Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is amanh.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Agincourt Medieval English
Surname Agincourt was first found in Lincolnshire where "Walter de Aincourt, who came from Aincourt, a lordship between Mantes and Magny Normandy, where the remains of the ancient family castle still exists... [more]
Alber German
Alber family name was first found in Alsace. The nickname given to someone fair in complexion or blond haired is derived from Latin word Albanus, which means white.
Anzalone Italian
The surname Anzalone was first found in Bolgna (Latin: Bononia).
Baldinger German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name for someone from a place called Baldingen, either in Württemberg, Germany, or Aargau, Switzerland.
Bartle Scottish
An Anglo-Scottish diminutive of Bart and Barth, derived from the biblical name 'Bartholomew' which means 'He who makes furrows' or a farmer.
Bertagni Italian
Bertagni has a lineage in Genoa and one in Lucca. Possibly derives from Gothic, Lombard and Germanic names containing the root germanica bertha (bright) or the celtic bert (bearer).
Betjeman Dutch
One of the earliest surnames, it derives from the Roman personal name "Benedictus", meaning blessed.
Bilek Czech
Nickname for a fair-haired person, from bílek 'whiteness', a derivative of bílý 'white'.
Billig German
Habitational name from a place named Billig, near Cologne. Nickname from Middle High German billich ‘proper’, ‘appropriate’.
Bistolfo Italian
Bistolfi has a lineage between Alessandria Casale Monferrato, Acqui Terme and Prasco, Genoa and Savona. Bistolfo may derive from a modified form of the medieval name Guisulfus. In an act of 1327 Gui-sulfus Cottalorda (Mayor of Breil) signed an important peace agreement with Tenda, probably passing by the name Wisulfus, and therefore by common substitution of W with B.
Blankenship English
Variant of Blenkinsop, a surname derived from a place in Northumberland called Blenkinsopp. The place name possibly derives from Cumbric blaen "top" and kein "back, ridge", i.e. "top of the ridge", combined with Old English hōp "valley" (compare Hope).
Braley English (American)
A New England variant spelling of Brailey. French: from a diminutive of Brael, from Old French braiel, a belt knotted at the waist to hold up breeches; presumably an occupational name for a maker of such belts... [more]
Brathwaite English
Place-name derived from the Old Norse words for a "broad clearing".
Brockhaus German
Occupational hereditary surname for a person who was physically powerful, derived from Old German brock which may refer to persons with a stocky or strong build. Or derived from Old German "Brook" or "Brauk," for people near a marshy landscape, common in northern regions.
Brumbaugh Ancient Germanic
Brumbaugh is derived from towns of the same name, located in various regions of Germany: from "in der Brumbach" a farm near Müsen, Germany, or in the town of Brombach, Swabia and or Switzerland.
Bruns French
Bruns was first found in Poitou where this noble family held a family seat since ancient times. The Bruns surname derives from the French word "brun," meaning "brown"; possibly a nickname for someone who habitually dressed in the color brown.
Capote Italian (Tuscan)
Capote is a name for person who was the chief of the head from the Italian personal name Capo.
Cleveland English
English regional name from the district around Middlesbrough named Cleveland ‘the land of the cliffs’, from the genitive plural (clifa) of Old English clif ‘bank’, ‘slope’ + land ‘land’... [more]
Commons Breton
It's generally believed this name comes from a Breton personal name, derived from element "cam," meaning "bent," or "crooked;" or from the herb "cummin" (cumin). Or from the place name Comines, in Flanders, Northern France.... [more]
Condon Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Anglicized form of Gaelic Condún, itself a Gaelicized form of the Anglo-Norman habitational name de Caunteton... [more]
Cope Anglo-Saxon
Earliest origins of the Cope surname date from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain, for a person who habitually wore a long cloak or cape. The surname Cope is derived from the Old English word cope, which emerged about 1225 and comes from the Old English word cape, which refers to a cloak or cape.
Dalmas French
Surname Dalmas was first found in Limousin. Literally means "of the sea."
Diggins Norman
Diggins came to England in the 11th century wave of migration that was set off by the Norman Conquest of 1066; from the Norman baptismal name which means the son of Diccon, a diminution of the parent name, Richard.
Dugmore Medieval English
This habitational name is chiefly found in the West Midlands region of England. The origin is certainly Old English pre 7th Century and may be Ancient British i.e. pre Roman 55 A.D. The origins are lost but are believed to develop from "Dubh" meaning "black" and "mor" a morass or swamp... [more]
Eichler Upper German
South German variant of Eich, the -ler suffix denoting association. "eager"
Eisenhower German
Americanized spelling of German Eisenhauer.
Engelby Anglo-Saxon
The name Engelby has a long Anglo-Saxon heritage, from people of the village of Ingoldsby, Lincolnshire, or from Ingleby, found in Derbyshire, or at Ingleby-Berwick, North Yorkshire.
Farnum English
English and Irish. The origins of the Farnum name lie with England's ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. It comes from when the family lived at Farnham, in several different counties including Buckinghamshire, Dorset, Essex, Suffolk, and the West Riding of Yorkshire... [more]
Fayard French
Originally French topographic name for someone who lived by a beech tree or beech-wood.
