German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Geiser German, German (Swiss)
Occupational name for a goatherd, from a derivative of Middle High German geiz 'goat'.
Geisinger German
Denoted a person from the town of Geising in Germany, which in turn got it's name from the Geisingberg mountain. The Geisingberg most likely got it's name from the Germanic geut or the Early New High German geußen, both meaning "to pour", and the German word Berg meaning "mountain"... [more]
Geist German
Habitational name for someone who lived in a house marked by the sign of the Holy Spirit (normally depicted as a dove), from Middle High German geist 'spirit'.
Geister German (Silesian)
Occupational name for a goatherd, from an agent derivative of Geist
Geller Yiddish, German, Russian
The name may derive from the German word "gellen" (to yell) and mean "one who yells." It may derive from the Yiddish word "gel" (yellow) and mean the "yellow man" or from the Yiddish word "geler," an expression for a redheaded man... [more]
Gemünd German
Regional name for someone who lives in Gemünden.
Gerdes German
Patronymic name, coming from "son of Gerhard.
Gerhart German
From the given name Gerhard
Gerling German
German patronymic from a short form of a Germanic personal name beginning with the element gar, ger ‘spear’, ‘lance’.
German English, Norman, German, Jewish, Greek
From Old French germain meaning "German". This sometimes denoted an actual immigrant from Germany, but was also used to refer to a person who had trade or other connections with German-speaking lands... [more]
Gersch German, Jewish
Variant of Giersch. ... [more]
Gerth German (Swiss)
From a reduced form of Gerhardt. Habitational name for someone from Gerthe near Bochum.
Gertsch German (Swiss)
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names formed with gēr meaning ‘spear’, ‘lance’.
Gertz German
Patronymic from a Germanic personal name meaning "hardy", "brave", "strong."
Gerwulf German
This is an old Germanic name meaning "spear wolf" (ger "spear" and wulf "wolf.")
Gerz German
Variant of Gertz.
Geyer German
Variant of Geier.
Gfeller German
Topographical name for someone who lived by a gorge, Middle High German gevelle, or a habitational name for someone from any of various places in Bavaria and Austria named from this word.
Giersch German
German from the female personal name Gerusch or Gerisch, pet forms of Gertrud (see Trude), with the Slavic suffix -usch or -isch.
Gieselman German
Variant spelling of Geiselman.
Gieselmann German
Variant spelling of Geiselman.
Giesinger German
Denoted a person from the town of Giesing in Germany. Or perhaps a variant spelling of Geisinger. A famous bearer of this surname is the German singer-songwriter Max Giesinger.
Gimpel German, Jewish
German: from a pet form of the personal name Gumprecht (see Gombert)... [more]
Gindlesperger German
Possibly a topographic name for someone who lived on a mountain near the town of Gindels in Bavaria, Germany.
Gindt German, Alsatian
From the Germanic personal name Gundo, from gund meaning "war", "battle".
Gingrich German (Americanized)
Potentially from German “junge” and “reich,” meaning “rich at a young age.” Anglicized by immigrants as either Gingrich or Guengerich.
Ginsburg German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone who came from Gunzberg in Bavaria, Günsburg in Swabia, or Gintsshprik (Königsburg) in East Prussia. Its origin is from the name of the river Günz, written in early Latin documents as Guntia, which was probably of Celtic origin, and Old High German burg meaning "Fortress, walled town".
Gisbert German
From the given name Gisbert.
Gish German
From a shortened form of the Germanic personal name Gisulf, literally "hostage wolf". It was borne by American actress Lillian Gish (?1893-1993), original name Lillian de Guiche.
Glaessel German (Anglicized)
Anglicized spelling of German Gläßel.
Glandt German
Nickname from Middle High Geman glander meaning "gleam", "sparkle", "shine", for someone with such a temperament.
Glock German
Meant "person who lives by a church bell-tower or in a house with the sign of a bell", "bell-ringer" or "town crier" (German Glocke "bell"). It was borne by Sir William Glock (1908-2000), a British music administrator.
