Submitted Surnames Starting with C

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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
COLLABRUSCO     Italian
From the region Calabria in southern Italy; widely moved to US.
COLLARD     English, French
English and French: from the personal name Coll + the pejorative suffix -ard.
COLLET     French
From a pet form of Colle.
COLLEY     English
With variant Coley, can mean "dark" or "blackbird" or it can be a nickname for Nicholas. Colley was used as a surname for generations of students from the same family taught by a teacher over many years in James Hilton's sentimental novel "Goodbye, Mr... [more]
COLLIER     English
This name is derived from Middle English cole, from Old English col meaning "coal", combined with the agent suffix (i)er, which denotes someone who does/works with something. Thus, the surname was originally used for a burner, gatherer or seller of coal.
COLLINSWORTH     English
Variant spelling of Collingsworth, itself a variant of Collingwood.
COLLINWOOD     English
Variation of Collingwood.
COLLIS     English
A variant of Collins, itself a patronymic of given names Collin or Colin, both ultimately nicknames for Nicholas.
COLLUM     Northern Irish
Reduced form of northern Irish McCollum.
COLMENARES     Spanish
It literally means "apiaries", denoting someone who either worked at some or lived near some.
COLO     Italian
From the personal name Colo, a short form of Nicolo (see Nicholas). (Colò) nickname from medieval Greek kolos ‘lame’, classical Greek kylos.
COLOMBRES     Asturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish in Ribadeva.
COLONEL     American
From a French word for a military rank of an officer who led a column of regimental soldiers. Could be a nickname for someone with a military bearing or demeanor.
COLTRANE     English
Cole-train, meaning literally "cole train", in the UK, was made famous by the Jazz musician John Coletrane in the 1960's (??)
COLUMBRO     Italian
Variant of Colombo
COMBEFERRE     Literature (?)
Combeferre is the surname of one of the strong, persuasive members of the ABC in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables. Meaning is unknown.
COMEAU     French, French (Acadian), Louisiana Creole
French: from a Gascon diminutive of Combe.
COMEAUX     French (Acadian), French Creole
Variant spelling of French Comeau.
COMIM     Italian
It mans waiter in italian.
COMINERO     Medieval Spanish (Latinized, Rare)
Means "gatherer of cumin" from the spanisgh word "comino".
COMINS     Irish
Variant of CUMMINGS
COMMANDER     Anglo-Saxon, French
From Middle English comander, comandor and comandour and also from Old French comandeor, all meaning "commander", "leader" or "ruler". The first recorded use of the name is through a family seat held in Somerset.
COMPTON     English
Habitational name from any of the numerous places throughout England (but especially in the south) named Compton, from Old English cumb meaning "short, straight valley" + tūn meaning "enclosure", "settlement".
CONAHAN     Irish (Anglicized)
Irish reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Connachaín (see Cunningham).
CONATSER     English (Anglicized)
A variant of the German last name Konitzer.
CONDOM     Obscure
Variant of Condon
CONDON     Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Condún, itself a Gaelicized form of the Anglo-Norman habitational name de Caunteton. This seems to have been imported from Wales, but probably derives ultimately from Caunton in Nottinghamshire, which is named with the Old English personal name Caluno{dh} (composed of the elements calu "bald" + no{dh} "daring") + Old English tun "enclosure", "settlement".
CONE     Irish
Reduced form of McCone. Americanized spelling of North German Kohn or Köhn, or Kuhn.
CONEY     English
Means "seller of rabbits", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a rabbit (in either case from Middle English cony "rabbit").
CONG TANG TON NU     Vietnamese
Often written with the middle two words uncapitalized when with a full name; example: Con tang ton Nu Hue Hue. The first name is Hue Hue, and the surname is Cong tang ton Nu. It is a female royal Vietnamese surname created by the NGUYEN Dynasty.
CONKLIN     Irish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish Coughlin.
CONLEY     Irish
Variant of Connolly. Also derived from the given name Conley.
CONLON     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Conalláin or Ó Caoindealbháin.
