German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Liebhart German
From a Germanic personal name, composed of the elements liub "beloved, dear" and hard "brave, strong".
Liebling German, Yiddish, Jewish
Derived from German lieb meaning "dear, beloved" or German liebling meaning "darling".
Liebrecht German
From a Germanic personal name formed with liut "people, tribe" and berht "shining, famous".
Lietzen German
Lietzen is a municipality in the district Märkisch-Oderland, in Brandenburg, Germany.... [more]
Limbach German
Derived from any of numerous places in Germany named with Germanic lindo meaning "lime tree" and bach meaning "stream". Several of these places are in areas such as the Palatinate, which contributed heavily to early German immigration to the United States.
Limbaugh German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of Limbach.
Linde German, Dutch, Jewish, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a conspicuous lime tree, from Middle High German, Dutch linde, Scandinavian lind. There are several places, especially in North Germany, named with this word... [more]
Lindell German, English
Derived from the German linde, meaning "lime tree."
Lindemann German
Means "soft man" in German, from the elements lind, meaning "soft, flexible", and mann, meaning "man".
Lindenberg German, Jewish, Dutch
As a German and Jewish name, it is derived from any of numerous places called Lindenberg in Germany, composed of Middle High German linde meaning "lime tree" and berg meaning "mountain, hill"... [more]
Lindenmeyer German
Habitational name for the tenant of a farm identified by a lime tree, derived from Middle High German linde meaning "lime tree" and meier meaning "tenant farmer".
Linder German
Derived from the German word linde, which means lime tree.
Lindley English, German
English habitational name from either of two places in West Yorkshire called Lindley, or from Linley in Shropshire and Wiltshire, all named from Old English lin ‘flax’ + leah ‘wood’, ‘glade’, with epenthetic -d-, or from another Lindley in West Yorkshire (near Otley), named in Old English as ‘lime wood’, from lind ‘lime tree’ + leah ‘woodland clearing’... [more]
Lindner German, Jewish
Habitational name from any of numerous places called Lindenau, Linde, Linden, or Linda.
Lindt German, Dutch
The Lindt surname comes from an Upper German word "lind," which meant "tender" or "gentle hearted." In some instances, especially in Saxony, the surname evolved from the personal name Lindemuth. In general, the similar phonetic name Linde comes from "Linden," which was a type of tree.... [more]
Linebaugh German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Leinbach.
Lineberry English, German, Dutch, West Frisian
Americanized spelling of Leinberg.
Ling English, German
Variant of Link.
Linn Scottish, Scots, English, Irish, German, Jewish, Finnish (Anglicized), Estonian
As a Scottish and Northern English surname, it is a variant of Lyne. Its usage as an English name is primarily by Scots living in Northern England.... [more]
Linzmeyer German, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Means "bailiff of Linz, Austria" in German, derived from Proto-Celtic *lentos (“bend”) and Middle High German meier meaning "bailiff, administrator", derived from Latin maior meaning "greater".... [more]
Lipps German
Derived from Lippe, a place in Westphalia, Germany. The name is a variant of the first name Philipp.
Littman German (East Prussian), German (West Prussian), German, Jewish
Derived from Germanized Czech personal names like Litomir (Czech: Ljutomir) and Litobor (Czech: Ljutobor) which ultimately go back to Old Slavic ljutu "grim; fierce; ferocious; wild". One theory suggests, however, that these given names might have been influenced by ljub- "love; dear".... [more]
Livengood German
The surname LIVENGOOD is the Americanized version of Leibendgut. Leibengut is Swiss-German in origin. It has been written as Livengood and Levengood in America. Records show the family name back to 1550, in Aarwangen, Canton of Berne, Switzerland... [more]
Loch German
From German Loch "hole", ultimately derived from Middle High German loch "hole, hollow, valley".
Lochner German
Means "a place where rivers meet with a partial obstruction from a wooden dam. "
Lock English, Dutch, German
Habitational name from any of various places called Loock, from look ‘enclosure’.