Gloff German
German and Swiss German: from the Germanic personal name Egilolf, composed of the elements agi(l) ‘edge’, ‘point’ (of a sword) + wolf ‘wolf’, cognate with Old English Ecgwulf. This was the name of several Lombard kings (ancestors of the Bavarian ducal line of the Agilolfinger), who introduced the name to Italy.
Gödel German
From an Old German personal name, Godilo, Godila.German (Gödel): from a pet form of a compound personal name beginning with the element god ‘good’ or god, got ‘god’.Variant of Godl or Gödl, South German variants of Gote, from Middle High German got(t)e, gö(t)te ‘godfather’.
Goebbels German, History
Originally an occupational name for a brewer. Paul Joseph Goebbels was a German politician and Reich Minister of Propaganda in Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945.
Goedel German
Variant of Gödel.
Goeman German
Patronym from a Germanic name: good or god + man.
Goertze German
Probably a variant of Göretz, a reduced form of Gerhards (see Gerhardt), or a variant of Goertz.
Goertzen German
German: probably a variant of Göretz, a reduced form of Gerhards (see Gerhardt), or a variant of Goertz.
Goethe German
From a short form of the personal name Godo, formed with the Germanic element god, got 'god', or from Middle High German göte 'godfather'.
Goettel German
From a pet form of Gottfried, or any of the other personal names formed with Got(t)-.
Goettems German, Brazilian
Brazilian adaptation of the German surname Goedems; altered for easier comprehension by the Portuguese-speaking population of Brazil. All members of the Goettems family in Brazil are descendants of Johann Goedems, born in Oberlöstern, Saarland, on September 17, 1798.
Goettner German (East Prussian, Anglicized)
Rare German surname originating in East Prussia. Has a root in Gott, meaning "God."
Goetz German
Originally a hypocorism of the given name Gottfried. Variants include the surnames Getz, Götz and the given name Götz.
Goetzinger German
Originally denoted a person who came from an place called Götzing, Götzingen or Goetzingen.... [more]
Gohrband German (Rare)
Contained in a Latin land deed granted to a German for a castle-keep dated February 21, 1308. It is believed to be the first written record and original spelling of the name, generally understood to mean in German, "he who lives by the marsh"... [more]
Goldberg German, Jewish, Danish
From German gold 'gold' and -berg, meaning 'gold-mountain'.
Goldman German, Jewish
Possibly meaning goldsmith in German, from Gold and Mann.... [more]
Goldring German, English, Jewish
This surname was probably given to someone who wore a gold ring.
Goldschmid German
Variant spelling of Goldschmidt.
Goldschmitt German
Variant of Goldschmidt, meaning "gold smith" in German.
Goldwasser German
German form of the anglicised surname Goldwater.
Goldwater German (Anglicized), Jewish (Anglicized)
This name is an Anglicized form of the German or Ashkenazic ornamental surname 'Goldwasser', or 'Goldvasser'. The name derives from the German or Yiddish gold', gold, with 'wasser', water, and is one of the very many such compound ornamental names formed with 'gold', such as 'Goldbaum', golden tree, 'Goldbert', golden hill, 'Goldkind', golden child, 'Goldrosen', golden roses, and 'Goldstern', golden star.
Gombert French, German
French and German: from Gundbert, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements gund ‘battle’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’... [more]
Goodbar German (Anglicized), English
Possibly an altered spelling of English Godber, derived from the medieval given name Godebert, or an occupational name for a beer brewer and a nickname for a toper... [more]
Goos German
See: http://www.houseofnames.com/goos-family-crest... [more]
Göring German
German surname most commonly associated with Nazi Party leader, Hermann Göring.
Görlitz German
The name of a small town in Saxony. Derived from old Sorbian word "Zgorelc" meaning "settlement on a burned-out forest."
Göschen German, North German
Patronymic from the German given name Gottschalk.
Gottlob German
From the given name Gottlob.
