Submitted Surnames Starting with W

usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Wilkes English, Frisian
English: patronymic from Wilk.... [more]
Wilkings English
It means Will to the king
Wilkosz Polish
Derivative of Wilk.
Wilks English
Variant of Wilkes.
Will Scottish, English, German
Scottish and northern English from the medieval personal name Will, a short form of William, or from some other medieval personal names with this first element, for example Wilbert or Willard... [more]
Wille German
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names beginning Willi-, as for example, Willibrant, Willihart.
Willett English
From a pet form of Will, or an Americanized form of French Ouellette.
Willing English
Patronymic from the Old English personal name Willa.
Willingham English
Habitational name from a place named Willingham, notably one in Cambridgeshire and one in Suffolk. The first is recorded in Domesday Book as Wivelingham "homestead (Old English hām) of the people of a man called Wifel".
Willman English
Occupational name for someone who was the servant of a man called Will.
Willock English
From the medieval male personal name Willoc, a pet-form based on the first syllable of any of a range of Old English compound names beginning with willa "will, desire".
Willows English (British)
This is an English residential or perhaps occupational surname. It may originate from one of the various places in England called 'The Willows', or even a place such as Newton le Willows in Lancashire, or it may describe a supplier of willow.
Wills English
Patronymic from Will.
Wills German
Patronymic from any of the Germanic personal names beginning with wil "will, desire".
Wimmer German
Occupational last name, meaning "wine maker," using a derivation of the element Wein (meaning "wine") and likely another derivation from -macher (meaning "maker"). It's possible as well that it is derived from Weimann.
Wimp English
The surname has at least two origins. The first is occupational and describes a maker of 'wimplels', an Old English veil later much associated with nuns. Second, it may also be locational from the village of Whimple in Devonshire, or Wimpole in Cambridge.
Wimpey English
Perhaps a deliberate alteration of Impey. It is borne by George Wimpey, a British construction company, founded in Hammersmith, London in 1880 by George Wimpey (1855-1913)... [more]
Win Dutch, English
Dutch: variant of Winne. ... [more]
Winchel English
from Old English wencel ‘child’, perhaps used to distinguish a son from his father with the same forename or perhaps a nickname for a person with a baby face or childlike manner
Wind English, German, Danish
Nickname for a swift runner, from Middle English wind "wind", Middle High German wint "wind", also "greyhound".
Wind English
Topographic name for someone who lived near a pathway, alleyway, or road, Old English (ge)wind (from windan "to go").
Wind Swedish (Rare)
From Swedish vind "wind". It's either ornamental or a habitational name derived from a place named with this element.
Wind German
Variant of Wendt.
Windenburg German, Ancient Germanic
Means "Windy Castle" in German.
Windham English, Irish (Anglicized)
English habitational name from Wyndham in West Sussex, near West Grinstead, probably named from an unattested Old English personal name Winda + Old English hamm ‘water meadow’; or from Wymondham in Leicestershire and Norfolk, named from the Old English personal name Wigmund (see Wyman) + Old English ham ‘homestead’... [more]
Winegardner English (American)
Anglicized form of the German occupational surname Weingartner. A known bearer of this surname is the American writer Mark Winegardner (b. 1961).
Winehouse Jewish, German
Anglicized variant of German and Yiddish 'Weinhaus'. From German wein, 'vine, grapevine' and haus 'house, building, home', likely indicating a house with a vineyard. ... [more]
Winford English
English location name meaning "from a white ford or water crossing" or "from a meadow ford".
Winfred English
From the given name Winfred.
Winfrey English
From the Old English personal name Winfrith, literally "friend-peace". A famous bearer of this surname is Oprah Winfrey (1954-), a US television talk-show presenter.
Winkel German, Jewish, Dutch, Belgian
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner of land in the country or a street corner in a town or city, from Middle High German winkel, German Winkel ‘corner’... [more]
Winkelmann German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner or kept a corner shop (see Winkel), with the addition of Middle High German man, German Mann ‘man’... [more]
Winkie English
For someone who came from Winkley.
Winkle English
it's said to originate from the village of Wincle, near the town of Macclesfield in the county of Cheshire.
Winks English
Variant of Winch
Winky English
For someone who came from Winkley.
