Belgian Submitted Surnames

Belgian names are used in the country of Belgium in western Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Robitaille French
Of uncertain meaning.
Roblès French
French form of Robles.
Robuchon French
Robuchon is derived from the Old French personal name Robert.
Rocher French
From French roche, meaning "rock'. It indicates a person who worked at a quarry.
Rockett French
From the French "la roche," or "of the rock." Some family histories trace this back to French Hugenots (sp) who immigrated to England in the 1500's from the Normandy region of France.
Roel English, Spanish, Dutch, German
From the name Roeland, meaning "famous country".
Roelfs Dutch
Means "son of Roelf".
Roelofs Dutch
Variant of Roelfs, meaning "son of Roelof".
Roland French, German, Scottish
French, German, English, and Scottish: from a Germanic personal name composed hrod ‘renown’ + -nand ‘bold’, assimilated to -lant ‘land’. (Compare Rowland).... [more]
Rolloos Dutch
Possibly derived from the given name Rollo.
Roman Catalan, French, Polish, English, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
From the Latin personal name Romanus, which originally meant "Roman". This name was borne by several saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Rouen.
Romana Catalan, French, Italian, Polish, English (Rare), German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
From the feminine form of the Latin personal name Romanus, which originally meant "Roman".
Romine English, Dutch
From Rome
Rommel Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for an obstreperous person, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rummeln, rumpeln to make a noise, create a disturbance (of imitative origin). Variant of Rummel.
Ronde Dutch
Means "round" in Dutch, originally a nickname for a plump person, ultimately from Latin rotundus.
Rondelli Italian, English, French
From the medieval name "Rondello" derived from French "rondel" meaning "go around, round" or "rondel", a French old nickname for a round, plump man.
Roop Dutch
Dutch: from a short form of the Germanic personal name Robrecht.
Roos Estonian, Swedish, Danish, Dutch, German (Swiss), Low German
Means "rose" in Estonian and Dutch. Swedish and Danish variant of Ros, also meaning "rose". This could be a locational name for someone living near roses, an occupational name for someone who grew roses, or a nickname for someone with reddish skin.
Root English, Dutch
English: nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle English rote ‘glad’ (Old English rot). ... [more]
Rosamel French
A French surname turned Spanish masculine given name, Rosamel likely derives from the combination of rose + Greek mel “honey”. As a surname, it was borne by a 19th century French naval officer with the wonderful name of Claude Charles Marie du Campe de Rosamel.
Rosenboom Dutch
Comes from Dutch "rosenboom" meaning "rose tree"
Rosier French
French for "rose tree" or "rose bush". A common surname in Francophone areas. It is also the name of a fallen angel who was considered the patron demon of tainted love and seduction.
Rosseau French, American
Variant spelling of Rousseau. Comes from the Old French word rous meaning "red", likely a nickname for someone with red hair or a particularly rosy complexion.
Rossignol French
Means "nightingale" in French, used as a nickname for person with a good singing voice, or ironically, for a raucous person.
Roudebush Dutch (Americanized), Belgian (Americanized)
Americanized form of Dutch and Belgian Ronderbosch or Rondenbosch, a habitational name for someone from Ronderbos in Dilbeek, Brabant, or Ronden Bos in Maldegen, East Flanders.
Rouen French
From the other broad category of surnames that was given to a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree. ... Ruen is a place-name from in Rouen, the capital of Normandy... [more]
Rouge French
Nickname for someone with a ruddy complexion.
Rougeau French
Diminutive of Rouge, a nickname for someone with a ruddy complexion.
Rouget French
Derived from the French adjective rouge meaning "red" combined with the French masculine diminutive suffix -et.
Roupert French (Rare)
Derived from the given name Roupert, which is an archaic French variant of Rupert.
Rouppert French (Rare)
Derived from the given name Rouppert, which is a gallicization of Ruppert, the Upper German form of Rupert.... [more]
Routin French
From French route meaning "road".
Routine French
Variant of Routin.
Rozelle French
Beautiful flower from France brought over by an immigrant named Page Rozelle. People said when she said something nice or touched you, good luck would come to you.
Ruelas French
A last name common in Mexico which is believed to have derived from the French word ruelle (or Portuguese word ruela) meaning lane or alley.
Ruisard French (Rare, ?)