Locke English, Dutch, German
English, Dutch, and German: variant of Lock. ... [more]
Lockhart Scottish, German
Scottish: of uncertain origin, probably from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements loc ‘lock’, ‘bolt’ + hard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’. English: occupational name for a herdsman in charge of a sheep or cattlefold, from Old English loc ‘enclosure’, ‘fold’ + hierde ‘herd(er)’.
Loesch German
German metonymic occupational name from Middle High German lösch ‘fine leather’.
Loescher German
German variant of Löscher, an occupational name for a fireman, from Middle High German leschen ‘to extinguish’. Als a variant of Loesch and Lescher or a derivative of Loesche.
Löffler German
Derived from German löffel, it denotes a person who produces or trades spoons.
Lösch Low German, Upper German
North German metonymic occupational name for a maker of fine leather, from Middle Low German losche ‘fine leather’. South German variant of Lesch (see Loesch).
Lothringer German
Indicates origin from Lothringen, German form of Lorraine
Loudermilk German
In German the word “lauter” translates into English as “pure” and the German word “milch” translates into English as “milk”. This surname belonged to those who worked in the dairy industry.
Löwenstein German
Habitational name from any of several places called Löwenstein.
Löwenthal German
Habitational name from any of various places called Löwenthal.
Lubahn German
Germanized form of a Slavic or Old Prussian name formed with lub- "love", "dear".
Lubbe German, Slavic, Prussian
Variant of Lubben. Germanized form of a Slavic or Old Prussian name formed with lub- ‘love’, ‘dear’ (see Luba).
Luchs German
meaning: lynx
Luckhardt German
Metronymic derived from the given name Liutgard.
Ludenberg German
From Latin ludere meaning "to play" and German berg meaning "mountain".
Lüdi German (Swiss)
Probably derived from the given name Ludwig
Luker German
Luker see also Lucher or Luchre, meaning money more specifically money obtained by nefarious means.
Lüll German
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names formed with liut- ‘people’ as the first element.
Lustig Swedish, German, Jewish, Dutch
From Swedish and German lustig ”humerous, funny, enjoyable” or Middle High German lustig ”merry, carefree”.
Lutter Dutch, English, German
Dutch and English: variant of Luter.... [more]
Lux German, Dutch
Patronymic from a vernacular form of Lucas.
Luxenberg German, Jewish, Luxembourgish, Belgian, French, Walloon
Habitational name from various places named Luxenberg, Luxemberg, Luxenburg, or Luxembourg, including the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.
Lyboult German
Famous Warrior... [more]
Lyday German (Anglicized)
Probably an Americanized form of German Leidig.
Lyman English, German (Anglicized), Dutch
English: topographic name for someone who lived near a meadow or a patch of arable land (see Layman). ... [more]
Maag German
Comes from the Middle High German “mage”, meaning “relative” or “kinsman”.
Mack Scottish, Irish, German, Dutch, French
Scottish (Berwickshire) and Irish: from the Old Norse personal name Makkr, a form of Magnus (Old Irish Maccus)... [more]
Macon French, German
French: See Maçon. An occupational name for a mason, French maçon. Habitational name from places so called in Saône-et-Loire, Allier, Aube, the Côte d’Or, Gers, and Deux-Sères... [more]
Mahler German
Variant of Maler, a German occupational surname meaning "painter", particularly a stained glass painter.... [more]
Makovoza Baltic (Latinized, Rare), German (Latinized, Rare), Russian (Rare)
There is no history of the name just a family name I on't know if some people have it as a first name too.
Maletz German (Silesian)
German-Silesian variant of Slavic surname Malec.
Mallow German
Variant spelling of Malow, a habitational name from Malow in Mecklenburg.
Mandrisch Polish, German
Upper Silesia
Manhart German (Modern)
From the Germanic personal name Manhard, composed of the Germanic elements man "man", "human" + hard "hardy", "brave", "strong"... [more]
Mantey German, Polish
Habitational name for someone from a place called Manthei in Schwerin province. This name is also established in Poland.