Winne Dutch, English
Dutch: occupational name for an agricultural worker, Middle Low German winne ‘peasant’. ... [more]
Winney English
Derived from an unattested Old English given name, *Wyngeofu, composed of the elements wyn "joy" and geofu "battle".... [more]
Winnick English (Rare)
Habitational name for someone from a place called Winwick, for example in Northamptonshire or Cambridgeshire, both of which are named from the Old English personal name Wina + wic 'outlying dairy farm or settlement'.
Winninger German
Probably denoted a person from the municipality of Winningen in the state of Rhineland-Palatinate in western Germany.
Winsett English
From an English surname of unexplained origin, perhaps related to Winslow, Winston or Windsor.
Winsininski Polish (Anglicized)
Winsininski is an anglicized version of the name "Wisniewski", which is from multiple places in Poland called Wisniewo, Wisniew, and Wisniewa. These names all have "wisna" which means cherry, or cherry tree.... [more]
Winstanley English
Means "person from Winstanley", Lancashire ("Wynnstān's glade", Wynnstān being an Old English male personal name, literally "joy-stone"; cf. Winston)... [more]
Winterberg German
Habitational name from any of several places named with Middle High German winter "winter" and berg "mountain".
Winterbourn English
A variant spelling of the surname Winterbourne, means "winter stream", a stream or river that is dry through the summer months.
Winterbourne English (British)
Probably meaning "winter stream". A large village in Gloucestershire, From the Thomas Hardy novel "The Woodlanders".
Winterfield English
From the English words "Winter" and "Field".
Winters English, German
Patronymic form of Winter.
Winterson English
Patronymic form of Winter.
Wiredu Akan
Meaning unknown.
Wirkola Kven
Norwegian Variant of Virkkula.
Wirta Finnish
From virta ‘stream’, used as a topographic name, also as a soldier’s name in the 17th century. Also adopted as an ornamental name, especially in western and southern Finland.
Wirtz German
One who acted as host in a tavern or inn.
Wise English
Nickname for a wise or learned person, or in some cases a nickname for someone suspected of being acquainted with the occult arts, from Middle English wise "wise" (Old English wis). This name has also absorbed Dutch Wijs, a nickname meaning "wise", and possibly cognates in other languages.
Wiseau English (American, Rare)
Meaning unknown, believed to be derived from French oiseau, meaning bird. As a surname, it is born by American Director Tommy Wiseau.
Wish English
Topographic name for someone who lived by a water meadow or marsh, Middle English wyshe (Old English wisc). Americanized spelling of Wisch.
Wisneski Polish
A derivate of Wisniewski, which is said to mean "The Little Cherry Tree"
Wisp English
The surname of the author of Quidditch Through The Ages in the Harry Potter Universe, Kennilworthy Whisp. Probably referring to the wind, or a family of people who usually were nearly bald.
Wissmach German
I think it is German
Witek Polish, English (Rare)
from the personal name Wit, a short form of Witold, a derivative of Lithuanian Vytautas, a compound of vyti 'to guide' + tauta 'the people'... [more]
Withall English
"Withall" comes from the village of "Cornwall" called "Withiel." There is also a connection to an aristocratic level, in the 15th at Henry VII court a noble man and knight went under the family name "Wit-hall"... [more]
Withycombe English
Willow Valley. ... [more]
Witkowski Polish
Name for someone from any of various places called Witkowo, Witków or Witkowice, all derived from the given name Witek.
Witly English
Variant of Whitley, a habitational name from any of various places named with Old English hwit ‘white’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’.
Witt English
Variant of White.
Witt German
Either from the given name Wittigo or from Middle Low German witte "white", a nickname for a pale person or someone with white hair.
Witte Dutch
Nickname for someone with white or blonde hair or an unusually pale complexion, from Middle Dutch witte "white".
Witten Low German
North German patronymic from Witte.
Wittenberg Low German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Wittenberg, Wittenberge, or Wittenbergen.
Wittenborn Low German
Habitational name from any of several places so named, for example near Bad Segeberg and near Neubrandenburg.
Witter German
From a Germanic personal name, composed of the elements widu "wood" and hari "army".
