Surnames Starting with S

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SAABArabic
Possibly from the Arabic given name SABAH.
SAARIFinnish
From Finnish saari meaning "island".
SABBADINItalian
From a nickname from Italian sabbato "Saturday", a name for one born on that day of the week.
SACCOItalian
Occupational name for a maker of sacks, from Italian sacco, Latin saccus.
SACHSGerman
Originally indicated a person from Saxony (German Sachsen). The region was named for the Germanic tribe of the Saxons, ultimately derived from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".
SACKVILLEEnglish
From the name of the Norman French town of Saqueneville.
SADIKTurkish
From the given name SADIK.
SADLEREnglish
Occupational name for a make of saddles, from Old English sadol "saddle".
SADOWSKIPolish
Denoted someone who lived in Sadowo, Sadowice or other places beginning with Polish sad "garden, orchard".
SAITOJapanese
Variant transcription of SAITOU.
SAITOUJapanese
From Japanese (sai) meaning "purification, worship" and (tou) meaning "wisteria". The latter character could indicate a connection to the Fujiwara clan.
SALAItalian, Spanish, Catalan, Romanian
Occupational name for a worker at a manor house, from the Romance word sala meaning "hall, large room", of Germanic origin.
SALAMANCASpanish
Originally indicated a person from Salamanca, a city in western Spain which is of unknown meaning.
SALAMONHungarian
Derived from the given name SALAMON.
SALAZARBasque
From Spanish sala meaning "hall" and Basque zahar meaning "old". It can also refer to the town of Salazar in Burgos, Spain, which is of the same origin.
SALCEDOSpanish
Derived from Latin salix meaning "willow tree". The name was originally given to one who lived near a willow tree.
SALIHOVIĆBosnian
Means "son of SALIH".
SALINASSpanish
Occupational name for a salt worker or someone who lived bear a salt works, from Spanish salina "salt works, salt mine", ultimately from Latin sal "salt".
SALLER (1)German
Originally denoted a person from the town of Sallern in Bavaria, possibly from a Celtic element meaning "stream".
SALLER (2)German
Denoted a person who lived by a prominent sallow tree, from Middle High German salhe "sallow tree".
SALMONEnglish, French
Derived from the given name SOLOMON.
SALOMONFrench, Jewish
Derived from the given name SALOMON.
SALUCCIItalian
From Italian sale meaning "salt".
SALVAGGIItalian
Italian form of SAVAGE.
SALVATICIItalian
Italian form of SAVAGE.
SALVIItalian
From the given name SALVO or SALVIO.
SALZWEDELGerman
Originally denoted a person from Salzwedel, Germany, which is of Old Saxon origin meaning "salt ford".
SAMARAArabic
Meaning unknown.
SAMPSONEnglish
Derived from a medieval form of the given name SAMSON.
SAMSEnglish
Derived from the given name SAMUEL.
SAMSAHungarian
Derived from a diminutive of the given name SÁMUEL.
SAMSONEnglish, French
Derived from the given name SAMSON.
SAMUELEnglish, French, German, Jewish
Derived from the given name SAMUEL.
SAMUELSEnglish
Derived from the given name SAMUEL.
SAMUELSONEnglish
Means "son of SAMUEL".
SÁNCHEZSpanish
Means "son of SANCHO".
SANCHEZSpanish
Americanized form of SÁNCHEZ.
SANDERGerman, Danish
Derived from the given name ALEXANDER.
SANDERSEnglish
Patronymic of the given name Sander, a medieval form of ALEXANDER.
SANDFORDEnglish
Indicated a person from Sandford, England, which means simply "sand ford".
SÁNDORHungarian
Derived from the given name SÁNDOR.
SANDOVALSpanish
Derived from the name of a town in Spain, ultimately from Latin saltus "forest, glade" and novalis "unploughed land".
SANDSEnglish
From Old English, indicated the original nearer lived on sandy ground.
SANGSTEREnglish, Scottish
Occupational name or nickname for a singer, from Old English singan "to sing, to chant".
SANNAItalian
From Italian sanna or zanna meaning "tusk, fang", a nickname for a person with a protruding tooth.
SAN NICOLÁSSpanish
Indicated the original bearer was from a place named after Saint NICHOLAS.
SANSONEItalian
Derived from the given name SANSONE.
SANTANASpanish, Portuguese
From any of the numerous places named after Saint ANNA.
SANTIAGOSpanish, Portuguese
From various Spanish and Portuguese places called SANTIAGO.
SANTINIItalian
Diminutive form of SANTO.
