Belgian Submitted Surnames

Belgian names are used in the country of Belgium in western Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Guion French
French: from the Germanic personal name Wido (see Guy).
Guiscard French
Derived from the Medieval French given name Guiscard.
Guitry French
Based on a personal name composed of the Germanic elements wid(u), wit- ‘wood’ + ric ‘power(ful)’.
Gullette French
Comes from Guillemme or William of Normandy. Reference 1066: The Battle of Hastings.
Guy English, French
From a French form of the Germanic personal name Wido, which is of uncertain origin. This name was popular among the Normans in the forms Wi, Why as well as in the rest of France in the form Guy.
Haan Dutch
It means "rooster" in Dutch
Hageman Dutch
Combination of Middle Dutch haghe "hedge, enclosure" and #man "man".
Hageman Dutch
Variant of German Hagemann.
Hager Dutch, North Frisian
From a Germanic personal name composed of hag 'hedge', 'enclosure' + hari, heri 'army'.
Halart French
Derived from the Germanic given name Halhard.
Hamel Yiddish, Dutch, German
The name Hamel has three origins.... [more]
Hamelin French
from the Norse word HAMO meaning home.
Harcourt French
This name is of locational origin either from the town and ancient chateau of Harcourt near Brionne in Normandy.
Harduin French
From the given name Harduin.
Hargier French
Known back to the 15th or 16th century in France.... [more]
Harmel French
Derived from the given name Armel.
Harmse Dutch, Low German
The surname Harmse is derived from Harms or Harm, a Low-German / Niederdeutsch surname or name. In Plattdeutsch/Low Saxon the word sine is used as a possessive construction, hence Harmse indicates that it is the child of Harms, Harm, or Harmensze... [more]
Harrett French
France, England
Hartman Dutch
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hard "hardy, strong" and man "man".
Hasard French
Variant of Hazard.
Hässli German (Swiss), French (Rare)
Swiss German diminutive form of Haas. This is a French surname via Alsace-Lorraine. A notable bearer is French footballer (soccer player) Eric Hassli (1981-).
Haverbus Yiddish, Dutch
From Yiddish/Hebrew Haver (חבר) and Baruch (ברוך), thus literally "blessed friend".
Haverkamp German, Dutch
Topographic name from Middle Low German haver "oats" and kamp "field".
Hay English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
Hazard English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
Hebert Dutch
From the personal name Egbert.
Hecht German, Dutch
From Middle High German hech(e)t, Middle Dutch heect, hecht "pike", generally a nickname for a rapacious and greedy person. In some instances it may have been a metonymic occupational name for a fisher and in others it may be a habitational name from a house distinguished by a sign depicting this fish.
Hee Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
A Danish habitational name from any of several places named from a word meaning ‘shining’ or ‘clear’, referencing a river.... [more]
Hegeman Dutch
Habitational name for someone from a place called Hegge(n) or ter Hegge(n), derived from a word meaning ‘hedge’.
Heidrick Dutch
Variant of Heidrich
Hein German, Dutch, Danish, Jewish
German, Dutch, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from a short form of the Germanic personal name Heinrich.
Heine German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from a short form of Heinrich.
Heineken Dutch, German
Derived from Hein, a Dutch diminutive of Hendrik. A famous bearer was Gerard Adriaan Heineken (1841-1893), the founder of the Heineken N.V. brewing company... [more]
Hellwig German, Dutch
Curiously it started out life in ancient history as the baptismal name, Hell-wig. "luck" & "war;" this name literally translates to, "battle-battle."
Helmeier German, Dutch, Danish
Variant spelling of Helmeyer.
Helmeyer German, Dutch, Danish
From Hel in Norse mythology and Meyer meaning "higher, superior". It means ´blessed´ or ´holy´. The name is mostly found in Germany, but also in the Netherlands and some parts of Denmark.
Hendel Yiddish, German, Dutch
From the given name Hendel, a Yiddish diminutive of Hannah.
