Submitted Surnames Starting with W

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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
WRINN Irish (Anglicized)
From Irish Gaelic Ó Rinn "descendant of Rinn", a personal name perhaps based on reann "spear".
WRÓBEL Polish
Means "sparrow" in Polish.
WROBLESKI Polish
from Polish "wroble" wren.
WRZESIŃSKI Polish
habitational name for someone from a place called Września in Poznań voivodeship, or a place called Wrzesina or Wrzesiny, named with wrzos ‘heather’.
WUBILIDOO Welsh Mythology
The last name of the Welsh god of Wubilidoo
WUJEK Polish
It literally means "uncle" in Polish but it could possibly refer to the Polesian village of the same name.
WULANDARI Indonesian
A notable bearer is Indonesian pop singer Rini Wulandari (1990-).
WULFHART German
Could mean "brave wolf" from the German elements "wulf" (variant of "wolf") and "hard" (meaning "brave, hardy").
WUORI Finnish
"mountain"
WÜRDEMANN German
From the German "Würde"-honour or dignity, and "Mann"-man or person. "Man of Honour" or "Person of Dignity".
WURDEMANN German (Rare)
This is a German surname, also spelled WÜRDEMANN (original) and often rendered as WUERDEMANN in English. It come from the German "würde", "dignity" or "honor" and "mann", meaning "man" or "person".... [more]
WURNIG German
German origin from the place name am Virgen originally meaning a person from the town of Virgen in Tyrol. Construed as a family name in 1501.
WURSTER German
Derived from German Wurst (Middle High German wurst) "sausage" and thus either denoted a butcher who specialized in the production of sausages, or was used as a nickname for a plump person or someone who was particularly fond of sausages.
WURÐINGTUN English
Habitational name from places in Lancashire and Leicestershire named Worthington; both may have originally been named in Old English as Wurðingtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Wurð", but it is also possible that the first element was Old English worðign, a derivative of worð ‘enclosure’.
WÜRTTEMBERG German
Württemberg is an historical German territory. Together with Baden and Hohenzollern, two other historical territories, it now forms the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg.
WURTZ German
A metonymic occupational name for a greengrocer or grower or seller of herbs, from Middle High German würz, meaning ‘herb’.
WYANDT German
Americanized form of German WIEGAND... [more]
WYCHERLEY English
Derived from a place name apparently meaning "elm-wood clearing" from Old English wice and leah. A famous bearer was the dramatist William Wycherley (1640-1715).
WYCKOFF Dutch
name for someone living at the main farm in a district, from Dutch wijk ‘district’ + hof ‘farmstead’, ‘manor farm’.
WYCKOFF East Frisian (Rare)
The North Germanic meaning is "settlement on a bay," as in the cognate Viking (Viking is derived from Old Norse vík "bay").
WYKES Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English wic, roughly meaning "farm." The plural form is a patronymic of which is "son of Wic."... [more]
WYLDE English (British)
It is a nickname for a person who was of wild or undisciplined character. Looking back even further, the name was originally derived from the Old English word "wilde," meaning "untamed" or "uncivilized."... [more]
WYLDEN English
Variant of Wilden.
WYLER English
English: variant of Wheeler or a respelling of Jewish Weiler.
WYLIE Medieval English
It is of locational origin, and derives from the places called Willey in the counties of Cheshire, Herefordshire, Shropshire, Warwickshire, Devonshire and Surrey.
WYMER English
Either (i) from the medieval male personal name Wymer (from Old English Wīgmǣr, literally "war-famous"); or (ii) from the Old Breton male personal name Wiumarch, literally "worthy-horse".
WYND Scottish, Irish
Scotland or Ireland not sure of original origin. There was a childe Wynd some type of royal who slayed a dragon type thing worm or something and a Henery Wynd who was a mercenary in a battle at north inch in Scotland
WYNN Welsh, English
The surname Wynn ,(also spelled Winn, and Gwynn), is derived from the Welsh element, Gwynn, which can loosely be translated as "white" or "fair". It features in the name of the North Welsh kingdom of Gwynedd, (meaning "white head" or "white land")... [more]
WYNTER English
Variant of Winter.
WYOMING English (American)
From the name of the US state.
WYSOKIŃSKI Polish
This indicates familial origin within the Lesser Polish village of Wysokin.
WYSZYŃSKI Polish
It indicates familial origin within any of several Podlachian villages named ''Wyszonki''.