SANTOItalian
Italian form of SANTOS.
SANTOROItalian
Means "all saint's day" in Italian, a nickname for one born on that day.
SANTOSPortuguese, Spanish
Means "saint" in Portuguese and Spanish, ultimately from Latin sanctus. This was a nickanme for a pious person.
SAPIENTIItalian
Means "wise, learned" in Italian.
SAPPINGTONEnglish
Possibly from the city of Sapperton, England, derived from Old English sapere meaning "soap maker" and tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town".
SAQQAFArabic
From Arabic سقف (saqaf) meaning "roof".
SARGSYANArmenian
Means "son of SARGIS" in Armenian.
SARKAHungarian (Anglicized)
Americanized form of SZARKA.
SARKISIANArmenian
Variant transcription of SARGSYAN.
SARKISSIANArmenian
Variant transcription of SARGSYAN.
SARKISYANArmenian
Variant transcription of SARGSYAN.
SÁRKÖZIHungarian
Originally indicated someone from Sárköz, a region in Hungary, derived from sár "mud" and köz "margin, lane".
SARNOItalian
Originally denoted a person from Sarno in Italy, named for the Sarno River (called Sarnus in Latin).
SARTIItalian
Variant of SARTO.
SARTINIItalian
Diminutive form of SARTO.
SARTOItalian
Occupational name meaning "tailor" in Italian, from Latin sartor, from sarcire meaning "to mend".
SARTORItalian
Variant of SARTO.
SARTREFrench
French cognate of SARTO.
SASHungarian
Means "eagle" in Hungarian.
SASAKIJapanese
From Japanese (sa) meaning "help, aid" (repeated, indicated by the iteration mark ) and (ki) meaning "tree, wood".
SASSHungarian
Variant of SAS.
SASTRESpanish
Spanish cognate of SARTO.
SATOJapanese
Variant transcription of SATOU.
SATOUJapanese
From Japanese (sa) meaning "help, aid" and (tou) meaning "wisteria". The final character might indicate a connection to the Fujiwara clan. This is the most common surname in Japan.
SAUBERGerman
Means "clean, tidy" in German.
SAULTFrench
French cognate of SOTO.
SAUTERGerman
Occupational name for a cobbler, from Latin sutor "sewer, cobbler".
SAUVAGEFrench
French form of SAVAGE.
SAUVAGEAUFrench
French diminutive form of SAVAGE.
SAUVAGEONFrench
French diminutive form of SAVAGE.
SAUVAGEOTFrench
French diminutive form of SAVAGE.
SAUVETERREFrench
From the name of various towns in France, derived from French sauve "safe" and terre "land".
SAVAGEEnglish
English nickname meaning "wild, uncouth", derived from Old French salvage or sauvage meaning "untamed", ultimately from Latin silvaticus meaning "wild, from the woods".
SAVATIERFrench
From Old French savatier "shoemaker", derived from savate "shoe", of uncertain ultimate origin.
SAVONAItalian
From the name of the city of Savona in northern Italy, called Savo by the Romans, of uncertain meaning.
SAWYEREnglish
Occupational name meaning "sawer of wood, woodcutter" in Middle English, ultimately from Old English sagu meaning "saw". Mark Twain used it for the main character in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).
SAYERWelsh
From Welsh saer meaning "carpenter".
SAYLOREnglish
Occupational name meaning "acrobat, dancer", derived from Old French sailleor, from Latin sallitor.
SCARLETTEnglish
Denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet, a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat).
SCARPAItalian
Means "shoemaker" from Italian scarpa meaning "shoe".
SCARSIItalian
Nickname for a poor or miserly person, from Italian scarso "scarse, scant".
SCAVOItalian
Means "serf, slave", from Old Sicilian scavu.
SCHÄFERGerman
From Old High German scaphare meaning "shepherd".
SCHEINBERGJewish
Ornamental name meaning "beautiful mountain" from old German schön "beautiful" and berg "mountain".
SCHENKGerman, Dutch
From Middle High German, Middle Dutch schenke meaning "wine server" (from Old High German scenken "to pour out").
SCHERERGerman
Occupational name for a cutter of cloth or a sheep-shearer, from Old High German skeran "to cut".
SCHERMERDutch, Low German
Dutch and Low German form of SCHIRMER.
SCHINDLERGerman
Occupational name for a roof tiler, from Middle High German schindel "shingle". A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who saved over a thousand Polish Jews during World War II.
SCHIRMERGerman
Means "fencer, fencing master", from Old High German skirmen meaning "to defend".