Götz German
Originally a hypocorism of Gottfried, which is derived from an Old High German given name. Variants include the surnames Getz and Goetz, as well as the given name Götz.
Götze German
From the given name Götz.
Goudier German
Germanic patronym from "godhari" meaning "army of God".
Grabe German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a dike or ditch, or habitational name from either of two places in Thuringia named with this word: Grabe and Graba.
Grabenstein German
Habitational name from Grafenstein near Wohlau, Silesia.
Grable German
Means "digger of ditches or graves" (from a derivative of Middle High German graben "ditch"). A famous bearer was US actress, dancer and singer Betty Grable (1916-1973).
Graef Dutch, German
Name used to denote the chairman of a town council. Compare Graf.
Grämlich German
Nickname for an irascible person, derived from Middle High German gramelich and gremlich meaning "angry".
Grass English, German
Topographic name for someone who owned or lived by a meadow, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who made or sold hay, from Middle English gras, Middle High German gras "grass, pasture, grazing".
Gratz German
From a short form of a Germanic personal name reflected by Old High German gratag 'greedy'
Grau German, Jewish
Nickname for someone with gray hair or a gray beard, from German grau "gray".
Graue German
Habitational name from a place so named near Hannover.
Graue German
Variant of Grau.
Grave German
Either from the northern form of Graf, but more commonly a topographic name from Middle Low German grave "ditch", "moat", "channel", or a habitational name from any of several places in northern Germany named with this word.
Graves English, French, German
Derives from someone who had an occupation as a grave digger or a caretaker for a graveyard.
Grawert Low German, German (East Prussian)
As a Low German name, Grawert is derived from Middle High German grā and Old High German grāo "gray" (originally "shimmery, gleaming"). As a surname, it was a nickname given to someone with gray hair.... [more]
Grebenstein German
Means "stone from the cliff or ridge" from German greben, (cliff or ridge) and stein (stone).... [more]
Greenberger German, Jewish
Anglicized form of the German surname Grünberger, which is formed from the words grün "green", Berg "mountain", and the habitational suffix -er. This name indicated a person who lived on or near a forest-covered mountain.
Greenburgh German, Jewish
The surname Greenburgh is anglicized for the German Jewish surname Greenberg which translates into English as green mountain.
Greet German
Americanized form of German Fried.
Greif German
Means "Griffin" in German. From the mythological creature.
Grell German
Nickname for an irritable or irascible person, from Middle High German, Middle Low German grellen "to be angry".
Grell German
Habitational name from a place named Grelle.
Grelle German
Variant of Grell.
Gretzinger German
Habitational name for someone from any of three places named Grötzingen (Old High German Grezzingun) in Baden-Württemberg.
Grewe German, Low German
Low German form of Graf via Middle Low German grave / greve.
Grieser Upper German
topographic name for someone living on a sandy site, from Middle High German griez ‘sand’ + -er suffix denoting an inhabitant.
Griezmann German (Rare)
This is the surname of French professional footballer Antoine Griezmann.
Grill German
From a nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle High German grille "cricket" (Old High German grillo, from Late Latin grillus, Greek gryllos). The insect is widely supposed to be of a cheerful disposition, no doubt because of its habit of infesting hearths and warm places... [more]
Grimké German (Americanized)
Americanised form of the German surname Grimk or Grimke with French inspiration. This was the name of a prominent American family of abolitionists.
Grimm English, German, Danish, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
From a nickname for a stern and forbidding individual, derived from the Old High German word grim "stern, severe". Or possibly from the given name Grímr derived from Old Norse gríma "mask, helmet"... [more]
Grindy German (Modern), French
I have seen elsewhere explanations about this name being German or French in origin. Sorry, I do not have the sources to hand
Grob German
A nickname for a strong, heavy man, or for a lout, from Middle High German g(e)rop "coarse".
Grohl German
Meaning uncertain, but likely a variant of Groll.