CONNELY     English
Variant of Connolly.
CONNERY     English
Variant of Conroy.... [more]
CONNICK     Yiddish
Variation on Koenig.
CONQUEST     English
Probably from a medieval nickname, perhaps applied to a domineering person. This surname is borne by the British poet, historian and critic Robert Conquest (1917-).
CONRAD     German
Americanized spelling of KONRAD.
CONRADI     German, Danish, Norwegian
Latinization of a patronymic from the personal name Konrad.
CONRADI     Italian
Variant of Corradi.
CONRAN     Irish
The surname Conran is derived from 'O Conarain', and Conran is a more anglicized version.... [more]
CONROY     Irish
meaning, "hound of prosperity"
CONSAGA     ?
CONSIGLIO     Italian
Meaning "Counselor" or "One who gives good advice".
CONSTANTINOU     Greek (Cypriot)
Cypriot variant of Konstantinou.
CONTE     Italian
Italian: from the title of rank conte ‘count’ (from Latin comes, genitive comitis ‘companion’). Probably in this sense (and the Late Latin sense of ‘traveling companion’), it was a medieval personal name; as a title it was no doubt applied ironically as a nickname for someone with airs and graces or simply for someone who worked in the service of a count.
CONTINO     Italian
Diminutive of Italian Conte or Conti.
CONTRERAS     Spanish
Habitual name for someone from Conteraras, a region in the province of Burgos, Spain. The name "Conteraras" is derived from Late Latin contraria meaning "surrounding area", "region", from contra meaning "opposite, against, hard by".
CONWAY     Welsh, Scottish, Irish
As a Welsh surname, it comes from the name of a fortified town on the coast of North Wales (Conwy formerly Conway), taken from the name of the river on which it stands. The river name Conwy may mean "holy water" in Welsh.... [more]
COOGAN     Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name "MacCogadhain"; composed of the Gaelic prefix "mac," which means "son of," and the Gaelic personal name "Cuchogaidh", which means "Hound of War". The name is also found in Ireland as Cogan, Coggan, Coggen, Cogin, Coggon, Coogan and Goggin(s).
COOGLAN     Irish
Irish surname of unknown meaning. May be a variant of Coghlan.
COOKSIN     English
Variant of Cookson
COOLEY     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Chúille ‘son of the servant of (Saint) Mochúille’, a rare Clare name.
COOLIDGE     English
Probably an occupational name for a college servant or someone with some other association with a university college, for example a tenant farmer who farmed one of the many farms in England known as College Farm, most of which are or were owned by university colleges.
COONROD     Dutch
Americanized spelling of Dutch Coenraet or Koenraadt or German Kühnrat (Konrad).
COOTER     English
A Sussex, England surname of uncertain meaning. Could be a local pronunciation of Cotter, meaning "cottage dweller" for a serf in the feudal system allowed to live in a cottage in exchange for labor on the cottage owner's estate.
COPELAND     English
Some sources say that Copeland is English: "one that is good at coping". Another says Copeland is Northern English and Scottish, from Cumberland and Northumberland meaning "bought land". Old Norse, kaupa-land for‘bought land’.
COPPENHAVER     German
Americanized spelling, probably originally spelled Kopenhaver or Koppenhaver. Means "owner of a hill".
COPPOLA     Italian
Coppola is an occupational name for someone who makes 'coppolas', which are a type of hat. The word 'coppola' literally means 'hat' in Neapolitan dialect. The name also could have been for someone who frequently wore a coppola too.... [more]
COPUS     English
For full analysis of the origin for the name Copus/Copas I would refer you to my family website copusfamily.co.uk
CORBALÁN     Aragonese
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous municipality.
CORBETT     English, Scottish, Welsh
Nickname from Norman French corbet meaning 'little crow, raven'. This surname is thought to have originated in Shropshire. The surname was taken by bearers to Scotland in the 12th Century, and to Northern Ireland in the 17th Century.... [more]
CORD     Northern Irish
Reduced form of McCord.
