Belgian Submitted Surnames

Belgian names are used in the country of Belgium in western Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Mesly French
Variant of Mesley.
Messiaen Dutch, French
Derived from Messiaen, the (archaic) Dutch form of the latinate first name Messianus, which itself is ultimately derived from the Roman praenomen Messus. The meaning of Messus is not wholly certain; it may be derived from the Latin verb meto "to reap, to harvest, to cut, to sever", or from the latinized form of Greek mesos or messos "(the) middle, (the) middle one"... [more]
Messier French
Occupational name for someone who kept watch over harvested crops, Old French messier 'harvest master' (Late Latin messicarius, agent derivative of messis 'harvest').
Metrejon Louisiana Creole (?), French (?)
Maiden surname of Constance Leto (nee Metrejon). She was born in Louisiana and has Cajun(French) ancestry. The Metrejon line is traced back to Joseph Marie Maitrejean, who was born c. 1778, in Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, an island off the coast of Brittany.
Mette German, Dutch
From a pet form of the female personal name Mechthild.
Michaël Dutch, French
From the given name Michaël.
Michelet French (Latinized, Rare)
Its name comes from the name Michael, the angel.
Michels German, Dutch
Patronymic from the personal name Michel (see Michael). ... [more]
Michelson French
This surname means son of Michelle.
Mick German, Dutch, Irish
Short form of the given name Mikolaj or an occupational name from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch micke "(wheat or rye) bread"... [more]
Mickley French
It originated when an immigrant family named Michelet came to New York from Northern France. Because they had a foreign surname, they made up the names Mickley and Michelin. The originator was Jean Jacques Michelet (John Jacob Mickley), a private in the Revolutionary War... [more]
Middag Dutch
From the Dutch word for "Midday". The earliest/oldest records of the surname are found in the Netherlands (Holland).
Mielke Dutch, German
The name is derived from the personal name Miel, a diminutive of the name Aemilius, and means "son of Miel."
Mier Spanish, Dutch, English (American)
As a Spanish name relates to late summer and means "harvest" or "ripened".... [more]
Milan Italian, French
Habitational name from the Italian city of Milan (see Milano).
Mimieux French
Unknown.
Minion French
French form of Miner, an occupational name for a someone working in a mine.
Minor English, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
Miramon French
MIRAMON is a French name with Spanish origins. ... [more]
Miramond Medieval Occitan, Occitan, French
From Old Occitan mirar "look" and mond "world".
Modderman Dutch
"Mud Man" was given to the people who built the dikes.
Mol Dutch
Habitational name for someone from Mol in Antwerp province.
Molenaar Dutch
Occupational name from molenaar "miller".
Molnar Dutch
Variant of Molenaar.
Molyneux French
Possibly a habitational name from Moulineux, meaning "mill of the waters", or derives from the Old French name De Molines or De Moulins, meaning "mill". The surname has been linked to a large French family that settled in Lancashire from France.
Monique French
A notable bearer is Kylie Monique, a singer.
Monnier French
It means Miller, someone operating a mill; from "meunier" or "mounier" in Old French.
Montagnet French, Basque
Meaning "mountains," this name is commonly found in the Basque Pyrenees.
Monteblanco French, Spanish
Originally from France "Mont Blanc" but translated when arrived in Spain.
Montesquieu French
From French montagne, meaning "mountain" and possibly also from queue, meaning "line". Charles Montesquieu was a 17th-century French aristocrat, philosopher and politician.
Monty French, English
Topographic name for a mountain dweller, from Old French mont 'mountain' (Latin mons, montis).
Monvoisin French
Married surname of a infamous 17th century fortune teller and poisoner, Catherine Monvoisin nee Deshayes, known as La Voisin. Executed for witchcraft in 1680 in the affair of the poisons. Her clients included the elite of Paris including a mistress of Louis XIV.
Moralee English, French
First found in Norfolk where they were seated from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings.
Morant English, French
From the Old French personal name Morant, perhaps from a nickname meaning "steadfast", or alternatively of Germanic origin and meaning literally "courage-raven". A known bearer was the British-born Australian soldier and poet Breaker Morant, original name Edwin Henry Murrant (?1864-1902).
Moretz German, Dutch
Variant spelling of Moritz.
Most Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived in a place where moss grew.
Motel French
Topographic name from a derivative of Old French motte ‘fortified stronghold’.
