Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which an editor of the name is Frollein Gladys.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Tatlow English (British, Rare)
I heard it was from a small village in England called Tallow.
Templeton English
Derived from Templeton, from the English words 'temple' and 'town'.
Terwilliger English
An anglicized version of the Dutch surname, Der Willikeur, meaning "a by-law; a statute". Also, Der willige-waar, means "serviceable ware", or "ware that sells well" and could be related as well.
Tetrault French
French, Franko-American
Thiel German
Derived from Old High German thiot "people".
Thoman German
Derived from the personal name Thoman.
Thoreau English
Last name of famous American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, sage writer and philosopher, Henry David Thoreau.
Thrall English
English status name from Old English þr?l ‘thrall’, ‘serf’ (from Old Norse þræll).
Tinks English
Variant of Tink.
Tinsley English
From a place name in England composed of the unattested name Tynni and Old English hlaw "hill, mound, barrow".
Toland Irish
The meaning of the name is unclear, but it seems to derive from the pre 13th century Gaelic O' Tuathalain suggesting that it was probably religious and may translate as "The male descendant of the follower of the lord".
Tooey Scottish
Variant of Toohey.
Torn German
Derived from Old High German dorn / torn "thorn". As a surname, it was usually given to someone who lived near a thorn hedge.
Townley English
Habitational name for a person from Towneley near Burnley in Lancashire, itself from the Old English elements tun "enclosure, settlement" and leah "wood, clearing"... [more]
Tozzi Italian
Derived from the Italian adjective tozzo meaning "squat; stocky" and also "chunk; hunk", both from Latin túndere meaning "to dent" or from Slavic stotz meaning "stump".... [more]
Tressillian English
Derived from a Cornish place name meaning "Sulyen's farmstead" (see Sulien).
Trueit English
Variant of Truett.
Trux German
Variant of Drux.
Tudorică Romanian
Derived from a Romanian diminutive of Tudor.
Ulrich German
Derived from the personal name Ulrich.
Unwin English
From the Old English male personal name Hūnwine, literally "bearcub-friend" (later confused with Old English unwine "enemy"). Bearers include British publisher Sir Stanley Unwin (1885-1968) and "Professor" Stanley Unwin (1911-2002), South African-born British purveyor of comical nonsense language.
Upwood English
Derived from a place name meaning "upper forest" in Old English.
Usanza Italian (Rare)
"custom, customary" Italian
Valmont English, French
Means "Hill of the vale"
Verde Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From Spanish verde "green" (Latin viridis), presumably a nickname for someone who habitually dressed in this color or had green eyes, etc. This is also a common element of place names.
Villein French
"Used in medieval England and France. Villein is another term used for the serfs in the lowest classes of the feudal system."
Villwock German
Of uncertain and much debated origin.... [more]
Viray Occitan, French, Catalan
Southern French (Occitan) and Catalan variant of Occitan Verai and Veray, nickname from Occitan verai ‘honest’... [more]
Viveash English
English surname of uncertain origin. May be Anglo-Norman from French vivace meaning "lively, vigorous", however its pronunciation has led to its connection to various places in southern England called Five Ash Trees.
Vogl German (Austrian)
Southern German variant of Vogel.
Vojtek Slovak
Derived from the given name Vojtech.
Wakely English
Damp meadow
Warton English
"From the poplar-tree farm"
Washburn English
Northern English topographic name for someone living on the banks of the Washburn river in West Yorkshire, so named from the Old English personal name Walc + Old English burna ‘stream’... [more]
Weldin English
Variant of Weldon.
Wesson English
Variant of Weston.
Westbury English
English British surname originating as a place name. There are several Westbury villages, parishes and even Manors across England that have given the name Westbury to people who take up residence in or come from those places... [more]
Westerly English
The name is originated from a term meaning 'winds from the West'. The name could be given to someone who is born in the west.
Westwood English, Scottish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Westwood, from Old English west "west" and wudu "wood".
Whipple English
English surname of uncertain meaning. It might be a shortened form of “whippletree”; an early name for the dogwood. It may also be a variation of Whipp – an early surname for someone who carried out judicial punishments.
Whitby English
English surname which was from either of two place names, that of a port in North Yorkshire (which comes from the Old Norse elements hvítr "white" (or Hvíti, a byname derived from it) combined with býr "farm") or a place in Cheshire (from Old English hwit "white" (i.e., "stone-built") and burh "fortress").
Whitman English
From Middle English whit ‘white’ + man ‘man’, either a nickname with the same sense as White, or else an occupational name for a servant of a bearer of the nickname White.... [more]
Whitmarsh English
English habitational name from Whitemarsh, a place in the parish of Sedgehill, Wiltshire, named from Old English hwit ‘white’ (i.e. ‘phosphorescent’) + mersc ‘marsh’. Compare Whitmore.
Whitside English (Rare, ?)
Possibly a variant of Whiteside.
Wilén Swedish, Finland Swedish, Finnish
Variant of Vilén or Willén (meanings uncertain, they might be variants of the same name).
Winsett English
From an English surname of unexplained origin, perhaps related to Winslow, Winston or Windsor.
Witt German
Either from the given name Wittigo or from Middle Low German witte "white", a nickname for a pale person or someone with white hair.
Wolken German
Surname derived from a diminutive of the given name Wolter, a Low German form of Walter.... [more]
Worden English
Guardian
Worth English
From the Old English WORÞ, meaning "enclosure".
Wowereit German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "squirrel", from Old Prussian wowere and Lithuanian voveraite (which, apart from "squirrel", also means "chanterelle").... [more]
Wurster German
Derived from German Wurst (Middle High German wurst) "sausage" and thus either denoted a butcher who specialized in the production of sausages, or was used as a nickname for a plump person or someone who was particularly fond of sausages.
Wycherley English
Derived from a place name apparently meaning "elm-wood clearing" from Old English wice and leah. A famous bearer was the dramatist William Wycherley (1640-1715).
Wylden English
Variant of Wilden.
Yesua Indonesian
From the given name Yesua, a variant of Yeshua. This surname is found among Indonesian populations.
Yocum German (Anglicized), English
Americanized form of Jochum, a Low German form of the given name Joachim.
Zale English, Polish (Anglicized)
Possibly from a Polish surname, the meaning of which is uncertain (it may have been a variant of the surname Zalas which originally indicated one who lived "on the other side of the wood", from za "beyond" and las "forest").