CORDASCO     Italian
From the given name Corda or Cordio (a short form of Accord(i)o, literally "agreement") + the suffix -asco denoting kinship.
CORDER     French (Anglicized, Archaic), English (American)
Linked to both English, French and Spanish origin. Cordier, Cordero, Corder- one who makes cord. Can refer to both the act of making cords (rope), cores of fire wood, or actual location names.... [more]
CÓRDOBA     Spanish
From Phonecian Qʾrtuba meaning “Juba’s city”, derived from qʾrt “city” and juba referring to King Juba I of Numidia. It can also refer to the city of Córdoba (Cordova) in Andalusia, Spain.
CÓRDOVA     Spanish
Variant of Córdoba.
CORDRAY     English
From a medieval nickname for a proud man (from Old French cuer de roi "heart of a king").
CORDS     German
Derived from the first name Konrad.
CORE     English (American), German (Anglicized)
Core is the anglicized form of the German surname Kohr, also spelled Kürr. Alternately, it is an English name of Flemish origin.
CORIO     Italian
Variant of COIRO.
CORIS     ?
CORK     English
Metonymic occupational name for a supplier of red or purple dye or for a dyer of cloth, Middle English cork (of Celtic origin; compare Corkery).
CORKE     English
Variant of Cork.
CORKERY     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corcra "descendant of Corcra", a personal name derived from corcair "purple" (ultimately cognate with Latin purpur).
CORLETT     Manx
From Manx Gaelic Mac Thorliot "son of Thorliot", a male personal name derived from Old Norse Thórrljótr, literally "Thor-bright".
ĆORLUKA     Croatian
Derived from Turkish körlük, meaning "blindness".... [more]
ČORLUKA     Croatian
Variant of Ćorluka.
CORMICAN     Scottish
From a pet form of the Gaelic personal name Cormac (see McCormick).
CORMIER     French
French topographic name for someone who lived near a sorb or service tree, Old French cormier (from corme, the name of the fruit for which the tree was cultivated, apparently of Gaulish origin).
CORNELLANA     Asturian (Castilianized)
Castilianized form of Curniana.
CORNWALLIS     Scottish
Example: Lord Charles Cornwallis.
CORNWELL     English
Habitational name from Cornwell in Oxfordshire, named from Old English corn, a metathesized form of cron, cran ‘crane’ + well(a) ‘spring’, ‘stream’.variant of Cornwall.
CORPUS     Anglo-Saxon
It was a name given to a dark-haired person. In Yorkshire and Suffolk, the surname Corpus is derived from the Old Norse word korpr, which means raven; in Oxfordshire, the surname is derived from the Old French word corp, which has the same meaning.
CORR     Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Corra "descendant of CORRA".
CORRADO     Italian
From the personal name CORRADO.
CORRALES     Spanish
denoting someone who worked on a barn or a farm . Corral means "barnyard", "corral", "yard" ,"sheepshed"
CORRAO     Italian
Reduced form CORRADO.
CORREA     Portuguese, Spanish
From Spanish, meaning "leather garment."
CORREIA     Portuguese
meaning "leather strap" or "belt", "rein", or "shoelace"; denoting a person who worked with leather products
CORRIE     English
Habitational name from places in Arran, Dumfries, and elsewhere, named Corrie, from Gaelic coire "cauldron", applied to a circular hanging valley on a mountain.
CORRIE     Scottish
Scottish spelling of MCCORRY.
CORRIGAN     English
Traditionally an Irish surname meaning "spear". From the Irish Gaelic corragán which is a double diminutive of corr 'pointed'.
CORSI     Italian
Patronymic or plural form of CORSO.
CORSON     English
Nickname from Old French 'corson', a diminutive of curt ‘short’
CORT     Polish, Russian, Jewish
Derived from the surname "Kutalczuk", "Kotelchik", "Cuttlechuck", or "Kuttlechuck"
CORTÁZAR     Basque (Castilianized)
Castilianized form of Kortazar.
