Submitted Surnames Starting with S

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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
SOUTHERN     English
Topographic name, from an adjectival derivative of South.
SOUTHWORTH     English
Means "southern enclosure".
SOUTOMAIOR     Galician
This indicates familial origin within the eponymous council in the Province of Pontevedra.
SOUZA     Portuguese
Name of the Balfager's (Visigoth family, part of the Iberian nobility) solar (realstate), later used as the family's surname; the name "Souza" comes from the Latin word "saxa" meaning "peeble".
SOVEREIGN     French
Translation of the French surname Souverain which is derived from Old French souverain meaning "high place".
SOVEREIGN     English
Occupational surname for a leader or supervisor, derived from the English word sovereign meaning "possessing supreme or ultimate power".
SOW     Wolof
SOWERBY     English
Habitational name from any places so-called in Northern England. Named from Old Norse saurr, 'mud, filth' and by, 'farm, estate'.
SOYDAN     Turkish (Modern)
Soy, "lineage, ancestry" and dan "from"; One who has come down from good ancestry (a good family)
SOYER     French
French surname (Alexis Benoist Soyer is a famous bearer).
SOZIO     Italian
Nickname from socio "companion", "ally".
ŠPAČEK     Czech
Means "tipcat". Pronounced "sh:pah-CZEK".
SPACEK     Polish
This is the surname of American actress Sissy Spacek (born December 25, 1949).
SPACKMAN     English
English variant of Speakman.
SPADAFORA     Italian
Variant form of Spatafora. Spadafora is the younger out of the two surnames and yet the most common of the two, which might partly be because it is a little bit more italianized. After all, spada is the modern Italian word for "sword", which indicates that Spadafora is 'closer' to Italian than Spatafora, which is closer to the original Greek origin instead (as the first element of the surname is derived from Greek spathe meaning "blade, sword").... [more]
SPALDING     English, Scottish
This surname originates as a locational surname (someone coming from Spalding in Lincolnshire) is derived from Old English Spaldingas, which may be a tribal name for members of the Spaldas tribe... [more]
SPARGO     Cornish
Cornish: habitational name from Higher or Lower Spargo, in the parish of Mabe, so named from Cornish spern ‘thorn bushes’ + cor ‘enclosure'.
SPARK     English, German
Northern English: from the Old Norse byname or personal name Sparkr ‘sprightly’, ‘vivacious’.... [more]
SPARROW     English
English: nickname from Middle English sparewe ‘sparrow’, perhaps for a small, chirpy person, or else for someone bearing some fancied physical resemblance to a sparrow.
SPARROW     English
Nickname from Middle English sparewe "sparrow", perhaps for a small, chirpy person, or else for someone bearing some fancied physical resemblance to a sparrow.
SPATAFORA     Italian
This surname originates from the Italian island of Sicily, where it was first borne by a noble family of Byzantine origin, which had settled on the island in the 11th century AD. Their surname was derived from the Greek noun σπάθη (spathe) "blade, sword" (akin to Latin spatha "broad sword with a double edge") combined with Greek φορεω (phoreo) "to carry, to bear", which gives the surname the meaning of "he who carries the sword" or "sword-bearer"... [more]
SPAULDING     English (British)
Variant spelling of Spalding.
SPEAKMAN     English
English (chiefly Lancashire) nickname or occupational name for someone who acted as a spokesman, from Middle English spekeman ‘advocate’, ‘spokesman’ (from Old English specan to speak + mann ‘man’).
SPECK     German
Variant of Specker as well as a locational surname from one of various places called Speck, Specke and Specken in northern Germany and Spöck in southern Germany, as well as an occupational surname derived from German Speck "bacon" denoting a butcher who sepcialized in the production of bacon, as well as a derisive nickname for a corpulent person.
SPECTOR     Jewish
Occupational name from Polish szpektor "teacher's assistant in a Jewish school", a derivative of Polish inspecktor "supervisor".
SPEE     ?
SPEIER     Ancient Germanic
Habitational name from Speyer.
SPEKTOR     Jewish, Russian
Variant of Spector.
