Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is IPeeOnApples.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Alaee English
1 English: variant spelling of Alley .... [more]
Antolin Spanish
1 Spanish (Antolín): from the personal name, a vernacular form of Antoninus, a name borne by thirteen saints.... [more]
Armellino Italian
Italian: of uncertain origin; possibly from a masculinized form of Armellina, an old female personal name derived from Latin animula, a diminutive of anima ‘spirit’, ‘soul’.
Baechli German
South German (Bächle): Swabian variant of Bach, from a diminutive of Middle High German bach ‘stream’.
Baggerly English
English: variant of Bagley .
Bala Indian
1 Indian (Gujarat and Bombay city): Parsi name, probably from Persian bālā ‘high’, ‘exalted’.... [more]
Baldis Frisian
Frisian, Dutch, and North German: from a reduced and altered form of the personal name Balthasar (see Baltazar).
Banuelos Spanish
Spanish (Bañuelos): habitational name from any of various places, primarily Bañuelos de Bureba in Burgos, named for their public baths, from a diminutive of baños ‘baths’ (see Banos)
Baylon Spanish
Spanish: variant of Bailón ( see Bailon ).
Beall English
English and Scottish: variant spelling of Beal.
Beals English
English: patronymic from Beal.
Beisel German
German:... [more]
Berthiaume French
French: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’ + helm ‘helmet’.
Bhole German
1 North German: nickname for a male relative, colleague in a guild or fraternity, or lover, Middle Low German bōle.... [more]
Bhuiya Bengali
Bangladeshi: from Bengali bhuyyan ‘landlord’, ‘chieftain’. Bearers of this surname claim descent from one of the twelve chieftains (nine Muslims and three Hindus), who ruled the Sultanate of Bengal (1336–1576)... [more]
Birdee English
Probably a variant spelling of English Burden .
Blankenbeckler German
German: variant of Blankenbacher ( see Blankenbaker ).
Blemker Dutch
Dutch: occupational name for a bleacher of textiles, Middle Dutch ble(e)kere.
Bocanegra Spanish
Spanish: nickname from boca ‘mouth’ + negra ‘black’, denoting a foul-mouthed or abusive person. In the form Boccanegra, this surname has also been long established in Italy.
Bottomley English
English (Yorkshire and Lancashire): habitational name from a place in West Yorkshire named Bottomley, from Old English botm ‘broad valley’ + lēah ‘woodland clearing’.
Bourn English
English: variant of Bourne .
Bremner Scottish
Scottish: regional name for someone from Brabant in the Low Countries, from Older Scots Brebner, Brabanare, ‘native or inhabitant of Brabant’ ( see Brabant ).
Broadhead English
1 English (Yorkshire): topographic name for someone who lived by a broad headland, i.e. a spur of a mountain, from Middle English brode ‘broad’ + heved ‘head’.... [more]
Buelna Asturian
Asturian-Leonese and Spanish: habitational name from any of the places called Buelna in Asturies and Cantabria.
Buenaventura Spanish
Spanish: from the personal name Buenaventura meaning ‘good fortune’, bestowed as an omen name or with specific reference to the Italian bishop and theologian St Bonaventura (canonized in the 14th century).
Cababa Spanish
Spanish (Cabaña) and Portuguese: habitational name from a place named with Spanish cabaña ‘hut’, ‘cabin’ (Late Latin capanna , a word of Celtic or Germanic origin).
Campanano Italian
Southern Italian:... [more]
Canales Spanish
Spanish: habitational name from any of several places called Canales, from canales, plural of canal ‘canal’, ‘water channel’, from Latin canalis.
Carleton English
English: variant spelling of Carlton.
Carniglia Italian
Italian: perhaps from Sicilian cirniglia, cirnigliu, an occupational name for a grain sifter or winnower.
Casaday Irish
Variant spelling of Irish Cassidy .
Chacon Spanish
Spanish (Chacón): nickname from chacón ‘gecko’.
Chell French
Probably a respelling of the French habitational name Challe, from any of the various places so named from Late Latin cala ‘rock shelter’.