Manuel Spanish, Portuguese, French, German
Derived from the given name Manuel.
Mark English, German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived on a boundary between two districts, from Middle English merke, Middle High German marc, Middle Dutch marke, merke, all meaning "borderland"... [more]
Markell Dutch, German, Slovene (Anglicized)
Dutch and German: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Markolf, composed of the elements marc, merc ‘boundary’ + wolf ‘wolf’... [more]
Marker German
Status name for someone who lived on an area of land that was marked off from the village land or woodland, Middle High German merkære.
Marotzke German
Germanized form of Polish Marocki, itself derived from the personal given name Marcin, the Polish form of Martin.
Marsteller German
Occupational name for a stable boy in or for the supervisor of the stables on a noble estate, from Middle High German mar(c) 'noble horse' stall 'stable' + the agent suffix -er.
Martain German (Rare)
Possibly a Germanized form of Dutch Martijn.
Martelle English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese
English and German: from a medieval personal name, a pet form of Martin or Marta.... [more]
Marx German
From a short form of the given name Markus. A famous bearer was Karl Marx (1818-1883), a German philosopher known for his work in socioeconomic theory.
März German
März means 'March' in German.
Masel German
German from a pet form of a short form of Thomas.
Mast German
Nickname from Middle High German mast "fat", "stout".
Mathis German, French
From the given name Mathis.
Matthes German
From German given name Matthias.
Matthias German, Dutch, English, Welsh, Greek
German and Dutch: from the personal name Matthias (see Matthew).... [more]
Mauer German
Variant of Maurer.
Mauer German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived near a wall, Middle High German mure "wall".
Maust German
Possibly an altered form Mast.
Mautz German
Meaning "to gripe", or "to complain" in Swabian German.
Mecklenburg German, Jewish
Regional name for someone from this province in northern Germany. Derived from Old Saxon mikil "big, great" and burg "castle".
Meinhard German
From the given name Meinhard
Meinhart German
From the given name Meinhard
Meister German
Means "Master" in German.
Mellenthin German
Habitational name from places so called near Berlin and on the island of Usedom.
Meltzer German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): occupational name for a maltster, a brewer who used malt, from German Meltzer (an agent derivative of Middle High German malt ‘malt’, ‘germinated barley’), Yiddish meltser ‘maltster’... [more]
Mencke German
Variant of Menke
Menke German
Derived as a diminutive of several Germanic given names whose first element was derived from Germanic *magin- and *megin- "strength; force; power".
Mentzer German
Habitational name with the agent suffix -er, either from Mainz, earlier Mentz, derived from the medieval Latin name Mogontia (Latin Mogontiacum, probably from the Celtic personal name Mogontios), or from Menz in Brandenburg and Saxony.
Menzel German, English
Derived from a short form of MENZ, Clemens or Hermann.
Menzer German
Variant of Mentzer.
Merkh German (Anglicized, ?)
Anglicized form of the name Märkh, a German name that existed in southern Germany with Arabic roots tied to the village of al-Märkh in Qatar; the name became Anglicized in the early 17th century. It is one of those surnames where anyone who possesses it is related to everyone else who possesses the name.
Mesmer German
Occupational name for a maker of knives from Middle High German messer meaning "knife". A famous bearer was Franz Mesmer (1734-1815), a German doctor known for his theory of "animal magnetism", which was eventually incorporated into the field of hypnosis.
Messer German
Occupational name for an official in charge of measuring the dues paid in kind by tenants, from an agent derivative of Middle High German mezzen "to measure".
Messerschmidt German
Name given to a knife smith. From German "messer" meaning knife, and "schmidt" meaning smith.
Mette German, Dutch
From a pet form of the female personal name Mechthild.
Metz German
From a short form of the female personal name Mechthild.