SPENCE     English, Scottish
Metonymic occupational name for a servant employed in the pantry of a great house or monastery, from Middle English spense "larder", "storeroom" (a reduced form of Old French despense, from a Late Latin derivative of dispendere, past participle dispensus, "to weigh out or dispense").
SPENDLOVE     English
From a medieval nickname for someone who spread their amorous affections around freely. A different form of the surname was borne by Dora Spenlow, the eponymous hero's "child-wife" in Charles Dickens's 'David Copperfield' (1849-50).... [more]
SPENS     Scottish
Variant of SPENCE.
SPERLICH     German
SPERO     Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Spiro.
SPEZIALI     Italian
Variant of Speziale.
SPICER     English, Jewish, Polish
English: occupational name for a seller of spices, Middle English spic(i)er (a reduced form of Old French espicier, Late Latin speciarius, an agent derivative of species ‘spice’, ‘groceries’, ‘merchandise’).... [more]
SPIEGEL     German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of mirrors, from Middle High German spiegel, German Spiegel "mirror" (via Old High German from Latin speculum, a derivative of specere "to look").
SPIEGLER     German, Jewish
Occupational name for a maker or seller of mirrors, from Middle High German spiegel, German Spiegel "mirror" and the agent suffix -er.
SPIEK     Dutch
SPIELBERG     Jewish, German
From Old High German spiegel "lookout point" or German Spiel "game, play" and berg "mountain". Locational surname after a town in Austria. A famous bearer is American director Steven Spielberg (1946-present).
SPIES     German
While it translates to the plural of "spy" in English, Spies is a semi-common name found throughout Germany and the surrounding nations. This surname is also popular throughout states with a high German population.
SPILLANE     Irish
Irish: reduced form O’Spillane, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Spealáin or ‘descendant of Spealán’, a personal name representing a diminutive of "speal" "‘scythe’". Compare Smullen... [more]
SPILLMAN     English
From the medieval male personal name Spileman, literally "acrobat" or "jester" (from a derivative of Middle English spillen "to play, cavort").
SPINA     American
Means "Thorn" in Latin.
SPINAZZOLA     Italian
From a place named Spinazzola in Italy.
SPINDLER     English, German, Jewish
Occupational name for a spindle maker, from an agent derivative of Middle English spindle, Middle High German spindel, German Spindel, Yiddish shpindl "spindle, distaff".
SPÍNOLA     Portuguese
Portuguese topographic name from a diminutive of espinha ‘thorn’, ‘thorn bush’.
SPINOLA     Italian
Italian (Liguria) diminutive of Spina. Italian topographic name for someone living by Monte Spinola in the province of Pavia.
SPINSTER     American (Rare)
A presumably extinct English occupational name, derived from the occupation of spinning.
Possibly from the Greek given name Spiridon.
SPITZ     German, Yiddish
From the German spitz "point", referring to a person who lives near a pointy hill or a field that is pointed at one end.
SPLAIN     Irish
Irish: reduced form of Spillane.
SPOHR     German
Occupational name for a maker of spurs, from Middle High German spor ‘spur’, or a topographic name, from Middle High German spor ‘spoor’, ‘animal tracks’.... [more]
SPOKONY     Russian (Anglicized, ?)
comes from the english version of the pronunciation of the Russian word for calm
SPOON     English
Apparently a metonymic occupational name either for a maker of roofing shingles or spoons, from Old English spon "chip, splinter" (see also Spooner).
SPRADLIN     English (British)
Originally Spradling, mean one who spreads seed
SPRAGUE     English
English from northern Middle English Spragge, either a personal name or a byname meaning "lively", a metathesized and voiced form of "spark."
SPRING     German
From Middle High German sprinc, Middle Low German sprink "spring, well", hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a spring or well, or habitational name from Springe near Hannover.
SPRINGALL     English
Means (i) "operator of a springald (a type of medieval siege engine)" (from Anglo-Norman springalde); or (ii) from a medieval nickname for a youthful person (from Middle English springal "youth").
SPRINGER     German, English, Dutch, Jewish
Nickname for a lively person or for a traveling entertainer. It can also refer to a descendant of Ludwig der Springer (AKA Louis the Springer), a medieval Franconian count who, according to legend, escaped from a second or third-story prison cell by jumping into a river after being arrested for trying to seize County Saxony in Germany.