Clavero English
1 English: occupational name from Old French clavier ‘doorkeeper’ (from Latin clavis ‘key’).... [more]
Clester English (American)
Probably an Americanized form of Dutch Klooster .
Cluxton English
Altered form of English Claxton.
Colbourn English
English: variant spelling of Colburn .
Conde Spanish
1 Spanish and Portuguese: “nickname from the title of rank conde ‘count’, a derivative of Latin comes, comitis ‘companion’.”... [more]
Cookinham Jewish (Americanized)
This has the form of an English habitational name; however, there is no record of any such place name in the British Isles, and the surname does not appear in present-day records. It is probably an Americanized form of Jewish Guggenheim .
Council English
1 English: nickname for a wise or thoughtful man, from Anglo-Norman French counseil ‘consultation’, ‘deliberation’, also ‘counsel’, ‘advice’ (Latin consilium, from consulere ‘to consult’)... [more]
Cranford English
English: habitational name from any of several places, for example in the county of Middlesex (now part of Greater London) and Northamptonshire (Cranford St. Andrew and Cranford St. John), named with Old English cran ‘crane’ + ford ‘ford’.
Crider German
Americanized spelling of German Kreider.
Cuadra Asturian
Asturian-Leonese: probably a habitational name from a place in Asturies called Cuadra.
Cuarto Italian
Italian:... [more]
Danneberg Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic): possibly a habitational name from any of various places in Germany named Dannenberg.
Debarros Portuguese
Portuguese: habitational name for someone ‘from (de) Barros’, of which there are numerous examples, all named from the plural of barro ‘clay’.
Deitz German
Variant spelling of German Dietz.
Dema Spanish
1 Spanish: unexplained; it is associated with Uesca province, in Aragon.... [more]
Dickey Irish
Northern Irish: from a pet form of the personal name Dick 1.
Diem German
German: from a reduced form of the personal name Dietmar ( see Dittmar ).
Dills English (American)
1 Variant spelling of Dutch Dils .... [more]
Disharoon French (Americanized)
Americanized form of an unidentified French name, possibly de Charente. This name was established in MD by the end of the 17th century.
Dobesh Czech (Americanized)
Americanized spelling of Czech Dobeš, from the Czech personal name Tobiáš, or of German Döbesch, from the same Czech personal name or some other Slavic form of Tobias .
Doerner German
German (Dörner): see Dorner .
Dopson English
Means "son of Dobbe".
Eiler German
1 North German: variant of Ehlert.... [more]
Engelmann German
1 German: variant of Engel 1, with the addition of the personal suffix -mann ‘man’, sometimes denoting a pet form.... [more]
Engin Scottish
Scottish: habitational name from Elgin, a place in Moray.
Estremera Spanish
Spanish: habitational name from a place in Madrid province called Estremera.
Fambro English
Variant of English Fambrough.
Farooqi Muslim
Muslim: Arabic family name (Fārūqī), denoting someone descended from or associated with someone called Farooq , in particular a descendant of the khalif ῾Umar.
Ffrench English
English and Scottish:... [more]
Friis Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Variant of Fries, found predominantly in Denmark.
Fusi Italian
Italian: of uncertain origin; it could be Greek, compare modern Greek Soyses, or alternatively, Caracausi suggests, of Arabic or Hebrew origin.
Ganesan Indian
Indian (Kerala, Tamil Nadu): Hindu name from Sanskrit gaṇeṣa ‘lord of the army’ ( see Ganesh ) + the Tamil-Malayalam third-person masculine singular suffix -n. This is found only as a given name in India, but has come to be used as a family name in the U.S.
Ganji Japanese
Japanese: rare in Japan, the name is written with characters meaning ‘red’ and ‘govern’. The actual meaning is unclear.
Ge Chinese
From Chinese 葛 (gé) referring to the ancient state of Ge, which existed during the Xia dynasty in what is now Henan province.
Gloff German
German and Swiss German: from the Germanic personal name Egilolf, composed of the elements agi(l) ‘edge’, ‘point’ (of a sword) + wolf ‘wolf’, cognate with Old English Ecgwulf. This was the name of several Lombard kings (ancestors of the Bavarian ducal line of the Agilolfinger), who introduced the name to Italy.