Gibbons English
Patronymic formed from a diminutive of Gib.
Gillan Irish
The Gillan surname is a reduced Anglicized form of the Irish Gaelic Mac Gille Fhaoláin, which means "son of the servant of St Faolán." While the name may have originated in Ireland, this line was extant by the beginning of the 17th century, only to find many of the family to return to Ireland about 100 years later with the Plantation of Ulster.... [more]
Gilligan Irish
English translation of Gaelic name Mac Giollagain, derived from the word, giolla, meaning: lad.
Guinan Irish
The surname Guinan comes from the Irish surname O Cuanain (O'Conein and MacConein) and is derived from the Irish Cuinin for "rabbit", son of Dugal. They claim descendancy through the Donnelly line of the native Irish.
Harms Medieval Low German
Of ancient German origin, Harms is derived from a Germanic personal name made up of the elements "heri," meaning "army," and "man," meaning "man." Surname Harms was first found in Prussia, in medieval times as one of the notable families of the region.
Heenan Ancient Irish
Thought to be a nickname or metonymic, and to owe its derivation from the early Gaelic word ean meaning a "bird". The derivation is from the ancient name O'hEeanchain, which loosely translates as The descendant of the son of the Bird.
Herrman German (Prussian)
Herrman is of ancient German origin. It is derived from a Germanic personal name made up of the elements heri, meaning "army," and man, meaning "man." Herrman was first found in Prussia, where the name emerged in medieval times as one of the notable families of the region.
Hertzel German
The ancestral home of the Hertzel family is in the German province of Bavaria. Hertzel is a German nickname surname. Such names came from eke-names, or added names, that described their initial bearer through reference to a physical characteristic or other attribute... [more]
Holtzclaw German (Anglicized, Modern)
Americanized spelling of German Holzklau, which translates into modern German as "wood thief", but is probably a nickname for someone who gathered wood, from Middle High German holz "wood" + a derivative of kluben "to pick up", "gather", "steal".
Jacqueman French
Alsace-Lorraine
Kelsch German (Anglicized)
Partly Americanized form of German Koelsch.
Kirchofer German
German topographic name for someone living near a churchyard, or habitational name for the proprietor or tenant of a farm named as "Church Farm", from Middle High German kirche "church" + hof "farmstead", "manor farm".
Leusink Medieval Dutch
Descendants from farmers from the Overijssel Province in the Netherlands. History can be traced to the middle ages, perhaps to a farm called Lossyng in the village of Neede.
Lomax English
Lomax is a territorial surname, derived from the hamlet of Lumhalghs, near Bury, Greater Manchester, and meaning "pool nook" or "recess". Notable persons with the surname Lomax include: Alan Lomax (1915–2002) American musicologist, son of John Avery Lomax... [more]
Manhart German (Modern)
From the Germanic personal name Manhard, composed of the Germanic elements man "man", "human" + hard "hardy", "brave", "strong"... [more]
Maté Hungarian
Hungarian (Máté): from the ecclesiastical personal name Máté, Hungarian form of Matthew.
Misirlou Greek
Misirlou (Μισιρλού), due to the suffix "ou", is the feminine form (in Greek) of Misirlis (Μισιρλής- a surname) which comes from the Turkish word Mısırlı, which is formed by combining Mısır ("Egypt" in Turkish, borrowed from Arabic مِصر‎ Miṣr) with the Turkish -lı suffix, literally meaning "Egyptian".
Nasers German
Habitational, derived from any of several places called Nesse in Oldenburg and Friesland.
Nitsche German (Silesian)
Derived from a popular Silesian short form of the personal name Nikolaus.
Noe Medieval English, Korean
A patronymic form of the biblical male given name Noah from the Hebrew word "noach" meaning long-lived. Possible origins could be ... [more]
Nussrallah Arabic
Nasrallah (Arabic: نصرالله‎) is a male Arabic given name, meaning "Victory of God", and is used by Muslims and Christians alike. It may also be transliterated as Nasralla, Nasrollah, Nasrullah and Al-Nasrallah... [more]
Oesten German
Possibly derived from a watercourse, e.g. the Oste, tributary of the Elbe.
Oldt Low German
North German: variant of Alt.
Pach German
Pach is an occupational hereditary surname for a baker in Old German. Pach is also a German local name for someone who lived by a stream, which was originally derived from the German word "bach" which means stream... [more]
Philippart Belgian
In the Medieval period, of Ancient Greek origin, derives from philippos, a compound made of philein meaning "to love", and hippos, a horse, hence "lover of horses".
Quelch English (British)
Mid 16th Century variant of the name Wels(c)he, Welsh or Welch, itself deriving from the Middle English "walsche", Celtic, foreign, (Olde English "woelisc", a derivative of "wealh", foreign), and originally given as a distinguishing nickname to a Celt... [more]
Roan Irish
variant of Roane
Rothfus German
Middle High German rot "red" + vuoz "foot", a nickname for someone who followed the fashion for shoes made from a type of fine reddish leather. Or a variant of Rotfuchs, from the Middle Low German form fos "fox", a nickname for a clever person.