Mullinix French
A locational name "of de Moloneaux" probably from the noble family who trace their descent from William the Conqueror, from Molineaux-sur-Seine, near Rouen. The name came to England during the wake of the Norman Conquest... [more]
Munch Danish, French, Norwegian (Rare)
Either a variant of Münch or Munk, both meaning "monk". A notable bearer was Norwegian painter Edvard Munch (1863-1944), whose best known work is 'The Scream'.
Musch Dutch, German
From a nickname meaning "house sparrow".
Muskow French (Archaic)
French Variant of Moscow.
Nadeau French
Variant of Nadal, which can be a name or the meaning "Christmas".... [more]
Nathaniël Dutch
From the given name Nathaniël.
Nault French
From a short form of various medieval personal names derived from Germanic personal names formed with wald 'rule' as the final element, in particular Arnold.
Navarre French
The name means "By the sea". Originally a country of its own, located between Spain and France, Navarre became a part of France in 1284 when the Queen of Navarre married King Philip IV of France. After much war, becoming independent once again, and falling into Spanish rule, the Kingdom of Navarre is now split between Spain and France.
Neeson Irish, Dutch, German
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Naois ‘son of Naois’, usually Anglicized as Mcneese. Can also be an altered form of Dutch or German Niesen... [more]
Neisingh South Slavic, Ukrainian, Russian, Dutch
The surname Neisingh is of Dutch and Slavic origin, It's derived from the English last name Nelson meaning son of Neal.
Netjes Dutch
Netjes is from the Dutch word for "tidy, neat" or "decent, proper."
Neuger German, French (?)
Was popularized by the German community. Famous bearers include investors Win Neuger and Dan Neuger, author Christie Cozad Neuger.
Nicolay German, French
From the given name Nicolay, a form of Nicholas through Russian Nikolay... [more]
Nicolin French
From the given name Nicolas.
Niedermeyer German, Dutch
Distinguishing name for a farmer (see Meyer) who had a farm lower (Middle High German nider(e)) than the neighboring one(s).
Niesen Dutch, German
Dutch: patronymic from the personal name Nijs, a reduced form of Denijs (see Dennis)... [more]
Niessen Dutch
Thought to be found most commonly in Limburg... [more]
Nieuwenhuis Dutch
Means "new house" in Dutch. Indicated that the bearer lived in a new house or lived in a village of the same name
Nieuwman Dutch
Dutch cognate of Neumann.
Nikkel German, Dutch
Possibly an altered spelling of Dutch Nikel, from the personal name, a Dutch form of Nicholas.
Niswonger Dutch
"One who dwells in the clearing"
Noble English, Scottish, Irish, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French noble "high-born, distinguished, illustrious" (Latin nobilis), denoting someone of lofty birth or character, or perhaps also ironically someone of low station... [more]
Noël French
Means "Christmas".
Noir French
Means "black" in French, originally used in Northern France as an ethnic nickname for someone from Southern France, Spain, Italy or North Africa. It also may have been used for someone who wore dark clothing or for someone who had an occupation during the night or was associated with the night.
Noisette French
This is a French surname meaning "hazelnut".
Noland Irish, French
Irish: variant of Nolan.... [more]
Nolf German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Arnolf, composed of the Germanic elements arn 'eagle' + wulf 'wolf'. Dutch: from a reduced form of Nodolf, derived from the personal name Odolf by transfer of the final -n in a preceding personal name such as Jan, Simoen
Noons French
From the Portuguese name Nunes.
Normand French
Means North Man, meaning vikings
Nugent English, Irish, French
An English, Irish (of Norman origin) and French habitational surname derived from any of several places in northern France (such as Nogent-sur-Oise), From Latin novientum and apparently an altered form of a Gaulish name meaning "new settlement".
Nyhuis Dutch
Variant of Nijhuis
Nys Belgian
common surname in belgium and wisonsin
Octobre French
Means "October" in French.
Odelin French
Not to be confused with the similarly spelled Odelín, which is Spanish rather than French, though they could have similar origins in name.
Odige French, African
A Name from french Odige (O.DI Zeouf) zeouf with means egg Zeouf is spelled as ge to shorten the name. This surname means fighter The French has been known to be Lovely and the language of love un-violent... [more]
Oeltjenbruns Dutch (Archaic)
Unexplained Dutch surname.