Wittlin Jewish
Eastern Ashkenazic, from the Yiddish female personal name Vitle, a pet form of Vite combined with the eastern Slavic suffix -in
Wittman German
Wittman was first found in the Palatinate in the Rhineland valley. The surname Wittman was given to someone who lived in the area that was referred to as widem which was originally derived from the German word denoting church property.
Witz German, Jewish
From the medieval personal name Witzo, a short form of any of several Germanic compound names beginning with wig ‘battle’... [more]
Witzel German
The German surname is of patronymic origin, deriving from the name of the father of the original bearer.
Witzig German
German: nickname from Middle High German witzic ‘clever’, ‘prudent’, ‘knowing’.
Władysław Polish
four polish kings names
Wlodawski Jewish
Habitual surname from Włodawa, Poland. First seen in a 1806 revision list of the city Kobryn (Grodno Guberniya), now Kobryn Belarus. ... [more]
Włoszczowski Polish
This indicates familial origin within either of 2 Lesser Polish localities: the town of Włoszczowa or the village of Włoszczowice.
Wodda Indian, Tamil
Another form of Odda.
Wodehouse English
The name "de Wodehouse" is attested as early as in the 11th century, of one Bertram, of Wodehouse-tower, Yorkshire, who lived at the time of the Norman conquest.... [more]
Wodziński Polish
Habitational name for someone from Wodzin in Piotrków voivodeship, named with Polish woda meaning "water".
Woehrle Ancient Germanic (Gothic)
Origin from Ohio Known for Farmers, less common occupation was Baker Farmer, Gardener and Bag Maker were the top 3 reported jobs.
Woelk German
German variant spelling of Wölk (see Wolk).
Woelke German
German variant spelling of Wölke, itself a variant of Wolk.
Wogan Irish
From the Old Welsh personal name Gwgan or Gwgon, originally probably a nickname meaning literally "little scowler". (Cf. the second element in Cadogan.) This surname is borne by Irish radio and television presenter Terry Wogan (1938-).
Wohl German, Yiddish
Meaning "pleasant" in both Middle German and Ashkenazic Yiddish
Wójcicki Polish
Habitational name for a person originally from a place called Wójcice.
Wojciechowska Polish
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Wojciechowo or Wojciechów, named with the personal name Wojciech.
Wójciński Polish
Habitational name for someone from any of the many places called Wójcin, or from Wójcina in Tarnów voivodeship, named with wójt meaning "village headman".
Wojick Polish
Pet form of the personal name Wojciech (see Voytek).
Wojtczak Polish
Polish: patronymic from Wojtek, a pet form of the personal name Wojciech ( see Voytek ).
Wolfhard English (Rare)
This name derives from the Old High German name “Wolfhard”, composed of two elements: the “*-wulfaz” (wolf) plus “*harduz / *hardu-” (hard, strong, brave, valiant, powerful one). In turn the name means “the one who is strong like a wolf”.
Wolfit English
From the medieval male personal name Wolfet or Wolfat (from Old English Wulfgēat, literally "wolf-Geat" (the name of a Germanic people)). This surname was borne by Sir Donald Wolfit (1902-1968), a British actor and manager.
Wolfmeyer German
From German wolf "wolf" and meyer "tenant farmer".
Wolford German
Means where the wolves cross the river/stream. Wolf meaning the animal and Ford meaning crossing a body of shallow water.... [more]
Wolfram English, German
From the given name Wolfram.
Wolfson English
Means "son of Wolf" in English.
Wolk German, American
Surname derived from a northern German short form of the given name Walter.
Wolken German
Surname derived from a diminutive of the given name Wolter, a Low German form of Walter.... [more]
Wolkers Dutch
Dutch from Walker.
Wollschläger German
Occupational name for someone who prepared wool for spinning by washing and combing or carding it, from Middle High German wolle(n)slaher, -sleger, Middle Low German wullensleger (literally ‘wool beater’).
Wollstonecraft Anglo-Saxon
Wollstonecraft derived originally from the Saxon name of Wulfstan which later developed into Wol(f)stan. The name means wolf stone and is one of a number of names based on Wolf.... [more]
Wolowitz Jewish
This is the surname of the character Howard in the American television show "The Big Bang Theory".
Wolsey English
From the medieval male personal name Wulsi (from Old English Wulfsige, literally "wolf-victory"). A famous bearer of the surname was English churchman and statesman Thomas Wolsey (Cardinal Wolsey), ?1475-1530.