SCHLENDERGerman
From Middle High German slinderen "to dawdle" or Middle Low German slinden "to swallow, eat".
SCHLIMMEGerman
From German schlimm "bad, crooked, awry".
SCHLOSSERGerman
Occupational name for a locksmith, derived from Old High German sloz meaning "lock".
SCHMELINGGerman
From Middle Low German smal meaning "small, slender".
SCHMIDTGerman
Occupational name derived from Middle High German smit "smith, metalworker", a cognate of SMITH.
SCHMITZGerman
Variant of SCHMIDT, originating in the Rhine area in western Germany.
SCHNEIDERGerman, Jewish
From German schneider or Yiddish shnayder, making it a cognate of SNYDER.
SCHNELLGerman
German cognate of SNELL.
SCHNURGerman, Jewish
From Old High German snuor meaning "rope, cord", an occupational name for a maker of rope.
SCHOOLDutch
From Dutch school, ultimately from Latin schola meaning "school", indicating a person who worked at or lived near a school.
SCHOORLDutch
Originally indicated a person from the town of Schoorl in the province of Noord-Holland in the Netherlands. It means "forest by the shore" in Dutch.
SCHÖTTMERGerman
Originally indicated a person from Schötmar, Germany (now part of the city of Bad Salzuflen in North Rhine-Westphalia).
SCHOVAJSACzech
Means "hide yourself", of Moravian origin.
SCHRECKGerman
From Middle High German schrecken meaning "to frighten, to scare".
SCHREIBERGerman
German cognate of SCRIVEN.
SCHREIERGerman, Jewish
Occupational name for a town crier, from Old High German scrian meaning "to shout, to yell".
SCHRIJNEMAKERSDutch
Occupational name for a cabinet maker, from Dutch schrijn "box, container" and maker "maker".
SCHRÖDER (1)Low German
Occupational name for a tailor, from Middle Low German schroden meaning "to cut".
SCHRÖTERGerman
Means "beer-porter, wine-porter" in German, an occupational name for a carrier of wine or beer barrels.
SCHUCHARDTGerman
From Middle High German schuochwürte meaning "shoemaker, cobbler".
SCHUHMACHERGerman
From the Middle High German occupational name schuochmacher meaning "shoemaker".
SCHULERGerman
Means "scholar, student" in German, ultimately from Latin schola meaning "school".
SCHULTLow German
Low German variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULTELow German
Low German variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULTHEIßGerman
Occupational name derived from Middle High German schultheiße meaning "mayor, judge".
SCHUSTERGerman
Means "shoemaker, cobbler", from Middle High German schuoch "shoe" and suter, from Latin sutor "sewer, cobbler".
SCHÜTTMANNGerman
Means "watchman, guard" from Middle High German schützen "to protect".
SCHUYLERDutch
Dutch form of SCHULER.
SCHWANGAUGerman
From the name of a town in southern Germany, possibly related to German Schwan meaning "swan".
SCHWARZGerman, Jewish
Means "black" in German, from Old High German swarz. It originally described a person with black hair or a dark complexion.
SCHWARZENBERGGerman
Means "black mountain" in German.
SCHWARZENEGGERGerman
From a place name, derived from Old High German swarz meaning "black" and ecka meaning "edge, corner". A famous bearer of this name is actor and politician Arnold Schwarzenegger (1947-).
SCHWEITZERGerman
Indicated a person from Switzerland (see SCHWEIZ).
SCHWENKE (1)German
Derived from Middle High German swenken meaning "to swing".
SCHWENKE (2)German
From a given name, a Low German diminutive of SWANHILD.
SCHWINGHAMMERGerman
Occupational name for a blacksmith, literally meaning "swing hammer" in German.
SCIACCAItalian
Originally denoted someone from Sciacca, Sicily, Italy, which is of uncertain origin.
SCIARRAItalian
From Sicilian sciarra meaning "quarrel, dispute", originally a nickname for a quarrelsome person.
SCOLAItalian
From Italian scuola meaning "school".
SCORDATOItalian
Means "forgotten, left behind" in Italian.
SCOTTEnglish, Scottish
Originally given to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic.
SCOTTIItalian
From the medieval given name Francescotto, a diminutive of FRANCESCO.
SCRIVENEnglish
Occupational name meaning "writer, clerk, scribe" in Old French, derived from Latin scriba.
SCULLYIrish
Anglicized form of Ó SCOLAIDHE.
SEABROOKEnglish
Denoted a person from a town by this name in Buckinghamshire, England. It is derived from that of a river combined with Old English broc "stream".