Olin English, Dutch
English or Dutch name meaning either "from a low lying area" or from the word Hollander meaning "one from the Netherlands" a country well known for a low lying landscape.
Onfroy French
From the given name Onfroy, a form of Humphrey.
Ooms Dutch
Derived from Dutch oom "uncle".
Oort Dutch
From Middle Dutch oort "edge, corner".
Oortwijn Dutch
Patronym of Oort meaning "place" or "location"
Oosterhuis Dutch
Oosterhuis is a Dutch surname meaning "eastern house".
Oostwal Dutch
From the Dutch words oost meaning "East" and wal meaning "shore" or "bank".
Oranje Dutch
means "orange" in Dutch, in reference to the Dutch Royal Family
Orleans French
From France. Middle ages??
Orley Dutch, Flemish, English
A surname of uncertain origin found among the Dutch, Flemish and English. In England the name is primarily found in Yorkshire and Devon. Orley may be an adapted form of a French name D'Orley or a nickname for Orlando... [more]
Osterhout Dutch
From the town of Oosterhout,, meaning "East Wood", as it is located nearby forests in the east of the Netherlands. Primary modern usage is in the United States can be traced back to Jan Jensen van Oosterhoudt, who immigrated to New Amsterdam in the 17th Century, and has been generally been simplified to Osterhout, where the O is pronounced as "AW"... [more]
Ostiguy Basque, French
Worn Quebec (Ostéguy variant), the name is visibly Basque and assumes initially a Ostegi form, which could designate a place where the foliage is abundant (osteo = + -egi sheet suffix). Alternatively, place the cold, cold house (Ortz, otz, followed -egi or -tegi).
Ostrander Dutch
Translated as "from the east border." The name may have been originally borne by one who lived near the eastern border of a town, province, or country.
Oudenhoven Dutch
Derived from Dutch oude "old" and hoeve "farm; farmstead; manor". As a surname it is derived from one of the many places of this name, for example in Menen, Passendale, Steenvoorde, Steenwerk, Broekburg or Godewaardsvelde.
Ouy French
Some derive this name from the French word "gui," meaning mistletoe. Others think it comes through the Celtic name "Kei," from Caius. Others belive the name comes from the French words "guide," a leader, or "guidon," a banner... [more]
Overbeeke Dutch
Means "over/on brook" or "over/on stream" or "over/on creek"... [more]
Palmberg Dutch (Rare), German (Rare)
Derived from any of the various places in Germany named Palmberg.
Pannebakker Dutch
A Dutch name that literally means “producer of tiles.” the earliest trace of the name in the Netherlands is in the year 1568, associated with Herr Jan de Pannebakker and his wife Nancy who were accused of heresy and killed by the Spaniards at Utrecht.... [more]
Paquette French
From the personal name Paquet, a pet form of Pascal.
Paramore French (Rare)
origin is unknown but the meaning of the name is lover used in France and England
Parrot French
Form of Pierone.... [more]
Parsley Medieval French, English, Norman, French
Derived from Old French passelewe "cross the water."... [more]
Passe French
Possibly a nickname from passe 'sparrow
Pasteur French
French for "shepherd" or "preacher, pastor". Famous bearer Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), French chemist who created the first rabies vaccine, gave his name to the process of 'pasteurization'.
Pathé French
Meaning, "Dweller near an important path or footway."
Pauw Dutch, Flemish
Means "peacock" in Dutch.
Pauwels Dutch
Means "son of Pauwel".
Pavek Dutch
Americanized spelling of Pávek.
Pêcheur French
French for "fisher."
Pelkey French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of French surnames Peltier and Pelltier.
Pellegrin French
Unknown. Possibly a variant of Pellegrino. This surname was given to the Chilean named Raúl Alejandro Pellegrin Friedmann (1958-1988; nicknamed José Miguel).
Pelt Dutch
Dutch: shortened form of Van Pelt.
Pelter Dutch
This surname is occupational in origin. It comes from the Latin word "pellis," meaning "skin" or "hide," and would have originally been born by someone who tanned or sold hides and pelts for a living.
Peltier French
Variant of Pelletier (from Old French pellet, a diminutive of pel "skin, hide").
Pennebaker Dutch (Anglicized)
Coming from the Dutch name Pannebakker. The name is of occupational origin and is traceable to a term literally translated as "producer of tiles." Legend has it that the family imigrated from central Europe in the mid 1300’s to the Netherlands to escape the wars and plague that were common in the area at that time.
