German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Rohrlach German (Rare), American
Form a place name, e.g., Rohrlach (Kreis Hirschberg) in Silesia (now Trzcińsko, Poland)
Rohrsen German
Unknown source.
Roland French, German, Scottish
French, German, English, and Scottish: from a Germanic personal name composed hrod ‘renown’ + -nand ‘bold’, assimilated to -lant ‘land’. (Compare Rowland).... [more]
Rolf German
English: Composed of the Germanic elements hrod ‘renown’ + wulf ‘wolf’. This name was especially popular among Nordic peoples in the contracted form Hrólfr and seems to have reached England by two separate channels; partly through its use among pre-Conquest Scandinavian settlers, partly through its popularity among the Normans, who, however, generally used the form Rou (see Rollo).... [more]
Rolfs German
This surname means "son of Rolf," a patronymic surname from northern Germany.
Roll Upper German, German, English
German: from Middle High German rolle, rulle ‘roll’, ‘list’, possibly applied as a metonymic occupational name for a scribe.... [more]
Rollin English, German
English: variant of Rolling.... [more]
Roman Catalan, French, Polish, English, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
From the Latin personal name Romanus, which originally meant "Roman". This name was borne by several saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Rouen.
Romana Catalan, French, Italian, Polish, English (Rare), German, Hungarian, Romanian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
From the feminine form of the Latin personal name Romanus, which originally meant "Roman".
Rommel Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for an obstreperous person, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rummeln, rumpeln to make a noise, create a disturbance (of imitative origin). Variant of Rummel.
Romp English, German
Likely a variant of Rump.
Röntgen German
Meaning uncertain. This was the name of German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen (1845-1923) who discovered and studied x-rays. Röntgen called the radiation "X" because it was an unknown type of radiation.
Roos Estonian, Swedish, Danish, Dutch, German (Swiss), Low German
Means "rose" in Estonian and Dutch. Swedish and Danish variant of Ros, also meaning "rose". This could be a locational name for someone living near roses, an occupational name for someone who grew roses, or a nickname for someone with reddish skin.
Rosberg German
Meaning "rose" "mountain"
Rosen German, Jewish
Means "Roses" in German
Rosenbaum German
Habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a rosebush, Middle High German rōsenboum.
Rosencrantz German
Means "rose wreath" in German.
Rosenheim German (Rare)
Derived from "home of roses".
Rosenthal German, Jewish
name for any of numerous places named rosenthal or rosendahl. means " rose valley"
Rosenzweig German, Jewish
A German and Jewish surname, meaning "rose twig" or "branch".
Roser German
German: topographic name for "someone who lived at a place where wild roses grew" (see Rose 1), with the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.German (Röser): habitational name from places called Rös, Roes, or Rösa in Bavaria, Rhineland, and Saxony, or a variant of Rosser.Swiss German (Röser): from a short form of a Germanic personal name based on hrod "renown".English: "unexplained".
Rosing German
1 German and Dutch: patronymic from a derivative of the medieval personal name Rozinus.... [more]
Rosmarin German
According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosemary and Latin dictonaries the name Rosmarin derives from the Latin words 'ros' ('dew' or 'tear') and 'marin' ('sea')... [more]
Rössel German
Means "knight" in German.
Rost German
From a nickname for a red-haired person, from Middle High German rost meaning ‘rust’.
Rost German
A metonymic occupational name for a limeburner or blacksmith, from Middle High German, Middle Low German rōst meaning ‘grate, grill’ or Middle High German rōst(e) meaning ‘fire, embers, pyre, grate’ (typically one for burning lime).
Roszhart German
The original spelling of the name is Roßhart. Roß means "horse" and hart means "hard" in German. The name was changed when the family immigrated to the United States in the 1850's. Some took on the name "Rosshart", and some "Roszhart" as the ß has the "sss" sound.
Rothberg German
From the elements rot "red" and berg "mountain" meaning "red mountain".
Rothfus German
Middle High German rot "red" + vuoz "foot", a nickname for someone who followed the fashion for shoes made from a type of fine reddish leather. Or a variant of Rotfuchs, from the Middle Low German form fos "fox", a nickname for a clever person.
Rothman German, Jewish
German (Rothmann) and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a person with red hair, from an elaborated form of Roth 1. ... [more]
Rothmann German
German: see Rothman.
Rothstein German, Jewish
From German rot meaning "red" and stein meaning "stone".
Rotstein German
German surname that means "red stone".
Rott German
As far as I've researched the name dates back to a man by the name of Count Palatine Kuno von Rott (~1083). After he got land from the Pfalzfrafs which seem to be a nobile family line.... [more]
Rottscheit German
Modernization of Rotscheidt, also a city in Germany (Rottscheidt) bearing another modern alternate spelling. When broken down it ultimately means "red" and "piece of wood", implying that the families of today descends from woodwrokers.