Groll German
Derived from grollen, 'to be angry', often used as a nickname for an angry or sulky individual.
Großkreutz German
From German "groß" meaning big and "kreutz" meaning cross.
Grove German
Form of Grob.
Grove German
Name from any of several places named Grove or Groven, which derive their name from Middle Low Germany grove ‘ditch’, ‘channel’. In some cases the name is a Dutch or Low German form of Grube.
Grove German
Variation of Graf.
Grube German
Name for someone who lived in a depression or hollow, from Middle High German gruobe "pit", "hollow". See also Gruber.
Grube German
From the personal name Grubo.
Grumbach German (Swiss), Alsatian
From the name of various places in Switzerland and Germany, for example the municipality of Grumbach in Rhineland-Palatinate.
Grunwald German, German (Swiss), Jewish
German and Swiss German (Grünwald): habitational name from any of various places named Grün(e)wald, from Middle High German gruene ‘green’ + walt ‘wood’, ‘forest’. ... [more]
Gschwendtner German (Austrian)
From the German word "schwenden", which means "swidden agriculture" in English
Gubler German (Swiss)
Means "Of the Mountains"... [more]
Guengerich German (Americanized)
Potentially from German “junge” and “reich,” meaning “rich at a young age.” Anglicized by immigrants as either Guengerich or Gingrich.
Guenther German
German: from a Germanic personal name composed of gund ‘battle’ + hari, heri ‘army’.
Guido Italian, German
From the given name Guido.
Guja German (East Prussian)
From the town Groß Guja
Gum German
North German:... [more]
Gunzenhauser German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from either of two places named Gunzenhausen, one in Württemberg and the other in Bavaria.
Gust German
German: from a short form of the personal name Jodocus, which is either a Latinized form of a Breton name, Iodoc, borne by a 7th-century Breton saint (compare Jost and Joyce) or from a reduced form of the personal name Augustus.... [more]
Guthrie Scottish, Irish, German
Scottish: habitational name from a place near Forfar, named in Gaelic with gaothair ‘windy place’ (a derivative of gaoth ‘wind’) + the locative suffix -ach. Possibly an Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mag Uchtre ‘son of Uchtre’, a personal name of uncertain origin, perhaps akin to uchtlach ‘child’.... [more]
Gutknecht German, German (Swiss)
Status name for a page of noble birth (Middle High German guot kneht).
Gütlin German, Yiddish
Diminutive of GUTE and GUTA, recorded in Frankfurt, Germany throughout the 14th century.
Guttenberg German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of various places, for example in Bavaria, called Guttenberg, from the weak dative case (originally used after a preposition and article) of Old High German guot ‘good’ + berg ‘mountain’, ‘hill’... [more]
Gutting German
Of uncertain origin. Probably from a Germanic personal name formed with god "good" or god, got "god".
Haack German
One who lived at the bend or hook in the river. (See Hooker)
Habelt German
from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Habo, a short form of various compound names formed with had(u) ‘battle’, ‘strife’
Haberfeld German
Means "oat field". From the words habaro "oat" and feld "field
Haberfield German (Anglicized)
Partial anglicization of Haberfeld
Haberland German
Topographic name from Middle High German haber(e) "oats" and land "land", or a habitational name from any of various places so called.
Habermann German, Jewish
Occupational name for a grower or seller of oats, composed of the elements Haber and the agent suffix -mann.
Habsburg German
This surname may have been used by someone whose descendants originated from the House of Habsburg, which was one of the most important royal houses in Europe. It is assumed that the surname is derived from High German Habichtsburg meaning "hawk castle," but some historians and linguists believe that it may actually be derived from Middle High German hab/hap meaning "ford", as there is a river with a ford nearby.
Hack German
Variant of Haack.
Hackmann German, Jewish
Occupational name for a butcher or a woodcutter.
Hafer German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a grower of or dealer in oats, from German Hafer "oats". Compare Haber. As a Jewish surname, it is in many cases ornamental.