Penning English, Dutch, Low German
From early Middle English penning, Low German penning, and Middle Dutch penninc, all meaning "penny". It was used as a topographic surname or a nickname referring to tax dues of a penny.
Pense French
Pense is, quite literally, a French word meaning "to think" or "thought", but is also a surname. Sometimes confused with the surname Pence, which is German.
Pépin French
From the Old French name Pepis, itself a form of the given name Pépin. Alternatively, it may be derived from French pépin meaning "(fruit) seed", thus making it an occupational name for a gardener or someone who grew fruit-bearing trees.
Peppe Dutch
From Peppo, a pet form of a Germanic personal name.
Perdue English, Irish, French
English and Irish from Old French par Dieu ‘by God’, which was adopted in Middle English in a variety of more or less heavily altered forms. The surname represents a nickname from a favorite oath... [more]
Persoon Dutch, Flemish
Derived from Dutch persoon, meaning "person".
Petitjean French
Combination of Old French petit "small" and the given name Jean 1, hence a nickname for a small or little man.
Peugeot French
Meaning unknown.
Peureux French
In the war there was a French resistance fighter named Maurice Peureux.
Peyron French
Unknown meaning. French surname. Famous bearer of this name is Bruno Peyron and the German princess Louise Peyron (1918-1989).... [more]
Pfannebecker Dutch (Germanized)
The Germanic spelling of the Dutch sername Pannebakker
Philippart Belgian
In the Medieval period, of Ancient Greek origin, derives from philippos, a compound made of philein meaning "to love", and hippos, a horse, hence "lover of horses".
Picquet French
A variant of Piquet of which it's meaning is of a military terminology of one soldier/small group of soldiers on a line forward of a postion to provide a warning of an enemy advance... [more]
Piednoel French
Modern (and also more common) form of Piénoel.
Piénoel French (Rare)
French surname that possibly refers to the buckled shoes that the original bearer was wearing, in which case it is derived from Old French pié meaning "foot" combined with Old French noiel meaning "buckle"... [more]
Pieper German, Dutch
Occupational name for a piper.
Pierrin French
From the given name Pierre.
Pieters Dutch
"Pieter's son"
Pigue French
French family last name may have been changed from the original French
Piketty French
Perhaps related to the English surname Pickett. A notable bearer is French economist Thomas Piketty (1971-).
Pillot French
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from Middle French pilot or pillot both meaning "stake, pole". This is the name of a wealthy merchant family from Besançon, France.
Pin French, Dutch
A topographic name for someone living by a pine tree or in a pine forest, or a habitational name from a place named with the Old French word pin, meaning ‘pine’.
Pittler French
A surname which originally belonged to a person who lived by a pit or hollow. Meaning "King of the Pit" or "King of the Hollow".
Plante French
French cognate of Plant.
Platte French
From Old French plat, meaning "flat."
Plumer German, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
Plumier French, Belgian
Possibly an occupational name for a dealer in feathers and quills, from an agent derivative of Old French plume "feather, plume" (compare English and Dutch Plumer)... [more]
Pointe French
Derivation of the name is from the pre 10th century Old French "pointe" meaning a sharp or pointed end, and ultimately from the Latin "puncta", to pierce.
Poisson French
Poisson is the French word for fish, and was given to one who was a fishmonger, fisherman, or could be a nickname for one who had the appearance similar to a fish.
Poitier French
Evidently an altered spelling of Pothier. A famous bearer is Bahamian-American actor Sidney Poitier (1927-).
Poland English, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
Poley French, German, Jewish
French: variant of Polet, Paulet, pet forms of Paul.... [more]
Polnareff French
Most known by famous French singer Michel Polnareff, and fictional Jojo's Bizarre Adventure character Jean-Pierre Polnareff (who is named after the singer).
Pompey French, English
Variant of Italian Pompei.
Pontiff French
Means "bridge builder". Comes from the French word pont, which means bridge. ... [more]
Poppe German, Dutch, English
German and Dutch variant of Popp 1 and English variant of Popp 2.