Originated as a result of trade between France and the Persian Empires before the Iranian Revolution, probably during the Safavid Dynasty. The surname has its roots in the Persian Riahi surname and the Arabic word رِيح (rīḥ) meaning "wind" and the Persian word “sered” before it was altered to fit French spelling rules.... [more]
Ruiter Dutch
Derived from the Dutch noun ruiter meaning "rider, horseman".
Rumfelt German, Dutch
Altered spelling of German Romfeld, derived from Middle Low German rüm- meaning "to clear (land)" and feld meaning "open country, field". It is a topographic name or possibly a metonymic occupational name for a person engaged in clearing woodland, or in some cases a habitational name for someone from Romfelt in the Ardennes... [more]
Rummel German, Dutch
North German and Dutch: variant of Rommel.... [more]
Rundlett French
this is a french word for little wine barrels.
Saba French, Occitan
Nickname from a variant of Occitan sabe meaning "tasty, flavorsome". Compare Sabourin.
Sabat French
Nickname for a noisy, rowdy person, from Middle French sab(b)at "noise", "racket".
Sablad French (Americanized)
Perhaps an Americanized spelling of French Sablon, a topographic name for someone who lived in a sandy place, a derivative of Sable .
Saëns French
From the given name Saëns
Saint English, French
Nickname for a particularly pious individual, from Middle English, Old French saint, seint "holy" (Latin sanctus "blameless, holy"). The vocabulary word was occasionally used in the Middle Ages as a personal name, especially on the Continent, and this may have given rise to some instances of the surname.
Sainte-Marie French, Occitan
French and Occitan cognate of Santamaría.
Saint-exupery French
From the place named Saint-Exupery. Famous bearer of this surname is Antoine Saint-Exupery, the writer of .
Saint-Jean French
Means Saint John in French
Saint-saëns French
From any place named Saint-Saens by honor to the saint Sidonius.
Sajin French
1 French: metonymic occupational name for a satin merchant or specialist satin weaver, from Middle French satin ‘satin’, a word of Arabic and (ultimately) Chinese origin, a derivative of the Chinese place name Tsinkiang, whence satin silk was brought to the Middle East and Europe in the Middle Ages.... [more]
Salaün Breton, French
Form of the given name Solomon.
Sale English, French
English: from Middle English sale ‘hall’, a topographic name for someone living at a hall or manor house, or a metonymic occupational name for someone employed at a hall or manor house. ... [more]
Samis Dutch, German
From a pet form of the personal name Samuel.
Sand French
Derived from the given name Sando.
Santamaria Italian, French, Spanish
Italian and French cognate of Santamaría as well as a Spanish variant.
Santerre French
Habitational name from a place to the southeast of the Somme river, named with Latin sana terra "healthy, wholesome land".
Sarazen French
From a medieval French nickname for a swarthy person, or for someone who had gone on a Crusade (from Old French sarrazin "Saracen"). It was borne by American golfer Gene Sarazen (1902-99), original name Eugene Saraceni.
Sard English, French, Spanish, Italian
In the book "Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary by Henry Harrison and Gyda (Pulling) Harrison 1912 - Reprinted 1996.... The Sard surname (which has been in England, Italy and Europe for a long time) is defined thus on page 136...... [more]
Sarrazin French
Means "Saracen" in Old French, a name used to refer to Arab Muslims in the Middle Ages. It was probably used as a nickname for an unruly person, a person with a dark complexion, or for someone who had taken part in a Crusade.
Sartain French
Means, "Tailor".
Saulnier French
In Middle French (the form of French spoken from 1340 to 1610), it literally means "salt merchant".
Sauve' French
Sauve' from France to Canada. Changed probably due to an "a" and an "o" confusion in cursive. My granfather's was typo-ed on WW II old men's sign up in MA. or RI, USA.
Savant French
Nickname from savant ‘learned’, a nickname for a university graduate or a particularly knowledgeable person.
Savard French
Either from Old French savart meaning "wasteland" or the Germanic elements sab of uncertain meaning and hard meaning "brave, hardy".
Savignac French
Habitational name for someone from various communes by this name in France.
Sax Dutch
Dutch variant of Sas.
Schade German, Dutch, Scottish, English
German and Dutch: from schade ‘damage’, a derivative of schaden ‘to do damage’, generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others’ lands.... [more]
Schaden German, Dutch
From schade 'damage', a derivative of schaden 'to do damage', generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others' lands.