Godil English
English: habitational name for someone from Gadshill in Kent, either of two places called Godshill in Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, or Godsell Farm in Wiltshire, which were all originally named Godeshyll ‘God's hill’.
Greet German
Americanized form of German Fried.
Guiles French
Of uncertain origin; it could be a variant of French Guill or of English Guile or Giles .
Gum German
North German:... [more]
Hartung German
German, Dutch, and Danish: from a Germanic personal name, a derivative (originally a patronymic) of compound names beginning with hart ‘hardy’, ‘strong’.
Hershman Jewish
1 Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Hirschman.... [more]
Hodapp German
1 South German: probably a nickname for a clumsy person, from Middle High German hōh ‘high’, ‘tall’ + the dialect word dapp ‘fool’.... [more]
Horner English
1 English, Scottish, German, and Dutch: from Horn 1 with the agent suffix -er; an occupational name for someone who made or sold small articles made of horn, a metonymic occupational name for someone who played a musical instrument made from the horn of an animal, or a topographic name for someone who lived at a ‘horn’ of land.... [more]
Hudspeth English
English (northeastern counties): unexplained. Compare Hedgepeth.
Hulbert English
1 English and German: from a Germanic personal name, Holbert, Hulbert, composed of the elements hold, huld ‘friendly’, ‘gracious’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’.... [more]
Hurl English
English (Suffolk): unexplained.
Ingles Spanish
Spanish (Inglés): ethnic term denoting someone of English origin, from Spanish Inglés ‘English’.
Ippolito Italian
Italian: from the personal name Ippolito (classical Greek Hippolytos, composed of the elements hippos ‘horse’ + lyein ‘loose’, ‘release’). This was the name of various minor early Christian saints... [more]
Iribe English
1 Southern English: unexplained.... [more]
Jared English
English: variant of Garrett .
Kad German
1 German: habitational name for someone from a place called Kade near Magdeburg, Kaaden (German name of Kadeň in North Bohemia), or Kaden in Westerwald.... [more]
Kalicki Polish
Polish: habitational name for someone from a place called Balice.
Karch Jewish
1 Jewish (Ashkenazic): Americanized spelling of Karcz .... [more]
Kercher German
1 Southern German variant of Karcher .... [more]
Kindem English
1 English: habitational name from a place in Derbyshire, of unknown etymology (probably a pre-English hill name, but the form is obscure).... [more]
Klin Slovene
Slovenian: nickname for someone with a beak-shaped nose, from kljun ‘beak’, ‘bill’ (old spelling klun).
Koev Dutch
1 Dutch: variant spelling of Coel, itself a variant of Kool .... [more]
Koger German
South German: occupational name for a knacker, from an agent derivative of koge ‘carrion’.
Korada Polish
Polish: nickname from porada ‘advice’, ‘counsel’.
Krolik Polish
1 Polish (Królik): from a diminutive of Polish król ‘king’ ( see Krol ).... [more]
Kuru Japanese
Japanese: though written with the character for ‘give’ or ‘present’, the original meaning may actually be ‘sunset’. The name is listed in the Shinsen shōjiroku and is no longer common in Japan, but there is a city by that name in Hiroshima prefecture and the area may have ancient connections with the family.
Lavine English
1 English: variant of Lavin 2.... [more]
Leighty English
Perhaps an altered spelling of the English family name Laity .
Lieu Vietnamese
Vietnamese (Liêu): unexplained.
Linhares Portuguese
Portuguese: habitational name from any of several places called Linhares, for example in Braganca, Guarda, and Vila Real, from the plural of linhar ‘flax field’ (Latin linare, a derivative of linum ‘flax’).
Loam English
1 English and Scottish: unexplained. The name is recorded in both England and Scotland. It may be a variant of Scottish Lour, a habitational name from Lour, formerly a part of the parish of Meathielour.... [more]
Lorrain French
French and English: variant spelling of Lorraine.
Lotfi Italian
Italian: patronymic or plural form of the personal name Lotto .
Lujano Spanish
Spanish: variant of Luján ( see Lujan ).