SPURGEON     English
Unexplained meaning.
SPURRELL     English (British, Rare)
Most likely from a place called Spirewell in southern Devon.
SPURRILL     English (British, Rare)
Most likely from a place called Spirewell in southern Devon.
SQUIRE     English
Surname comes from the occupation of a Squire. A young man who tends to a knight.
SQUIRES     English
Surname is plural of Squire. A young person that tends to his knight, also someone that is a member of a landowner class that ranks below a knight.
SRINIVASAN     Indian, Tamil
Tamil variant of Shrinivas.
Derived from Thai ศรี (sǐi) meaning “glory, majesty, splendour” combined with สุวรรณ (sù-wan) meaning “gold, golden”.
SRIVASTAV     Indian, Hindi, Nepali, Punjabi, Telugu
Variant transcription of Shrivastav.
SRIVASTAVA     Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Punjabi, Nepali, Kannada
Variant transcription of Shrivastav.
SROKA     Polish
From the Polish word sroka, meaning "magpie".
STAAL     Dutch (Modern)
From Middle High German stal meaning "steel". May have been a occupational name, for a steelworker or blacksmith.
From Middle High German stet meaning "place", "town" + müller meaning "miller", hence an occupational name for a miller who ground the grain for a town.
STÅHL     Swedish
Variant of Stål.
STAHL     German
Metonymic occupational name for a smith or armorer, from Middle High German stal "steel, armor".
STÄHLE     German
Variant of Stahl.
STÅL     Swedish
Means "steel" in Swedish.
STÅLBERG     Swedish
Combination of Swedish stål "steel" and berg "mountain".
STALEY     English
Byname from Middle English staley "resolute, reliable", a reduced form of Stallard.
STALEY     Belgian French
From Old French estalee "fish trap", hence possibly a metonymic occupational name for a fisherman, or topographic name for someone who lived near where fish traps were set.
STÅLHAMMAR     Swedish
Means "Steel Hammer" (From Swedish stål "steel" and hammare "hammer"). Was originally a name common among blacksmiths.
STALIN     Russian
Derived from the Russian word сталь meaning "steel". It is the alias surname of Ioseb Jughashvili, more commonly known as Joseph Stalin, former dictator of the Soviet Union.
STALLARD     English
Byname for a valiant or resolute person, from a reduced pronunciation of Middle English stalward, stalworth "stalwart" (an Old English compound of stǣl "place" and wierðe "worthy").
STALLINGS     German
STALLMAN     German
Variant of Staller. German: topographic name for someone who lived in a muddy place, from the dialect word stal. English: habitational name from Stalmine in Lancashire, named probably with Old English stæll 'creek', 'pool' + Old Norse mynni 'mouth'.
STALTON     English
can not find a meaning to my name anywhere.
STA MARIA     Spanish
Means "St. Mary"
STAMBOULI     Arabic (Maghrebi)
Means "from Istanbul" (chiefly Algerian and Tunisian).
STANASILA     Romanian
Meaning unknown.
STANCEL     German
Probably an altered spelling of Stancil or possibly of German Stenzel.
STANCIL     English
English habitational name from a place so named in South Yorkshire.
STANDFUß     German
It literally means "pedestal".
STANFORD     English
Olde English pre 7th Century "stan", stone, and "ford", ford; hence, "stony ford".
STANG     German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German stang, German Stange ‘pole’, ‘shaft’, hence a nickname for a tall, thin person, a metonymic occupational name for a maker of wooden shafts for spears and the like, or a metonymic occupational name for a soldier.
STANIĆ     Croatian, Serbian
Means "son of STANKO".
STANIKZAI     Pashto
Of unknown meaning. The Stanikzai are a Pashtun tribe in Afghanistan.
STANISLAW     Polish, German
Polish from the personal name Stanislaw, composed of the Slavic elements stani ‘become’ + slav ‘glory’, ‘fame’, ‘praise’. This surname is well established in German-speaking lands.
