Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which an editor of the name is Frollein Gladys.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Cholmondeley English
An aristocratic surname derived from a place name in Cheshire which means "Ceolmund's grove" in Old English.
Cleland Belgian, Scottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish reduced form of McClelland. ... [more]
Clisby English
Surname originating in the village of Cleasby in North Yorkshire's Richmondshire district.
Combeferre Literature (?)
Combeferre is the surname of one of the strong, persuasive members of the ABC in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables. Meaning is unknown.
Conklin Irish, Dutch
Origin unidentified. Most likely of Dutch origin (the name is found in the 18th century in the Hudson Valley), or possibly a variant of Irish Coughlin.
Connick Yiddish
Variation on Koenig.
Copeland English
Some sources say that Copeland is English: "one that is good at coping". Another says Copeland is Northern English and Scottish, from Cumberland and Northumberland meaning "bought land". Old Norse, kaupa-land for‘bought land’.
Corrigan English
Traditionally an Irish surname meaning "spear". From the Irish Gaelic corragán which is a double diminutive of corr 'pointed'.
Coulson English
Means "son of Cole".
Courfeyrac Literature
Courfeyrac is the surname that Victor Hugo used for Marius' closest friend in the friend of the ABC. Meaning is unknown.
Couter English
The couter (also spelled "cowter") is the defense for the elbow in a piece of plate armour. Initially just a curved piece of metal, as plate armor progressed the couter became an articulated joint.... [more]
Coward English
several origins... [more]
Creig Scottish, English
Derived from Scottish Gaelic crioch "border".
Crofter English
A surname of Scottish origin used in the Highlands and Islands and means “an owner or a tenant of a small farm”. The Old English word croft seems to correspond with the Dutch kroft meaning “a field on the downs”.
Cudak Polish
Means "oddity, crank" in Polish. It can also come from the word cud meaning "miracle, wonder".
Cully English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Colla meaning "descendant of Colla". The Old Irish name Colla was a variant of Conla (perhaps the same Connla).
Cutler English
Given to a "knife maker" or a man that "makes cutlery"
Cyle English
Variant of Kille.
Dacy English
Variant of Dacey.
Daggett English
Derived from the Old French word "Dague", meaning knife or dagger, and as such was a Norman introduction into England after the 1066 Conquest. The name is a medieval metonymic for one who habitually carried a dagger, or who was a manufacturer of such weapons.
Daice English
Of obscure origin and meaning.
Dalin Swedish
Variant of Dahlin.
Daudet French
Not available.
Deiley English
Variant of Dailey.
Delane English
Anglicized form of Dubhshlainte.
Demma English
Possibly an Anglicization of the Italian surname Demma, a metronymic from the personal name Emma.
Derwent English
Originating from Derwent River in England.
Devoy English
Anglicized form of Gaelic surname Ó Dubhuidhe ‘descendant of Dubhuidhe’, a name probably derived from dubh "dark, black" and buidhe "sallow".
Didschus German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German name meaning "tall; big", from Old Prussian didis (or Old Prussian didszullis "the tall one").
Dimond English, Irish
English and Irish variant of Diamond.
Dinjer German (Rare)
Occupational surname that originated in the German dialect spoken in the Rhineland-Palatinate region. ... [more]
Dobie Scottish
Variant of Doby.
Dobileit German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "clover; trefoil".
Doepner German
Derived from Middle Low German top and dop "pot". This is an occupational surname originally given to a potter.
Dotson English
Patronymic of the Middle English name Dodde. Originally derived from the Germanic root dodd meaning "something rounded", used to denote a short, rotund man.
Drux German
Variant of Trux, which itself is a contracted form of Truxes and derived from the German word Truchsess, ultimately from Middle High German truhsaeze and Old High German truhtsazzo (from truht "band; cohort; regiment" and saza "seat; chair").... [more]
Duret French
Derived from French dur meaning "hard, tough".
Duska English (Rare)
Anglicized spelling of Duška.
Ealey English
Variant of Ely.
Earenfight English
appears in early American history in Pennsylvania and New Jerssey. Jacob Earenfight fought in the Battle of Princeton in the American Revolutionary War.
Eastman English
Derived from the Old English given name Eastmund, or a variant of East.
Edelstein Jewish
Ornamental name derived from German Edelstein "gemstone; precious stone".
Edgely English
A surname of Anglo-Saxon origin, and a place name taken from either a village in Cheshire or one in Shropshire. The name means “park by the wood” in Old English.
Efner English
Variant of Hefner.
Einhorn German, Jewish
Derived from German Einhorn (Middle High German einhorn) "unicorn", denoting someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a unicorn.
Ellender English
English variant of Allender.
Ellender English
A nickname for a stranger or newcomer, from Middle High German ellende ‘strange’, ‘foreign’, or a habitational name for someone from any of twenty places named Elend, denoting a remote settlement, as for example in the Harz Mountains or in Carinthia, Austria.
Elwell English
Means "person from Elwell", Dorset (probably "spring from which omens can be read").
Emsley English
A name that came from a family that lived in Yorkshire, where they derived the family name from Helmsley. Probably of Old English origin Helm and ley or leah, which means "a clearing in the woods."
Engelsen Norwegian
Means "son of Engel".
Enjolras Literature
From a surname which was from Occitan enjeura meaning "to terrify". This was the name of a charismatic activist in Victor Hugo's novel 'Les Misérables' (1862).
Ennor English
Of debated origin and meaning. Theories include a derivation from the Welsh given name Ynyr and a derivation from Jenner.
Escher Dutch, German
German habitational name for someone from any of the various places called Esch, Esche, or Eschen.
Eskell Old Danish
Variant of Eskil, a form (found in Old Danish) of the Norse name Áskell, Ásketill.