CORTÉS     Spanish
From Old French corteis, curteis which means "courteous, polite". It could also serve as a habitual surname for people from Cortes in Spain or Portugal.
CORTÈS     Catalan
Catalan form of Cortés.
CORTÊS     Portuguese
Portuguese form of Cortés.
CORTÉZ     Spanish
Variant of Cortés.
CORTRIGHT     English
Habitational surname from the Dutch Kortrijk for a person from a place of this name in Flanders. Perhaps also a respelling of English Cartwright.
CORVINUS     Hungarian
dirived from Corvin, maning raven.
COSCA     Italian
Topographic name from the Calabrian dialect word c(u)oscu "oak", also "wood".
COSCO     Italian
Masculinized form of COSCA.
COSCOLLOLA     Catalan
This indicates familial origin within or within the vicinity of the eponymous farmhouse in the municipality of Lladurs.
COSGROVE     English
Habitational name from Cosgrove in Northamptonshire, named with an Old English personal name Cof + Old English graf "grove", "thicket".
COSGROVE     Irish
From the Gaelic name Ó Coscraigh "descendant of COSCRACH."
ĆOSIĆ     Croatian, Serbian
Means ''beardless''.
ČOSIĆ     Croatian
Variant spelling of Ćosić.
COSTABILE     Italian
Italian name.... [more]
COSTELLO     Irish, Italian
Costello (Irish: Mac Coisdealbha) is a common Irish surname originating in County Mayo. The surname derives from Jocelyn de Angulo (fl.1172), an Anglo-Norman knight.... [more]
COSTIC     ?
COSTINIU     Romanian
Meaning unknown.
COTONI     Italian
means "cottons" in Italian
COTTER     English
"A cottage dweller", a name in the feudal system for a serf allowed to live in a cottage in exchange for labor on the cottage owner's estate.
COTTON     English, French
English: habitational name from any of numerous places named from Old English cotum (dative plural of cot) ‘at the cottages or huts’ (or sometimes possibly from a Middle English plural, coten)... [more]
COTTRELL     English French
First found in Derbyshire where the family "Cottrell" held a family seat and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege lord for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings, 1066CE... [more]
COULIBALY     Western African, Manding
Meaning uncertain. One popular folk etymology suggests that it is derived from Bambara kulun-bari meaning "without a canoe", referring to someone who crossed a river or other body of water without the use of a canoe... [more]
COURCEL     French
Variant of Courcelles.... [more]
COURCELLES     French
The name of several places in France, Belgium and Canada. In Middle French the word courcelle was used to describe a "small court" or a "small garden". The word is derived from the medieval Gallo-Romance and Gallo-Italian word corticella, which was formed from the Latin word cohors, meaning "court" or "enclosure", and the diminutive –icella.... [more]
COURFEYRAC     Literature
Courfeyrac is the surname that Victor Hugo used for Marius' closest friend in the friend of the ABC. Meaning is unknown.
COURTIER     French, Medieval French, Medieval English
French: habitational name from places called Courtier (Seine-et-Marne, Aples-de-Haute-Provence), Courtié (Tarn), or Courtière (Loir-et-Cher). ... [more]
COURTOIS     French
French form of Curtis.... [more]
COUTER     English
The couter (also spelled "cowter") is the defense for the elbow in a piece of plate armour. Initially just a curved piece of metal, as plate armor progressed the couter became an articulated joint.... [more]
COUTINHO     Portuguese
Diminutive of Couto.
COVA     Catalan, Galician
Topographic name from Catalan and Galician cova ‘cave’, or a habitational name from a place named with this word, in the provinces of Lugo, Ourense, Pontevedra, Catalonia and Valencia.