Schaumburg German, Dutch, Belgian
Habitational name from any of the places called Schaumburg or Schauenburg in Germany, or Schauwberg in Brabant, Belgium.
Schellekens Dutch
A Dutch patronymic surname of Germanic names like Schalk and Godschalk, meaning "God's Servant".
Schenkel German, Dutch, Jewish
German, Dutch, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for someone with long or otherwise notable legs, from Middle High German schenkel, Middle Dutch schenkel, schinkel ‘thigh’, ‘lower leg’, German Schenkel ‘thigh’.
Schild German, Dutch
Occupational name for a maker or painter of shields, from Middle High German, Middle Dutch schilt "shield".
Schimmelpenninck Dutch, Flemish
White horse penny. An old family, whose origin is uncertain, but who have for centuries ranked among the nobles of Gelderland and Zutphen. One of the name was also a burgomaster of Cologne in 1409; and, the same year, another held the office of alderman of Brussels.
Schink Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for someone with long or otherwise remarkable legs, from Middle High German schinke ‘thigh’, ‘leg’. Compare Schenkel. ... [more]
Schoen German, Jewish, Dutch
German (Schön) nickname for a handsome or pleasant man, from Middle High German schoene ‘fine’, ‘beautiful’; ‘refined’, ‘friendly’, ‘nice’. ... [more]
Schoenmaker Dutch
Dutch word for "shoemaker."
Schottlander German, Jewish, Dutch
From German Schottland, 'Scotland' and, in some cases, denoted an immigrant from Scotland or Ireland. Numerous Irish fled to continental Europe after the Anglo-Norman invasion in the 13th century.... [more]
Schouten Dutch
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Schouten (disambiguation))... [more]
Schroot Dutch
Nickname for a person who collects scraps of food,from the Dutch word "schroot" meaning "scrap". Name was usually given to someone who was impoverished.
Schutte Dutch, Low German
Dutch and North German (Schütte) occupational name for an archer, from Middle Low German schutten ‘to shoot’. Compare German Schuetz.
Scroggins Dutch
From Holland
Sebas French
From the given name Sebastien.
Sebert German, French
From a German personal name composed of the elements sigi meaning "victory" + berht meaning "bright", "famous".
Seger Swedish, English, Dutch
Means "victory" in Swedish. It is also a variant of the English surname Seager or derived from the Germanic given name Sigiheri "victory army".
Seivert Dutch
Derived from the given name Sivert.
Serre French
Means 'greenhouse' in French.
Seul French
From Fr. "only, alone"
Sévigny French
A kind of bush.
Shade English, German, Dutch, Scottish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary, from Old English scead ‘boundary’.nickname for a very thin man, from Middle English schade ‘shadow’, ‘wraith’.... [more]
Sievert Low German, Dutch, Swedish
Derived from the given name Sievert. A Sievert (Sv) is a unit measuring the effect of ionizing radiation on the human body (called equivalent absorbed radiation dose)... [more]
Sikkema Dutch
Most prevalent in the Netherlands.
Sikkens Dutch (Modern)
Son of Sikke (or Sikko)
Sim Scottish, Dutch
Scottish and Dutch: from the personal name Sim, a short form of Simon.
Simonin French
From the given name Simon. Possibly brought by the Russian migrants who came to France.
Simplice French
From the given name Simplice
Sivelle French
A rare surname.
Sivertsen Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Patronymic of Sivert.... [more]
Sjoerdsma Frisian, Dutch
Derived from the Frisian given name Sjoerd combined with the Frisian surname suffix -(s)ma, which is most likely derived from Old Frisian monna meaning "men".... [more]
Slack English, Dutch, Scottish
English and Dutch: nickname for an idle person, from Middle Dutch slac, Middle English slack, ‘lazy’, ‘careless’. ... [more]
Sluiter Dutch
Occupation name for a porter, or gatekeeper. Also an occupational name for someone who made and poured alcohol. "The one who pours the alcohol." - Middle Dutch Sluter. Compare to English Porter.
Smet Flemish
One who is a blacksmith
Smidt Dutch
A Dutch corruption of the German Schmidt which means smith.
Smolders Belgian (Modern)
A Flemish occupational name equivalent to "Miller", meaning a person who operated a wind or water mill for grinding grain.
Snyder Dutch, English, German, Yiddish, Jewish
Means "tailor" in Dutch, an occupational name for a person who stitched coats and clothing.... [more]
Soldat Russian, Ukrainian, French, German
Means "soldier" in various languages.
