German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Kuch German
German metonymic occupational name for a pastry cook, from German kuchen ‘cake’, or simply a variant of Koch ‘cook’.
Kuchenmeister German
Occupational name for a master cook (literally "kitchen master"), a court official.
Kuchler German (Rare)
Often confused with Küchler a name for a cookie baker, Kuchler is a noble name for an old german family. Kuchler is origined in a city named Kuchl at the border of todays german bavaria... [more]
Kues German, Dutch
Habitational name from Cues, now part of Bernkastel-Kues in the Rhineland Palatinate.
Kühl German, Low German
The spelling Kühl results from a folk-etymological association with High German kühl ‘cool’ (Middle High German küel(e), a nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’... [more]
Kuhlman German
Nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm.’
Kuhlmann German
German (also Kühlmann) nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’ (see Kuhl).
Kul German, Dutch
Derived from Old High German kol meaning "coal", perhaps an occupational name for a miner or coal seller.
Kulp German
anglicized version of Kolbe
Külper German
German cognate of Culpeper.
Kummerer Upper German (Germanized, Rare)
Kummerer means ""bringer of sorrow""
Kummerow German
Habitational name from any of various places in Brandenburg and Mecklenburg called Kummerow.
Kunis German, Dutch
From a derivative of the personal name Konrad.
Künnen German
Metronymic from the given name Kunigunde.
Künzi German, Swiss, German (Austrian)
From a pet form of the personal name Kuntz.
Künzler German
Nickname for a flatterer, from an agent derivative of Middle High German künzen "to flatter".
Kupfer German, Jewish
German (Küpfer) and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a worker or trader in copper, Middle High German kupfer, German Kupfer ‘copper’... [more]
Kurpjuhn German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "shoemaker", derived from Old Prussian kurpjuns "shoemaker", ultimately from Old Prussian kurpe, kurpi "shoe".
Kürschner German
Occupational name for a furrier, Middle High German kürsenære, from Middle High German kürsen meaning "fur coat".
Kurth German
From the given name Kurt
Kurtz German
Variant of Kurz.
Kurzberg German, Yiddish, Jewish
From a location name meaning "short mountain" in German, from Middle High German kurz meaning "short" and berg meaning "mountain". As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
Kurzhals German
Short Neck
Küster German
It literally means "sexton".
Kutch German (Anglicized)
Americanized variant of German Kutsch.
Kutsch German
Topographic name of Slavic origin, from Sorbian kut ‘corner’, ‘nook’. Variant of Kutsche, metonymic occupational name for a coachman or coachbuilder, from the Hungarian loanword kocsi (see Kocsis).
Kutschera German
German cognate of Kučera.
Kuttelwascher German
Surname given to those who had the occupation of cleaning tripe. Combines the words kuttel meaning "tripe" and washer meaning "washer". Bearers of the surname typically live in Austria.
Kutz German
From a pet form of the personal name Konrad.
Kutzler German
This is the surname of my great-grandfather, of German ancestry.
Ladstetter German
JEWS AND GREMAM
Lahner German, Hungarian
Habitational name for someone from any of various places called Lahn in Hungary and Germany. In southern Germany and Austria, Lahn denotes a place where there had been an avalanche or landslide, from Middle High German laen, lēne meaning "avalanche".
Lamberg German
Derived from any of several places so named in Germany.
Lampe German
From German meaning "lamp".
Lampert German, English
German & English variant of Lambert.... [more]
Land English, German
Topographic name from Old English land, Middle High German lant, "land, territory". This had more specialized senses in the Middle Ages, being used to denote the countryside as opposed to a town or an estate.
Landis German, German (Swiss)
German and Swiss German nickname for a highwayman or for someone who lays waste to the land, from Middle High German landoese.
Langhans German
German and Dutch: distinguishing nickname for a tall man (see Lang) called Hans.
Langhofer German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Langhof.
Langwiesner German
Derived from location means 'Long field'
Lantz German
Habitational name from places called Lanz or derived from the given name Lanzo.
Lanzo English (?), German (?)
From the given name Lanzo
Lapp German
From Middle High German lap(pe) ‘cloth’, ‘patch’, ‘rag’; a metonymic occupational name for a mender of clothes or shoes, or a nickname for a simple-minded person.... [more]
Lars Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare), German
Patronymic from the given name Lars.
Läufer German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Lauf, also an occupational name for a messenger or a nickname for a fast runner, from an agent derivative of Middle High German loufen, German laufen ‘to run’.
