Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is amanh.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
BLANKENSHIP English
Variant of Blenkinsop, a surname derived from a place in Northumberland called Blenkinsopp. The place name possibly derives from Cumbric blaen "top" and kein "back, ridge", i.e. "top of the ridge", combined with Old English hōp "valley" (compare Hope).
BRATHWAITE English
Place-name derived from the Old Norse words for a "broad clearing".
CAPOTE Italian (Tuscan)
Capote is a name for person who was the chief of the head from the Italian personal name Capo.
CLEVELAND Old English, English, Popular Culture
English regional name from the district around Middlesbrough named Cleveland ‘the land of the cliffs’, from the genitive plural (clifa) of Old English clif ‘bank’, ‘slope’ + land ‘land’... [more]
CONDON Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Condún, itself a Gaelicized form of the Anglo-Norman habitational name de Caunteton. This seems to have been imported from Wales, but probably derives ultimately from Caunton in Nottinghamshire, which is named with the Old English personal name Caluno{dh} (composed of the elements calu "bald" + no{dh} "daring") + Old English tun "enclosure", "settlement".
EICHLER Upper German
South German variant of Eich, the -ler suffix denoting association. "eager"
EISENHOWER German
Americanized spelling of German Eisenhauer.
GIBBONS English
Patronymic formed from a diminutive of Gib.
HEENAN Ancient Irish
Thought to be a nickname or metonymic, and to owe its derivation from the early Gaelic word ean meaning a "bird". The derivation is from the ancient name O'hEeanchain, which loosely translates as The descendant of the son of the Bird.
HERRMAN German (Prussian)
Herrman is of ancient German origin. It is derived from a Germanic personal name made up of the elements heri, meaning "army," and man, meaning "man." Herrman was first found in Prussia, where the name emerged in medieval times as one of the notable families of the region.
HERTZEL German
The ancestral home of the Hertzel family is in the German province of Bavaria. Hertzel is a German nickname surname. Such names came from eke-names, or added names, that described their initial bearer through reference to a physical characteristic or other attribute... [more]
HOLTZCLAW German (Anglicized, Modern)
Americanized spelling of German Holzklau, which translates into modern German as "wood thief", but is probably a nickname for someone who gathered wood, from Middle High German holz "wood" + a derivative of kluben "to pick up", "gather", "steal".
JACQUEMAN French
Alsace-Lorraine
KELSCH German (Anglicized)
Partly Americanized form of German Koelsch.
KIRCHOFER German
German topographic name for someone living near a churchyard, or habitational name for the proprietor or tenant of a farm named as "Church Farm", from Middle High German kirche "church" + hof "farmstead", "manor farm".
LOMAX English
Lomax is a territorial surname, derived from the hamlet of Lumhalghs, near Bury, Greater Manchester, and meaning "pool nook" or "recess". Notable persons with the surname Lomax include: Alan Lomax (1915–2002) American musicologist, son of John Avery Lomax... [more]
MANHART German (Modern)
From the Germanic personal name Manhard, composed of the Germanic elements man "man", "human" + hard "hardy", "brave", "strong". Americanized spelling of German Manhardt.
NASERS German
Habitational, derived from any of several places called Nesse in Oldenburg and Friesland.
PHILIPPART Belgian
In the Medieval period, of Ancient Greek origin, derives from philippos, a compound made of philein meaning "to love", and hippos, a horse, hence "lover of horses".
ROTHFUS German
Middle High German rot "red" + vuoz "foot", a nickname for someone who followed the fashion for shoes made from a type of fine reddish leather. Or a variant of Rotfuchs, from the Middle Low German form fos "fox", a nickname for a clever person.
ROWSON English (British, Anglicized)
The ancestors of the Rowson family first reached the shores of England in the wave of migration after the Norman Conquest of 1066. Their name is derived from the Norman given name Ralph. This name, which also occurs as Ralf, Rolf, and Raoul, is adapted from the Old French given name Raol.... [more]
RUCKER German
Middle High German: nickname rucken "to move or draw". North German: nickname from Middle Low German rucker "thief", "greedy or acquisitive person". German: from a reduced form of the Germanic personal name Rudiger... [more]
SLATTERY Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Irish (Munster): reduced form of O’Slattery, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Slat(ar)ra ‘descendant of Slatra’, a byname meaning "robust", "strong", "bold".
SPEIER Ancient Germanic
Habitational name from Speyer.
STEINAUER Medieval German
Dweller at or near a stone or rock, often a boundary mark; one who came from Stein, in Germany and Switzerland; descendant of Staino or Stein ("stone").... [more]
SYNGE English (British)
First found in Shropshire where they had been anciently seated as Lords of the Manor of Bridgenorth, from the time of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 A.D.
WALLING Anglo-Norman
From the Anglo-Norman personal name Walweyn, the Old German forename Waldwin, or the Old English personal name Wealdwine, which means "power-friend".