Meusburger German (Austrian)
The history of this last name is that it means "Mountain Dweller." Being as part of the Austrian surnames, it's a widely used one in it's home country. A few brothers had gone to various countries, as of now there is Meusburgers in Columbia, as well as the United States and throughout Europe... [more]
Michels German, Dutch
Patronymic from the personal name Michel (see Michael). ... [more]
Mick German, Dutch, Irish
Short form of the given name Mikolaj or an occupational name from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch micke "(wheat or rye) bread"... [more]
Middendorf German
"middle of the village"
Mielke Dutch, German
The name is derived from the personal name Miel, a diminutive of the name Aemilius, and means "son of Miel."
Minden German, English
Habitational name from any of various places so named, for example in Westphalia (German) or Shropshire (English).
Minor English, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
Mishler German
Americanized spelling of Swiss German Mischler .
Mittel German
Literally "middle", probably a topographic name from a farm occupying a middle position in a settlement. Compare Mitter.
Mittelmann German
From a byname from Middle High German mittelman "mediator, arbitrator".
Mitter German
Topographic name for someone who lived on or owned a property that was in the middle between two or more others, especially if the others were both held by men with the same personal name (for example, Mitter Hans), from the strong form of Middle High German mitte "mid, middle".
Mittermeier German (Austrian)
Literal meaning "middle farmer" its thought to have been given to farmers living between two there farms in the mountains.
Möbius German
Patronymic surname derived from the given name Bartholomäus, the German form of Bartholomew.
Möbus German
Variant of Möbius.
Mogasen German
meaning unknown
Mohler German, English
The Mohler surname is derived from the Low German word möhl which means mill. Thus the name originally denoted someone who live or worked near a mill. Variant of Müller.
Mohr German
From a short form of an old personal name, Morhart (see Morath).
Mohrbacher German
Likely arose as a name for those living near Morbach, Germany
Mohrenschildt German
From the surname Mohren and scilt "shield"
Montag German
It means Monday in German.
Mook German
This surname means 'flying insect' from a German word that is mauke. (I think it is mauke, I am SO not sure.)
Moretz German, Dutch
Variant spelling of Moritz.
Mosbrucker German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a bridge over a swamp, from Middle High German mos meaning "bog", "swamp" + brucke meaning "bridge".
Mosele Italian, German (Austrian)
This surname is to be found in north-eastern Italy, more specifically in the Vicenza and Verona provinces. Families with this name are certain to be originally from the mountain town of Asiago, situated on a plateau north of Vicenza and now a well-known skiing resort... [more]
Most German
Metonymic occupational name for a producer or seller of must, i.e. unfermented grape juice, from Middle High German most, ultimately derived from Latin mustum vinum meaning "young (i.e. fresh) wine"... [more]
Motz German
Meaning "dirty" or "grubby".
Mousel German (Austrian, Anglicized), English
Anglicisation of the German Mäusl, from the German word maus - "mouse" combined with a diminutive suffix, literally meaning "little mouse"... [more]
Mozart German
The surname was first recorded in the 14th century as Mozahrt, and later as Motzhardt in Germany. It is a compound word, the first part of which is Middle High German mos, also spelt mosz, and meaning “bog, marsh” in southern dialects (compare modern German Moos)... [more]
Mühlfeld German
Variant form of Muhlfeld.
Müsch German
Either a habitational name from a place named Müsch in Germany, or a topographic name meaning "bog", perhaps given to someone living near a bog.
Musch Dutch, German
From a nickname meaning "house sparrow".
Mustafi Albanian, German (Rare)
Means "the chosen one"
Mutter German
(also Mütter): occupational name for an official employed to measure grain, from Middle High German mutte, mütte 'bushel', 'grain measure' (Latin modius) + the agent suffix -er.
Nabrotzky German
Supposedly means "lived near water". Originated from Prussia.
Nachtigall German, Jewish
Nickname from Middle High German nachtegal "nightingale" from Old High German galan "to sing". Cognate to Nightingale.
Nachtrieb German
It possibly comes from the German name of a nachtrab, which is a "night bird like the owl". Another possible meaning is "night tribe".
Nadel German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a maker of needles, or in some cases for a tailor, from Middle High German nadel(e), German Nadel "needle".
