Submitted Surnames Starting with S

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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
SPECK German
Variant of Specker as well as a locational surname from one of various places called Speck, Specke and Specken in northern Germany and Spöck in southern Germany, as well as an occupational surname derived from German Speck "bacon" denoting a butcher who sepcialized in the production of bacon, as well as a derisive nickname for a corpulent person.
SPECTOR Jewish
Occupational name from Polish szpektor "teacher's assistant in a Jewish school", a derivative of Polish inspecktor "supervisor".
SPEIER Ancient Germanic
Habitational name from Speyer.
SPENDLOVE English
From a medieval nickname for someone who spread their amorous affections around freely. A different form of the surname was borne by Dora Spenlow, the eponymous hero's "child-wife" in Charles Dickens's 'David Copperfield' (1849-50).... [more]
SPENGLER German
Occupational surname literally meaning “metal worker” or “tin knocker”.
SPENS Scottish
Variant of SPENCE.
SPERING English
There is a fish in Germany or Austria names "Spering or Spiering fish" it is in the meat Isle of Germany orAustrian fish.... [more]
SPERO Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Spiro.
SPEZIA Italian
Means "spice, drug" in Italian. It was used to denote someone who worked as a spicer or apothecary.
SPICER English, Jewish, Polish
English: occupational name for a seller of spices, Middle English spic(i)er (a reduced form of Old French espicier, Late Latin speciarius, an agent derivative of species ‘spice’, ‘groceries’, ‘merchandise’).... [more]
SPIEGEL German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of mirrors, from Middle High German spiegel, German Spiegel "mirror" (via Old High German from Latin speculum, a derivative of specere "to look").
SPIEGLER German, Jewish
Occupational name for a maker or seller of mirrors, from Middle High German spiegel, German Spiegel "mirror" and the agent suffix -er.
SPIELBERG Jewish, German
From Old High German spiegel "lookout point" or German Spiel "game, play" and berg "mountain". Locational surname after a town in Austria. A famous bearer is American director Steven Spielberg (1946-present).
SPIER English
An English surname, meaning "the one who watches".
SPIES German
While it translates to the plural of "spy" in English, Spies is a semi-common name found throughout Germany and the surrounding nations. This surname is also popular throughout states with a high German population.
SPILLANE Irish
Irish: reduced form O’Spillane, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Spealáin or ‘descendant of Spealán’, a personal name representing a diminutive of "speal" "‘scythe’"... [more]
SPILLMAN English
From the medieval male personal name Spileman, literally "acrobat" or "jester" (from a derivative of Middle English spillen "to play, cavort").
SPINA American
Means "Thorn" in Latin.
SPINAZZOLA Italian
From a place named Spinazzola in Italy.
SPINDLER English, German, Jewish
Occupational name for a spindle maker, from an agent derivative of Middle English spindle, Middle High German spindel, German Spindel, Yiddish shpindl "spindle, distaff".
SPÍNOLA Portuguese
Portuguese topographic name from a diminutive of espinha ‘thorn’, ‘thorn bush’.
SPINOLA Italian
Italian (Liguria) diminutive of SPINA. Italian topographic name for someone living by Monte Spinola in the province of Pavia.
SPINSTER American (Rare)
A presumably extinct English occupational name, derived from the occupation of spinning.
SPIRIDOVICH Russian
Possibly from the Greek given name SPIRIDON.
SPITERI Maltese
The surname Spiteri is derived from the Latin word "hospitalieri" meaning hospitaliers. It was initially given to babies born to mothers who worked as nurses at the Knights' hospital during the 16th century where the babies' fathers were usually knights who had been treated at said hospital.
SPLAIN Irish
Irish: reduced form of SPILLANE.
SPOHR German
Occupational name for a maker of spurs, from Middle High German spor ‘spur’, or a topographic name, from Middle High German spor ‘spoor’, ‘animal tracks’.... [more]
SPOKONY Russian (Anglicized, ?)
comes from the english version of the pronunciation of the Russian word for calm
SPOON English
Apparently a metonymic occupational name either for a maker of roofing shingles or spoons, from Old English spon "chip, splinter" (see also SPOONER).
SPRADLIN English (British)
Originally Spradling, mean one who spreads seed
SPRAGUE English
English from northern Middle English Spragge, either a personal name or a byname meaning "lively", a metathesized and voiced form of "spark."
SPRENGER German
German form of the surname Springer
SPRING German
From Middle High German sprinc, Middle Low German sprink "spring, well", hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a spring or well, or habitational name from Springe near Hannover.