SEAVEREnglish
From the unattested Old English given name Sæfaru, derived from the Old English elements "sea, ocean" and faru "journey".
SEBASTIANIItalian
From the given name SEBASTIANO.
SEDLÁČEKCzech
Diminutive form of SEDLÁK.
SEDLÁKCzech
Means "farmer" in Czech. A sedlák had more land than a Zahradník or a Chalupník, but less land than a Dvořák.
SEEGERGerman
From the given name SIEGER.
SEEGERSDutch
Means "son of SIEGER".
SEELENDutch
Variant of CEELEN.
SEELENFREUNDJewish
From German Seele meaning "soul" and Freund meaning "friend".
SEGAL (1)Jewish
From the Hebrew phrase סגן לויה (segan Lewiyah) meaning "assistant Levite".
SEGAL (2)French
Occupational name for a grower or seller of rye, from Old French, from Latin secale "rye".
SEGERSDutch
Means "son of SIEGER".
SEGHERSDutch
Means "son of SIEGER".
SEGRETIItalian
From Italian segreto meaning "secret", a nickname for a confidant.
SEIDELGerman
From a diminutive of the given name SIEGFRIED.
SELBYEnglish
From the name of a village which meant "willow farm" in Old English.
SELVAGGIOItalian
Italian form of SAVAGE.
SEMPERSEnglish
From the name of various towns named Saint Pierre in Normandy, all of which commemorate Saint PETER.
SENFT (1)German
Occupational name for a mustard seller, from German Senf "mustard".
SENFT (2)German
Nickname for a helpful, kind person, from Old High German semfti meaning "soft, accommodating".
SENIOREnglish
Originally a name for the elder of two brothers.
SEPPÄFinnish
Means "smith" in Finnish.
SEPPÄNENFinnish
Patronymic form of SEPPÄ.
SEPÚLVEDASpanish
Derived from the name of the Sepúlveda Valley in the mountains of Segovia, and was originally used to denote people from that region. It is possibly derived from Spanish sepultar "to bury".
SERAFIMPortuguese
Derived from the Latin given name SERAPHINUS.
SERAFINPolish, Italian
Derived from the given name SERAFIN or SERAFINO.
SERAFINIItalian
Derived from the given name SERAFINO.
ȘERBANRomanian
Means "a Serb" in Romanian.
SERGEANTEnglish, French
Occupational name derived from Old French sergent meaning "servant", ultimately from Latin servire "to serve".
SERPICOItalian
From a nickname derived from Italian serpe "serpent, reptile".
SESSAItalian
Originally indicated a person from from Sessa or Sessa Cilento, Italy (from Latin Suessa, of uncertain meaning).
SESSIONSEnglish
From the name of the city of Soissons in northern France, itself derived from the name of the Celtic tribe of the Suessiones.
ŠEVČÍKCzech
Occupational name derived from Czech švec meaning "shoemaker, cobbler".
SEVERIJNSDutch
Derived from the Latin given name SEVERINUS.
SÉVERINFrench
Derived from the given name SÉVERIN.
SEVERINSDutch
Derived from the Latin given name SEVERINUS.
SEVRIENSDutch
Derived from the Latin given name SEVERINUS.
SEWARD (1)English
Derived from the given name SIGEWEARD.
SEWARD (2)English
Means "swineherd" from Old English su "sow, female pig" and hierde "herdsman, guardian".
SEWARD (3)Irish
Anglicized form of Ó SUAIRD.
SEXTONEnglish
Occupational name for a sexton (Middle English sexteyn), a caretaker for a church or graveyard.
SEYMOUR (1)English
From Saint Maur, a French place name, which commemorates Saint MAURUS.
SEYMOUR (2)English
From an English place name, derived from Old English "sea" and mere "lake".
SGROItalian
Nickname for a curly-haired person, from Greek σγουρος (sgouros) meaning "curly".
SHAFIRJewish
Ornamental name meaning "sapphire" in Yiddish.
SHAINJewish
Means "beautiful, handsome" in Yiddish, from German schön.
SHAKESPEAREEnglish
From a nickname for a warlike person, from Old English scacan "to shake" and spere "spear". A famous bearer was the English dramatist and poet William Shakespeare (1564-1616).
SHANNONIrish
From Irish Ó Seanáin which means "descendant of SEANÁN".
SHAPIROJewish
Means "pretty, lovely" in Hebrew, from Aramaic.
SHARMAIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Assamese, Gujarati, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Nepali
Means "joy, shelter, comfort" in Sanskrit.