Rowson English (British, Anglicized)
The ancestors of the Rowson family first reached the shores of England in the wave of migration after the Norman Conquest of 1066. Their name is derived from the Norman given name Ralph. This name, which also occurs as Ralf, Rolf, and Raoul, is adapted from the Old French given name Raol.... [more]
Rucker German
Middle High German: nickname rucken "to move or draw". North German: nickname from Middle Low German rucker "thief", "greedy or acquisitive person". German: from a reduced form of the Germanic personal name Rudiger... [more]
Ruzicki Polish
Ruzicki was first found in Polesie, inhabited by Ruthenians, called Polesians, of Ukrainian descent. One of the principal names of the area was the royal Clan of Poraj, of which the family name Ruzycki is a branch.
Sather Anglo-Saxon
Sather is a name of ancient Anglo-Saxon origin and comes from the family once having lived in the ancient chapelry of Satterthwaite found near Hawkeshead in Lancashire. This surname was originally derived from the Old English elements soetr meaning shield and pveit meaning pasture... [more]
Schaller Upper German
From Middle High German word "schal," which means "noise," or "bragging," and as such is was thought to have originally been a nickname for a braggart, or for a market crier.
Schmoeckel German (East Prussian)
Originally Smekel. In the 17th century the ‘Sm’ in Low German was gradually replaced by the ‘Schm’ from High German. ... [more]
Shaddy Irish
Origin unidentified. Perhaps a variant of Irish Sheedy.
Slattery Irish (Anglicized, Modern)
Irish (Munster): reduced form of O’Slattery, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Slat(ar)ra ‘descendant of Slatra’, a byname meaning "robust", "strong", "bold".
Sobolewski Polish
Locational surname that means a person from places in Poland called Sobolew or Sobolewo, both derived from the Polish sobol, meaning "sable".
Speier Ancient Germanic
Habitational name from Speyer.
Steinauer Medieval German
Dweller at or near a stone or rock, often a boundary mark; one who came from Stein, in Germany and Switzerland; descendant of Staino or Stein ("stone").... [more]
Stieglitz German
Meaning goldfinch, Stiglitz was borrowed into German from a Slavic language, probably Old Czech stehlec. Several possible origins: of the surname can be: ... [more]
Stiglitz German
Variant of Stieglitz
Synge English (British)
First found in Shropshire where they had been anciently seated as Lords of the Manor of Bridgenorth, from the time of the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 A.D.
Tarsney English (British)
Tarsney is a variant spelling of Tosne.
Toohey Scottish Gaelic
Modern form of the ancient pre 10th century Gaelic O' Tuathaigh meaning the descendant of the chief.
Topp German
German: from Low German topp 'point', 'tree top', hence a topographic name; or alternatively a metonymic occupational name or nickname from the same word in the sense 'braid'.
Troxel German
Roots of the German surname Troxel can be found in the region of Hesse, where the name originated. Troxel may be an occupational name, derived from the Middle High German word "truhsaesee," meaning "leader." In this case, Troxel would be a variation of the German surname Truchsess.
Uhl German
Uhl begins in the German province of Bavaria. Uhl is a nickname surname, a class of German names derived from eke-names, or added names, that described people by a personal characteristic or other attribute... [more]
Van Wert Dutch (Americanized, Modern)
From Dutch and Belgian: habitational name for someone from places in Belgium and the Netherlands called Weert, (De) Weerd, Weerde, or Waarde.
Walling Anglo-Norman
From the Anglo-Norman personal name Walweyn, the Old German forename Waldwin, or the Old English personal name Wealdwine, which means "power-friend".
Wittman German
Wittman was first found in the Palatinate in the Rhineland valley. The surname Wittman was given to someone who lived in the area that was referred to as widem which was originally derived from the German word denoting church property.
Xenos Ancient Greek
From Greek xenos ‘stranger’, ‘newcomer’ (equivalent to English Newman), or short for a composite name such as Xenocostas ‘Costas the newcomer’.
Xiao Chinese (Wu)
From the name of a fiefdom or territory called Xiao (in present-day Anhui province) that existed during the Zhou dynasty (1122–221 bc). A descendant of the ruler of the state of Song was granted this fiefdom and subsequently his descendants adopted the place name as their surname.
Xing Chinese
From the name of an area called Xing, which existed during in the Zhou dynasty (1122–221 bc). Descendants of the ruling family of this area adopted Xing as their surname. Another account of the origin derives it from an area named Pingxing.
Xue Chinese
From the area of Xue, in present-day Shandong province. During the Xia dynasty (2205–1766 bc) an official with the title ‘chief of carts’ was granted this area. Much later, in the state of Qi during the Warring States period (403–221 bc) the same area was granted to a prince... [more]
Yarbrough Anglo-Saxon
The ancient roots of the Yarbrough family name are in the Anglo-Saxon culture. The name Yarbrough comes from when the family lived in either the parish or the hamlet called Yarborough in the county of Lincolnshire... [more]
Yonover English (British)
The surname Yonover was first found in Somerset where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor.