Belgian Submitted Surnames

Belgian names are used in the country of Belgium in western Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Kuyper Dutch
Variant of Kuiper
Kuypers Dutch
Variant of Kuiper
Labeau French
Variant of Lebeaux.
Label French
Variant of Labelle.
Laborde French
Occupational or status name for a tenant farmer, from borde "small farm" (from Frankish bord "plank") and the definite article la.
Labossiere French
Norman habitational name from a common village name La Boissière, meaning 'wooded area', from bois 'wood'. possibly a metronymic, from a feminine derivative of Bossier 'cooper', denoting the 'wife of the cooper'.
Labrie French
Topographic name from l’abri meaning "the shelter", or a habitational name from a place named with this word.
Lacasse French
Means "box maker"
Lachtrup Dutch
Means 'laughing group' in Dutch. Also occurs in Germany, but mostly in the Netherlands.
Lackyard French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of French surname, Lacaillade.
Lacombe French
French (western and southwestern): topographic name for someone living in or near a ravine, from la combe ‘the ravine’ (a word of Gaulish origin, related to English Combe).... [more]
Lacour French
topographic or occupational name for someone who lived at or was employed at a manorial court (see also Court).
Ladouceur French
french canadian
Lafayette French
The name of Marquis de Lafayette; a famous French man during the revolutionary war.
Lafitte French
French: topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary mark, Old French fitte (Late Latin fixta petra ‘fixed stone’, from the past participle of figere ‘to fix or fasten’), or habitational name from any of several places in western France named with this word
La Forge French
This is my Grandmother's maiden name
Laframboise French, French (Quebec)
Derived from La Framboisière, a commune in the Eure-et-Loir department in northern France.
Lagasse French
French: nickname from Old French agace, agasse ‘magpie’ + the definite article l’.
Lagrange French
French: topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, a variant of Grange, with the definite article la.
Lahaie French
Locational name for someone who lived near a hedge or large bush, from old French "La" the and "Haie" hedge.
Lakeman Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a lake or pond.
La Liveres French
Means 'the books' in French
Lalonde French
French (Normandy): habitational name from any of various places in Normandy, so named from Old Norse lundr ‘grove’, with the definite article la.
Lamarche French
French: topographic name or habitational name, a variant of LaMarque.
Lamarr French, English
Variant form of Lamar.
Lambers French
Means "illustrious land", variant of Lambert
Lambillotte French (Modern)
Currently, a common name in Wallonia, Belgium with some descendants in USA. Believed to be derived from three terms..."lamb" "ill" "otte". The first term has remained unchanged from early Germanic term; the second is latin for "of the" and the third a dimiuative or feminine form suffix... [more]
Lamont Scottish (Modern), Northern Irish, French
Scottish and northern Irish: from the medieval personal name Lagman, which is from Old Norse Logmaðr, composed of log, plural of lag ‘law’ (from leggja ‘to lay down’) + maðr, ‘man’ (genitive manns).... [more]
L'amoreaux French
French surname meaning "The Lovers"
Lamoureaux French
Means "the lover" in French. It would be the nickname of an amorous person.
Lande French, Norwegian, Jewish
French: topographic name for someone living on a heath, lande (from Gaulish landa ‘space’, ‘land’), or a habitational name from any of numerous minor places named La Lande from this word.... [more]
Landen Belgian
Belgian habitational name from Landen in Brabant.
Landers Dutch
Patronymic from Lander.
Landry French, English
From the Germanic personal name Landric, a compound of land "land" and ric "powerful, ruler".
Langevin French
From French l'Angevin meaning "the Angevin", denoting a person from the French province of Anjou.
Langhorn English, Danish, Dutch
Northern English: probably a habitational name from a minor place in Soulby, Cumbria, called Longthorn, from Old English lang ‘long’ + horn ‘projecting headland’, or a topographic name with the same meaning.... [more]
Lansdowne French, English
The first marquis lansdowne, land owners for there lords and farmers also know as tenants.
Lansing Dutch
Patronymic from Lans, Germanic Lanzo, a Dutch cognate of Lance.
Lapin French
Means "Rabbit" in French.
Laporte French
Topographic name for someone who lived near the gates of a fortified town (and often was in charge of them; thus in part a metonymic occupational name), from Old French porte "gateway", "entrance" (from Latin porta, "door", "entrance"), with the definite article la... [more]
Large French, English
Originally a nickname derived from Middle English and Old French large "generous".