Maatta Italian
1 Southern Italian: from a feminine form of Matto .... [more]
Madariaga Basque
Basque: habitational name from any of various places in Gipuzkoa named Madariaga, from Basque madari ‘pear tree’ + -aga ‘place’.
Makkar Polish
Polish and Ukrainian: from the personal name Makary (Polish), Makar (Ukrainian), vernacular forms of the Greek ecclesiastical name Makarios meaning ‘blessed’.
Mallery English
1 English: see Mallory .... [more]
Manda Indian
1 Indian (Andhra Pradesh): Hindu (Brahman) name based on the name of a subgroup of Brahmans.... [more]
Mantilla Spanish
Spanish: from mantilla ‘mantilla’, ‘scarf worn over the head and shoulders’, presumably an occupational name for a maker of mantillas or a descriptive name for someone who habitually wore such a garment.
Mcdearmon Scottish
Scottish: variant of McDiarmid with excrescent -n-.
Mckewon Scottish
Scottish and northern Irish: variant of McEwen .
Meltzer German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): occupational name for a maltster, a brewer who used malt, from German Meltzer (an agent derivative of Middle High German malt ‘malt’, ‘germinated barley’), Yiddish meltser ‘maltster’... [more]
Mishler German
Americanized spelling of Swiss German Mischler .
Napper English
1 English: occupational name for a naperer, the servant in charge of the linen in use in a great house, Middle English, Old French nap(p)ier. Compare Scottish Napier .... [more]
Navida Galician
Galician and Asturian-Leonese: habitational name from either of two places named Navia, in Galicia and Asturies.
Neubert German
German (mainly Saxony): reduced form of Neubauer with excrescent -t. Compare Neuber .
Neumeyer German
German: distinguishing name for a newly appointed steward or tenant farmer, or one who was a newcomer to an area, from Middle High German niuwe ‘new’ + meier ‘steward’, ‘tenant farmer’ ( see Meyer 1)... [more]
Nevel German
1 German: variant of Nebel .... [more]
Nhan Vietnamese
Vietnamese: unexplained.
Ninberg Jewish
1 Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Feinberg .... [more]
Nipper German
1. habitational name for someone from Nippe in Hesse. ... [more]
Niu Chinese
1 Chinese 牛: this name probably arose during the Zhou dynasty ( 1122–221 bc ) in the area of Gansu province; the details are unclear. It was borne by a person named Niu Wen, who was a descendant of the eldest brother of the last king of the Shang dynasty, Zhou Xin ( 1154–1123 bc ).... [more]
Northcote Engli
English: variant of Northcutt.
Obermiller German (Americanized)
Partly Americanized form of German Obermüller, a topographic name for the miller at the ‘upper mill’.
O'day Irish
Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Deaghaidh (see O’Dea).
Okuna Polish
Polish (also Okuła): nickname for a lame person, from okuleć ‘to stumble or founder’, Old Polish okułac.
Olds English
English: patronymic from Old .
Ollison Danish (Americanized)
Americanized form of Olesen .
Oppedisano Italian
Italian: habitational name for someone from Oppido Mamertino in Reggio Calabria, so named from Latin oppidum ‘fortified place’, ‘stronghold’. The original settlement was destroyed by an earthquake in 1783 ; it was rebuilt on a site further south.
Opstad Norwegian
Norwegian: habitational name from any of ten farmsteads in southeastern Norway named Olstad, from a contracted form of Old Norse Ólafsstaðir, from the personal name Ólaf + staðir, plural of staðr ‘farmstead’, ‘dwelling’.
Orry English
1 English: unexplained.... [more]
Ouy French
Some derive this name from the French word "gui," meaning mistletoe. Others think it comes through the Celtic name "Kei," from Caius. Others belive the name comes from the French words "guide," a leader, or "guidon," a banner... [more]
Pacal German
South German: pet form of Pach .
Palmberg Swedish
Combination of Swedish palm "palm tree" and berg "mountain".
Pannala Finnish
Finnish: from the female personal name Anna + the local suffix -la. Found chiefly in Ostrobothnia.