SPRINGALL English
Means (i) "operator of a springald (a type of medieval siege engine)" (from Anglo-Norman springalde); or (ii) from a medieval nickname for a youthful person (from Middle English springal "youth").
SPRINGBORN Low German
The surname goes back to the place of living of the first carrier of that surname in medieval times, who lived in the vicinity of a spring or water well. Springborn is of German origin, specifically Middle Low German... [more]
SPRINGBOURNE English (American)
American form of Springborn.
SPRINGER German, English, Dutch, Jewish
Nickname for a lively person or for a traveling entertainer. It can also refer to a descendant of LUDWIG der Springer (AKA LOUIS the Springer), a medieval Franconian count who, according to legend, escaped from a second or third-story prison cell by jumping into a river after being arrested for trying to seize County Saxony in Germany.
SPRINGFIELD English
Dusty Springfield 1939-1999
SPRY English
Was apparently a nickname for an active, brisk, or smart person. The word spry is of obscure origin.
SPURGEON English
Unexplained meaning.
SPURRELL English (British, Rare)
Most likely from a place called Spirewell in southern Devon.
SPURRILL English (British, Rare)
Most likely from a place called Spirewell in southern Devon.
SQUIRE English
Surname comes from the occupation of a Squire. A young man who tends to a knight.
SQUIRES English
Surname is plural of Squire. A young person that tends to his knight, also someone that is a member of a landowner class that ranks below a knight.
SRINIVASAN Indian, Tamil
Tamil variant of SHRINIVAS.
SRISUWAN Thai
Derived from Thai ศรี (sǐi) meaning "glory, majesty, splendour" combined with สุวรรณ (sù-wan) meaning "gold, golden".
SRIVASTAV Indian, Hindi, Nepali, Punjabi, Telugu
Variant transcription of SHRIVASTAV.
SRNA Croatian
Means ''doe''.
SROKA Polish
From the Polish word sroka, meaning "magpie".
STAAL Dutch (Modern)
From Middle High German stal meaning "steel". May have been a occupational name, for a steelworker or blacksmith.
STADTMUELLER German
From Middle High German stet meaning "place", "town" + müller meaning "miller", hence an occupational name for a miller who ground the grain for a town.
STÅHL Swedish
Variant of STÅL.
STAHL German
Metonymic occupational name for a smith or armorer, from Middle High German stahel "steel, armor".
STÄHLE German
Variant of STAHL.
STAHLER German
Occupational name for a foundry worker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German stal 'steel'.
STAHLING German (German, Modern, Rare)
Denoted a person who worked with steel. Derived from the name "Stähling", which was derived from "Stalin."
STÅL Swedish
Means "steel" in Swedish.
STÅLBERG Swedish
Combination of Swedish stål "steel" and berg "mountain".
STALEY English
Byname from Middle English staley "resolute, reliable", a reduced form of STALLARD.
STALEY Belgian
From Old French estalee "fish trap", hence possibly a metonymic occupational name for a fisherman, or topographic name for someone who lived near where fish traps were set.
STÅLHAMMAR Swedish
Means "Steel Hammer" (From Swedish stål "steel" and hammare "hammer"). Was originally a name common among blacksmiths.
STALIN Russian
Derived from the Russian word сталь meaning "steel". It is the alias surname of Ioseb Jughashvili, more commonly known as Joseph Stalin, former dictator of the Soviet Union.
STALLARD English
Byname for a valiant or resolute person, from a reduced pronunciation of Middle English stalward, stalworth "stalwart" (an Old English compound of stǣl "place" and wierðe "worthy").
STALLMAN German
Variant of Staller. German: topographic name for someone who lived in a muddy place, from the dialect word stal. English: habitational name from Stalmine in Lancashire, named probably with Old English stæll 'creek', 'pool' + Old Norse mynni 'mouth'.
STALTON English
can not find a meaning to my name anywhere.
STA MARIA Spanish
Means "St. Mary"
STAMBOULI Arabic (Maghrebi)
Means "from Istanbul" (chiefly Algerian and Tunisian).
STAN Romanian
Meaning uncertain. It might be taken directly from the Romanian name STAN (2).
STANASILA Romanian
Meaning unknown.
STANCEL German
Probably an altered spelling of STANCIL or possibly of German STENZEL.
STANCIL English
English habitational name from a place so named in South Yorkshire.
STANDFUß German
It literally means "pedestal".
STANG German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German stang, German Stange ‘pole’, ‘shaft’, hence a nickname for a tall, thin person, a metonymic occupational name for a maker of wooden shafts for spears and the like, or a metonymic occupational name for a soldier.
STANIĆ Croatian, Serbian
Means "son of STANKO".