Larivière French (Modern)
From the region of Bourgoigne, in France, meaning 'the river'. The name is likely a topographic reference to the physical location, likely a river in this case.
Lasalle French
1. French: local name or occupational name for someone who lived or worked at a manor house, from Old French sal(e) ‘hall’ (modern French salle; see also Sale), with the definite article la... [more]
Lascelles French
French location name from Lacelle in Orne, northern France and referring to "small rooms or cells inhabited by monks".
Latendresse French
From Letendre, thus meaning "tenderness".
Laurence English, French
From the given name Laurence.
Laurencot French
Likely from a given name that was a diminutive of Laurence 2.
Lavalle French
means "of the valley" in english.
Lavelle French
From Old French val "valley".... [more]
Lavely French (Anglicized, ?)
Possibly an English variant of Lavallée.
Lavender English, Dutch
Occupational name for a washerman or launderer, Old French, Middle Dutch lavendier (Late Latin lavandarius, an agent derivative of lavanda ‘washing’, ‘things to be washed’)... [more]
Laverdière French
Habitational name from various places named La Verdière in France, or a variant of the name Leverdier (see Verdier).
Laverdure French
From the French place name La Verdure meaning "greenness, greenery".
Laviolette French, French (Quebec), French (Acadian)
A secondary surname, associated with some forty family names in Canada and also used independently since 1698, a nickname from the flower violette ‘violet’, with the definite article la. In feudal France it was a name given to soldiers and domestic servants.
Lawyer Dutch (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Dutch Lauwer, an occupational name for a tanner or leather worker.
LeBoeuf French
Nickname for a powerfully built man, derived from French boeuf meaning "bull", with the definite article le. In some cases it may have been originally a metonymic occupational name for a herdsman.
Le Borgne French
Means "the one-eyed" in French.
Leborgne French
Variant spelling of Le Borgne.
Le Breton French
Describes someone from the French region Breton.
Lechat French
Means "The Cat" in French.
Lecoq French
Coq means rooster or fowl
Ledger English, Norman, French, Dutch
English: from a Norman personal name, Leodegar, Old French Legier, of Germanic origin, composed of the elements liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’ + gar, ger ‘spear’... [more]
Ledoux French
Means "the amiable" from French doux meaning "sweet, soft, gentle".
Lefferts Dutch, North Frisian
From lefert meaning "Leopard."
Lefrançois French
From the given name François. It may also mean "the Frenchman", probably used to denote someone who came from the region of Île de France in France.
Léger French, French (Cajun)
From the Old German name Leodegar, meaning "people spear."
Leloup French
Means “the wolf” in French.
Le Maistre French
From French meaning 'master'
Lemaître French
Means "the master" in French, either used as a nickname for someone who behaved in a masterful manner or an occupational name for someone who was a master of their craft.
Lemercier French
French surname designating a vendor of sewing materials, from the word mercier.
Le Monnier French
Occupational surname for a miller, literally meaning "the miller" in French.
Lemonnier French
Variant spelling of Le Monnier.
Lems Dutch
"It is said that long ago there was a river in Holland named 'Lems'. Since then the river has dried up, but those who lived around the river were given the surname of 'Lems'.
Lenglet French
Means "The Englishman".
Lenoir French
French surname which was originally a nickname for a person with dark hair or skin, derived from noir "black" combined with the definite article le. A famous bearer is Étienne Lenoir (1822 - 1900), the inventor of the internal combustion engine.
Leonhardt German, Dutch
From the Germanic personal name Leonhard, composed of the elements leo "lion" and hard "hardy, brave, strong".
Léotard French
From the given name Leopold. Jules Léotard was an acrobat who popularized the leotard, a gymnastics garment. The garment is named after him.
Lepère French
Means "the father" in French.
Lepine French
From Old French espine "thorn bush".
Le Roux French
Nickname for a person with red hair, from Old French rous "red." Variant spelling of Leroux.
Lessard French
Name for someone who lived in a clearing, derived from French l'essart meaning "the assart" (a term for cleared forest land used for agriculture). It is also a habitational name for someone from any of various locations named Lessard or Lessart, of the same origin and meaning.
Lesueur French
Means "the shoemaker" in French.
Letendre French
From 'tendre', meaning "tender" or "delicate".
