Submitted Surnames Starting with W

usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Weisenburger German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of numerous places named Weissenburg "white fortress".
Weishuhn German
Derived from Middle High German wiz meaning "white" and huon meaning "hen, fowl", hence a metonymic occupational name for a poultry farmer or dealer, or perhaps in some instances a nickname.
Weisman German, German (Austrian), Jewish
A German surname meaning "white man"
Weissmuller German
Translates to "White Miller".
Weisz Jewish
Hungarian spelling of Weiss.
Weixel German
German: variant spelling of Weichsel, a topographic name for someone who lived near a sour cherry tree (St. Luce cherry), from Middle High German wīhsel (modern German Weichsel(n), pronounced ‘Weiksel’.
Welborn English
Habitational name from Welborne in Norfolk, Welbourn in Lincolnshire, or Welburn in North Yorkshire, all named with Old English wella ‘spring’ + burna ‘stream’.
Welburn English
English surname meaning "From the Spring brook"
Welby English (British, Rare)
Lincolnshire family name
Weld English
Meant "one who lives in or near a forest (or in a deforested upland area)", from Middle English wold "forest" or "cleared upland". A famous bearer is American actress Tuesday Weld (1943-).
Weldin English
Variant of Weldon.
Weldon English
Weldon is one of the many names that the Normans brought with them when they conquered England in 1066. The Weldon family lived in Northamptonshire, at Weldon.... [more]
Welfing German
Name given to our family by our relative, a German king.
Welford English
English surname meaning "Lives by the spring by the ford"
Welk German (East Prussian)
Nickname from Middle High German welc, meaning "soft and mild". The name was first recorded in South Holland, however many of the bearers of the name trace its roots back to East Germany. A famous bearer of this name was Lawrence Welk, an American musician and host of the Lawrence Welk Show.
Welker German
Variant of Walker.
Well English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a spring or stream, Middle English well(e) (Old English well(a)).
Welland English (British, Rare)
From the name of the place, derived from Old English wig - war and landa - territory, land.
Wellborn English
Related to Wellburn
Wellborne English
Related to Wellborn
Welle German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a spring or stream, Middle Low German welle.
Weller English, German
Either from the Olde English term for a person who extracted salt from seawater, or from the English and German "well(e)," meaning "someone who lived by a spring or stream."... [more]
Welles English
Variant of Wells.
Wellington English
Habitational name from any of the three places named Wellington, in Herefordshire, Shropshire, and Somerset. All are most probably named with an unattested Old English personal name Weola + -ing- (implying association with) + tun ‘settlement’.
Wellman English
From German Welle meaning "wave" and man, meaning "man", referring to someone who lived by a stream.
Wellspeak French (Anglicized)
Anglicized version of Beauparlant.
Welsch German
From Middle High German welsch, walsch "person from a Romance country (especially Italy), foreigner", hence an ethnic name or in some cases perhaps a nickname for someone who had trading or other connections with the Romance countries.
Welsh Irish
Variant of Walsh.
Welsh Scottish, English
Ethnic name for someone from Wales or a speaker of the Welsh language. Compare Walsh and Wallace.
Welton English
Habitational name from any of various places named Welton, for example in Cumbria, Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, and East Yorkshire, from Old English well(a) ‘spring’, ‘stream’ + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
Weltraum German
A German surname meaning "outer space".
Welty German (Swiss)
From a Swiss German diminutive of the German given name Walther. A literary bearer was the American writer Eudora Welty (1909-2001).
Wen Chinese
From Chinese 温 (wēn) meaning "warm", also referring to any of several territories that were called Wen, namely an ancient state that existed during the Zhou dynasty.
Wences Slavic
Based on Wenceslaus or Wenceslas, latinized forms of name of Slavic rulers in various forms such as Václav, Wacław, Więcesław, Vyacheslav, Vjenceslav, etc. Derived from the Slavic words veli/vyache/więce/više ("great(er), large(r)"), and slava ("glory, fame")... [more]
Wend German
Variant of Wendt.
Wendelin German
From the given name Wendelin.
Wendler Medieval German
derived from a German word meaning to wander or wanderer
Wendt German, Danish
Ethnic name for a Wend, Middle High German wind(e). The Wends (also known as Sorbians) once occupied a large area of northeastern Germany (extending as far west as Lüneburg, with an area called Wendland), and many German place names and surnames are of Wendish origin... [more]
Wenig German
From the German word “wenig”, meaning little.