STANIKZAI Pashto
Of unknown meaning. The Stanikzai are a Pashtun tribe in Afghanistan.
STANISLAW Polish, German
Polish from the personal name Stanislaw, composed of the Slavic elements stani ‘become’ + slav ‘glory’, ‘fame’, ‘praise’... [more]
STANISŁAWSKI Polish
Coming from any of the towns Stanisławów, Stanisławice, etc.. in Poland.
STANKOVIĆ Serbian, Croatian
A common surname derived from the South Slavic masculine given name STANKO.... [more]
STANNARD English
From the medieval personal name Stanhard, literally "stone-strong" or "stone-brave".
STANSFIELD English (British)
Habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire, probably named with the genitive case of the Old English personal name STAN "stone" and Old English feld "pasture, open country"... [more]
STANTZ German
Possibly an altered spelling of German Stanz, a habitation name from places called Stans or Stanz in Austria and Switzerland (see also Stentz).
STAPLEFORD English
Habitational name from any of a number of places, in Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, and Wiltshire, so named from Old English stapol meaning "post" + ford meaning "ford".
STAPLETON English
Habitational surname from any of various places in England.
STAR German, Dutch, Jewish, English
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname from German Star, Middle High German star, ‘starling’, probably denoting a talkative or perhaps a voracious person.... [more]
STARBUCK English
After Starbeck village in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England. A famous bearer of this name was the fictional character, Starbuck, the first mate of the Pequod in Herman Melville's novel Moby-Dick.
STARČEVIĆ Croatian
Means "son of an old man" from star "old".
STARCZEWSKI Polish (Rare)
It indicates origin in either a place named Starczewo or Starczewice.
STARLING English
From a medieval nickname for someone thought to resemble a starling, especially in constantly chattering.
START English
Habitational name from any of the various minor places named from Old English steort "tail".
ŠŤASTNÝ Czech, Slovak
From the word, meaning "happy".
STATE German
Nickname from Middle High German stæt(e) meaning "firm", "steadfast", "constant".
STAUB German (Swiss), German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) occupational nickname for a miller, from Middle High German stoup, German Staub ‘dust’. The Jewish surname may also be ornamental.
STAUBER German, Jewish
An occupational name from STAUB, with the addition of the German agent suffix -er.
STAUCH German
From Middle High German stuche, a term used to denote both a type of wide sleeve and a headcovering. Also a habitational name from a place called Staucha, near Dresden.
STAUFFER German
This surname refers either to various towns named Stauffen or else it might be derived from Middle High German stouf "high rock/cliff/crag".
STAVIG Norwegian
Combination of Old Norse stafr "pole" and vik "bay". This was the name of a farmstead in Norway.
STAVONIN Russian
Originally Stavnin (shutter-maker), Stavonin resulted from an incorrect spelling that stuck (for over a hundred years)... [more]
STAWELSKI Polish
Comes from a combination of the two personal names PAWEŁ and STANLEY, "Staweł" with the suffix -ski
STAY English, American
Possibly related to the word Stay, or a nickname for STANLEY.
ST CLAIR French, English
From the place name St CLAIR
STEACY English
Variant of Stacy.
STEAD English
Dweller at the homestead.
STEEL English
Variant of STEELE.
STEELWORKER English (Rare)
Modern version of SMITH, meaning "someone who works with steel". Comes from the occupation Steel Worker .
ȘTEFĂNESCU Romanian
Patronymic Romanian surname taken from the name Ștefăn, ultimately meaning "Descendant of Ștefăn".
STEFANI Italian
Patronymic or plural form of STEFANO.
STEFANIAK Czech
Comes from the personal name Stefan.
STEFANOPOULOS Greek
Means "son of STEFAN".
STEFANOWICZ Polish
Means "son of STEFAN".
STEFAŃSKI Polish
Habitational name for someone from Stefanów or Stefanowo, named with the personal name STEFAN.
STEFKOVIC Slovak
Possibly means 'son of Stefko', judging by the fact that Slavic suffixes such as '-ovich' and '-ovic' mean '(name)'s son'.
STEGALL German
Grandmother marian name
STEGER German
Means "head miner" or "overman" from the German verb "steigen" meaning "to climb" or in this case "to lead a climb".
STEGER German
From a derivative of Middle High German stec "steep path or track, narrow bridge". The name was likely given to someone living close to a path or small bridge.
STEHLÍK Czech
It's from goldfinch
STEHR German
From Middle High German ster ‘ram’, hence probably a nickname for a lusty person, or possibly a metonymic occupational name for a shepherd.
STEIER German
Variant of STEIGER.
STEIERT German
Variant of STEIGER and STEIER.
STEIGER German
Occupational name from Middle High German stiger 'foreman', 'mine inspector'
STEINAUER Medieval German
Dweller at or near a stone or rock, often a boundary mark; one who came from Stein, in Germany and Switzerland; descendant of Staino or STEIN ("stone").... [more]
STEINBACH German, Jewish
German habitational name from any of the many places named Steinbach, named with Middle High German stein ‘stone’ + bach ‘stream’, ‘creek’. ... [more]
STEINBECK German
Denotes a person hailing from one of the many places in Germany called Steinbeck or Steinbach, from Middle High German stein "stone" and bach "stream, creek". In some cases it is a South German occupational name for a mason... [more]
STEINBERG German
From stony mountain. From "stein" meaning stone, and "berg" meaning mountain.
STEINER German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): occupational name for someone who worked with stone: a quarry-man, stone-cutter, or stonemason; an agent derivative of STEIN. Also can be a topographic name for someone who lived on stony ground or near a prominent outcrop of rock.
STEINMETZ German, Jewish
Occupational name from Middle High German steinmetze, German steinmetz "stonemason", "worker in stone".
STEINWEDEL German
From the German word "stein" and "wedel" which mean "stone frond", which was a name given to someone who lived near a stone wall covered in plants.
STEJSKAL Czech
Stejskal means "he did complains" in Czech.
STELTER German
nickname for a disabled person; from Middle Low German stelte, stilt "wooden leg"
STELZNER German
Variant of Stelzer, probably an occupational name for a stilt-maker. Also, a habitational name for anyone from any of the places named Stelzen.
STEM German
Tis is my Surname, of German ancestry.
STEMLE English
FROM KUPPENHEIM, BADEN, GERMANY, WHERE IT WAS (AND IS TODAY) SPELLED WITH 2 Ms: STEMMLE.... [more]
STEMPFER German
Derived from occupation means 'Stump remover'
STENMARK Swedish
Combination of Swedish sten "stone, rock" and mark "ground, land, field".
STENSETH Norwegian
habitational name from any of numerous farmsteads, notably in eastern Norway, named Steinset, from either the noun stein ‘stone’ or the same word as a personal name + set ‘farmstead’.... [more]
STENT English (Archaic)
Derived from the Old Norse name Steinn meaning "stone". Recorded in several forms including Stein, Steen, Stone and Ston, this surname is english. It is perhaps not surprisingly one of the first recorded surnames anywhere in the world.... [more]
STENVALL Swedish
Composed of the elements sten "stone" and vall "mound".
STENZEL German
German from a reduced pet form of the Slavic personal name Stanislaw (see Stencel, STANISLAW).
STEPANIAN Armenian (Expatriate)
Variant transcription of STEPANYAN used by Armenians living outside of Armenia.
STEPANKOV Russian
Means "son of Stepan".
STEPANOV Serbian, Russian
Means "son of STEPAN".
STEPANOVICH Ukrainian
Patronymic from the personal name STEPAN.
STEPANYAN Armenian
Means "son of STEPAN".
STERKEN Dutch, English
Means "strong". Derived either from the Old English term sterċan, meaning "to make rigid", or from the Old Saxon sterkian and Old High German sterken, both meaning "to strengthen."
STERNKE Low German (Rare, ?)
From the German word or surname Stern meaning "star" and the Low German diminutive "-ke". The exact origins of this surname are unknown.
STERVENSON ?
unknown
STETSON English
Of unknown origin and meaning, though likely English.
STEVEN Scottish, English, Dutch, North German
From the personal name Steven, a vernacular form of Latin Stephanus, Greek Stephanos "crown". This was a popular name throughout Christendom in the Middle Ages, having been borne by the first Christian martyr, stoned to death at Jerusalem three years after the death of Christ... [more]
STEWARD English
Occupational name for an administrative official of an estate or steward, from Old English stig "house" and weard "guard".
ST FLEUR Haitian Creole
From the French place name St FLEUR.
ST-GELAIS French (Quebec)
From the French place name Saint-Gelais which was allegedly named for a 5th-century bishop of Poitiers. The name Gelais is a variant of GÉLASE.
ST GEORGE English
From Saint George.
ST GEORGES French
“Saint George.”
STICKLES English
Derived from the word stigol
STICKMAN English (Canadian)
The Origin for the surname Stickman comes from the YouTube series Iron Hand character "Tim Stickman" and his wife (season 3) his kids (season 4) and parents (all seasons) made in 2016 and premiering in 2017.