Pease English
English: from Middle English pese ‘pea’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of peas, or a nickname for a small and insignificant person. The word was originally a collective singular (Old English peose, pise, from Latin pisa) from which the modern English vocabulary word pea is derived by folk etymology, the singular having been taken as a plural.
Pita Spanish
Spanish and Portuguese: from Spanish, Portuguese pita ‘chicken’ or in some cases possibly from the plant pita ‘pita’, ‘American aloe’, presumably a topographic name.
Piu Chinese
1 Chinese 牛: this name probably arose during the Zhou dynasty ( 1122–221 bc ) in the area of Gansu province; the details are unclear. It was borne by a person named Niu Wen, who was a descendant of the eldest brother of the last king of the Shang dynasty, Zhou Xin ( 1154–1123 bc ).... [more]
Portrey Jewish
Origin uncertain. Perhaps an altered form of Jewish Portnoy of North German Portner.
Procopio Italian
Italian (Calabria) and Greek (Prokopios): from the personal name Procopio, Greek Prokopios, from pro ‘before’, ‘in front’ + kopē ‘cut’, actually an omen name meaning ‘success’, ‘prosperity’ but as a Church name taken to mean ‘pioneer’ as it was the name of the first victim of Diocletian's persecutions in Palestine in AD 303... [more]
Rackers German
German (Räckers): in the Lower Rhine-Westphalia area, from a reduced form of Rädeker, itself a reduced form of Rademaker.
Rath German
1 German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): descriptive epithet for a wise person or counselor, from Middle High German rāt ‘counsel’, ‘advice’, German Rat ‘counsel’, ‘advice’, also ‘stock’, ‘supply’.... [more]
Reifinger German
1 German: perhaps a habitational name for someone from any of several places called Reiting in Bavaria and Austria, or from a Germanic personal name, a variant of Rediger .... [more]
Reinert German
North German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ragin ‘counsel’ + hard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’, for example Reinhard ( see Reinhardt ).
Rhea English
English: variant spelling of Rea.
Ricario Spanish
Spanish and Jewish (Sephardic): from the personal name Ricardo ( see Richard ).
Rick English
1 English: variant of Rich 2.... [more]
Ronchetto Italian
Italian: diminutive from a variant of Ronco .
Rosholt Norwegian
Norwegian: habitational name from either of two farms called Røsholt in southeastern Norway, named with Old Norse, either ross ‘mare’ or ruð ‘clearing’ + holt ‘grove’, ‘wood’.
Rosing German
1 German and Dutch: patronymic from a derivative of the medieval personal name Rozinus.... [more]
Sablad French (Americanized)
Perhaps an Americanized spelling of French Sablon, a topographic name for someone who lived in a sandy place, a derivative of Sable .
Sadile English
1 English (mostly Lancashire): probably a variant of Sale .... [more]
Saini Indian
Indian (Panjab): Hindu (Arora) and Sikh name derived from the name of an Arora clan.
Saipe English
English: perhaps a habitational name from a minor place in Wiltshire named Stype.
Sajin French
1 French: metonymic occupational name for a satin merchant or specialist satin weaver, from Middle French satin ‘satin’, a word of Arabic and (ultimately) Chinese origin, a derivative of the Chinese place name Tsinkiang, whence satin silk was brought to the Middle East and Europe in the Middle Ages.... [more]
Scherl German
Southern German: metonymic occupational name for a potter, from scherbe ‘pot’, ‘potsherd’.
Schoene German
German (Schöne): variant of Schoen 1.
Schramm German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): metonymic nickname for a person with a scar, from Middle High German schram(me), German Schramme, Yiddish shram ‘scar’.
Secrest German
Variant of German Siegrist.
Sereno Italian
1 Italian: from the personal name Sereno (from Latin serenus, serena ‘clear’, ‘calm’).... [more]
Shefts German (Americanized)
Probably an Americanized spelling of German Schütz( see Schuetz ).
Shemer Jewish
1 Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant spelling of Schimmer.... [more]
Shultz German (Americanized)
Americanized spelling of German Schultz , or a variant spelling of the Jewish name.