Wenn English
Surname from Norfolk, England
Wennerström Swedish
Combination of the place name element wenner, which is probably derived from the name of Lake Vänern, and Swedish ström "stream".
Wensley English
Habitational name from Wensleydale in North Yorkshire.
Wentworth English
Habitational name from places in Cambridgeshire and South Yorkshire called Wentworth, probably from the Old English byname Wintra meaning ‘winter’ + Old English worð ‘enclosure’... [more]
Wentz German (Rare)
Originally a pet form of the given names Werner and Wenceslaw. Meaning "guard" or "army".
Wentzel German
Variant spelling of Wetzel.
Wenz German
Variant of Wentz
Wenzel German
Variant of Wentzel or from the given name Wenzel
Wepener South African, German
South African, German decent/history
Werdum German
Werdum is a municipality in the district of Wittmund, in Lower Saxony, Germany.
Wernersson Swedish
Means "son of Werner".
Wero Spanish (Latin American), Maori
Maori: Means "to cast a spear"... [more]
Wertheimer German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from Wertheim.
Weseloh German
German habitational name from a place so named near Hannover.
Wesner German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places named Wessen.
Wesolowski Polish
Meaning Happy men
Wesson English
Variant of Weston.
Westbay English (Rare)
It literally means "West Bay".
Westbroek Dutch
Dutch form of Westbrook.
Westbury English
English British surname originating as a place name. There are several Westbury villages, parishes and even Manors across England that have given the name Westbury to people who take up residence in or come from those places... [more]
Westdyke English
Name given to someone who lived on the west side of a dyke.
Westen English, Scottish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Weston, from Old English west 'west' + tun 'enclosure', 'settlement'. English: variant of Whetstone.
Wester German
From Middle High German wëster ‘westerly’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived to the west of a settlement, or a regional name for one who had migrated from further west.
Westergaard Danish
Danish variant of Westergård.
Westergård Swedish, Finnish
From Swedish väster meaning "west, western" combined with gård meaning "farm, yard, estate".
Westerly English
The name is originated from a term meaning 'winds from the West'. The name could be given to someone who is born in the west.
Westerman English
Topographical surname for someone who lived west of a settlement or someone who had moved to the west, from Old English westerne meaning "western" and mann meaning "man, person".
Westermann Low German
From Middle Low German wester meaning "westerly" and man meaning "man", making it a topographic surname for someone who lived west of a settlement or a regional surname for someone who had moved to the west... [more]
Westernmeir German
Of German decent.
Westgate English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a west gate in a city, or a habitual surname for someone from Westgate. It is derived from Middle English west meaning "west" and gate "gate" (or "street" in northern and eastern areas; from Old Norse gata).
Westhouse Dutch
West of the House, originating from the name VeistHuis
Westin Swedish
Variant spelling of Vestin.
Westlake English (Canadian)
Combined of West and Lake.
Westling Swedish
Combination of Swedish väst "west" and the common surname suffix -ling. A notable bearer is Prince Daniel (b. 1973), husband of Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden.
Westmeir English
Not avaliable.
Weston Dutch
Diminutive of Westenberg
Westrop English (British)
Viking name local to Somerset and several counties in the North East of England. Approximate meaning "place to the west of the village with the church".
Westwood English, Scottish
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Westwood, from Old English west "west" and wudu "wood".
Weton English
Variant of Weeton
Wettstein German (Rare)
North German: variant of Wetzstein, from Middle Low German wetsten "whetstone".
Wey English
Variant of Way.
Wharton English
Derived from an Olde English pre 7th Century river name Woefer.
Whately English
Old English location or occupational surname meaning "from the wheat meadow".
Whatley English
From any of the various places in England named with Old English hwæte "wheat" and leah "woodland clearing".
Wheeldon English
Habitational name from a place in Derbyshire named Wheeldon, from Old English hweol ‘wheel’ (referring perhaps to a rounded shape) + dun ‘hill’, or from Whielden in Buckinghamshire, which is named with hweol + denu ‘valley’.