COVERDALE     English (British)
From the valley (Dale) of the river Cover.... [more]
COVERT     English, French
The surname is probably topographical, for someone who either lived by a sheltered bay, or more likely an area sheltered by trees. The formation is similar to couvert, meaning a wood or covert, and originally from the Latin "cooperio", to cover... [more]
COVEY     Irish, English
Irish: reduced form of MacCovey, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cobhthaigh (see Coffey).... [more]
COWAN     Scottish (Anglicized), Northern Irish (Anglicized)
This surname, widespread in Scotland and Ulster, is an Anglicized form of the old Gaelic MacEoghain or MacEoin. The Gaelic prefix "mac" means "son of", plus the personal name Eoghan from the old Celtic "Oue(i)n", well-born, but believed to derive ultimately from the Greek "Eugenious", "born lucky" or "well-born"... [more]
COWARD     English
several origins... [more]
COWARKS     English
English
COWEN     Scottish, English (British)
Scottish and northern English: variant spelling of Cowan.
COWIE     Scottish
habitational name from any of several places, especially one near Stirling, named Cowie, probably from Gaelic colldha, an adjective from coll ‘hazel’
COY     Irish
Reduced form of McCoy.
COYLE     Irish
Irish reduced variant of McCool.
CRABB     English, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
CRABBE     English, Literature, Popular Culture
The character 'Vincent Crabbe' has this surname in the Harry Potter series.
CRĂCIUN     Romanian
Crăciun is the Romanian word for Christmas.
CRAFT     English (American)
Variant of Croft and Americanized spelling of Kraft.
CRAGG     Scottish, Irish, English
Variant of Craig, from Middle English Crag.
CRAMER     German, English
Variant of German surname KRÄMER.
CRAN     Anglo-Saxon
This picturesque name is of Anglo Saxon origin and is a nickname surname given to a tall thin man, or someone with long legs, or some other fancied resemblance to the bird. The derivation is from the old English "cran(uc)", "cron(uc)", "cren(uc)", which means a crane and until the introduction of a separate word in the 14th Century also a heron... [more]
CRANDALL     Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Raonuill "son of RAONULL".
CRANE     English, Dutch
1. English: nickname, most likely for a tall, thin man with long legs, from Middle English cran ‘crane’ (the bird), Old English cran, cron. The term included the heron until the introduction of a separate word for the latter in the 14th century... [more]
CRANSHAW     English
From Cranshaw in Lancashire, named from Old English cran(uc) ‘crane’ + sceaga ‘grove’, ‘thicket’.
CRANSTON     Scottish
Combination of the Old English byname Cran "crane" and Old English tun "settlement".
CRASHMAN     American
Surnames of fictional characters Carl and Chloe Crashman from Carl².
CRAUWELS     Flemish, Dutch, German
Derrives from the Middle Dutch (medieval Dutch) word "crauwel" and Middle High German word "kröuwel" which means "flesh hook", "curved fork" or "trident". The word is no longer used. The first person with this name was most likely a farmer, butcher or a person that runned an inn or a hostel that was named after this tool.
CRAVEN     Irish, English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Crabháin (County Galway) or Mac Crabháin (Louth, Monaghan) ‘descendant (or ‘son’) of Crabhán’... [more]
CRAVOTTA     Sicilian
From a Sicilian immigrant to America, Cravotta was changed to Cravatta upon arrival at Ellis Island. The name means "bowtie."
CRAWLEY     English, Irish (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the many places called Crawley, named with Old English crawe ‘crow’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’. Compare Crowley. ... [more]
CREANGĂ     Romanian, Moldovan
A Surname commonly used in Romania and Moldova.... [more]
CREEL     Scottish Gaelic (Anglicized, Modern)
Fish Basket. The word Creel relates to Crille in Gaelic meaning weave.
CREEPINGBEAR     English (American, Rare)
Possibly taken from the English words creeping and bear.
CREESE     English
This most interesting surname has two possible origins. Firstly it may be of Anglo-Saxon origin, from the Olde English "creas", Middle English "crease", meaning "fine or elegant", which was a nickname given to an elegant person or one who dressed in fine or elegant clothes... [more]
CREMA     Italian, German
From the italian city "Crema"
CRENSHAW     English
The derivation of this surname is from the Old English pre 7th Century "Crawa", a crow, with "sceaga" a grove, thus "Crowswood". The earliest recording of this placename is in the Lancashire Inquests of 1324 and appears as "Croweshagh".