Coming from any of the towns Stanisławów, Stanisławice, etc.. in Poland.
STANKOVIĆ     Serbian, Croatian
A common surname derived from the South Slavic masculine given name Stanko.... [more]
STANNARD     English
From the medieval personal name Stanhard, literally "stone-strong" or "stone-brave".
STANSFIELD     English (British)
Habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire, probably named with the genitive case of the Old English personal name Stan "stone" and Old English feld "pasture, open country". It may also be a topographic name from Middle English stanesfeld "open country of the (standing) stone"... [more]
STANTZ     German
Possibly an altered spelling of German Stanz, a habitation name from places called Stans or Stanz in Austria and Switzerland (see also Stentz).
STAPLEFORD     English
Habitational name from any of a number of places, in Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, and Wiltshire, so named from Old English stapol meaning "post" + ford meaning "ford".
STAPLETON     English
Habitational surname from any of various places in England.
STAR     German, Dutch, Jewish, English
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname from German Star, Middle High German star, ‘starling’, probably denoting a talkative or perhaps a voracious person.... [more]
STARBUCK     English
After Starbeck village in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England. A famous bearer of this name was the fictional character, Starbuck, the first mate of the Pequod in Herman Melville's novel Moby-Dick.
STARČEVIĆ     Croatian
Means "son of an old man" from star "old".
STARCZEWSKI     Polish (Rare)
It indicates origin in either a place named Starczewo or Starczewice.
STARLING     English
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a starling, especially in constantly chattering.
STARRATT     Scottish
Variant of Starrett.
START     English
Habitational name from any of the various minor places named from Old English steort "tail".
ŠŤASTNÝ     Czech, Slovak
From the word, meaning "happy".
STATE     German
Nickname from Middle High German stæt(e) meaning "firm", "steadfast", "constant".
STAUB     German (Swiss), German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) occupational nickname for a miller, from Middle High German stoup, German Staub ‘dust’. The Jewish surname may also be ornamental.
STAUCH     German
From Middle High German stuche, a term used to denote both a type of wide sleeve and a headcovering. Also a habitational name from a place called Staucha, near Dresden.
STAUFFER     German
This surname refers either to various towns named Stauffen or else it might be derived from Middle High German stouf "high rock/cliff/crag".
STAVIG     Norwegian
Combination of Old Norse stafr "pole" and vik "bay". This was the name of a farmstead in Norway.
STAVONIN     Russian
Originally Stavnin (shutter-maker), Stavonin resulted from an incorrect spelling that stuck (for over a hundred years)... [more]
STAWELSKI     Polish
Comes from a combination of the two personal names Paweł and Stanley, "Staweł" with the suffix -ski
STAY     English, American
Possibly related to the word Stay, or a nickname for Stanley.
ST CLAIR     French, English
From the place name St CLAIR
STEACY     English
Variant of Stacy.
STEEL     English
Variant of Steele.
STEELWORKER     English (Rare)
Modern version of Smith, meaning "someone who works with steel". Comes from the occupation Steel Worker .
ȘTEFĂNESCU     Romanian
Patronymic Romanian surname taken from the name Ștefăn, ultimately meaning "Descendant of Ștefăn".
STEFANI     Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Stefano.
Comes from the personal name Stefan.
Means "son of Stefan".
Means "son of Stefan".
STEFAŃSKI     Polish
Habitational name for someone from Stefanów or Stefanowo, named with the personal name Stefan.
STEFKOVIC     Slovak
Possibly means 'son of Stefko', judging by the fact that Slavic suffixes such as '-ovich' and '-ovic' mean '(name)'s son'.
STEGALL     German
Grandmother marian name
STEGER     German
Means "head miner" or "overman" from the German verb "steigen" meaning "to climb" or in this case "to lead a climb".
STEGER     German
From a derivative of Middle High German stec "steep path or track, narrow bridge". The name was likely given to someone living close to a path or small bridge.
STEHLÍK     Czech
It's from goldfinch
STEHR     German
From Middle High German ster ‘ram’, hence probably a nickname for a lusty person, or possibly a metonymic occupational name for a shepherd.