Naegele German
Variant of Nagel.
Nagelschmidt German
Means "nail smith" in German
Nantz German
From a pet form of a Germanic compound name formed with Nant- (for example, Nantwig, Nantger); its meaning is reflected in Middle High German nenden 'to dare'.
Narr German
Nickname for a foolish or silly person, from Middle High German narr ‘fool’, ‘jester’.
Nasers German
Habitational, derived from any of several places called Nesse in Oldenburg and Friesland.
Nasser German
Someone from any of the places called Nassen, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Hesse, and Bavaria.
Nast German
Topographic name for someone who lived in a thickly wooded area, or a metonymic occupational name for a woodcutter, from Middle High German nast meaning "branch", a regional variant of ast, resulting from the misdivision of forms such as ein ast meaning "a branch".
Nau German
A variant of Neu; meaning "ship" or "boat."
Neeson Irish, Dutch, German
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Naois ‘son of Naois’, usually Anglicized as Mcneese. Can also be an altered form of Dutch or German Niesen... [more]
Neff German, German (Swiss)
From Middle High German neve 'nephew', hence probably a distinguishing name for a close relation or familiar of a prominent personage.
Negley German (Swiss)
Altered spelling of Swiss German Nägele, Naegeli, or Nägeli, variants of Nagel.
Neher German
An occupational name for a tailor from a deritive of Middle Low German, 'nehen' which means 'to sew' or 'to embroider'
Nein German
Unexplained. Perhaps from a short form of a Germanic personal name formed with an element cognate with Old High German niuwi meaning "new".
Neinstein German, Jewish
Means “nine stones” in German
Nenninger German
Habitational name for someone from Nenningen in Württemberg.
Nerger German (Silesian)
My family name, Nerger, is listed in the "Deutsches Namenlexicon" by Hans Bahlow. The meaning, given in the lexicon, is "ernahrer" or provider.
Nerz German
From the German word Nerz meaning "Mink".
Nettesheim German
"nice home"
Neu German (Modern)
The name Neu is a common German last name.
Neuber German
Contracted form of Neubauer.
Neuberger German
German surname meaning 'new mountaineer'
Neubert German
German (mainly Saxony): reduced form of Neubauer with excrescent -t. Compare Neuber .
Neuburg German
From the name of various places in Germany and Austria.
Neuenfeldt German
Habitational name for someone from places so named in Brandenburg and Pomerania, or from places in Lower Saxony or Westphalia called Neuenfelde.
Neuer German
Inflicted form of Neu meaning "new man" see Neumann
Neufeld German, English
Neufeld is a surname of German origin, meaning "new field". It is not seldom in Germany and it is common among German speaking Mennonites from Russia.
Neuger German, French (?)
Was popularized by the German community. Famous bearers include investors Win Neuger and Dan Neuger, author Christie Cozad Neuger.
Neuhaus German, Jewish
Topographical name for someone who lived in a new house, Middle High German niuwe hus, modern German neu Haus, or a habitational name for someone from any of several places named Neuhaus ('new house') in various parts of Germany and Austria, also in Bohemia.
Neuhauser German, German (Austrian)
Means "new house" in German.
Neujahr German
nickname for someone who owed feudal dues at the New Year, or sometimes a name given to someone born on that day
Neumeyer German
German: distinguishing name for a newly appointed steward or tenant farmer, or one who was a newcomer to an area, from Middle High German niuwe ‘new’ + meier ‘steward’, ‘tenant farmer’ ( see Meyer 1)... [more]
Neuser German (Rare)
Person who had ancestors that lived in Germany near Dusseldorf in the town called Neuss.
Neustädter German
Habitational name for someone from any of many places in Germany and Austria called Neustadt.
Neuwirth German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a new innkeeper, from Middle High German niuwe ‘new’ + wirt and German neu + Wirt ‘master of a house’, ‘innkeeper’.