Popuchet French
Wise and classy
Portugal Spanish, Portuguese, English, Catalan, French, Jewish
Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, French, and Jewish surname meaning ethnic name or regional name for someone from Portugal or who had connections with Portugal. The name of the country derives from Late Latin Portucale, originally denoting the district around Oporto (Portus Cales, named with Latin portus ‘port’, ‘harbor’ + Cales, the ancient name of the city)... [more]
Posey English, French
Derived from the Greek word "desposyni." The Desposyni is a term referring to a group of people that are allegedly direct blood relatives to Jesus. They are mentioned in Mark 3:21 and Mark 3:31. American actress Parker Posey is a famous bearer.
Posthumus Dutch, Low German
From a personal name which was given to a posthumous child, i.e., one born after the death of his father, derived from Latin postumus "last, last-born" (superlative of posterus "coming after, subsequent") via Late Latin posthumus, which was altered by association with Latin humare "to bury", suggesting death (i.e., thought to consist of post "after" and humus "grave", hence "after death"); the one born after the father's death obviously being the last.
Poteet English, French
From the French name Pottet, which is derived from pot meaning "pot", originally a name for a potter.
Pottier French
A variant of the french word for potter, potier.... [more]
Prévost French
From Old French prevost meaning "provost", a status name for officials in a position of responsibility.
Prevot French
A prevot was a govenment position during the Ancient Régime
Primeau French
First found in Burgundy France.
Prince English, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French prince (Latin princeps), presumably denoting someone who behaved in a regal manner or who had won the title in some contest of skill.
Prins Dutch, Jewish
Means "prince" in Dutch, but almost never a surname for a prince. Instead, it's an occupational surname for someone in the service of a prince or a nickname for someone who acted in a regal manner. The surname is also Jewish Dutch and is used as an ornamental adoption of Dutch prins still meaning "prince".
Privett French, English, Welsh (?)
French, from the given name Privat (see Privatus). Also an English habitational name from a place so named in Hampshire, derived from Old English pryfet "privet".
Prophet English, Scottish, French, German
Scottish, English, French, and German: nickname from Middle English and Old French prophete, Middle High German prophet ‘prophet’, ‘seer’, ultimately from Greek prophetes ‘predictor’, from pro ‘before’ + a derivative of phemi ‘to speak’... [more]
Proust French
From a nickname derived from French preux meaning "valiant, brave". A famous bearer was Marcel Proust (1871-1922), a French writer.
Provencher French
From the French word for the flower periwinkle. (pervenche) Brought to Canada from France in 1660 by Sebastien Provencher.
Provost English, French
Derived from the Middle English provost; referring to the person who heads a religious chapter in a cathedral or educational establishment. It was also used as a nickname for a self-important person and is a French variant of Prevost.
Prudhomme French, English, Norman, Medieval French
French (Prud’homme) and English (of Norman origin): nickname from Old French prud’homme ‘wise’, ‘sensible man’, a cliché term of approbation from the chivalric romances. It is a compound of Old French proz, prod ‘good’, with the vowel influenced by crossing with prudent ‘wise’ + homme ‘man’... [more]
Prue English, French
English: nickname for a redoubtable warrior, from Middle English prou(s) ‘brave’, ‘valiant’ (Old French proux, preux).... [more]
Pruitt English, French
French and English: nickname from a pet form of Old French proux ‘valiant’, ‘brave’, or ‘wise’ (see Proulx, Prue).
Puddephatt Dutch
Form of Cooper, meaning barrell maker
Pulver Low German, French, English
I comes from the Latin verb meaning "to make powder." This name was given to either an alchemist or one who made gunpowder.
Pusey French
Habitational name form Pusey in Haute-Saône, so named from a Gallo-Roman personal name, Pusius, + the locative suffix -acum.
Pyle Dutch
Metonymic occupational name for a marksman or an arrowsmith, from pijl meaning "arrow".
Quackenbush Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Dutch Quackenbosch, a topographic name from Dutch quaak ‘swamp’ (cognate with the English word quagmire) + bosch ‘woodland’, ‘wilderness’.
Raad Dutch
Metonymic occupational name for an adviser, counselor, or member of a town council, from raad ‘advice’, ‘counsel’.
Raat Dutch
''Somebody who gives good advice'', ''counsel'' Raad = advice.... [more]
Racine French
Means "(tree) root" in French, used as an occupational name for a grower or seller of root vegetables or as a nickname for a stubborn person.
Raison English, Scottish, French
From a medieval nickname for an intelligent person (from Old French raison "reason, intelligence").