Lauffer German
The lauffer name is generally thought to have evolved from a place name to a surname. ... Versions of the name that evolve from the word "läufer," which meant "runner," are thought to have originally been an occupational name for a messenger.
Laumann German
Meaning unknown.
Lauper German (Swiss)
From the short form of a Germanic personal name composed of the elements liut 'people', 'tribe' + berht 'famous'. topographic name for someone who lived at a Lauben, a row of houses and stores with an arcade in front, from Middle High German loube 'arbor', 'bower', 'gallery'.
Lautemann German
From laute "lute" and man "man". This name was used by musicians who played the lute
Lautenschläger German, Alsatian
Derived from Middle High German lutenslaher meaning "lute player".
Lauterbach German
From the name of various places in Germany, for example the village of Lauterbach in the district of Rottweil, Baden-Württemberg.
Lautermilch German (Modern)
Comes from German words Lauter, meaning 'pure', or 'nothing but', and Milch, meaning 'milk'. This could mean that the people who first used this name were farmers.
Lauth German
Variant of Laut
Lebkuchen German
A German surname meaning "gingerbread".
Lechner German
This name finds its origin in the Austrian Lechtal, where the Lech river flows.
Lederer German
Leatherworker
Ledermann German
Variant form of Leatherman.
Leffler German, Swedish
Occupational name for a spoonmaker. Derived from German Löffel "spoon".
Lehigh German, Irish
Derived from a Native American word "Lechauwekink", meaning "where there are forks in the stream". Variant of Lechau .
Lehner German
Status name for a feudal tenant or vassal, from an agent derivative of Middle High German lehen 'to hold land as a feudal tenant'. variant of Leonhardt.
Lehnhart German
"Lean deer." From the German words lehn and Hart, "lean" and "deer" respectively.
Leibniz German
The German surname Leibnitz emerged in the lands that form the modern state of Lower Saxony, which is presently bordered by the North Sea, the Hartz mountains and the Elbe and Ems rivers. Lower Saxony was previously a medieval dukedom... [more]
Leich German
A coworker at my job has this surname and they told me that it’s German. I know nothing more about this surname.
Leidig German
From a short form of any of several Germanic personal names composed with the first element liut ‘people’, ‘tribe’. Also a nickname for a disagreeable, cantankerous person, from Middle High German leidic ‘disagreeable’, ‘tiresome’.
Leinbach German
German topographic name from any of several streams called leinbach, from Middle High German lin ‘flax’ or Middle Low German leie (genitive leien) ‘rock’, ‘stone’ + bach ‘stream’.
Leinberg German
Habitational name for someone in Bavaria, or a topographic name from Middle High German lin meaning "flax" and berg meaning "mountain".
Leinen German
Name means LINEN in German. The first known Leinen was a tailor
Leiter German
From Leiter ‘leader’, status name for a foreman or for the leader of a military expedition, from Middle High German leiten ‘lead’.German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): variant of Leitner.
Lemberg German
Habitational name from a place called Lemberg in Silesia, originally Löwenberg, from Middle High German lewe, löwe "lion" and berg "mountain".
Lenkeit German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) surname.... [more]
Lennin German
Variant of Lennon.
Leno German (Anglicized)
Anglicised form of Lienau. A famous bearer is American television host and comedian Jay Leno (1950-).
Lentz German
Variant of Lenz.
Leonardo Italian, Spanish, German
Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese from the Germanic personal name Leonhard, formed from the elements leo ‘lion’ + hard, ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’; this was an early medieval saint’s name (see Leonard).
Leonhardt German, Dutch
From the Germanic personal name Leonhard, composed of the elements leo "lion" and hard "hardy, brave, strong".
Lepp German
Unflattering nickname from Middle High German lappe "coxcomb", "puppy" (modern German Laffe).... [more]
Lerner German, Jewish
Its literal meaning can be either "student" or "scholar".
Lesch German
German variant of Loesch.
Lescher German
German metonymic occupational name for a mediator or arbitrator, or possibly for a fireman, from Middle High German leschære ‘extinguisher’.
Lesnar German
Variant spelling of German Lessner, a habitational name from any of various places in eastern Germany called Lessen, all named with Slavic les 'forest'.
Leuenberger German (Swiss)
Means "one who came from Löwenberg" in German.
Levin Jewish, Lithuanian, Belarusian, German, Russian, French (Quebec, Anglicized), Various
As a Lithuanian Jewish and Belarusian Jewish name, it is a Slavicized form of Levy. As a German and German Jewish name, it is derived from the given name Levin... [more]
Lex German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Alexius, Alexis.
Liberman German, Jewish
Variant spelling of Liebermann.