Létourneau French
Nickname for a chatty, gregarious person or an occupational name for a birdcatcher, derived from French l'étourneau meaning "the starling".
Leva Bulgarian (Rare), Czech (Rare), French (Rare), Jewish (Rare)
From the Hebrew given name Lev, meaning Lion. It is also the name of the currency in Bulgaria, and a verb in French meaning to lever or to lift.
Levan French, English
Comes from le vent, meaning "the wind."
Lever French, English
Nickname for a fleet-footed or timid person, from Old French levre ‘hare’ (Latin lepus, genitive leporis). It may also have been a metonymic occupational name for a hunter of hares... [more]
Levy English, French, Jewish
There are three possible sources of this surname. ... [more]
Lex German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Alexius, Alexis.
L'Heureux French
Means "the happy one" in French.
L'Homme French
Variant spelling of Lhomme.
Lhomme French
From the name of the commune of Lhomme, located in the Sarthe department in northwestern France.
Liem Dutch
Habitual surname for Lieme in Eastphalia, which is from lim meaning "mire".
Lilandriz Dutch
Last name, supposedly from Hollad
Lilandroz Dutch
Last name from Holland
Lillard Belgian
Habitational name from either of two places called Li(e)laar, in Gavere and Sint-Maria-Oudenhove, East Flanders.
Linde German, Dutch, Jewish, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a conspicuous lime tree, from Middle High German, Dutch linde, Scandinavian lind. There are several places, especially in North Germany, named with this word... [more]
Lindenberg German, Jewish, Dutch
As a German and Jewish name, it is derived from any of numerous places called Lindenberg in Germany, composed of Middle High German linde meaning "lime tree" and berg meaning "mountain, hill"... [more]
Linders Dutch
Dutch name from the Linder tree.
Lindt German, Dutch
The Lindt surname comes from an Upper German word "lind," which meant "tender" or "gentle hearted." In some instances, especially in Saxony, the surname evolved from the personal name Lindemuth. In general, the similar phonetic name Linde comes from "Linden," which was a type of tree.... [more]
Line Danish, Norwegian, French
From the given name Line.
Lineberry English, German, Dutch, West Frisian
Americanized spelling of Leinberg.
Lisle Norman, English, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: variant spelling of Lyle.
Listrat French
From Occitan "listrat" meaning "chopped off, striped" or from "Listrac", a commune in the Gironde department in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region of southwest France.
Lock English, Dutch, German
Habitational name from any of various places called Loock, from look ‘enclosure’.
Locke English, Dutch, German
English, Dutch, and German: variant of Lock. ... [more]
Loepp Dutch
Variant of Loop.
Loewen Dutch
Dutch variant of Loewe.
Loiseau French
Means "The Bird" in French.
Lokerson Dutch
May be derived from Locke, Dutch meaning enclosure.
Lombard French, English
French and English cognate of Lombardi.
Loop Dutch
Habitational name from de Loop (meaning "the watercourse"), in the province of Antwerp.
Lorain French
Occupational name for a saddler, derived from the Old French word lorain, meaning "a leather strap used on a horse's breastplate".
Lorang French
Surname of uncertain origin. Might be derived from:... [more]
Lord French
Nickname from Old French l'ord "the dirty one".
Lorrain French
French and English: variant spelling of Lorraine.
Lorraine French
Indicates origin within Lorraine, in eastern France
Losee Dutch (Anglicized)
Perhaps an Americanized spelling of Lossie, a vernacular derivative of the female personal name Lucia... [more]
Losey Dutch
Probably of Dutch origin. See Losee.
Louise French
From the given name Louise or a variant of Louis.
Louisin French
From the given name Louis.
Lovett English, French
From Ango-Norman French "louvet" meaning "young wolf".
Lubben Low German, Dutch
Dutch and North German (Lübben) patronymic from German Lübbe, Dutch $Lubbe, short forms of the personal names Leopold and Lübbert (see Luebbert)... [more]
Lucien French
From the given name Lucien.
Lucius Dutch
From the personal name Lucius (Latin Lucius, an ancient Roman personal name probably derived from lux "light", genitive lucis).
Lupin French
Lupin is a variant on the Latin word "lupus", meaning "wolf". Two important literary characters, Arsène Lupin, the famous French gentleman-burglar, and Professor Remus Lupin, from the world of Harry Potter, have this name... [more]
Lustig Swedish, German, Jewish, Dutch
From Swedish and German lustig ”humerous, funny, enjoyable” or Middle High German lustig ”merry, carefree”.
