Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which an editor of the name is Frollein Gladys.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Baclan Celtic (Rare)
Form of the surname Backlund
Bade English
From the Old English personal name Bada which possibly a short form of various names with the first element being the Old English beadu "battle". It could also be a short form of a Germanic personal name composed with badu "strife", or from an occupational North German surname from the Middle Low German bade "messenger".
Badrinette English
Apparently an extremely rare name of French origin, but isn't used as a first name in France. It might come from the rather uncommon French surname Bardinette, which apparently is a variant spelling of the surname Bardinet... [more]
Bainebridge English, Irish
Bridge over the Bain, An English town named for its place on the river Bain, now used as a surname. Lives near the bridge over the white water... [more]
Bannion Scottish
Scottish/Irish
Barbon French (Quebec)
Derived from the nickname barbon meaning "old codger" as well as referring to a "confirmed bachelor".
Barker English
SURNAME Town cryer, or someone who shouts out notices
Bauerdick German
A surname originating from the Rhineland region of Germany. It is derived from German Bauer (Bur in the locals dialects) "farmer" and Deich (Diek and Dick in the local dialects) "levee" or Teich "pond"... [more]
Bauersack German
Semi-Germanized form of the Polish surname Burczak, originally derived from Polish burczec "growl; shout".... [more]
Baumfree Dutch, American, African American
This name is clearly derived from Sojourner Truth, a former African-American slave who was born as Isabella Bomefree (but at some point the surname was changed to the more German-looking Baumfree). Although Sojourner's original owners - James and Elizabeth Bomefree/Baumfree - were apparently of Dutch descent, it is questionable whether the surname is really of Dutch origin... [more]
Baylis English
Derived from the Middle English 'bail(l)i', a development of the Old French 'baillis'. In Scotland the word survives as 'bailie', the title of a chief magistrate for a part of a county or barony. The word survives in England as 'bailiff', an officer who serves writs and summonses for the court.
Bearden English
English habitational name, a variant of Barden, or from places in Devon and Cornwall called Beardon.
Becher German
Shortened form of Becherer as well as a surname given to for someone who distilled or worked with pitch, in which case it is derived from Middle High German bech / pech "pitch".
Bechmann German (Rare)
Surname denoting someone who worked with pitch, from Middle High German bech / pech "pitch" and man, a suffix which can mean "man" or simply be used as a name suffix.
Beckett English
An Old English name simply meaning "beehive". Famous Irish playwrite Samuel Beckett bears this name.
Beckley English
This surname was taken from an English habitational name from any of the various places, in Kent, Oxfordshire, and Sussex, named Beckley whose name was derived from the Old English byname Becca and the Old English lēah "woodland clearing".... [more]
Beech English
Dweller at the beech tree.
Belmont English
English surname of Norman origin, a variant of the surname Beaumont, which was derived from place names meaning "lovely hill" in Old French (from beu, bel "fair, lovely" and mont "hill").
Bender German, German (East Prussian)
As a German surname, Bender is a regional occupational surname from the Rhineland area denoting a "barrel-maker" (the Standard German Fassbinder became "Fassbender" in the local dialects and ultimately was shortened to Bender).... [more]
Berghold German
Surname that denoted the owner of a vineyard.
Bernoulli French
French patronymic surname that was derived from the first name Bernoul (which was probably derived from Bernold or Bernolf).
Bertram German
Derived from the German given name Bertram.
Beruška Czech
Allegedly derived from Czech beruška "ladybird; ladybug".
Beske German
Likely derived from Peschke and Peske, vernacular forms of the given name Petrus.
Betz German
Derived from a Thuringian short form of the personal name Bernhard.
Birket English
It's a locational surname taken from the village of Birket Houses in Lancashire.
Blakesmith German (Anglicized)
Derived from the German, Blechschmidt, it means "tin smith", and/or, blacksmith.
Blaxton English
There are two possible origins for this surname; one- from the name of the village in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster (part of South Yorkshire, England) on the border of Lincolnshire, or two- from the Old English personal name Blaecstan, meaning "black stone"
Blaylock English
The surname of James P. Blaylock (1950-), an early steampunk author. His surname may mean "black lock" from Middle English blakelok, originally referring to a person with dark hair.
Bleuzen Breton
Derived from the feminine given name Bleuzenn.
Blin Welsh
The same as Blaen, a point, the inland extremity of a valley. Blin also signifies weary, troublesome.
Bosley English
English habitation surname derived from the Old English personal name Bosa and the Old English leah "clearing, field". It's also possibly a variant of the French surname Beausoleil meaning "beautiful sun" from the French beau 'beautiful, fair' and soleil 'sun'... [more]
Bostwick English
From an English surname which was from a lost or unidentified place name. The second element is clearly Old English wic "outlying (dairy) farm".