CRESS     German, Jewish, Belarusian
The maiden name of my Great Grandmother.... [more]
CRETE     French
French (adjectival form Crété ‘crested’): nickname for an arrogant individual, from Old French creste ‘crest (of a hill)’ (Late Latin crista), used with reference to the comb of a rooster... [more]
CREUS     Spanish
Variant of Cruz. Famous bearer of this surname is Spanish footballer Xavi Hernández.
CRIADO     Portuguese, Spanish
Occupational name from criado ‘servant’.
CRICKS     American
"living near a river." Comes from a similar origin of Rios
CRIPPEN     English
Variant of CRISPIN.
CRISPEN     English
Variant spelling of CRISPIN.
CRISPIN     English, French
From the Middle English, Old French personal name CRISPIN.
CRISTIANO     Italian
From the given name Cristiano.
CRNKOVIĆ     Croatian
Derived from crn "black". The name refers to a person who was dark-skinned, or a person from the region Crna Gora "Black Mountain" (modern-day Montenegro).
CROAKER     English
Meant "person from Crèvecoeur", the name of various places in northern France ("heartbreak", an allusion to the poverty of the local soil).
CROAN     Irish
Variant of Croghan.
CROCK     English
Meaning "barrel," signifying one who made or worked with barrels.
CROCKETT     English, Scottish
Nickname for someone who affected a particular hairstyle, from Middle English croket ''large curl'' (Old Norman French croquet, a diminutive of croque "curl", "hook").
CROCKETT     Scottish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Riocaird "son of RICHARD".
CROFTER     English
A surname of Scottish origin used in the Highlands and Islands and means “an owner or a tenant of a small farm”. The Old English word croft seems to correspond with the Dutch kroft meaning “a field on the downs”.
CROGHAN     Irish (Anglicized)
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Conchruacháin ‘son of Cú Cruacháin’, a personal name meaning ‘hound of Croghan’. Croghan in county Roscommon was the ancient royal site of the province of Connacht.
CRONIN     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Ó Cróinín.
CROOK     Scottish, English
Possible origin a medieval topographical surname, denoting residence from the Middle English word "crok" from the Old NOrse "Krokr". Possibly a maker or seller of hooks. Another possibility is meaning crooked or bent originally used of someone with a hunch back.
CROOKS     English
Patrynomic for Crook.
CROSSAN     Irish
Irish reduced form of McCrossen, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Chrosáin ‘son of the satirist’. Sometimes translated as 'bard' or 'storyteller.'
CROSTHWAITE     English
Means the clering of the cross
CROW     English
From Middle English crow, Old English crawa, applied as a nickname for someone with dark hair or a dark complexion or for someone thought to resemble the bird in some other way.
CROWLEY     Irish (Anglicized), English
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cruadhlaoich ‘descendant of Cruadhlaoch’, a personal name composed of the elements cruadh ‘hardy’ + laoch ‘hero’. ... [more]
CROWNER     English
Means "coroner" (from Anglo-Norman corouner "coroner", a derivative of Old French coroune "crown").
CROWTHER     English
Originally meant "person who plays the crowd (an ancient Celtic stringed instrument)". It was borne by British entertainer Leslie Crowther (1933-1996).
CROY     Irish (Anglicized)
A shortened form of the surname McRoy, from Irish Gaelic Mac Rúaidh "son of Rúadh", literally "the red one".
CROY     Scottish
Means "person from Croy", the name of various places in Scotland.
CROZIER     English, French
English and French occupational name for one who carried a cross or a bishop’s crook in ecclesiastical processions, from Middle English, Old French croisier.
CRUCHAGA     Basque (Castilianized)
Castilianized form of Krutxaga.
CRUIKSHANK     Scottish
From a medieval Scottish nickname for someone with a crooked leg (from Scots cruik "bent" + shank "leg"). This was the surname of British caricaturist George Cruikshank (1792-1872) and British actor Andrew Cruikshank (1907-1988).