Lutter Dutch, English, German
Dutch and English: variant of Luter.... [more]
Lux German, Dutch
Patronymic from a vernacular form of Lucas.
Luxenberg German, Jewish, Luxembourgish, Belgian, French, Walloon
Habitational name from various places named Luxenberg, Luxemberg, Luxenburg, or Luxembourg, including the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.
Lyé French
A habitational name from places named Lié located in Deux-Sèvres and Vendée.
Lyman English, German (Anglicized), Dutch
English: topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow or a patch of arable land (see Layman). ... [more]
Maagd Dutch
Dutch form of Virgo.
Maarschalkerweerd Dutch
Meaning "Keeper of the horses."
Mace English, French
English: from a medieval personal name, a survival of Old English Mæssa, which came to be taken as a pet form of Matthew.... [more]
Mack Scottish, Irish, German, Dutch, French
Scottish (Berwickshire) and Irish: from the Old Norse personal name Makkr, a form of Magnus (Old Irish Maccus)... [more]
Mackin Dutch
Pet form of Macco.
Macon French, German
French: See Maçon. An occupational name for a mason, French maçon. Habitational name from places so called in Saône-et-Loire, Allier, Aube, the Côte d’Or, Gers, and Deux-Sères... [more]
Maffret French
beleived to originated in{ NICE, france} in the late 19th century, emmigration from france to london,{stepney}, where the surname was mistakenly added an extra letter "T" resulting in the surname MAFFRETT
Main Scottish, English, French, Norman
Various origins explained include:... [more]
Maine French
French topographic name from Old French maine ‘dwelling’, ‘residence’, ‘abode’, or a habitational name from any of numerous places so named.
Maison French
Means "house" in French.
Maisonneuve French
Means "new house" in French.
Maker Dutch
From Dutch maken "to make or mend".
Malecuit French
Means "doughy," "soggy," or "undercooked" in French.
Malefeijt Dutch
A variant spelling of Malefeyt. This is also actually an archaic spelling (as the sound written as -eijt will be always be written as -eit or -ijt in modern times), but it has (barely) managed to survive into modern times... [more]
Malefeyt Dutch (Archaic)
Archaic Dutch surname that is now no longer in use (not in this exact spelling, that is): the spelling reflects the surname's origin from older times (as -eyt is an exclusively archaic spelling that has not survived into modern times like its counterparts -eit and -ijt did)... [more]
Malefijt Dutch
Modern form of Malefeyt, which is also the most common form of the surname. In The Netherlands, there were 24 bearers of the surname in 2007.
Malfait French
Derived from French mal fait, which literally means "poorly done, badly done". In the context of the surname, it refers to the first bearer being "malformed" or "deformed" (as it was in the eyes of people from older times), which means that he either was physically disabled or able-bodied but with a physical trait that deviated from the norm.
Malfeyt Dutch, Flemish
Generally a Dutch form (or "dutchization", if you will) of Malfait, with the spelling reflecting the surname's origin from older times (as -eyt is an exclusively archaic spelling that has not survived into modern times like its counterparts -eit and -ijt did)... [more]
Malfoi French
Variant of Malfoy.
Malfois French
Variant of Malfoy.
Malfoy French
Malfoy is a French name roughly translating to "bad faith"
Malin English, French, Dutch
From the given name Malin (English), and from the given name Madalin composed of the Germanic element madal meaning "council" (French, Dutch).
Mallet Anglo-Norman, Medieval English, French, Catalan
Originated in Norman France and spread to England following the Norman conquest of 1066. The surname comes from the given name Malle, an Old English diminutive of Mary or from the given name Malo, a popular form of the name of Saint Maclovius, a 6th-century Welsh monk who the church of Saint Maclou in Rouen is named for.... [more]
Maloret French
This surname comes from the French and means 'unfortunate' or 'luckless'.
Malpass English, Scottish, French
Habitational name from any of various places named Malpas, because of the difficulty of the terrain, from Old French mal pas "bad passage" (Latin malus passus). It is a common French minor place name, and places in Cheshire, Cornwall, Gwent, and elsewhere in England were given this name by Norman settlers... [more]
Mancio French
Mancio derives from the surname Venâncio and Amâncio, being an unusual French variation.
Manes Dutch
Variant of Magnus, MENNEN or a short form of Germanus.