Wheelwright English (British)
Middle English "maker of wheels"
Whent English
Topographical for someone who lived by a cross road, or perhaps a very sharp bend in the road. The derivation being from the Olde English pre 7th century word "wendan," meaning to wander.
Whetzel American
Altered spelling of German Wetzel.
Whineray English
Means "person from Whinneray", Cumbria, or "person who lives in a nook of land growing with gorse" (in either case from Old Norse hvin "whin, gorse" + vrá "nook of land"). It was borne by New Zealand rugby player Sir Wilson Whineray (1935-2012).
Whippet English
Possibly used as a nickname from the early 17th century English word whippet, meaning "to move briskly". A type of sighthound bears this name.
Whipple English
English surname of uncertain meaning. It might be a shortened form of “whippletree”; an early name for the dogwood. It may also be a variation of Whipp – an early surname for someone who carried out judicial punishments.
Whisman English
Variation of Wisman or Wiseman.
Whistler English
An English occupational surname, meaning "one who whistles."
Whitby English
English surname which was from either of two place names, that of a port in North Yorkshire (which comes from the Old Norse elements hvítr "white" (or Hvíti, a byname derived from it) combined with býr "farm") or a place in Cheshire (from Old English hwit "white" (i.e., "stone-built") and burh "fortress").
Whitcomb English (British)
means wide valley
Whitehouse English
the origin of this surname started in England where people were called Whitehouse when they painted their houses white.
Whitelaw Scottish
Scottish and northern English: habitational name from any of various places in the Scottish Borders called Whitelaw, from Old English hwit ‘white’ + hlaw ‘hill’.
Whiteman English
From a nickname (see White).
Whiteplume Arapaho
Native Arapaho Wyoming Montana
Whitfield English
It is locational from any or all of the places called Whitfield in the counties of Derbyshire, Kent, Northamptonshire and Northumberland, or from the villages called Whitefield in Lancashire, the Isle of Wight and Gloucestershire.
Whitgift English
Means "person from Whitgift", Yorkshire ("Hvítr's dowry"). This surname was borne by Anglican churchman John Whitgift (?1530-1604), archbishop of Canterbury 1583-1604 (in addition, Whitgift School is an independent day school for boys in South Croydon, founded in 1595 by John Whitgift; and Whitgift Centre is a complex of shops and offices in the middle of Croydon, Greater London, on a site previously occupied by Whitgift School).
Whitlam English
From a medieval nickname for a mild-mannered person (from Middle English whit "white" + lam "lamb"). This surname is borne by Australian Labour politician Gough Whitlam (1916-), prime minister 1972-75.
Whitley English
This surname is derived from a place name composed of Old English elements hwit meaning "white" and leah meaning "clearing, grove."
Whitlock English
Nickname for someone with white or fair hair, from Middle English whit ‘white’ + lock ‘tress’, ‘curl’. Compare Sherlock. ... [more]
Whitlow English
white hill” place name from east side of country in lower Northumbria perhaps? Or perhaps next lower shire.
Whitman English
From Middle English whit ‘white’ + man ‘man’, either a nickname with the same sense as White, or else an occupational name for a servant of a bearer of the nickname White.... [more]
Whitmarsh English
English habitational name from Whitemarsh, a place in the parish of Sedgehill, Wiltshire, named from Old English hwit ‘white’ (i.e. ‘phosphorescent’) + mersc ‘marsh’. Compare Whitmore.
Whitside English (Rare, ?)
Possibly a variant of Whiteside.
Whitson Scottish (Gallicized)
This surname originated in Lanarkshire in Scotland. The family held a seat from King Malcolm IV in 1153 in Wicestun.
Whitted Scottish
probably a reduced form of Whitehead
Whittington English
From a place name, meaning "Hwita’s settlement".
Whittlesey English
A habitational surname for someone from Whittlesey, an ancient market town in the Fenland district of Cambridgeshire in England. The town's name is derived from an unattested Old English personal name Wittel (or Witil), an occupational name given to a moneyer, and the Old English eg, meaning "island", also used to describe a piece of firm land in a fen... [more]
Whybrow English
From the medieval female personal name Wyburgh, literally "war-fortress". (Cf. Germanic cognate Wigburg.)
Wiącek Polish
Derived from the given name Wiecek (see Wieceslaw).