Soule English, French, Medieval English
English: of uncertain origin; perhaps derived from the vocabulary word soul as a term of affection.... [more]
Soulier French
Metonymic occupational name for a shoemaker, from Old French soulier ‘shoe’, ‘sandal’.... [more]
Southard English, Dutch
Possibly derived from the English surname Southworth.
Sovereign French
Translation of the French surname Souverain which is derived from Old French souverain meaning "high place".
Soyer French
French surname (Alexis Benoist Soyer is a famous bearer).
Springer German, English, Dutch, Jewish
Nickname for a lively person or for a traveling entertainer. It can also refer to a descendant of Ludwig der Springer (AKA Louis the Springer), a medieval Franconian count who, according to legend, escaped from a second or third-story prison cell by jumping into a river after being arrested for trying to seize County Saxony in Germany.
Staal Dutch (Modern)
From Middle High German stal meaning "steel". May have been a occupational name, for a steelworker or blacksmith.
Staley Belgian
From Old French estalee "fish trap", hence possibly a metonymic occupational name for a fisherman, or topographic name for someone who lived near where fish traps were set.
Star German, Dutch, Jewish, English
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname from German Star, Middle High German star, ‘starling’, probably denoting a talkative or perhaps a voracious person.... [more]
St Clair French, English
From the place name St Clair
Steenbok Afrikaans, Dutch
Dutch and Afrikaans form of Steinbock.
Sterken Dutch, English
Means "strong". Derived either from the Old English term sterċan, meaning "to make rigid", or from the Old Saxon sterkian and Old High German sterken, both meaning "to strengthen."
Steven Scottish, English, Dutch, Low German
From the personal name Steven, a vernacular form of Latin Stephanus, Greek Stephanos "crown". This was a popular name throughout Christendom in the Middle Ages, having been borne by the first Christian martyr, stoned to death at Jerusalem three years after the death of Christ... [more]
St Georges French
“Saint George.”
St Louis French, English
In honor of Saint Louis.
Stlouis French
Habitational name from any of several places named with a religious dedication to a St. Louis.
Stockard Scottish Gaelic, Dutch
Scottish: occupational name for a trumpeter, Gaelic stocaire, an agent derivative of stoc ‘Gaelic trumpet’. The name is borne by a sept of the McFarlanes.... [more]
Stoker Dutch (Modern)
A Stoker is (or was) someone who stokes (tends to) fires, coals, or furnaces.
Storm English, Low German, Dutch, Scandinavian
Nickname for a man of blustery temperament, from Middle English, Middle Low German, storm, Old Norse stormr "storm".
Stricker German, Low German, Dutch
Occupational name for a rope maker or knitter (of hose, for example), from an agent derivative of Middle High German, Middle Low German stricken ‘to tie’.
Strijbis Dutch
It means noble and kind hearted. Someone with the last name Strijbis is usually someone who frequently does good deeds.
Strycker Dutch
From Dutch de Strycker, an occupational name for someone responsible for measuring out cloth or grain. See also Stryker.
Stryker Dutch
From Dutch Strijker, an occupational name for someone whose job was to fill level measures of grain by passing a flat stick over the brim of the measure, thus removing any heaped excess... [more]
Stuyvesant Dutch
Dutch surname of unknown meaning. ... [more]
St-vil Haitian Creole, French (Caribbean), French
From the place named St Vil.
Sylvain French
From the given name Sylvain
Sylvestre French
From the given name Sylvestre.
Sys Belgian (Modern)
No actual idea as to origin except it is Belgian from Flanders region.
Tabak Dutch
Occupational name for a butcher or hog breeder, from Middle Dutch tucbake, from tucken meaning "to pull, push, or strike" + bake meaning "hog".
Tailleur French
French for "tailor."
Talbert English, French
From a continental Germanic personal name composed of the elements tal "valley" and berth "bright".
Tallon English, Irish, Norman, French
English and Irish (of Norman origin), and French from a Germanic personal name derived from tal ‘destroy’, either as a short form of a compound name with this first element (compare Talbot) or as an independent byname... [more]
Tanguay French, English
From a personal name, a contraction of Tanneguy, from Breton tan meaning 'fire', and ki meaning 'dog', which was the name of a 6-th century Christian saint associated with Paul Aurelian.