Hendryckx Dutch, Flemish
From the given name Hendrick
Hennen German, Dutch
Patronymic of Henne.
Henri French
From the first name Henri.
Herd Dutch
Comes from Middle Dutch hert, herte ‘hart’, ‘stag’; probably a nickname for someone who was fleet of foot, or a habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a deer; variant of Heard.
Herold English, Dutch, German
From the given name Herold. This was the surname of David Herold, one of the conspirators in the Abraham Lincoln assassination plot.
Herrick Dutch
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements heri, hari 'army' + ric 'power', or from an assimilated form of Henrick, a Dutch form of Henry.
Herve French
From the given name Hervé.
Heyer English, German, Dutch
English variant of Ayer. ... [more]
Hick Dutch
From a pet form of a Germanic personal name, such as Icco or Hikke (a Frisian derivative of a compound name with the first element hild "strife", "battle").
Hickenlooper Dutch, German
This surname means hedge hopper.
Hieronymus Dutch, German
From the Greek given name ‘Ιερωνυμος (Hieronymos) meaning "sacred name". (See Jerome.)
Hilaire Haitian Creole, French
From the given name Hilaire.
Hilbert English, French, Dutch, German
English, French, Dutch, and German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild ‘strife’, ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.
Hilger German, Dutch
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hild 'strife', 'battle' + gar, ger 'spear'.
Hinkebein Dutch, German
Nickname for someone with a limp, from Middle Low German hinken meaning "to limp" + bein meaning "leg".
Hoddson French
Variation of the surname, HODSON.
Hoen German, Dutch
Nickname from hoen 'chicken', 'hen', perhaps denoting a silly person.
Holl German, Dutch, English
Short form of German HÖLD or a topographic name meaning "hollow" or "hole".
Hollande French
French form of Holland.
Hollander German, English, Jewish, Dutch, Swedish
Regional name for someone from Holland.
Hollier English, French
Occupational name for a male brothel keeper, from a dissimilated variant of Old French horier "pimp", which was the agent noun of hore "whore, prostitute". Hollier was probably also used as an abusive nickname in Middle English and Old French.... [more]
Holman Dutch
Topographic name for a dweller in a hollow
Hoogenboom Dutch
Topographic name for someone living by a tall tree, "tall tree", or a habitational name from places called Hoogboom and Hogenboom in the Belgian province of Antwerp, meaning "tall tree".
Hoogland Dutch
A Dutch toponoymic surname meaning 'high land'. A famous bearer of this surname is Duco Hoogland, a Dutch politician.
Hoot Dutch, German
The Dutch form is a habitation name for someone who lived in the hout or "woods" while the German form hoth is from an occupational name for a maker of hats.
Hoppe Dutch
Variant of Hopp.
Hosekin Dutch
Occupational name for a maker or seller of hose (garments for the legs), from Middle Low German hose "hose".
Hoskins Dutch
Variant of Hosekin.
Houard French
Variant of Huard.
Hourmilogué Occitan, French
Meaning unknown.
Houseal French (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
French (Lorraine) spelling of German Häusel, a topographic name meaning ‘small house’, a diminutive of Haus... [more]
Houtteman Flemish (Dutchified)
Flemish. Houtteman. Meaning: Woodsman. Our ancestors were wardens of the woods, protecting them for the king and royal family.
Huard French
From the given name Huard the French form of Hughard.
Hubertus German, Dutch
From the given name Hubertus.
Huck English, Dutch
From the medieval male personal name Hucke, which was probably descended from the Old English personal name Ucca or Hucca, perhaps a shortened form of Ūhtrǣd, literally "dawn-power".
Huet English, French
From the nickname from given name Hugh, Hugues, Hugo or Hubert.
Huette French
French variant of Huet.
Hugo French
Victor Hugo was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement. He was also the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
Hugues French
From the given name Hugues.
Huijs Dutch
Variant of Huys.
Huitema Dutch
The name is believed to come from the Dutch word 'hout', meaning wood. Thus, this was a name often given to woodcutters.