STIFF English (American)
Used sometimes as a derogatory term, stiff means uptight. It is used in a surname in American culture as well as in the media, such as novels, movies or tv shows.
STIFTER German
Unknown History of Stifter. Stifter means Founder in German
STIGWARD Scottish, Danish, Swedish
The proper form of "STEWART"
STILES English
From Old English stigel, stigol ‘steep uphill path’ (a derivative of stigan ‘to climb’).
STILINSKI Polish (?)
The last name of one of the characters from the Teen Wolf 1980s movie and the MTV show, Stiles Stilinski.
STINCHCOMB English
Habitational name from Stinchcombe in Gloucestershire, recorded in the 12th century as Stintescombe, from the dialect term stint meaning "sandpiper" + cumb meaning "narrow valley".
STINSON English, Scottish
This is one of the many patronymic forms of the male given name Stephen, i.e. son of Stephen. From these forms developed the variant patronymics which include Stim(p)son, Stenson, Steenson, and Stinson.
STIPIĆ Croatian, Serbian
Means "son of STIPE".
STIRRETT Scottish
Variant of STARRETT, probably via STERRETT (since that would better explain the sound transformation).
STIRRUP English (British)
Originated in Merseyside, England.
ST LEGER Irish, English
Anglo-Irish surname, from one of the places in France called Saint-LÉGER, which were named in honour of St. LEODEGAR.
ST LOUIS French, English
In honor of Saint Louis.
STLOUIS French
Habitational name from any of several places named with a religious dedication to a St. Louis.
STOCK Medieval English
English: A topographic name for someone who lived near the trunk or stump of a large tree, Middle English STOCKE (Old English Stocc)... [more]
STOCKARD Scottish Gaelic, Dutch
Scottish: occupational name for a trumpeter, Gaelic stocaire, an agent derivative of stoc ‘Gaelic trumpet’. The name is borne by a sept of the MCFARLANEs.... [more]
STOCKDALE English
Habitational name from a place in Cumbria and North Yorkshire, England. Derived from Old English stocc "tree trunk" and dæl "valley".
STOCKE English
English: A topographic name for someone who lived near the trunk or stump of a large tree, Middle English STOCKE (Old English Stocc)... [more]
STOCKLEY English
Derived from Old english stocc (tree bark) and leah (clearing), indicating that the original bearer of this name lived in a wooded clearing.
STOCKTON English
Habitational surname for a person from any of the places (e.g. Cheshire, County Durham, Hertfordshire, Norfolk, Shropshire, Warwickshire, Wiltshire, Worcestershire, and North and West Yorkshire) so called from Old English stocc "tree trunk" or stoc "dependent settlement" + tun "enclosure", "settlement".
STOCKWELL English
An English boy's name meaning "From the tree stump spring"
STOEHR German
From Middle Low German store ‘sturgeon’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who caught or sold sturgeon, or a nickname for someone with some supposed resemblance to the fish... [more]
STOGDILL English
Possibly a variant of STOCKDALE.
STOGNER Anglo-Saxon
The surname Stogner belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.
STOHOKE Irish
Gaelic name that originated in Ireland.
STOHR German
North German (Stöhr): see STOEHR.... [more]
STOIAN Romanian
From the given name Stoian (see Stoyan)
STOIANOV Bulgarian
Variant transcription of STOYANOV.
STOJKANOVIĆ Vlach
Means "son of STOJKAN".
STOKE English
Derived from Old English stoc "place".
STOKELY English
Variation of STOCKLEY.
STOKER Dutch (Modern)
A Stoker is (or was) someone who stokes (tends to) fires, coals, or furnaces.
STOLARSKI Polish
Derivative of Stolarz "carpenter" "joiner", with the addition of the common suffix of surnames -ski.
STOLINSKI Belarusian
This indicates familial origin within the town of Stólin.
STOLLER German, Jewish, English
Habitational surname for someone from a place called Stolle, near Zurich (now called Stollen).... [more]
STOLLERMAN German
A man from Stoll, a province of Germany.
STOLT Swedish
Swedish soldier name meaning "proud". ... [more]
STOLTENBERG German, Norwegian
Habitational name from places so called in Pomerania and Rhineland. A famous bearer is Jens Stoltenberg (b. 1959), Prime Minister of Norway 2000-2001 and 2005-2013.
STOLTZFUS German
Stoltzfus is a surname of German origin. It is common among Mennonites and Amish. All American Stoltzfuses are descended from Nicholas Stoltzfus (1719–1774), an Amish man who migrated from Germany to America in 1766.
STONEMAN German
Longer version of STONE.
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