Lichter German, Jewish
Occupational name for someone who made candles or possibly for someone who tended a light, from an agent derivative of from Middle High German lieht, Yiddish likht "candle, light".
Lickert German (East Prussian)
Derived from the German feminine name Luitgard, and thus ultimately from Old High German liut "people" and garto "garden; enclosure".
Lieb German, Jewish
Nickname for a pleasant or agreeable person, from Middle High German liep "dear, beloved"; Yiddish lib or German lieb. This word was also used as a personal name, both alone (German) and in compounds (German and Jewish).
Lieb German
From a short form of the various compound Slavic personal names formed with lubo- "love" as the first element.
Lieber English, German, Polish, Jewish
From the given name Lieber.
Lieberherr German (Swiss)
Derived from the given name Lieber.
Lieberknecht German
A compound name where lieber is derived from the given name Liebert and kneckt is an occupational surname for a journeyman, derived from the Middle Low German knecht meaning "knight’s assistant, servant".
Liebermann German, Jewish
Derived from German lieb or Yiddish lib meaning "dear, beloved". Many Liebermann families originally spelled the name in Hebrew or Cyrillic characters, so variations in the spelling occurred during transliteration to the Latin alphabet.
Liebhart German
From a Germanic personal name, composed of the elements liub "beloved, dear" and hard "brave, strong".
Liebling German, Yiddish, Jewish
Derived from German lieb meaning "dear, beloved" or German liebling meaning "darling".
Liebrecht German
From a Germanic personal name formed with liut "people, tribe" and berht "shining, famous".
Lienau German
Denoted a person from any of the various places in northern and eastern Germany called Lienow.
Lietzen German
Lietzen is a municipality in the district Märkisch-Oderland, in Brandenburg, Germany.... [more]
Limbach German
Derived from any of numerous places in Germany named with Germanic lindo meaning "lime tree" and bach meaning "stream". Several of these places are in areas such as the Palatinate, which contributed heavily to early German immigration to the United States.
Limbaugh German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Limbach.
Linde German, Dutch, Jewish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from Middle Hugh German, Dutch linde or Scandinavian lind "lime tree". Almost exclusively ornamental in Swedish, otherwise probably habitational. There are also a number of feminine names containing the element lind, for example Linda, Dietlinde and Gerlinde, and it's possible that the surname is derived from any of those names.
Lindemann German
Means "soft man" in German, from the elements lind, meaning "soft, flexible", and mann, meaning "man".
Lindenberg German, Jewish, Dutch
As a German and Jewish name, it is derived from any of numerous places called Lindenberg in Germany, composed of Middle High German linde meaning "lime tree" and berg meaning "mountain, hill"... [more]
Lindenmeyer German
Habitational name for the tenant of a farm identified by a lime tree, derived from Middle High German linde meaning "lime tree" and meier meaning "tenant farmer".
Linder German
Derived from the German word linde, which means lime tree.
Lindley English, German
English habitational name from either of two places in West Yorkshire called Lindley, or from Linley in Shropshire and Wiltshire, all named from Old English lin ‘flax’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘glade’, with epenthetic -d-, or from another Lindley in West Yorkshire (near Otley), named in Old English as ‘lime wood’, from lind ‘lime tree’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’... [more]
Lindner German, Jewish
Habitational name from any of numerous places called Lindenau, Linde, Linden, or Linda.
Lindt German, Dutch
The Lindt surname comes from an Upper German word "lind," which meant "tender" or "gentle hearted." In some instances, especially in Saxony, the surname evolved from the personal name Lindemuth. In general, the similar phonetic name Linde comes from "Linden," which was a type of tree.... [more]
Linebaugh German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Leinbach.
Lineberry English, German, Dutch, West Frisian
Americanized spelling of Leinberg.
Ling English, German
Variant of Link.
Linn Scottish, Scots, English, Irish, German, Jewish, Finnish (Anglicized), Estonian
As a Scottish and Northern English surname, it is a variant of Lyne. Its usage as an English name is primarily by Scots living in Northern England.... [more]
Linzmeyer German, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Means "bailiff of Linz, Austria" in German, derived from Proto-Celtic *lentos (“bend”) and Middle High German meier meaning "bailiff, administrator", derived from Latin maior meaning "greater".... [more]
Lipps German
Derived from Lippe, a place in Westphalia, Germany. The name is a variant of the first name Philipp.
Lipschitz German, Jewish
The name is derived from the Slavic "lipa," meaning "linden tree" or "lime tree." The name may relate to a number of different place names: "Liebeschitz," the name of a town in Bohemia, "Leipzig," the name of a famous German city, or "Leobschutz," the name of a town in Upper Silesia.