CRUSOE     English (Rare)
According to Reaney and Wilson this name was taken to England by John Crusoe, a Huguenot refugee from Hownescourt in Flanders, who settled in Norwich.
CRUZAN     Dutch
Americanized spelling of CRUYSSEN.
CUA     Catalan
Nickname from Catalan cua meaning "tail".
CUADRO     Celtic (Latinized, Modern)
It refers to a work of art or a painting (picture, frame). It's very common in Portugal.
CUAYA     Asturian
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous parish of the municipality of Grau.
CUBA     Portugese, Asturian-Leonese, Galician, Spanish
habitational name from any of the places in Portugal (in the provinces of Alentejo and Beira Baixa) or Spain (in Aragon, Asturies, and Galicia) named Cuba, from cuba ‘barrel’ (from Latin cupa)... [more]
CUDA     Slovak
Derives from the word name derives from cuda meaning "miracle".
CUDAHY     Irish (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Ó Cuidighthigh.
CUDDIHY     Ancient Irish (Rare)
Ó’Cuidighthigh means descendant or grandson of the helpful one
CUENCA     Spanish
Cuenca is an ancient Spanish last name which originated from Cuenca, a city in the Kingdom of Castilla.... [more]
CUGINI     Italian (Rare)
Means "cousins" in Italian.
CULBERT     Anglo-Saxon, Irish, English, Scottish
Meaning and origin are uncertain. Edward MacLysaght (The Surnames of Ireland, 1999, 6th Ed., Irish Academic Press, Dublin, Ireland and Portland, Oregon, USA) states that this surname is of Huguenot (French Protestant) origin, and found mainly in Ireland's northern province of Ulster... [more]
CULBERTSON     English, Scottish, Northern Irish
Patronymic from Culbert.
CULLIMORE     English (Rare)
Apparently a habitational name from an unidentified place. There is a place called Colleymore Farm in Oxfordshire, but it is not clear whether this is the source of the surname, with its many variant spellings
CULLY     English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Colla meaning "descendant of Colla". The Old Irish name Colla was a variant of Conla (perhaps the same Connla).
CULPEPER     English
Variant of Culpepper. Known bearers of this surname include: Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1664), an English herbalist, physician and astrologer; and English colonial administrator Thomas Culpeper, 2nd Baron Culpeper (1635-1689), governor of Virginia 1680-1683... [more]
CULPEPPER     English
Means "person who collects, prepares and/or sells herbs and spices" (from Middle English cullen "to pick" + pepper).
CULVER     English
Means "person who keeps or looks after doves", or from a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a dove (e.g. in mild disposition) (in either case from Middle English culver "dove")... [more]
CULVÉRT     French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
CUMANI     Albanian
Meaning unknown.
CUMBERBATCH     English
Name for someone from Comberbach in North Cheshire. May come from etymological elements meaning "stream in a valley."
CUMBERLAND     English
Regional name for someone from Cumberland in northwestern England (now part of Cumbria).
CUMMING     Irish, Scottish, English
Perhaps from a Celtic given name derived from the element cam "bent", "crooked"
CUMMINGS     Irish
Variant of CUMMING
CUNDALL     English
This is an English surname, deriving from the village so-named in North Yorkshire. The village takes its name from the Cumbric element cumb meaning 'dale' (cognate with Welsh cwm, 'valley') and Old Norse dalr meaning 'valley', forming a compound name meaning 'dale-valley'.
CUNHA     Portuguese (Brazilian)
This name can mean either mean that your upper class or a coin maker. Cunha directly translates to "coin" or "wedge"
CUNLIFFE     English
Originally meant "person from Cunliffe", Lancashire ("slope with a crevice" (literally "cunt-cliff")).
CUNNIFF     Irish
From Irish Gaelic Mac Conduibh "son of Condubh", a personal name meaning literally "black dog".
CUOMO     Italian
Probably from a shortened form of Cuosëmo, a Neapolitan variant of the Italian male personal name Cosimo.
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