Wolstenholme English (British, Rare)
A famous bearer is Chris Wolstenholme, bassist and sometimes vocalist of British alternative rock band Muse.
Wolston English
From the Middle English personal name Wolfstan or Wolstan, Old English Wulfstan, composed of the elements wulf ‘wolf’ + stan stone or a habitational name from any of a large number of places called Woolston(e) or Wollston, all of which are named with Old English personal names containing the first element Wulf (Wulfheah, Wulfhelm, Wulfric, Wulfsige, and Wulfweard) + Old English tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’.
Woltring Dutch
Derived from the German or Germanic name "Woltering".... [more]
Wolveridge English (British)
Derived from the personal name Wulfric.
Wonai Shona
It is a form of the Shona name Onai.
Wondergem Dutch
gem cutter or gem setter-jewler
Wongai Shona
It is a form of the Shona name Vongai
Wongchai Thai
From Thai วงศ์ (wong) meaning "lineage, family, dynasty" and ไชย (chai) meaning "victory".
Wongkaeo Thai
From Thai วงศ์ or วงษ์ (wong) meaning "lineage, family, dynasty" and แก้ว (kaeo) meaning "crystal, glass, diamond".
Wongkham Thai
From Thai วงศ์ (wong) meaning "lineage, family, dynasty" and คำ (kham) meaning "gold".
Wongphakdi Thai
From Thai วง (wong) meaning "lineage, family, dynasty" and ภักดี (phakdi) meaning "devotion, loyalty".
Wongsawat Thai
From Thai วงศ์ (wong) meaning "lineage, family, dynasty" and สวัสดิ์ (sawat) meaning "happiness".
Wongsuwan Thai
From Thai วงศ์ (wong) meaning "lineage, family, dynasty" and สุวรรณ (suwan) meaning "gold".
Wongyai Thai
From Thai วงศ์ (wong) meaning "lineage, family, dynasty" and ใหญ่ (yai) meaning "big, large, great".
Woo Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of Hu.
Woo Korean
Woo is a spelling variant of ‘Wu’ referring to an ancient state of ‘Wu’. It is located in the Jiangsu province.
Woodbine English (Rare)
From the English word "woodbine" that means "honeysuckle(plant)"in English.It seems uncommon in the English-speak culture for a surname.Also some American place names,too.
Woodbridge English
Originated in old England and likely linked to the town of Woodbridge in Suffolk, East Anglia, United Kingdom. Well known Woodbridge's include the Australian Tennis player Todd Woodbridge. There was a famous lineage of six English John Woodbridge's in the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries, all Church ministers... [more]
Woodfall English
English surname used as a first name. The name means "dweller by a fold in the woods" - in this case, "fold" means "sheep-pen".... [more]
Woodfork English
"fork in the road in woodland"
Woodger English (British)
Woodger comes from the occupation of wood cutter in old english
Woodley English (American)
"From the wooded meadow". The actress Shailene Woodley's last surname
Woodlock Irish, French, English
From an Old English personal name, Wudlac, composed of the elements wudu ‘wood’ + lac ‘play’, ‘sport’.
Woodman English
Occupational name for a woodcutter or a forester (compare Woodward), or topographic name for someone who lived in the woods. ... [more]
Woodnut English
From a rare Anglo-Saxon personal name meaning "bold as Wade" and meant to honor the legendary Germanic sea-giant named Wade.
Woodruff English
Topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of land where woodruff grew, Anglo-Saxon wudurofe composed of wudu "wood" with a second element of unknown origin.
Woodson English
From a location in Yorkshire, England earlier spelled Woodsome and meaning "from the houses in the wood" or possibly a patronymic meaning "descendant of a wood cutter or forester."
Woodwin English (British)
Mix of words "Wood" and "Win".
Wooldridge English
From the medieval personal name Wolrich (from Old English Wulfrīc, literally "wolf-power").
Woolever German
Morphed from the German surname Wohleber which means well-liver
Woolgar English
From the medieval male personal name Wolgar (from Old English Wulfgār, literally "wolf-spear").
Woolley English
A habitational name from any of various places so-called. Most, including those in Berkshire, Cambridgeshire, and West Yorkshire in England, are derived from the Old English wulf, meaning "wolf", and leah, meaning "wood" or "clearing"... [more]
Woolnough English
From the medieval male personal name Wolnoth or Wolnaugh (from Old English Wulfnōth, literally "wolf-daring").