Röver German
This surname was originally used as a derogative nickname for an unscrupulous individual, from Middle Low German rover meaning "pirate, robber."
Rover English, German (Anglicized)
This surname is derived from Middle English roof (from Old English hrof) combined with the agent suffix (i)er, which denotes someone who does/works with something. Thus, the surname was originally used for a constructor or repairer of roofs.... [more]
Rubinstein German, Jewish, Polish
Means "ruby stone", from rubin and stein. Rubin means "ruby" in German and stein means "stone" in German.
Ruch German (Swiss)
It was originally a nickname for a greedy person, from Middle High German ruoch ‘eager,’ ‘intent.’... [more]
Rucker German
Middle High German: nickname rucken "to move or draw". North German: nickname from Middle Low German rucker "thief", "greedy or acquisitive person". German: from a reduced form of the Germanic personal name Rudiger... [more]
Rückmann German
From a Germanic personal name based on hrok "intent", "eager" (Old High German ruoh).
Rudat German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "russet; auburn; reddish brown", derived from Old Prussian ruds and Lithuanian rudas.
Rude Norwegian, German
German: From a pet form of a personal name formed with Old High German hrōd "fame", for example Rudolf or Rüdiger... [more]
Rüdiger German
Derived from the given name Rüidger
Rudner German
German: unexplained. Perhaps a variant of Redner.
Rudolf German
From a personal name composed of Old High German hrōd "renown" and wolf "wolf", equivalent to English Ralph. This name is also found in Slovenia.
Ruedig German
Variation of Rudig.
Rueger German
The name was likely first bestowed on someone thought to have the characteristics of a heron as a nickname, eventually becoming a hereditary surname.
Ruesch German (Swiss), Jewish
Swiss/German variant of Rusch. Meaning "shaggy," "bristly," "unkempt," or "quick."
Ruge German
Nickname from Middle High German ruowe, ruge ‘quiet’, ‘calm’ or Low German rug ‘rough’, ‘crude’.... [more]
Rugh German
A variant of the Alsacian German (and probably Swiss before that) Ruch. Also a variant of the Danish Rügh (not related as far as is known)
Ruhe German
Variant of Ruge. (Rühe) is also a nickname from Rüde ‘hound.’ Habitational name from places named Rühen, Rüden, Rhüden in northern Germany.
Ruhland German
Variation of Rüland.
Ruhr German
Name given to a person who lived near the Ruhr River in Germany.
Ruland German
Medieval form of Roland.
Rumfelt German, Dutch
Altered spelling of German Romfeld, derived from Middle Low German rüm- meaning "to clear (land)" and feld meaning "open country, field". It is a topographic name or possibly a metonymic occupational name for a person engaged in clearing woodland, or in some cases a habitational name for someone from Romfelt in the Ardennes... [more]
Rumfield German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Rumfelt.
Rummel German, Dutch
North German and Dutch: variant of Rommel.... [more]
Rumple German
It is derived from Rumbald, an Old German personal name.
Rumschlag German
This name is possibly a derivative of the German word for "envelope" which is spelled 'Umschlag'.
Runge German
From the old word "runga", meaning stick or whip
Ruprecht German
From the given name Ruprecht.
Rusch German
Meaning "shaggy," "bristly," "unkempt," or "quick."
Ruschel German
Variant of Rusch
Rusher German (Americanized)
Americanized version of the German surname Rüscher or Roshcer. Either a topographic name for someone who lived among rushes or an occupational name for someone who created things out of rushes.
Ruth English, German (Swiss)
English: from Middle English reuthe ‘pity’ (a derivative of rewen to pity, Old English hreowan) nickname for a charitable person or for a pitiable one. Not related to the given name in this case.... [more]
Rutman Jewish, German
1. Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic): origin uncertain; perhaps a variant of Rothman. ... [more]
Rutmann German
German: see Rutman.
Rutt English, German
English: variant of Root.... [more]
Ryne German (Swiss)
Respelling of Swiss German Rhyn, a topographic name for someone living on the Rhine river, Middle High German Rin.
Rynearson German, German (Swiss)
Derived from the Rhine River.
Sachtleben German
Nickname for someone perceived to lead a carefree, easy life, from Middle Low German sacht(e) meaning "soft" + leben meaning "life".
Sackmann German
Occupational name from Middle High German sacman meaning "baggage servant", one who was in charge of transporting and looking after a knight’s baggage and supplies on campaign.
Sadat German (Rare)
The last name Sadat means "master" and "gentleman," and is originally a religious last name which was popular in the west, more precisely in Germany.