Siu Chinese
1 Chinese: see Xiao.... [more]
Soman Indian
Indian (Kerala, Tamil Nadu): Hindu name from Sanskrit soma ‘moon’ + the Tamil-Malayalam third-person masculine singular suffix -n. This is only a given name in India, but has come to be used as a family name in the U.S.
Steely English (American)
Americanized form of Swiss German Stühle, a variant of Stuhl .
Stepnowsky Polish
Polish (Stępnowski): habitational name for someone from Stępno in Kalisz voivodeship, named with stępać ‘to plod’ ( see Stepien ), or from a place called Stepnów, now in Ukraine.
Strahm German (Swiss)
Derived from Middle Hugh German strām "strip of land".
Sule Indian
1 Indian (Maharashtra); pronounced as two syllables: Hindu (Maratha) name, from Marathi suḷa ‘pointed tooth’, from Sanskrit šūla ‘spike’, ‘spear’.... [more]
Sulick German
Americanized form of German Auligk, a habitational name from a place in Saxony so named.
Swartzlander English (American)
Americanized form of German Schwarzländer, a habitational name for someone from an area of Bavaria known as Schwarzland ‘the black land’, from Middle High German swarz ‘black’ + land ‘land’.
Talavera Spanish
Spanish: habitational name from any of several places named Talavera, especially Talavera de la Reina in Toledo province.
Teates German (Americanized)
Probably an altered spelling of German Dieter .
Thalman German (Americanized)
Partly Americanized spelling of German Thalmann or Thälmann.
Thotti Italian
Italian: patronymic or plural form of Trotto .
Thulin Swedish
Meaning uncertain. Possibly derived from thule, an ancient Greek and Roman term for an area in northern Europe which some believe to be the Nordic countries.
Tinklenberg German
Probably of German origin, a habitational name from Tecklenburg in North Rhine-Westphalia.
Tomasyk Czech
Czech and Slovak (Tomášek) and German (under Slavic influence): from a pet form of the personal name, Czech Tomáš ( see Thomas ).
Trando Italian
Italian: from the Germanic (Lombardic) personal name Brando, a short form of the various compound personal names formed with brand ‘sword’, particularly Aldobrando and Ildebrando.
Tumber English
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called from their situation on a stream with this name. Humber is a common prehistoric river name, of uncertain origin and meaning.
Ucar Croatian
1 Croatian, Serbian, and eastern Slovenian: ironic nickname for an autocratic person, from car ‘tsar’.... [more]
Udom English
English: nickname for someone who had done well for himself by marrying the daughter of a prominent figure in the local community, from Middle English odam ‘son-in-law’ (Old English āðum).
Umlauf German
German: occupational name for a policeman in a town or city, from Middle High German umbe laufen ‘to make the rounds’.
Veca Italian
Southern Italian: possibly from vece ‘change’, ‘mutation’, ‘alternation’ (from Latin vix, vicis, plural vices), or from a pet form of a personal name formed with this element.
Vladi Czech
Czech, Slovak, and Romanian: from a short form of the personal name Vladislav, an old Slavic name composed of the elements volod ‘rule’ + slav ‘glory’, Latinized as Ladislaus and found in Hungarian as László ( see Laszlo ).
Vorac German
German: variant of Vorndran.
Walbridge English
English (Dorset): habitational name, probably from Wool Bridge in East Stoke, Dorset.
Warthen German
German: from a short form of the personal name Wartold, from Old High German wart ‘guardian’.
Weinheimer German
German: habitational name for someone from any of the places named Weinheim, for example in Baden and Hessen.
Weixel German
German: variant spelling of Weichsel, a topographic name for someone who lived near a sour cherry tree (St. Luce cherry), from Middle High German wīhsel (modern German Weichsel(n), pronounced ‘Weiksel’.
Wojtczak Polish
Polish: patronymic from Wojtek, a pet form of the personal name Wojciech ( see Voytek ).
Wrbanek Polish
Polish, Czech (Urbánek), and Sorbian: from a pet form of the personal name Urban . The surname is also established in Germany.
Wrieden Jewish
Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Fried or a short form of any of the various compound names beginning Frieden of the same derivation.
Zangara Italian
Southern Italian: from a feminine form of Zangaro ( see Zangari ).
Zink German
German:... [more]