Ramage French, Scottish
From a medieval Scottish nickname for a hot-tempered or unpredictable person (from Old French ramage "wild, uncontrollable" (applied to birds of prey)).
Rambeau French (Rare), Ancient Germanic (Frankish)
Altered spelling of the southern French family name Rambaut, from an Old French personal name, Rainbaut, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "counsel" + bald "bold", "brave", or alternatively from the Germanic personal name Hrambehrt or Hrambald, composed of the elements hramn "crow" & berht "bright" or bald "bold", "brave".
Randel French, German
French: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Rando, a short form of various compound names formed with rand ‘(shield) rim’ as the first element... [more]
Range German, French
German: nickname for a ragamuffin, from Middle High German range ‘naughty boy’, ‘urchin’.... [more]
Ranger English, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
Ravel French, French (African)
Derived from either a place called Ravel in the district of Drome or Provence, or from the word 'rave' meaning a root vegetable, and hence a grower or seller of such items.
Ravenel English, French
Habitational name from Ravenel in Oise or a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of horseradish, from a diminutive of Old French ravene ‘horseradish’ (Latin raphanus)... [more]
Raymond English, French
From the Norman personal name Raimund, composed of the Germanic elements ragin "advice, counsel" and mund "protection".
Réal French
This can derive from several different sources: southern French réal "royal", a word which was applied to someone either as a nickname (presumably given to people perceived as being regal) or as an occupational name (given to a person in the service of the king); or the French place name Réal, in which case this is a habitational name taken from any of various places which were named for having been part of a royal domain (also compare Reau, Reaux).
Redding English, German, Dutch
English variant spelling of Reading. In 1841 Redding was the most commonly used surname in all of Buckinghamshire. A famous bearer is Otis Redding.... [more]
Redig Dutch, Upper German
Dutch and North German variant of Redding.
Reese Low German, Dutch, German
Nickname for a very big man, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rese ‘giant’.... [more]
Régis French
Occupational name for a local dignitary, from a derivative of Old French régir "to rule or manage".
Reisz Dutch
Patronymic from a pet form of one of the Germanic compound names formed with ragin "counsel" as the first element.
Remis Greek, Dutch, German, Asturian
Greek from a medieval Greek personal name, Remis, a vernacular form of the personal name Remigius (see French Remy)... [more]
Renaudin French
From the given name Renaud.
Rens Dutch
From a reduced form of the personal name Laurens.
Reus Dutch, German, Catalan
Dutch: nickname for a big man, from Middle Dutch reuse(n) 'giant'. German: topographic name from Middle High German riuse 'fish trap' (Middle Low German ruse) or from a regional term reuse 'small stream', 'channel'... [more]
Revere English, French, Judeo-Italian
French: variant of Rivière, Rivoire, or Rivier, topographic name for someone living on the banks of a river, French rivier ‘bank’, or habitational name from any of the many places in France named with this word.... [more]
Rhett English, Dutch
Anglicized form of Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel".
Rhine German, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see Rhein). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
Rhoton German, French
Rhoton is a German and French surname from the 1800s. Some people believe that it is derived from the French word for red, but the origin is overall unknown. The name represents strength and power.
Riche English, French
English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
Riel French
French variant of Riehl. Most notable bearer is Canadian Métis political leader Louis Riel, best known for his Red River Rebellion.
Ritchings French, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
Rives French, Jewish
Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): from the Yiddish female personal name Rive a back-formation from Rivke (see Rifkin).... [more]
Rivet French, English
French: from a diminutive of Old French rive ‘(river) bank’, ‘shore’ (see Rives).... [more]
Rivett English, French
English (East Anglia): metonymic occupational name for a metalworker, from Middle English, Old French rivet ‘small nail or bolt’ (from Old French river ‘to fix or secure’, of unknown origin).... [more]
Riviere French, French (Quebec), French (Acadian)
Possibly from the French word meaning "river"
Robben French, Dutch
It is a French surname that was originally derived from the Germanic name Robert, which is composed of the elements hrod, meaning famous, and berht, meaning bright.
Robertin French (Rare)
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robertin, which was a diminutive of the given name Robert.
Robichaux French
An altered spelling of Robichon or Roubichou, pet forms of Robert.
Robinet French
Derived from the medieval French masculine given name Robinet, which was a diminutive (as the -et suffix indicates) of the given name Robin.... [more]