Saenger German, Jewish
Occupational name for a chorister or a nickname for someone who liked singing, from Middle High German senger, German Sänger meaning "singer".
Saffeels English (Rare), German (Rare)
Used as a last name a minimum of 82 times in (USA, Germany).
Sallwasser German
It is derived from the German words (Salz) meaning "salt", & (Salweide) meaning "water".
Saltzman Jewish, German
Altered spelling of Salzmann.
Salzmann German, Jewish
Occupational name for a producer or seller of salt, from German salz "salt" + mann "man".
Samet German, Jewish, Yiddish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of velvet, from Yiddish samet ‘velvet’ (German Samt, ultimately from Greek hexamiton, a compound of hex ‘six’ + mitos ‘thread’).
Samis Dutch, German
From a pet form of the personal name Samuel.
Sand English, Scottish, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, German, Jewish
From the vocabulary word sand. As a Swedish and Jewish name, often ornamental. Otherwise topographic.
Sande German
Variant of Sand.
Sandmeier German, German (Swiss), German (Austrian)
From Middle High German sand combined with Meier, referring to a tenant farmer whose farm was on sandy soil.
Sankt Johann German
Means Saint John in German.
Saperstein Jewish, German
“Sapphire” and “stone”
Sarnow Polabian (Germanized), German
From the village of Sarnow in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. Surname of the mayor of Stralsund Karsten Sarnow.
Sattler German
An occupational name meaning "saddle maker".
Sauerwein German
Occupational nickname for someone who sold sour wine, or perhaps a nickname for someone with a sour disposition, from Middle High German sur "sour" + win "wine", i.e. vinegar.
Saur German
Variant of Sauer.
Schaaf German
Metonymic occupational name for a shepherd, from Middle High German schāf ‘sheep’. In some cases it may have been a nickname for someone thought to resemble a sheep, or a habitational name for someone living at a house distinguished by the sign of a sheep... [more]
Schaben German
Describes an inhabitant of the region Swabia
Schachner German
German origins (as told to me by my family); popular in Austria and also has Jewish and Slavic origins, according to the internet/ancestry.com.
Schade German, Dutch, Scottish, English
German and Dutch: from schade ‘damage’, a derivative of schaden ‘to do damage’, generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others’ lands.... [more]
Schaden German, Dutch
From schade 'damage', a derivative of schaden 'to do damage', generally a nickname for a thug or clumsy person, or, more particularly, a robber knight, who raided others' lands.
Schaefer German (?)
Originating in Germany SCHAEFER is a given surname meaning Shepard in German.
Schaff German
Name given to sheepherders, accounding to personal family history.
Schäffler German
Occupational name for a cooper, from an agent derivative of Middle High German scheffel "bushel".
Schaffner German, Jewish, German (Swiss)
German: occupational name for a steward or bailiff, variant of Schaffer.
Schalk German
germany
Schaller Upper German
From Middle High German word "schal," which means "noise," or "bragging," and as such is was thought to have originally been a nickname for a braggart, or for a market crier.
Schattner German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of several places named Schaten or Schatten, or a topographic name for someone living in a shady location, from Middle High German schate "shade", "protection".
Schatz German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a treasurer, from German Schatz ‘treasure’, Middle High German scha(t)z. It may also have been a nickname for a rich man (or ironically for a miser), or else for a well-liked person or a ladies’ favorite, from the use of the vocabulary word as a term of endearment... [more]
Schätzel German
German diminutive of Schatz, or a nickname for a lover meaning "little sweetheart" (from the same word used as a term of endearment).
Schauble German
Diminutive of Scaub
Schauer German
The Schauer surname comes from the Middle High German word "schouwen" meaning "to inspect;" as such, the name is thought to have originally been occupational, for some kind of inspector, perhaps an official of a market.
Schaumburg German, Dutch, Belgian
Habitational name from any of the places called Schaumburg or Schauenburg in Germany, or Schauwberg in Brabant, Belgium.
Schaus German, Luxembourgish
A nickname for a simpleton, from schaus, a word in Rhenish Franconian and Lower Rhine dialects of German.
Schauwecker German
habitational name for someone from Schaubeck near Marbach (Württemberg).
Scheetz German
Anglicized version of the German surname, Schütz, "archer," "yeoman," "protect."
Scheidegger German, German (Swiss)
Topographic name for someone who lived near a boundary or watershed. The name was derived from the Old German word SCHEIDE, meaning 'to part, to divide'. It may also have been a habitation name from any of the numerous places named with this word.
Schell German
Means "noisy" or "loud" from the German word "schel"
Schemmel German
Nickname for a disabled person, from Middle High German schemel "stool", which was used as a crutch by invalids.