Hagelberg German
From German hagel meaning "hail" and berg meaning "mountain".
Hagemann German, Danish
Combination of Middle Low German hage "enclosure, hedge" and mann "man".
Hahm German
Metonymic occupational name for a sealer of weights and measures, from Middle High German hāme ‘(standard) measure’.
Hähner German
Pet form of Heinrich.
Hahner German
Occupational name for a poultry farmer, from an agent derivative of Middle High German hane "rooster".
Hahner German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Hahn or Hag.
Halberstadt German
Habitational name from any of various places so named, notably the city near Magdeburg and Halberstadt near Königstein in Saxony.
Ham English, German, Scottish, Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon meaning the home stead, many places in England. One who came from Hamm in North-Rhine Westphalia, or one who came from Ham in Caithness Scotland's most northerly county. In Scotland this surname devires from the Norse word "Hami", meaning homestead.
Hamberg German, Danish, Jewish
German, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from any of several places named Hamberg. Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Hamburg.
Hamberger German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name for someone from any of various places named Hamberg. Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Hamburger.
Hamburg German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from the great city and port at the mouth of the river Elbe, named with the Germanic elements ham ‘water meadow’ + burg ‘fortress’, ‘fortified town’.
Hamburger German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name for someone from Hamburg.
Hamel Yiddish, Dutch, German
The name Hamel has three origins.... [more]
Hamer English, German
From the town of Hamer in Lancashire from the old english word Hamor combining "Rock" and "Crag". It is also used in Germany and other places in Europe, possibly meaning a maker of Hammers.
Hammer German, English, Jewish
From Middle High German hamer, Yiddish hamer, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or user of hammers, for example in a forge, or nickname for a forceful person.
Hammerschmidt German, Jewish
Occupational name for a blacksmith, from German hamer, 'hammer' and schmidt, 'smith. See Hammersmith.
Hammersmith German, English
Normally an anglicization of German Hammerschmidt. Perhaps also from Norwegian Hammersmed.... [more]
Hamp English, German
English: unexplained; compare Hemp.... [more]
Händel German
Derived from Hans or Heinrich.
Häner German
Variant of Hanner.
Haner German
Altered spelling or variant of Hahner.
Hang German (Swiss)
From the given name Hank
Hänner German
Pet form of Heinrich.
Hanner German
From a pet form of Hann, short form of Johann.
Har German
Variant of Har.
Harbach German
Habitational name from any of several places named Harbach.
Hardekop German (Rare)
Derived from Middle High German hart "hard" and kopf "head". As a surname, it was given to a hard-headed, stubborn person.
Harlacher German
Habitational name for someone from Ober- or Unter-Harlachen, near Überlingen.
Harless English, German
English: probably a variant spelling of Arliss, a nickname from Middle English earles ‘earless’, probably denoting someone who was deaf rather than one literally without ears.
Harnar German
Given to one who was noisy
Harold English, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name Hereweald, its Old Norse equivalent Haraldr, or the Continental form Herold introduced to Britain by the Normans... [more]
Hartung German
German, Dutch, and Danish: from a Germanic personal name, a derivative (originally a patronymic) of compound names beginning with hart ‘hardy’, ‘strong’.
Haselbauer German
Translates to 'hazel farmer'
Hassdenteufel German
A German Satzname, from the expression "Hass den Teufel" meaning "hate the devil".
Hasselbach German
Habitational name from any of the places in various parts of Germany called Hasselbach.
Hasslacher German
hass=hate; lacher=laughter... [more]
Hässli German (Swiss), French (Rare)
Swiss German diminutive form of Haas. This is a French surname via Alsace-Lorraine. A notable bearer is French footballer (soccer player) Eric Hassli (1981-).
Hattendorf German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from places called Hattendorf, near Alsfeld and near Hannover. The element hatt, had means ‘bog’
Hattler German
Occupational name for someone who raises goats.
Hauck German
Derived from the first name Hugo.
Haueis German
Derived from Middle High German houwen "to beat" and isen "iron". This surname denoted a smith.