Woosencraft Welsh
though this surname has an exotic look & attracts legends, it has it's origins in the Lancashire place name Wolstencraft, from elements Wulfstan (personal name) + croft ("enclosure")
Wooten English
Habitational name from any of the extremely numerous places named with Old English wudu "wood" + tun "enclosure", "settlement",
Worden English
Guardian
Work Scottish
Scottish: habitational name from the lands of Work in the parish of St. Ola, Orkney.
Workman English
Ostensibly an occupational name for a laborer, derived from Middle English work and man. According to a gloss, the term was used in the Middle Ages to denote an ambidextrous person, and the surname may also be a nickname in this sense.
Worley English
mostly found in Lancashire and Sussex. very old english surname. something to do with a hill near a stream.
Worship English (British)
Registered with the Guild of One Name Studies... [more]
Worsley English
Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational surname from either of the places called Worsley in Lancashire and in Worcestershire. The place in Lancashire was recorded as "Werkesleia" in 1196, and means Weorchaeth's wood or glade, derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Weorchaeth", from weorc, work, fortification, and leah, a wood, or clearing in a wood... [more]
Worth English
From the Old English WORÞ, meaning "enclosure".
Worthington English
Habitational name from places in Lancashire and Leicestershire named Worthington; both may have originally been named in Old English as Wurðingtun "settlement (Old English tun) associated with Wurð", but it is also possible that the first element was Old English worðign, a derivative of worð ‘enclosure’.
Woulfe English, Irish
English: variant spelling of Wolf. ... [more]
Wowereit German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "squirrel", from Old Prussian wowere and Lithuanian voveraite (which, apart from "squirrel", also means "chanterelle").... [more]
Woytek Czech, Slovak, Polish
Eastern European surname of unknown meaning. A variant of Vojtek.
Wozniak Polish (Expatriate)
Unaccented form of Woźniak primarily used outside of Poland.
Woźniakowa Polish (Archaic), Jewish
Archaic feminine spelling of Woźniak.
Wozzek German
Germanized form of Voytek.
Wrangler English
Given to a person who worked as a wrangler.
Wraye English
Variant of the habitational name Wray or Ray, from any of various minor places in northern England named Wray, Wrea, or Wreay, from Old Norse vrá ‘nook’, ‘corner’, ‘recess’.
Wrbanek Polish
Polish, Czech (Urbánek), and Sorbian: from a pet form of the personal name Urban . The surname is also established in Germany.
Wren English
Nickname from the bird, Middle English wrenne, probably in reference to its small size.
Wrenn English
Derived from the surname Wren... [more]
Wretman Swedish
Combination of Swedish vret "remote small field situated some distance away from a bigger field" and man "man".
Wrieden Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Fried or a short form of any of the various compound names beginning Frieden of the same derivation.
Wriedt German, Dutch
Nickname from Middle Low German wrēt, wrede meaning "fierce", "evil", "angry".
Wrightson English
Means "son of Wright".
Wrinn Irish (Anglicized)
From Irish Gaelic Ó Rinn "descendant of Rinn", a personal name perhaps based on reann "spear".
Wróbel Polish
Means "sparrow" in Polish.
Wrobleski Polish
from Polish "wroble" wren.
Wroldsen Norwegian
Means "son of Wrold" in Norwegian.
Wryta Norman
Old Norse Men Normans Wryta brothers fought with William The Conqueror at Battle of Hastings onto King Henry VIII granting landed, gentry, coat of arms, baronetcy, and lord title to Sir John Wright of Kelvedon Hall ESsex on 6/20/1509
Wrzesiński Polish
Name for someone from a place called Września, Wrzesina or Wrzesiny, all derived from Polish wrzos meaning "heather".
Wujek Polish
It literally means "uncle" in Polish but it could possibly refer to the Polesian village of the same name.
Wulfhart German
Could mean "brave wolf" from the German elements "wulf" (variant of "wolf") and "hard" (meaning "brave, hardy").
Wulflam Low German
Name of the mayor of Stralsund Bertram Wulflam and his son Wulfhard Wulflam.
Wunder German
Miracle