Humbert German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements hun "Hun, giant" or hun "bear cub" and berht "bright, famous". This was particularly popular in the Netherlands and North Germany during the Middle Ages as a result of the fame of a 7th-century St... [more]
Huot English, French
Variant of Huet.
Huygens Dutch, Belgian
Means "son of Hugo". A notable bearer was Dutch mathematician, physicist and astronomer Christiaan Huygens (1629–1695).
Huys Dutch, Flemish
Derived from Huis, itself a variant of Huus and Huuchs, medieval Dutch genitive forms of the given name Hugo.
Iles English (British), French
English (mainly Somerset and Gloucestershire): topographic name from Anglo-Norman French isle ‘island’ (Latin insula) or a habitational name from a place in England or northern France named with this element.
Imbert French
From the medieval French personal name Imbert, of Germanic origin and meaning literally "vast-bright".
Isaac Jewish, English, Welsh, French
Derived from the given name Isaac.
Isabelle French, English
From the given name Isabelle.
Isabeth French
A matronym derived from the given name Élisabeth/Elisabeth.
Iselle French
Frenchified forms of Iseli, a Swiss German variant of Eisele.... [more]
Isidore French
From the given name Isidore.
Jacobi Jewish, English, Dutch, German
From the Latin genitive Jacobi ‘(son) of Jacob’, Latinized form of English Jacobs and Jacobson or North German Jakobs(en) and Jacobs(en).
Jacot French
Variant spelling of Jacquot.
Jacqueman French
Alsace-Lorraine
Jacquemin French
From a pet form of the given name Jacques.
Jacquot French
From the given name Jacquot, a diminutive of Jacques.
Jade English, French
From the given name Jade. It could also indicate someone with jade green eyes.
Janisse French
Possibly a respelling of French Janisset, from a pet form of Jan, a variant spelling of Jean, French equivalent of John.
Janmaat Dutch
Famous bearer of this surname is Dutch footballer Daryl Janmaat.
Japenga Dutch
Means son of Jap "Yap" related to Jacobson in the Netherlands
Japon Filipino, Spanish, French
Ethnic name or regional name for someone from Japan or who had connections with Japan.
Jardin French, English
Derived from Old French jardin meaning "enclosure, garden", hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a garden or a metonymic occupational name for someone who worked as a gardener.
Jary French
France-England-USA
Jay English, French
Nickname from Middle English, Old French jay(e), gai "jay (the bird)", probably referring to an idle chatterer or a showy person, although the jay was also noted for its thieving habits.
Jean-baptiste Haitian Creole, French
From the French given name Jean-Baptiste.
Jeannot French
From the given name Jeannot, a French diminutive of (1)Jean.
Jeanpetit French
Means "little Jean" from Old French petit "small" and the given name Jean, originally a nickname for a small man called Jean (or applied ironically to a large man), or a distinguishing epithet for the younger of two men named Jean.... [more]
Jeaume French (Rare)
Variant form of the patronymic surname of Jaume.
Jesten Dutch
Variation of Joosten.
Jesús Spanish, Catalan, Occitan, French
From the given name Jesús.
Joachim German, French, Polish
From the given name Joachim
Job English, French, German, Hungarian
English, French, German, and Hungarian from the personal name Iyov or Job, borne by a Biblical character, the central figure in the Book of Job, who was tormented by God and yet refused to forswear Him... [more]
Joffé French, Jewish
French form of Joffe.
Johanneson German, Dutch
Variant of Johannessen which means "son of Johannes
Joliet French
From French Jolie "pretty one" and the popular suffix -et "little" meaning "pretty little one."
Jonas Danish, German, Dutch, Norwegian
From the given name Jonas
Jost Dutch, German
Dutch and German: from a personal name, a derivative of the Breton personal name Iodoc (see Joyce), or from the personal name Just.
Jourdain French
From the given name Jourdain.
Jourdine French, English
English and French variant of Jordan.