Wiatt English (American)
Americanized variant of Wyatt.
Wiberg Swedish
Combination of Old Norse víðr "forest, wood" (probably taken from a place name) and Swedish berg "mountain".
Wichayanee Thai
Meaning Unknown.
Wick English, German
English: topographic name for someone who lived in an outlying settlement dependent on a larger village, Old English wic (Latin vicus), or a habitational name from a place named with this word, of which there are examples in Berkshire, Gloucestershire, Somerset, and Worcestershire... [more]
Wickersham English
A habitational surname that originates from a lost medieval site or village of Norse origins.... [more]
Wickramanayake Sinhalese
From Sanskrit विक्रम (vikrama) meaning "stride, pace" or "valour" and नायक (nayaka) meaning "hero, leader".
Wickramaratne Sinhalese
From Sanskrit विक्रम (vikrama) meaning "stride, pace" or "valour" and रत्न (ratna) meaning "jewel, treasure".
Wickramasinghe Sinhalese
From Sanskrit विक्रम (vikrama) meaning "stride, pace" or "valour" and सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion".
Wickramasuriya Sinhalese
From Sanskrit विक्रम (vikrama) meaning "stride, pace" or "valour" and सूर्य (surya) meaning "sun".
Wicksey English
Two separate surnames, joined together to form Wicksey, when the Vikings invaded England. The name means "Dairy Farmer on the Marsh".
Wickstrand Swedish (Rare), Finnish (Rare)
Variant of Wikstrand, a surname composed of Swedish vik "bay" and strand "beach".
Wickström Swedish, Finland Swedish, Finnish
Variant of Wikström. A notable bearer was Finnish engineer John Wickström (1870–1959)
Widegren Swedish
Combination of Swedish vide "willow" and gren "branch".
Wideman English (American)
Americanized from of German Widemann or Weidmann.
Wideman Swedish (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Swedish Widman.
Widemann German
Derived from the given name Widiman, composed of Old High German witu "wood" or wit "wide" and man "man".
Widger English
From the Old English male personal name Wihtgār, literally "elf-spear".
Widjaja Indonesian
From the Indonesian word wijaya meaning "victory".
Widman Swedish
Meaning uncertain. Perhaps a combination of Old Swedish viþr "wood, forest" or vid "wide" and man "man". It is also possible, though less likely, that it is a re-spelling of Vikman, where the first element is Swedish vik "bay".
Widman German
Altered spelling of German Widmann.
Widmann German
Variant of Wiedmann ‘huntsman’ and Wideman.
Wie Korean
Means “top” in Korean. Most known for Korean American golfer Michelle Wie West
Wiebe German
From a short form of any of various Germanic personal names beginning with wig ‘battle’, ‘war.’
Wieczorek Polish
Means "bat" in Polish, used as a nickname for a person thought to resemble a bat, ultimately from wieczór meaning "evening".
Wiedemann German
Variation of Wideman.
Wiedmann Upper German
North German variant of Widemann (see Wideman).
Wiegel German
From a pet form of any of the various Germanic personal names beginning with the element wig 'battle', 'war'.
Wieland German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the given name Wieland.
Wielandt German
From the given name Wieland.
Wiemann Low German
Variant of Weinmann, from Middle Low German, Middle High German winman ‘viticulturalist’, ‘wine merchant’. Variant of Wiedemann... [more]
Wierczowokowski Polish
A polish surname that is not used anymore to often. It was common in Polish areas.
Wierzbicka Polish
Feminine form of Wierzbicki.
Wierzbowski Polish
Taken from the word wierzba meaning "willow", this name may have designated someone who lived near a willow tree.
Wiese German
Derived from the Old German word wisa, which means meadow.
Wiesel German, Jewish
Means "weasel" in German.
Wiesenthal German
Habitational name from any of various places called Wiesent(h)al.
Wiesenthal Jewish
Ornamental name from German Wiese "meadow" + Tal "valley".
Wieslander Swedish
Combination of an unexplained first element and the common surname suffix -lander.
Wiesner German
German: habitational name for someone from a place called Wiesen, or topographic name for someone who lived by a meadow, a derivative of Middle High German wise ‘meadow’.
Wiest Polish
Not available
Wiflin English (Rare)
Possibly derived from the elements wefa and land.