STEINAUER     Medieval German
Dweller at or near a stone or rock, often a boundary mark; one who came from Stein, in Germany and Switzerland; descendant of Staino or Stein ("stone").... [more]
STEINBACH     German, Jewish
German habitational name from any of the many places named Steinbach, named with Middle High German stein ‘stone’ + bach ‘stream’, ‘creek’. ... [more]
STEINBECK     German
Denotes a person hailing from one of the many places in Germany called Steinbeck or Steinbach, from Middle High German stein "stone" and bach "stream, creek". In some cases it is a South German occupational name for a mason... [more]
STEINBERG     German
From stony mountain. From "stein" meaning stone, and "berg" meaning mountain.
STEINER     German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): occupational name for someone who worked with stone: a quarry-man, stone-cutter, or stonemason; an agent derivative of Stein. Also can be a topographic name for someone who lived on stony ground or near a prominent outcrop of rock.
STEINMETZ     German, Jewish
Occupational name from Middle High German steinmetze, German steinmetz "stonemason", "worker in stone".
STEJSKAL     Czech
Stejskal means "he did complains" in Czech.
STELTER     German
nickname for a disabled person; from Middle Low German stelte, stilt "wooden leg"
STEM     German
Tis is my Surname, of German ancestry.
STEMLE     English
STEMPFER     German
Derived from occupation means 'Stump remover'
STENSETH     Norwegian
habitational name from any of numerous farmsteads, notably in eastern Norway, named Steinset, from either the noun stein ‘stone’ or the same word as a personal name + set ‘farmstead’.... [more]
STENT     English (Archaic)
Derived from the Old Norse name Steinn meaning "stone". Recorded in several forms including Stein, Steen, Stone and Ston, this surname is english. It is perhaps not surprisingly one of the first recorded surnames anywhere in the world.... [more]
STENZEL     German
German from a reduced pet form of the Slavic personal name Stanislaw (see Stencel, Stanislaw).
STEPANIAN     Armenian (Expatriate)
Variant transcription of Stepanyan used by Armenians living outside of Armenia.
STEPANKOV     Russian
Means "son of Stepan".
STEPANOV     Serbian, Russian
Means "son of Stepan".
STEPANOVICH     Ukrainian
Patronymic from the personal name Stepan.
STEPANYAN     Armenian
Means "son of Stepan".
Means "son of Stephan or Stephen".
STERIN     ?
STERKEN     Dutch, English
Means "strong". Derived either from the Old English term sterċan, meaning "to make rigid", or from the Old Saxon sterkian and Old High German sterken, both meaning "to strengthen."
STERNKE     Low German (Rare, ?)
From the German word or surname Stern meaning "star" and the Low German diminutive "-ke". The exact origins of this surname are unknown.
STERRETT     Scottish
Variant of Starrett.
STETSON     English
Of unknown origin and meaning, though likely English.
STEVEN     Scottish, English, Dutch, North German
From the personal name Steven, a vernacular form of Latin Stephanus, Greek Stephanos "crown". This was a popular name throughout Christendom in the Middle Ages, having been borne by the first Christian martyr, stoned to death at Jerusalem three years after the death of Christ... [more]
ST FLEUR     Haitian Creole
From the French place name St Fleur.
STICKMAN     English (Canadian)
The Origin for the surname Stickman comes from the YouTube series Iron Hand character "Tim Stickman" and his wife (season 3) his kids (season 4) and parents (all seasons) made in 2016 and premiering in 2017.
STIFF     English (American)
Used sometimes as a derogatory term, stiff means uptight. It is used in a surname in American culture as well as in the media, such as novels, movies or tv shows.
STIFT     Dutch
STILINSKI     Polish (?)
The last name of one of the characters from the Teen Wolf 1980s movie and the MTV show, Stiles Stilinski.
STINCHCOMB     English
Habitational name from Stinchcombe in Gloucestershire, recorded in the 12th century as Stintescombe, from the dialect term stint meaning "sandpiper" + cumb meaning "narrow valley".
STINSON     English, Scottish
This is one of the many patronymic forms of the male given name Stephen, i.e. son of Stephen. From these forms developed the variant patronymics which include Stim(p)son, Stenson, Steenson, and Stinson.