Juillet French
Means "July" in French.
Juin French
Derived from French juin meaning "June", perhaps indicating a person who was baptized in that month.
Jules French
From a personal name (Latin Julius). The name was borne in the Middle Ages in honor of various minor Christian saints.
Juncker German, Danish, French
Meaning "young nobleman" in German and Danish.
Juneau French
A nickname for someone who is "young"
Justin French, English, Slovene
From a medieval personal name, Latin Justinus, a derivative of Justus.
Justus German, Dutch, Finnish
From the given name Justus
Kaag Dutch
Named after the Dutch town of Kaag.
Kamp German, Dutch
From the German element kamp (from Latin campus) "field".
Kanssen Dutch, Flemish
Son of Kant
Kat Dutch, Frisian, Afrikaans, Jewish
Means "Cat" in Dutch, Frisian, and Afrikaans, perhaps originally a nickname for someone who owned a cat or somehow resembled a cat.
Katje Dutch
It means 'Little Kate' in Dutch. A fun nickname for anyone
Kemper German, Dutch
German: status name denoting a peasant farmer or serf, an agent noun derivative of Kamp ... [more]
Kentie Scottish, English, Dutch
Origin and meaning unknown. The name Kentie was spread in the Netherlands when a Scottish soldier, Alexander Kenti, settled at Woudrichem, the Netherlands around 1650. Alexander Kenti was born and raised in the Scottish highlands... [more]
Kerbow French
Possibly derived from the French word 'corbeau', meaning "raven".
Kergoat Breton, French
From Breton ker "Village" or "Area" and koad "Woods".
Kesler German, Dutch, Jewish
It is an occupational name that means coppersmith. In alpine countries the name derived from the definition: the one living in the basin of a valley.
Kessel Dutch
Habitational name for someone originally from any of the various locations in the Netherlands named Kessel.
Kesteloot Belgian (Modern)
No idea whatsoever as to the origin of the surname other than it is of Belgian origin.
Keurig Dutch
Keurig is "derived from" a Dutch word meaning "excellence." A more accurate translation from the Dutch is "neat" or "tidy."
Kiel Dutch
Dutch from Middle Dutch kidel, kedel ‘smock’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who make such garments or perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore one. Also a dutch habitational name from a place so named in Antwerp or from the German city Kiel in Schleswig-Holstein.
Kilian German, Dutch, Polish, Czech
from the Irish personal name Cillín (see Killeen).
Kill German (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Perhaps derived from Kilian.
Kin Dutch
Nickname for someone with a pointed or jutting chin.
Kind English, German, Jewish, Dutch
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German kint, German Kind ‘child’, hence a nickname for someone with a childish or naive disposition, or an epithet used to distinguish between a father and his son... [more]
Kinne German, Dutch
German: From the female given name Kinne, a Silesian diminutive of Kunigunde.... [more]
Kippenberger German, French, Scottish
Mainly means "Shepard".
Kleynen Flemish
Comes from the town in Belgium. Originally Van Klijnen
Klopp German, Dutch
Habitational name from a place called Kloppe.
Knickerbocker Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of the Dutch occupational name Knickerbacker "marble baker", i.e., a baker of children's clay marbles. This lowly occupation became synonymous with the patrician class in NYC through Washington Irving's attribution of his History of New York (1809) to a fictitious author named Diedrich Knickerbocker... [more]
Koetsier Dutch
"Coachman, Coachdriver"... [more]
Koev Dutch
1 Dutch: variant spelling of Coel, itself a variant of Kool .... [more]
Kok Dutch
It is a Dutch occupational surname, meaning cook.
Kolk Dutch
"Kolk is Dutch for either whirlpool or canyon. Probably the name refers to wild water."
Koonings Dutch
From the Dutch word "koning" meaning "king", thus meaning "of the king".
Koop Dutch (Modern)
Comes from the Biblical given name Jacob, meaning "he who supplants."