SHARPEnglish
Nickname for a keen person, from Old English scearp "sharp".
SHARROWEnglish
Originally a name for someone from Sharrow, England, derived from Old English scearu "boundary" and hoh "point of land, heel".
SHAWEnglish
Originally given to a person who lived near a prominent thicket, from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket, copse".
SHEAIrish
Anglicized form of Ó SÉAGHDHA.
SHEACHScottish
From the Gaelic given name SÍTHEACH.
SHEAREREnglish
English cognate of SCHERER.
SHEEDYIrish
Anglicized form of Ó SÍODA.
SHEEHYIrish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic given name SÍTHEACH.
SHEHUAlbanian
From the Arabic title شيخ (shaykh) meaning "sheik".
SHEINFELDJewish
Ornamental name derived from German schön "fine, beautiful" and feld meaning "field".
SHELBYEnglish
Variant of SELBY.
SHELTONEnglish
From the name of various English towns, meaning "shelf town" in Old English.
SHEPARDEnglish
Occupational name meaning "shepherd, sheep herder", from Old English sceaphyrde.
SHERAZIUrdu
Urdu form of SHIRAZI.
SHERBURNEnglish
Denoted a person hailing from any of the various places called Sherborne or Sherburn in England, derived from Old English scir "bright" and burna "spring, fountain, stream".
SHERIDANIrish
From the Irish name Ó Sirideáin meaning "descendant of Sirideán". The given name Sirideán means "searcher".
SHERMAN (1)English
Means "shear man", referring to someone who used shears in his line of work, such as a sheep-shearer.
SHERMAN (2)Jewish
Means "tailor" in Yiddish, derived from שׁער (sher) "scissors".
SHIMIZUJapanese
From Japanese (shi) meaning "clear, pure, clean" and (mizu) meaning "water".
SHINE (1)English
Means "beautiful, attractive" from Old English sciene.
SHINE (2)Irish
Anglicized form of Ó SEIGHIN.
SHIRAZIPersian
Originally denoted someone who came from the city of Shiraz, located in southern Iran. The city's name is possibly of Elamite origin.
SHORTEnglish
From a nickname for a short person, from Middle English schort.
SHRIVERGerman
German cognate of SCRIVEN.
SHVETSUkrainian, Russian
Means "shoemaker" in Ukrainian and Russian.
SIDDALLEnglish
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English sid "wide" and halh "nook, recess".
SIDNEYEnglish
Originally derived from various place names in England meaning "wide island", from Old English sid "wide" and eg "island". Another theory holds that it comes from the name of a town in Normandy called "Saint DENIS", though evidence for this is lacking.
SIEBERTGerman
Derived from the given name SIEGBERT.
SIEGEL (1)German
Occupational name for a maker of seals or signet rings, ultimately from Latin sigillum "seal".
SIEGEL (2)German
Derived from the diminutive of Germanic given names beginning with the element sigu meaning "victory".
SIEGERGerman
From the given name SIEGER.
SIEGERTGerman
Derived from the given name SIEGHARD.
SIEKERTGerman (Rare)
Derived from the given name SIEGHARD.
SIEMONGerman
Variant of SIMON.
SIENAItalian
Indicated a person from Siena in Italy, which was named after the Gaulish tribe of the Senones.
SIENKIEWICZPolish
Patronymic from the given name Sienko, an old diminutive of SZYMON. This was the surname of the Polish writer Henryk Sienkiewicz (1846-1916).
SIERRASpanish
Originally indicated a dweller on a hill range or ridge, from Spanish sierra "mountain range", derived from Latin serra "saw".
SIERŻANTEnglish
Polish cognate of SERGEANT.
SIKORAPolish
Means "tit (bird)" in Polish.
SILJENorwegian
Derived from the given name SILJE.
SILVAPortuguese, Spanish
From Spanish or Portuguese silva meaning "forest".
SILVEIRAPortuguese
Means "forests" in Portuguese.
SILVEREnglish
From a nickname for a person with grey hair, from Old English seolfor "silver".
SILVESTRIItalian
Derived from the given name SILVESTER.
ŠIMEKCzech
Derived from the name Šimek, a diminutive of ŠIMON.
SIMENEnglish (Rare)
From the given name SIMON (1).
SIMEONOVBulgarian
Means "son of SIMEON".
SIMMONGerman
From the given name SIMON (1).
SIMMONSEnglish
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SIMMSEnglish
Derived from the medieval given name Sim, a short form of SIMON (1).
SIMÕESPortuguese
Means "son of SIMÃO" in Portuguese.
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