Tapon French
From the old French word tapon, meaning "cork". Hence this surname was first given to corks makers.
Tazelaar Dutch
Dutch (Zeeland) variant of ’t Hazelaar, topographic name for someone living by hazel bushes.
Tebow Dutch, Belgian, French
From the Old French personal name Teobaud, Tibaut (see Theobald).
Tellinghuisen Dutch
Unexplained; possibly a habitational name from a lost or unidentified place.
Temple English, French
Occupational name or habitational name for someone who was employed at or lived near one of the houses ("temples") maintained by the Knights Templar, a crusading order so named because they claimed to occupy in Jerusalem the site of the old temple (Middle English, Old French temple, Latin templum)... [more]
Templin French
Possibly from a French diminutive of Temple.
Ten Boom Dutch
Means "at the tree" in Dutch. A notable bearer of this surname was Corrie ten Boom (1892-1983), a German woman who helped Jewish people take refuge into her home during the Second World War.
Teneyck Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a prominent oak tree, Middle Dutch eyk. This has been a prominent family name in Albany, NY, area since the 1630s.
Terrien French
Topographic name from an adjectival derivative of terre "land", denoting someone who lived and worked on the land, i.e. a peasant. It is Americanized frequently as Landers, and occasionally as Farmer.
Tetrault French
French, Franko-American
Tetreault French
Ultimately derived from French tistre "to weave".
Theriault French (Rare)
Possibly from the Greek "therion" which means a beast of a nondescript nature.
Thienpondt Belgian
Possible translation is “ten pounds” in Flemish possibly Dutch. ... [more]
Thorbecke Dutch
Combined from old Norse god 'Thor' and old Norse 'Beck' means 'stream'. This is a dutch surname from old Norse.
Timm German, Dutch, English
English: probably from an otherwise unrecorded Old English personal name, cognate with the attested Continental Germanic form Timmo. This is of uncertain origin, perhaps a short form of Dietmar... [more]
Timmerman Dutch
"carpenter"
Timothée French
From the given name Timothée.
Tisserand French
French for "weaver."
Tisseur French
Occupational surname meaning "weaver".
Tonnelier French
French for "cooper."
Tonnoir French, French (Belgian)
Means "thunder". Originally, a nickname given to loud men. Very rare.
Tourville French
The name Tourville is a very old, and in one case, very famous name. One of the Marshall's of France was named Anne Hilarion de Cotentin de Tourville. This reads: Anne Hilarion of/from Cotentin, Comte (Count) of Tourville... [more]
Toussaint French
Derived from the given name Toussaint, which in turn is derived from Toussaint, the French name for the Christian feast day All Saints' Day (celebrated on November 1st every year)... [more]
Towers French
1. Variant of Tower, with later -s. ... [more]
Traylor French
Assumed to mean "by the trail". May have originally been "Trouillart". Variations may include: Trail Traill Treil Trelly Teign Pentrail
Troy German, Jewish, French, Dutch
As a German and Jewish surname, it is and Anglicized form of Treu or a similar surname.... [more]
Truax French (Americanized)
An Americanized spelling of the French surname Trieux.
Trumbo French, German
French (Alsatian) form of German Trumbauer.
Tunnard Dutch (Modern)
Often found used in Lincolnshire UK as a surname in farming families.
Turbefield French, Norman
The name is a village in Normandy. Is documented in Gloucester Abbey in 1044.
Turcat French, French (Quebec)
Means "Turkman"
Turcotte French, Welsh
Means "tower" in French and Welsh.
Urban English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Hungarian, Jewish
From a medieval personal name (Latin Urbanus meaning "city dweller", a derivative of urbs meaning "town", "city").
Vachon French
French definition, cattle herder. Vashon English variant. Vaca Spanish.
Vaillant French
From a medieval nickname for a brave person (from Old French vaillant "brave, sturdy").
Val Spanish, French
It means valley. It comes from Britain and then moved to Aragón (Spain).
Valade French
Variant of Vallée.
Valentin French, Italian, Romanian, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Czech, Russian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Jewish
From the given name Valentin. It was sometimes adopted as a personal name by Jews.
Valère French
From the given name Valère.
Vallera French
French: habitational name from Vallery in Yonne, once a Romano-Gallic estate, recorded in 1218 as Valerianus. The surname is also found in the British Isles and may be of Norman origin, from the same place.