Nevel German
1 German: variant of Nebel .... [more]
Ney German, English
A dialectal form of the common German word neu "new".... [more]
Nibbe German
Nickname meaning ‘beak’, or from a short form of a Germanic personal name Nippo, composed of Old High German nit ‘hostility’, ‘eagerness’ + boto ‘messenger’.
Nichter German, Yiddish
Possibly means "negator, negate" from Middle High German nicht meaning "not", or "sober", from Middle High German nüchter. Perhaps it originally denoted a person who was a philosopher, judge, or bartender.
Nickal German
Variant of Nickel
Nickel German
From the German word "kupfernickel" meaning Devil's copper or St Nicholas's (OLd Nick's) copper.
Nicks English, German
From the nickname of Nicholas.
Nicolay German, French
From the given name Nicolay, a form of Nicholas through Russian Nikolay... [more]
Nied Upper German
South German: habitational name from Nied in Hesse.
Niederhäuser German, Swiss
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Niederhaus or Niederhausen, denoting the lower of two dwellings or settlements or one in a low-lying position.
Niedermeier German, German (Austrian)
Occupational name for a farmer who had a farm lower than the neighboring one(s). This surname and its variant spellings are common to Austria and Bavaria, Germany.
Niedermeyer German, Dutch
Distinguishing name for a farmer (see Meyer) who had a farm lower (Middle High German nider(e)) than the neighboring one(s).
Niehaus German
North German: topographic name from Middle Low German nie ‘new’ + hus ‘house’; or a habitational name from a common North German and Westphalian farm name with the same meaning.
Nies German
German: from a reduced form of the personal name Dionys (see Dennis), which was stressed on the last syllable; this was a popular personal name as a result of the influence of the French Saint Denis... [more]
Niesen Dutch, German
Dutch: patronymic from the personal name Nijs, a reduced form of Denijs (see Dennis)... [more]
Nietzsche German, German (Silesian)
Derived from a Silesian diminutive for the given name Nikolaus. A famous bearer was Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), a German philologist and philosopher.
Nigg German, German (Swiss)
From a short form of the personal name Niklaus, a German form of Nicholas.
Nikkel German, Dutch
Possibly an altered spelling of Dutch Nikel, from the personal name, a Dutch form of Nicholas.
Nipper German
1. habitational name for someone from Nippe in Hesse. ... [more]
Nitsche German (Silesian)
Derived from a popular Silesian short form of the personal name Nikolaus.
Nolf German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Arnolf, composed of the Germanic elements arn 'eagle' + wulf 'wolf'. Dutch: from a reduced form of Nodolf, derived from the personal name Odolf by transfer of the final -n in a preceding personal name such as Jan, Simoen
Noll German
From a short form of any of various medieval personal names derived from Germanic personal names ending in -n + wald 'rule', for example Arnold and Reinwald.
Nonnenmacher German
Occupational name for a gelder of hogs, from Middle High German nunne, nonne meaning "nun", and by transfer "castrated hog" + an agent derivative of machen meaning "to make".
Nora Italian, German
Italian and German: from a short form of the feminine personal names Eleonora or Leonora.
Norrell English, German (?)
A locational surname from the Germanic (Old English/Old Norse) term for the north. It either refers to someone who lived in a location called Northwell, lived north of a well, spring or stream (Old English weall)... [more]
Notbohm German, Low German
Low German cognate of High German Nussbaum.
Nungesser German
Apparently a variant spelling of German Nonnengasse, derived from a street name meaning "nuns, lane". It could also be a variant of Gnugesser, a nickname for a big eater, derived from g(e)nug meaning "enough" and esser meaning "eater" (which derived from essen meaning "to eat")... [more]
Nürnberger German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from the city of Nürnberg in Bavaria.
Nuss German
from Middle High German nuz ‘nut’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a gatherer and seller of nuts, or a nickname for a man thought to resemble a nut in some way
Obenauf German
Surname used to refer to someone who lived 'up there' (on a mountain, hill, etc.).
Oberlin German, English
From Oberst and the suffix Lynn.... [more]