher or a person that runned an inn or a hostel that was named after this tool.
Crepeau French
From the Latin word, crispus, meaning "curly hair".
Crete French
French (adjectival form Crété ‘crested’): nickname for an arrogant individual, from Old French creste ‘crest (of a hill)’ (Late Latin crista), used with reference to the comb of a rooster... [more]
Crispin English, French
From the Middle English, Old French personal name Crispin.
Crozier English, French
English and French occupational name for one who carried a cross or a bishop’s crook in ecclesiastical processions, from Middle English, Old French croisier.
Cruzan Dutch
Americanized spelling of Cruyssen.
Culvért French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
Curie French
Occupational name for a farm hand, from Old French éscuerie "stable".
Cuyler Dutch
Variant of Koole or Kuilart.
Cyr French
From the Latin personal name Quiricus or Cyricus, Greek Kyrikos or Kyriakos, ultimately from Greek kyrios 'lord', 'master'.
Daane Dutch
From a pet form of the personal name Daniel.
D'abbadie French, English, Occitan
Means "of the Abbey" from the Occitan abadia. Variants Abadia, Abbadie, Abadie, Abada, and Badia mean "Abbey".
D'abbeville French
Means "of Abbeville" Abbeville is a commune in France. Takes its name from Latin Abbatis Villa meaning "Abbot's Village".
Dalebout Dutch
From the griven german name Dalbaldus
Daleiden German, Dutch (Rare)
Habitational name from a place in the Rhineland called Daleiden.
Dalmas French
Surname Dalmas was first found in Limousin. Literally means "of the sea."
Damas French
French form of DAMASCUS. Famous bearer Léon-Gontran Damas (1912-1978) was a French poet and politican from French Guiana, cofounder of the Négritude Mouvement and author of the collection "Black Label".
d'Amboise French
Denoted a person from Amboise, a commune located in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France.
Dame French, English
From the old French dame, "lady" ultimately from Latin domina, "mistress".
Dameron French
Nickname for a foppish or effeminate young man, Old French dameron, a derivative of Latin dominus "lord", "master" plus two diminutive endings suggestive of weakness or childishness.
Damian French, Spanish, Italian, Czech, Slovak, Polish
From the medieval personal name Damian, Greek Damianos (from damazein "to subdue"). St. Damian was an early Christian saint martyred in Cilicia in ad 303 under the emperor Domitian, together with his brother Cosmas... [more]
Damien French
From the given name Damien
Dancy French, English
Denoted a person from Annecy, France.
Daniël Dutch
From the given name Daniël.
Dano French
Perhaps an altered spelling of French Danot or Danon, from pet forms of Jourdain or Daniel.
Danser German, French, English
German: variant of Danzer. Altered spelling of English Dancer.... [more]
D'aoust French
D'Aoust, denotes someone from Aoust(e) in France. Aouste is situated in the Ardennes department (Champagne-Ardenne region) in the north-east of France at 29 km from Charleville-Mézières, the department capital... [more]
D'arcy English, French, Norman
Originally a Norman French surname, meaning "from Arcy"... [more]
D'artagnan French, Literature
Surname given to a person from Artagnan, France. It is also used by Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the captain of the Musketeers from the novel, "The Three Musketeers".
Daudet French
Not available.
D'aurevalle French (Archaic)
This medieval surname literally means "from Aurevalle". Aurevalle can refer to any of the three French communes that are nowadays known by the more modern spelling Orival. All of them ultimately derive their name from Latin aurea vallis meaning "golden vale" or "golden valley".
D'auréville French
Variant spelling of D'aureville.
D'aureville French
This surname literally means "from Aureville". Aureville is a commune in southwestern France, which was established in late medieval times. It derives its name from Latin aurea villa or villa aurea which literally means "golden country-house, golden farm" but of course later came to mean "golden village".
D'aurevilly French
Variant form of D'aureville. A known bearer of this name was the French novelist Jules Barbey d'Aurevilly (1808-1889).
Davet French
Possibly derived from the given gave David.
Dawley English, French, Irish
"From the hedged glade" Originally, D'Awley (probably from D'Awleigh).... [more]
Deberry French
Habitational name for someone from Berry-au-Bac in Aisne, France.
DeBevoise French
Denoted someone from Beauvais, a city and commune in northern France.
Deblois French
French surname meaning "From Blois", a town in Mid-Western France. The origins of the surname started back in the 1600s when a man named Grégoire Guérard traveled to Flanders (Now Belgium) and immigrated to New France (Now Canada) in 1658... [more]
De Boer Dutch
Variant of Boer.
De Bonte Dutch
Bont is a word to describe something with many colours, originally used for spotted cows. So the name means: The one with many colours. Figuratively speaking this would mean: The one who acts crazy.
De Brún Irish, French
Derived from Brun, meaning brown in French
Debs French
From the given name Debus, a variant of Thebs or Thebus, which was an altered short form of Mattheus. This was borne by American union leader Eugene V. Debs (1855-1926).
Debussy French
This surname dates back to the Middle Ages. Unknown meaning.
Decazes French
The surname Decazes was first found in Gascony (French: Gascogne), an area of southwest France bordering Spain, that was part of the "Province of Guyenne and Gascony" prior to the French Revolution, where the family held a family seat in ancient times.... [more]
De Champagne French
Meaning "Of Champagne" in French.
De Clermont French
Means "of the bright hill" from the French de meaning "of" and clair, cler 'bright', 'clear' + mont 'hill'
Decock Belgian
Belgian form of De Kock.
Dedeaux French
Meaning uncertain. Probably a habitual surname for someone from Deaux in Gare.
Defoor Dutch
Given to someone who lived near a castle or citadel
Deford French
Variant of Dufort meaning "son of the strong" from French de-, "of" and fort, "strong". Notable namesake is author Frank Deford.
De Forest French
Alternative spelling of Deforest.
Deforge French
This is a surname of French origins. Introduced into England after the famous Invasion and Conquest of 1066, it is residential, but also possibly occupational. It is a surname which in its different forms is widely recorded heraldically, and particularly in the French regions of Brittany and Normandy... [more]
Defrain French
Variant of Frain combined with the French de "from".... [more]
De Geer Dutch, Swedish
The name is possibly derived from the town of Geer near Liège, Belgium. The town lies along the course of the river Jeker, which is called Geer in French.
Degelos Jewish (Rare), French
Most probable origin - Jewish adapting French sounding names... [more]
De Goede Dutch
From a nickname meaning "the good" or "the kind".
De Groeve Dutch (Modern)
De Groeve is a surname meaning stone.