Mansell Anglo-Norman, French
A status name for a particular type of feudal tenant, Anglo-Norman French mansel, one who occupied a manse (Late Latin mansa ‘dwelling’), a measure of land sufficient to support one family... [more]
Manuel Spanish, Portuguese, French, German
Derived from the given name Manuel.
Manville French
A locational surname deriving from any of the various places in France called "Manneville or Magneville", named, from the Old Germanic personal name "Manno" or the Old French adjective "magne", great, with the word "ville", meaning a town or settlement.
Marant English, French
Probably a variant of Morant.
Marc French
Derived from the French given name Marc.
Marceau French
From the given name Marcel.
Marcel French
From the given name Marcel
Marcelin French, Haitian Creole
From the given name Marcelin.
Marcellin French
From the given name Marcellin
Marchant French, English, Spanish
Variant of Marchand, from French marchand meaning "merchant, mercantile". Though it is of French origin, it was transferred into the Spanish-speaking world, especially Chile, by French invasion of the Iberian Peninsula.
Mark English, German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived on a boundary between two districts, from Middle English merke, Middle High German marc, Middle Dutch marke, merke, all meaning "borderland"... [more]
Markell Dutch, German, Slovene (Anglicized)
Dutch and German: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Markolf, composed of the elements marc, merc ‘boundary’ + wolf ‘wolf’... [more]
Marriott English, French
Derived from Mary.
Marsman Dutch
Dutch surname meaning "man from the marsh". Created in combination with the Dutch words "mars", (meaning marsh), and "man", (meaning man). Rare.
Martelle English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese
English and German: from a medieval personal name, a pet form of Martin or Marta.... [more]
Martial French
Derived from the given name Martial.
Martineau French
Diminutive of Martin.
Martinet French
From a pet form of the personal name Martin.
Martinique French, Antillean Creole, French (Caribbean)
From the French department named Martinique.
Mary French
Habitational name from places in Saône-et-Loire, Seine-et-Marne, and Nièvre, named in Latin as Mariacum meaning "estate of Marius".
Masey English, Scottish, French, Norman
English and Scottish (of Norman origin) and French: habitational name from any of various places in northern France which get their names from the Gallo-Roman personal name Maccius + the locative suffix -acum.... [more]
Masse English, French, Dutch
English: variant of Mace ... [more]
Mast Dutch
Nickname for a tall, lanky man, from Middle Dutch mast "(ship's) mast".
Mast Dutch
Occupational name for a swineherd, from Middle Dutch mast "swine fodder", or a topographic name for someone from a place rich in animal fodder, for example acorns.
Matheny French (Anglicized)
Of French origin. According to Matheny family tradition, this surname comes from the name of a village in France named Mathenay. This may also have been a French Huguenot surname.
Mathias French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Dutch: from the personal name Mathias (see Matthew).... [more]
Mathis German, French
From the given name Mathis.
Matias Filipino, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Czech (Americanized)
Spanish (Matías), Portuguese, and Dutch: from the personal name (see Matthew).... [more]
Matthias German, Dutch, English, Welsh, Greek
German and Dutch: from the personal name Matthias (see Matthew).... [more]
Matthieu French
From the given name Matthieu.
Maturin French
From the French male personal name Maturin, from Latin Mātūrīnus, a derivative of Mātūrus, literally "timely". It was borne by the Irish "Gothic" novelist Charles Maturin (1782-1824).
Maurice English, French
This surname is taken from a given name which is derived from the Roman name Mauritius, a derivative of Maurus.
Maury French, Occitan, English
As a French name, it derives from a short form of the given name Amaury (see Emery)... [more]
Maxime French
From the French given name Maxime.
Maximin French
From the given name Maxime.
Mayne French
French variant of Maine.
Mazarin French
French form of Italian Mazzarino.
Meaux French
Habitational name from a place in Seine-et-Marne, so named from the Gaulish tribal name Meldi, or from Meaux-la-Montagne in Rhône.
Mée French
French habitational name from places called (Le) Mée in Mayenne, Eure-et-Loir, and Seine-et-Marne, derived from Old French me(i)s ‘farmstead’ (Latin mansus).
Meijster Dutch
From the German word meister meaning "master".
Mélançon French
Nickname from a dialect word meaning 'melancholic'.
Mendès French
French form of Mendes.
Menu French
From French meaning "petite".