Wigger English
Derived from the word wicga "bug"
Wiggin English
Either (i) from the Germanic male personal name Wīgant, literally "warrior", introduced into England by the Normans; or (ii) from the Breton male personal name Wiucon, literally "worthy-noble", introduced into England by the Normans.
Wiggins English
Patronymic from the personal name Wiggin.
Wiggs English (British)
The surname Wiggs was first found in Leicestershire where they held a family seat from very ancient times, at Lennerlyde. This interesting name has two possible origins. The first being a metonymic occupational name for a maker of wedge-shaped bread, from the Medieval English "Wigge" meaning "wedge-shaped"... [more]
Wight Scottish, English
Nickname from Middle English wiht, wight "nimble, strong".
Wightman English
"Wight" in Anglo-saxon could refer to a "soul," a "being," or to "courage." It is similar to the different meanings of the words "spirit" and "spirited." ... [more]
Wigley English
Derived from the words wicga "bug" and leah "woodland, clearing"
Wiig Norwegian
Variant of Vik.
Wijayawickrama Sinhalese
Alternate transcription of Wijewickrama.
Wijeratne Sinhalese
From Sanskrit विजय (vijaya) meaning "victory" and रत्न (ratna) meaning "jewel, treasure".
Wijesekara Sinhalese
From Sanskrit विजय (vijaya) meaning "victory" and शेखर (shekhara) meaning "crest, peak, top".
Wijesinghe Sinhalese
From Sanskrit विजय (vijaya) meaning "victory" and सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion".
Wijesuriya Sinhalese
From Sanskrit विजय (vijaya) meaning "victory" and सूर्य (surya) meaning "sun".
Wijewickrama Sinhalese
From Sanskrit विजय​ (vijaya) meaning "victory" and विक्रम (vikrama) meaning "stride, pace" or "valour".
Wijk Swedish
Derived from Swedish vik "bay".
Wijngaard Dutch
Means "vineyard" in Dutch.
Wikén Swedish (Rare)
Combination of Swedish vik "bay" and the common surname suffix -én.
Wikström Swedish
Composed of the elements vik "bay" and ström "stream"
Wilberforce English
Means "person from Wilberfoss", Yorkshire ("Wilburh's ditch"). This is borne by Wilberforce University, a university in Xenia, Ohio, USA, founded in 1856 and named in honour of the British philanthropist and anti-slavery campaigner William Wilberforce (1759-1833)... [more]
Wilbraham English
Denoted a person hailing from Wilbraham in Cambridgeshire, England. The place name itself means "Wilburg's homestead or estate" in Old English, Wilburg or Wilburga allegedly referring to a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon princess who was given the lands later called Wilbraham by her father, King Penda of Mercia.
Wilburn English
A habitation name of uncertain origin found in the East Midlands. Speculation includes the possibility of the meaning "well" and "burn, borne" therefore meaning one who lived near a well or spring by a waterway crossing.
Wilcoxson English
Patronymic form of Wilcox which is derived from a diminutive of the given name William
Wilczek Polish
Diminutive form of Wilk, which means "wolf" in Polish.
Wild Medieval English, English, German, Jewish
English: from Middle English wild ‘wild’, ‘uncontrolled’ (Old English wilde), hence a nickname for a man of violent and undisciplined character, or a topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of overgrown uncultivated land.... [more]
Wildblood English
From a medieval nickname for a rakish or hot-headed person.
Wildin English
The former placename is composed of the Olde English pre 7th Century words "wilg", willow, and "denu", a valley; while the latter place in Worcestershire is derived from the Olde English personal name "Winela", plus the Olde English "dun", a hill or mountain.
Wildrick English
From German Wildreich, a medieval personal name, from Old High German wildi "wild".
Wildsmith English
Probably means "maker of wheels, wheelwright".
Wile Hungarian
no particular meaning. the word wile means to trick though.
Wilén Swedish, Finland Swedish, Finnish
Variant of Vilén or Willén (meanings uncertain, they might be variants of the same name).
Wiles English
Occupational name for a trapper or hunter, from Middle English wile "trap, snare". It could also be a nickname for a devious person.
Wilewski Polish
This indicates familial origin within the Masovian village of Wilewo.
Wilhelmsson Swedish
Means "son of Wilhelm".