Krane Dutch, Low German
Dutch: nickname for a long-legged or tall thin man, from Middle Dutch crane ‘crane’. ... [more]
Kroll German, Dutch, Polish
Nickname for someone with curly hair, from Middle High German krol 'curly', Middle Low German krulle 'ringlet', 'curl', Middle Dutch croel, crul (apparently a loanword from German)... [more]
Kuba Dutch, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish
From Kuba, a pet form of the personal name Jakub.
Kues German, Dutch
Habitational name from Cues, now part of Bernkastel-Kues in the Rhineland Palatinate.
Kuijper Dutch
Variant of Kuiper
Kul German, Dutch
Derived from Old High German kol meaning "coal", perhaps an occupational name for a miner or coal seller.
Kunis German, Dutch
From a derivative of the personal name Konrad.
Kuyper Dutch
Variant of Kuiper
Kuypers Dutch
Variant of Kuiper
Labeau French
Variant of Lebeaux.
Label French
Variant of Labelle.
Laborde French
Occupational or status name for a tenant farmer, from borde "small farm" (from Frankish bord "plank") and the definite article la.
Labossiere French
Norman habitational name from a common village name La Boissière, meaning 'wooded area', from bois 'wood'. possibly a metronymic, from a feminine derivative of Bossier 'cooper', denoting the 'wife of the cooper'.
Labrie French
Topographic name from l’abri meaning "the shelter", or a habitational name from a place named with this word.
Lacasse French
Means "box maker"
Lachtrup Dutch
Means 'laughing group' in Dutch. Also occurs in Germany, but mostly in the Netherlands.
Lackyard French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of French surname, Lacaillade.
Lacombe French
French (western and southwestern): topographic name for someone living in or near a ravine, from la combe ‘the ravine’ (a word of Gaulish origin, related to English Combe).... [more]
Lacour French
topographic or occupational name for someone who lived at or was employed at a manorial court (see also Court).
Ladouceur French
french canadian
Lafayette French
The name of Marquis de Lafayette; a famous French man during the revolutionary war.
Lafitte French
French: topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary mark, Old French fitte (Late Latin fixta petra ‘fixed stone’, from the past participle of figere ‘to fix or fasten’), or habitational name from any of several places in western France named with this word
Lafontaine French
Means" The fountain" in French.
La Forge French
This is my Grandmother's maiden name
Laframboise French, French (Quebec)
Derived from La Framboisière, a commune in the Eure-et-Loir department in northern France.
Lafrenière French
Topographic name derived from French frenière meaning "place of ash trees". It is often Americanised as Freeman.
Lagasse French
French: nickname from Old French agace, agasse ‘magpie’ + the definite article l’.
Lagrange French
French: topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, a variant of Grange, with the definite article la.
Lahaie French
Locational name for someone who lived near a hedge or large bush, from old French "La" the and "Haie" hedge.
Lakeman Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a lake or pond.
La Liveres French
Means 'the books' in French
Lalonde French
French (Normandy): habitational name from any of various places in Normandy, so named from Old Norse lundr ‘grove’, with the definite article la.
Lamarche French
French: topographic name or habitational name, a variant of LaMarque.
Lamarr French, English
Variant form of Lamar.
Lambers French
Means "illustrious land", variant of Lambert
Lambillotte French (Modern)
Currently, a common name in Wallonia, Belgium with some descendants in USA. Believed to be derived from three terms..."lamb" "ill" "otte". The first term has remained unchanged from early Germanic term; the second is latin for "of the" and the third a dimiuative or feminine form suffix... [more]
Lamont Scottish (Modern), Northern Irish, French
Scottish and northern Irish: from the medieval personal name Lagman, which is from Old Norse Logmaðr, composed of log, plural of lag ‘law’ (from leggja ‘to lay down’) + maðr, ‘man’ (genitive manns).... [more]
L'amoreaux French
French surname meaning "The Lovers"
Lamoree French
From the nickname "the loved one" derived from the French word amour meaning "love".