STIPIĆ     Croatian, Serbian
Means "son of Stipe".
STIRRETT     Scottish
Variant of Starrett, probably via Sterrett (since that would better explain the sound transformation).
STIRRUP     English (British)
Originated in Merseyside, England.
ST LEGER     Irish, English
Anglo-Irish surname, from one of the places in France called Saint-Léger, which were named in honour of St. Leodegar.
STLOUIS     French
Habitational name from any of several places named with a religious dedication to a St. Louis.
STOCK     Medieval English
English: A topographic name for someone who lived near the trunk or stump of a large tree, Middle English Stocke (Old English Stocc). In some cases the reference may be to a primitive foot-bridge over a stream consisting of a felled tree trunk... [more]
STOCKARD     Scottish Gaelic, Dutch
Scottish: occupational name for a trumpeter, Gaelic stocaire, an agent derivative of stoc ‘Gaelic trumpet’. The name is borne by a sept of the McFarlanes.... [more]
STOCKDALE     English
Habitational name from a place in Cumbria and North Yorkshire, England. Derived from Old English stocc "tree trunk" and dæl "valley".
STOCKE     English
English: A topographic name for someone who lived near the trunk or stump of a large tree, Middle English Stocke (Old English Stocc). In some cases the reference may be to a primitive foot-bridge over a stream consisting of a felled tree trunk... [more]
STOCKLEY     English
Derived from Old english stocc (tree bark) and leah (clearing), indicating that the original bearer of this name lived in a wooded clearing.
STOCKTON     English
Habitational surname for a person from any of the places (e.g. Cheshire, County Durham, Hertfordshire, Norfolk, Shropshire, Warwickshire, Wiltshire, Worcestershire, and North and West Yorkshire) so called from Old English stocc "tree trunk" or stoc "dependent settlement" + tun "enclosure", "settlement".
STOEHR     German
From Middle Low German store ‘sturgeon’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who caught or sold sturgeon, or a nickname for someone with some supposed resemblance to the fish... [more]
STOGDILL     English
Possibly a variant of STOCKDALE.
STOHOKE     Irish
Gaelic name that originated in Ireland.
STOHR     German
North German (Stöhr): see Stoehr.... [more]
STOIANOV     Bulgarian
Variant transcription of Stoyanov.
STOJČEV     Macedonian, Bulgarian
Means "son of Stojan".
STOK     Polish
STOKE     English
Derived from Old English stoc "place".
STOKELY     English
Variation of Stockley.
STOKER     Dutch (Modern)
A Stoker is (or was) someone who stokes (tends to) fires, coals, or furnaces.
STOKES     Irish, Scottish
Variant of Stoke and Stohoke... [more]
STOLARSKI     Polish
Derivative of Stolarz "carpenter" "joiner", with the addition of the common suffix of surnames -ski.
STOLINSKI     Belarusian
This indicates familial origin within the town of Stólin.
STOLLER     German, Jewish, English
Habitational surname for someone from a place called Stolle, near Zurich (now called Stollen).... [more]
A man from Stoll, a province of Germany.
STOLT     Swedish
Swedish soldier name meaning "proud". ... [more]
STOLTENBERG     German, Norwegian
Habitational name from places so called in Pomerania and Rhineland. A famous bearer is Jens Stoltenberg (b. 1959), Prime Minister of Norway 2000-2001 and 2005-2013.
Topographic name for someone who lived by a paved road, in most cases a Roman road, from Middle English stane, stone, "stone" and street "paved highway", "Roman road".
STORCH     German, Jewish
From Middle High German storch "stork", hence a nickname for someone thought to resemble the bird.
STORCK     German
German. from the meaning the House of the Storks. ... [more]
STOREY     English
From the Old Norse nickname Stóri, literally "large man". A literary bearer is British novelist and playwright David Storey (1933-).
STORM     English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian (Rare)
Nickname for a man of blustery temperament, from Middle English, Middle Low German, storm, Old Norse stormr meaning "storm".
STORMO     Norwegian
Habitational name from any of numerous farmsteads, notably in northern Norway, so named from stor meaning "big" + mo meaning "moor", "heath".