Littman German (East Prussian), German (West Prussian), German, Jewish
Derived from Germanized Czech personal names like Litomir (Czech: Ljutomir) and Litobor (Czech: Ljutobor) which ultimately go back to Old Slavic ljutu "grim; fierce; ferocious; wild". One theory suggests, however, that these given names might have been influenced by ljub- "love; dear".... [more]
Livengood German
The surname LIVENGOOD is the Americanized version of Leibendgut. Leibengut is Swiss-German in origin. It has been written as Livengood and Levengood in America. Records show the family name back to 1550, in Aarwangen, Canton of Berne, Switzerland... [more]
Loch German
From German Loch "hole", ultimately derived from Middle High German loch "hole, hollow, valley".
Lochner German
Means "a place where rivers meet with a partial obstruction from a wooden dam. "
Lock English, Dutch, German
Habitational name from any of various places called Loock, from look ‘enclosure’.
Locke English, Dutch, German
English, Dutch, and German: variant of Lock. ... [more]
Lockhart Scottish, German
Scottish: of uncertain origin, probably from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements loc ‘lock’, ‘bolt’ + hard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’. English: occupational name for a herdsman in charge of a sheep or cattlefold, from Old English loc ‘enclosure’, ‘fold’ + hierde ‘herd(er)’.
Loesch German
German metonymic occupational name from Middle High German lösch ‘fine leather’.
Loescher German
German variant of Löscher, an occupational name for a fireman, from Middle High German leschen ‘to extinguish’. Als a variant of Loesch and Lescher or a derivative of Loesche.
Löffler German
Derived from German löffel, it denotes a person who produces or trades spoons.
Loos Dutch, German
Patronymic from a short form of either Dutch Lodewijk or German Nikolaus, or the name of a place in northern France.
Lösch Low German, Upper German
North German metonymic occupational name for a maker of fine leather, from Middle Low German losche ‘fine leather’. South German variant of Lesch (see Loesch).
Lothringer German
Indicates origin from Lothringen, German form of Lorraine
Loudermilk German
In German the word “lauter” translates into English as “pure” and the German word “milch” translates into English as “milk”. This surname belonged to those who worked in the dairy industry.
Löwenstein German
Habitational name from any of several places called Löwenstein.
Löwenthal German
Habitational name from any of various places called Löwenthal.
Lubahn German
Germanized form of a Slavic or Old Prussian name formed with lub- "love", "dear".
Lubbe German, Slavic, Prussian
Variant of Lubben. Germanized form of a Slavic or Old Prussian name formed with lub- ‘love’, ‘dear’ (see Luba).
Luchs German
meaning: lynx
Luckhardt German
Metronymic derived from the given name Liutgard.
Ludenberg German
From Latin ludere meaning "to play" and German berg meaning "mountain".
Lüdi German (Swiss)
Probably derived from the given name Ludwig
Luker German
Luker see also Lucher or Luchre, meaning money more specifically money obtained by nefarious means.
Lüll German
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names formed with liut- ‘people’ as the first element.
Lustig Swedish, German, Jewish, Dutch
From Swedish and German lustig ”humerous, funny, enjoyable” or Middle High German lustig ”merry, carefree”.
Lutter Dutch, English, German
Dutch and English: variant of Luter.... [more]
Lux German, Dutch
Patronymic from a vernacular form of Lucas.
Luxenberg German, Jewish, Luxembourgish, Belgian, French, Walloon
Habitational name from various places named Luxenberg, Luxemberg, Luxenburg, or Luxembourg, including the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.
Lyboult German
Famous Warrior... [more]
Lyday German (Anglicized)
Probably an Americanized form of German Leidig.
Lyman English, German (Anglicized), Dutch
English: topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow or a patch of arable land (see Layman). ... [more]
Maag German
Comes from the Middle High German “mage”, meaning “relative” or “kinsman”.
Mack Scottish, Irish, German, Dutch, French
Scottish (Berwickshire) and Irish: from the Old Norse personal name Makkr, a form of Magnus (Old Irish Maccus)... [more]
Macon French, German
French: See Maçon. An occupational name for a mason, French maçon. Habitational name from places so called in Saône-et-Loire, Allier, Aube, the Côte d’Or, Gers, and Deux-Sères... [more]
Mahler German
Variant of Maler, a German occupational surname meaning "painter", particularly a stained glass painter.... [more]
Mai German
Derived from German der Mai meaning "May", perhaps indicating a person who was baptized in that month.