Bowersock English
Likely an Americanized spelling of Bauersack.
Bowskill English
From the place name Bowscale.
Braham English
From the name of a town called Braham, probably derived from Old English brom meaning "broom (a type of plant)" and ham meaning "home, settlement" or hamm meaning "river meadow".
Braque French
Surname of cubist artist Georges Braque.
Bravo Spanish, Spanish (Mexican), Portuguese
From a Spanish and Portuguese nickname for a fierce or violent man (from Spanish and Portuguese bravo "fierce, violent"). This surname was borne by Charles Bravo (1845-1876), a British lawyer and possible murder victim.
Brazil English (Rare), Irish (Anglicized, Rare)
Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Breasail "descendant of Breasal", Breasal being a byname which meant "strife".
Brinkley English
"From Brinca's Field" or "Field in the forest"
Brinton English
English locational surname, taken from the town of the same name in Norfolk. The name means "settlement belonging to Brun" - the personal name coming from the Old English word for "fire, flame".
Bucher German
Upper German surname denoting someone who lived by a beech tree or beech wood, derived from Middle High German buoche "beech tree".
Bulstrode English
Locational surname referring to the medieval village of Bulstrode in Berkshire. ... [more]
Burchell English
An English surname derived from the village of Birkehill (also known as Biekel or Birtle). It means "birch hill".
Byam English
Probably means "person from Bytham", Lincolnshire ("homestead in a valley bottom"). Glen Byam Shaw (1904-1986) was a British theatre director.
Cable English
English: metonymic occupational name for a maker of rope, especially the type of stout rope used in maritime applications, from Anglo-Norman French cable ‘cable’ (Late Latin capulum ‘halter’, of Arabic origin, but associated by folk etymology with Latin capere ‘to seize’).... [more]
Cadan Irish
Anglicized form of Mac Cadain.
Calloway American (Modern, Rare)
Means "pebble". From the Old French cail(ou) 'pebble'. Traditionally an English surname, which is a regional name of French Norman origin from Caillouet-Orgeville in Eure, France.
Canella Italian
Italian regional surname denoting someone who lived by a canal. From the Italian canale 'canal', from the Latin canalis meaning "canal; conduit; groove; funnel; or ditch". Alternatively, it may come the genus name of wild cinnamon, a diminutive of the Latin canna "reed, cane".
Cardwell English
From the traditionally British surname, which is a variant of the British surname Caldwell, a from the Old English cald "cold" and well(a) "spring, stream".
Carisbrook English
Carisbrooke is a village on the Isle of Wight; the name is thought to mean "Carey's brook". When in 1917 the British royal family changed its name from the "House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha" to the "House of Windsor" and renounced all German titles, the title of Marquess of Carisbrooke was created for the erstwhile German Prince Alexander of Battenberg.
Carmichael Scottish, English
From the name of a village in Scotland meaning "fort of Michael", from Welsh caer meaning "fortress" and the given name Michael.
Carrington English, Scottish
English: habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Carrington, probably named with an unattested Old English personal name Cara + -ing- denoting association + tun ‘settlement’.... [more]
Cassar Maltese
Of debated origin and meaning. Theories include a derivation from the Italian given name Cesare (via the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies) and a Maltese adoption of the Sicilian surname Cassarà... [more]
Castellan Italian
This name is of Latin origin. It comes from "castellanus" meaning 'castellan, steward of a castle'.
Cater English
Comes from the English word "caterer".
Caverly English
English surname, a variant of the English surname Calverley, itself derived from the Old English calf "calf" and leag "field, clearing".
Cawood English
Traditional English habitational surname meaning "jackdaw wood" from the Old English ca referring to 'jackdaw' (a member of the crow family), and wudu 'wood'.
Cécire Norman
Derived from the feminine name Cécile.
Chalk English
English: from Old English cealc 'chalk', applied as a topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of chalk soil, or as a habitational name from any of the various places named with this word, as for example Chalk in Kent or Chalke in Wiltshire.
Champion English (Rare)
From an English and French surname.
Champlin Belgian, English
Means Champion, was a family name in Belgium, a status and influence that was envied by the princes of the region.... [more]
Chénier French
French surname which indicated one who lived in an oak wood or near a conspicuous oak tree, derived from Old French chesne "oak" (Late Latin caxinus). In some cases it may be from a Louisiana dialectical term referring to "an area of shrub oak growing in sandy soil" (i.e., "beach ridge, usually composed of sand-sized material resting on clay or mud... [more]
Chiere French (Rare)
Possibly derived from the Old French chiere, from chier, meaning "dear, dearest".
Chirico Italian
Surname of Italian surrealist artist, Giorgio de Chirico