Hauptman German
Variant spelling of Hauptmann.
Hauptmann German
Derived from German hauptmann, a word used for a German military rank meaning "Captain".
Haus German
Topographic and occupational name for someone who lived and worked in a great house, from Middle High German, Middle Low German hus "house" (see House).
Hausch German
From the Germanic personal name Huso, a short form of a compound name composed with hus ‘house’, ‘dwelling’ as the first element.
Hauser German, Jewish
From Middle High German hus "house", German haus, + the suffix -er, denoting someone who gives shelter or protection.
Hausle German (Austrian)
Topographical name for someone who's House was near the Woods, from German "Häus" House "le" Woods
Hausmann German
From Middle High German hus "house" (see Haus) + man "man".
Hauswirth German
From Middle High German haus 'house' and wirt 'owner' or 'master'.
Havertz German
Variant of Ritz.
Havner German
Variant of Hafner.
Hay English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
Haydn German
Meaning "heathen". Famous bearer is Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).
Haydt German
Varient of Heid.
Heartfield German (Anglicized)
Anglicised spelling of Herzfeld.
Heartman German (Anglicized)
Americanised spelling of Hartmann.
Hebel German
1 German: metonymic occupational name for a baker, from Middle High German hebel ‘yeast’.... [more]
Heber German
Occupational name for a carrier (someone who loaded or transported goods), from an agent derivative of Middle High German heben "to lift".
Hebert German
Variant of Heber.
Hecht German, Dutch
From Middle High German hech(e)t, Middle Dutch heect, hecht "pike", generally a nickname for a rapacious and greedy person. In some instances it may have been a metonymic occupational name for a fisher and in others it may be a habitational name from a house distinguished by a sign depicting this fish.
Hecker German
German form of Hatcher.
Hefler German
Derived from the Old German and German word hof, which means settlement, farm or court.
Hefner German, Jewish
Recorded in several spellings including Hafner, Haffner, and Hevner, this is as surname of early Germanic origins. ... [more]
Heid German, Jewish
Topographic name from Middle High German heide, German Heide ‘heath’, ‘moor’. Compare Heath.... [more]
Heidenreich German
From the medieval personal name Heidenrich, ostensibly composed of the elements heiden 'heathen', 'infidel' (see Heiden 2) + ric 'power', 'rule', but probably in fact a variant by folk etymology of Heidrich.
Heider German
Combination of German Heide "heath, headland" and the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant. The surname can be either topographic for someone living on or near a heath, or habitational for someone from any place named with the element Heide.
Heigl German
Derived from the given name Hugo.
Heiland German
South German: from Middle High German heilant ‘savior’, ‘Christ’, presumably either a name given to someone who had played the part of Christ in a mystery play or an occupational name for a healer, from Middle High German heilen ‘to heal’, ‘save’.
Heiliger German
Heiliger means "Holy" or "Holy One" in German.
Heimbach German
Town / City in Germany
Heimburg German
German for "home". Originates in the German village of Heimburg (not to be confused with Hamburg) and the nearby castle of the same name.
Hein German, Dutch, Danish, Jewish
German, Dutch, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from a short form of the Germanic personal name Heinrich.
Heinbokel German
(Hein) is a short form of the name Heinrich, (the German form of the name Henry) & Bokel is a place name in Lower Saxony, Schleswig-Holstein & North Rhine-Westphalia.
Heine German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from a short form of Heinrich.
Heineken Dutch, German
Derived from Hein, a Dutch diminutive of Hendrik. A famous bearer was Gerard Adriaan Heineken (1841-1893), the founder of the Heineken N.V. brewing company... [more]
Heinemann German, Jewish
Combination of Heine, a short form of Heinrich, and Mann "man".
Heiner German
From the given name Heiner.
Heinisch German
From a pet form of the personal name Heinrich.
Heinl German
South German variant of Heinle.
Heinle German
This surname is derived from what may be a pet form of Heinrich.