Makovoza Baltic (Latinized, Rare), German (Latinized, Rare), Russian (Rare)
There is no history of the name just a family name I on't know if some people have it as a first name too.
Maletz German (Silesian)
German-Silesian variant of Slavic surname Malec.
Mallow German
Variant spelling of Malow, a habitational name from Malow in Mecklenburg.
Mandrisch Polish, German
Upper Silesia
Manhart German (Modern)
From the Germanic personal name Manhard, composed of the Germanic elements man "man", "human" + hard "hardy", "brave", "strong"... [more]
Mantey German, Polish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Manthei in Schwerin province. This name is also established in Poland.
Manuel Spanish, Portuguese, French, German
Derived from the given name Manuel.
Mark English, German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived on a boundary between two districts, from Middle English merke, Middle High German marc, Middle Dutch marke, merke, all meaning "borderland"... [more]
Markell Dutch, German, Slovene (Anglicized)
Dutch and German: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Markolf, composed of the elements marc, merc ‘boundary’ + wolf ‘wolf’... [more]
Marker German
Status name for someone who lived on an area of land that was marked off from the village land or woodland, Middle High German merkære.
Marlock German (Archaic)
Derived from Middle High German and Middle Low German mar(e), denoting an evil elf, a creature that sits on one's chest at night, and Middle High German loc "a lock of hair; hair; mane"... [more]
Marotzke German
Germanized form of Polish Marocki, itself derived from the personal given name Marcin, the Polish form of Martin.
Marsteller German
Occupational name for a stable boy in or for the supervisor of the stables on a noble estate, from Middle High German mar(c) 'noble horse' stall 'stable' + the agent suffix -er.
Martain German (Rare)
Possibly a Germanized form of Dutch Martijn.
Martelle English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese
English and German: from a medieval personal name, a pet form of Martin or Marta.... [more]
Marx German
From a short form of the given name Markus. A famous bearer was Karl Marx (1818-1883), a German philosopher known for his work in socioeconomic theory.
März German
März means 'March' in German.
Masel German
German from a pet form of a short form of Thomas.
Mast German, Dutch
Derived from Middle High German and Middle Dutch mast "mast (fodder made of acorns and beechnuts); the process of fattening livestock", this used to be an occupational name for a pig farmer or a swineherd... [more]
Mathis German, French
From the given name Mathis.
Matthau German
Derived from the given name Matthias. This name was borne by the American actor Walter Matthau (1920-2000).
Matthäus German
From the given name Matthäus.
Matthes German
From German given name Matthias.
Matthias German, Dutch, English, Welsh, Greek
German and Dutch: from the personal name Matthias (see Matthew).... [more]
Mauer German
Variant of Maurer.
Mauer German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a wall, Middle High German mure "wall".
Mauser German
Occupational name for a mouse catcher.
Maust German
Possibly an altered form Mast.
Mautz German
Meaning "to gripe", or "to complain" in Swabian German.
Mayerhofer German (Austrian)
Denoted a person from the municipality of Mayrhof in the Austrian state of Upper Austria.
Mecklenburg German, Jewish
Regional name for someone from this province in northern Germany. Derived from Old Saxon mikil "big, great" and burg "castle".
Meinhard German
From the given name Meinhard
Meinhart German
From the given name Meinhard
Meister German
Means "Master" in German.
Melchior Dutch, German
Derived from the given name Melchior.
Mellenthin German
Habitational name from places so called near Berlin and on the island of Usedom.
Meltzer German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): occupational name for a maltster, a brewer who used malt, from German Meltzer (an agent derivative of Middle High German malt ‘malt’, ‘germinated barley’), Yiddish meltser ‘maltster’... [more]
Mencke German
Variant of Menke
Mengele German
Doctor Josef Mengele (Born on March 16, 1911 - Died on February 7, 1979), also known as the Angel of Death, was a German Schutzstaffel (SS) Officer and physician during World War II. He is mainly remembered for his actions at the Auschwitz concentration camp, where he performed deadly experiments on prisoners, was a member of the team of doctors who selected victims to be killed in the gas chambers and was one of the doctors who administered the gas.
Menke German
Derived as a diminutive of several Germanic given names whose first element was derived from Germanic *magin- and *megin- "strength; force; power".
Mentzer German
Habitational name with the agent suffix -er, either from Mainz, earlier Mentz, derived from the medieval Latin name Mogontia (Latin Mogontiacum, probably from the Celtic personal name Mogontios), or from Menz in Brandenburg and Saxony.
Menzel German, English
Derived from a short form of MENZ, Clemens or Hermann.