STOUT     Scottish, English
Probably a nickname for a brave or powerfully built man, from Middle English stout ‘steadfast’. A contrary origin derives from the Old Norse byname Stútr ‘gnat’, denoting a small and insignificant person.
STOWELL     English
A locational name from various places in England called Stowell
ST PETER     English
Originally from French Canadian immigrants. It was the closest translation to Saint Pierre.... [more]
STRACHAN     Scottish
Scottish habitational name from a place in the parish of Banchory, Kincardineshire, which is first recorded in 1153 in the form Strateyhan, and is perhaps named from Gaelic srath ‘valley’ + eachain, genitive case of eachan ‘foal’.
STRAIGHT     English
Nickname from Middle English streʒt "straight, upright", presumably applied in either a literal or a figurative sense.
STRAIT     English
Variant of Straight.
STRAKA     Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak: Nickname from straka ‘magpie’, probably for a thievish or insolent person.... [more]
STRANDBERG     Swedish
Combination of Swedish strand meaning "beach" and berg meaning "mountain".
STRANG     English
Originally given as a nickname to one who possessed great physical strength.
Means "person from Strangeways", Greater Manchester ("strong current").
Ornamental name composed of German Strasse "street" and Berg "mountain, hill".
STRASSMANN     German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone living on a main street, from Middle High German strasse, German Strasse "street, road" and man "man".
STRATTON     English
English: habitational name from any of various places, in Bedfordshire, Dorset, Hampshire, Norfolk, Oxfordshire, Somerset, Suffolk, Surrey, and Wiltshire, so named from Old English str?t ‘paved highway’, ‘Roman road’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’... [more]
STRAUGHAN     English
Northern English (Northumbria and the Northeast) variant of Scottish Strachan.
STRAUS     German, Jewish
Variant of STRAUSS
STRAUSS     German, Jewish
From the German word strauß, meaning "ostrich." In its use as a Jewish surname, it comes from the symbol of the building or family that the bearer occupied or worked for in the Frankfurter Judengasse... [more]
STRAWBERRY     English (American, Rare)
Possibly from the name of the fruit, or from any of the various places named Strawberry in the US.
STRAWBRIDGE     English (American)
Someone who built bridges as a living.
STRAZDIŅŠ     Latvian
Derived from the name strazds meaning "starling".
STRAZDS     Latvian
Literally means "blackbird".
STREAM     English
English topographic name for someone who lived beside a stream, Middle English streme. Americanized form of Swedish Ström or Danish Strøm (see Strom).
STREETER     English
English (Sussex) topographic name for someone living by a highway, in particular a Roman road (see Street).
STRETE     English
Strete is derived from Old English "Straet" which, in turn is derived from the latin "strata". This surname has spelling variants including, Streeter, Street, Straight, and Streeten. The first occurrences of this surname include Modbert de Strete of Devon (1100), AEluric de Streitun and his heir Roger (at the time of Henry de Ferrers) and Eadric Streona, Ealdorman of Mercia.
STRIBLING     English
From a medieval nickname for a youthful or inexperienced person (from Middle English stripling "youth").
STRID     Swedish
From the Swedish word stid meaning either "swift, rapid" or "battle, combat, fight".
STRIGL     German
Name given in 1056 a.d. Meaning- Keeper of the Royal Horses.
STRINDBERG     Swedish
Likely a combination of Strinne, the name of a village in Multrå parish, Ångermanland, Sweden, and berg "mountain". A well known bearer of this name was Swedish playwright and novelist August Strindberg (1849-1912).
STROH     English, German
Means "straw" when translated from German, indicating a thin man, a person with straw-colored hair, or a dealer of straw.
This indicates familial origin within the Lesser Polish village of Strojnów.
STROJNY     Polish
A nickname for a dandy; Elegant and Well-Dressed.
STRÖM     Swedish
Means "stream" in Swedish.
STRØM     Norwegian, Danish
Means "stream" in Norwegian and Danish. ... [more]
STRÖMBERG     Swedish
Swedish ornamental name. A combination of ström "stream" and berg "mountain".
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