Schenkel German, Dutch, Jewish
German, Dutch, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for someone with long or otherwise notable legs, from Middle High German schenkel, Middle Dutch schenkel, schinkel ‘thigh’, ‘lower leg’, German Schenkel ‘thigh’.
Scheremet German
German cognate of Şeremet.
Scherl German
Southern German: metonymic occupational name for a potter, from scherbe ‘pot’, ‘potsherd’.
Scherman German
German version of Sherman
Scherzer German (Austrian)
Habitational name for someone from a place called Scherz in Switzerland
Scheunemann German
It literally means someone who either lives near (or in, if poor &/or homeless) a barn or works within its general vicinity.
Schick German
A nickname given to a person who's smart, stylish, and well-dressed.
Schicklgruber German (Austrian)
This was the surname of Maria Schicklgruber (April 15, 1795 - January 7, 1847), the mother of Adolf Hitler.
Schie German
From a nickname that meant "shy".
Schiefelbein German
Habitational name from Schievelbein in Pomerania.
Schierokauer German, Yiddish
Derived from the town of Sieraków in the Silesian Voivodeship in Poland.
Schiff German, Jewish
From Middle High German Schif "ship", indicating the bearer was either a sailor, or lived in a house distinguished by a ship sign.
Schild German, Dutch
Occupational name for a maker or painter of shields, from Middle High German, Middle Dutch schilt "shield".
Schildhauer German
First appeared during the Middle Ages in Central Europe/Germany. The name means "Shield-Maker" and suggests correlation to Blacksmiths or or other forms of metalwork in the time period.
Schiller German
Nickname for someone with a squint, from an agent derivative of Middle High German schilhen, schiln 'to squint'.
Schink Upper German, Dutch
Nickname for someone with long or otherwise remarkable legs, from Middle High German schinke ‘thigh’, ‘leg’. Compare Schenkel. ... [more]
Schinker German
Unknown, though I would very much like to know. Possible Hungarian influence as well as German.
Schlatter Upper German
Topographic name from Middle High German slâte "reedy place", or a habitational name from any of several places named Schlatt, from the same word.
Schleicher German
Could derive from the word schleifen meaning "to grind" but most likely is derived from the word schleicher "to sneak, creeper"
Schleifer German
Derived from the word schleifen "to grind, polish".
Schlemmer German
Derived from a Middle High German word meaning "feast" and thus used as a nickname for a "gourmet".
Schlep German
Probably a nickname or occupational name for a laborer or carrier, especially in a mine, from Middle Low German slepen, Middle High German slepen 'to drag or carry (a load)' (modern German schleppen, schleifen).
Schley German
Name for someone living by the Schlei river.
Schloss German
Shortened form of Schlosser.
Schlossberg German
Ornamental name composed of German Schloss ‘castle’ + Berg ‘mountain’, ‘hill’.
Schlote German
literal meaning: smokestack
Schlott German, Low German
Occupational name for a locksmith, from Middle Low German slot 'lock'.
Schmaltz German (Rare), German (Austrian, Rare)
Schmaltz is a German and Austrian surname. It was used as an occupational surname for chandlers.
Schmiedt German
Variant spelling of Schmidt.
Schmoeckel German (East Prussian)
Originally Smekel. In the 17th century the ‘Sm’ in Low German was gradually replaced by the ‘Schm’ from High German. ... [more]
Schmuck German, German (Austrian)
From Middle High German smuc meaning "jewel", "finery", hence a metonymic occupational name for a jeweler, or a nickname for someone who wore a prominent jewel or ornament.North German: nickname from Middle Low German smuck meaning "neat", "dainty".
Schnee German, Popular Culture
A German surname meaning "snow". One fictional bearer of this surname is Weiss Schnee, a main character from the popular web series RWBY.
Schneid German, Jewish
Variant form of Schneider. Means "cut"
Schnieder German
North German and American variant of Schneider
Schock German
German origin. Means "shock" in German, as in surprise.
Schoen German, Jewish, Dutch
German (Schön) nickname for a handsome or pleasant man, from Middle High German schoene ‘fine’, ‘beautiful’; ‘refined’, ‘friendly’, ‘nice’. ... [more]
Schoenberg German, Jewish
Means "beautiful mountain" in German
Schoene German
German (Schöne): variant of Schoen 1.
Schoenwetter German
German (Schönwetter): nickname for someone with a happy disposition, from Middle High German schœn ‘beautiful’, ‘fine’, ‘nice’ + wetter ‘weather’.
Schömer German
Nickname for an offensive person, from Middle High German schemen "to insult."
Schommer German
"one who was a gossip, a vagabond or rascal"... [more]
Schön German, Swedish
Derived from Middle High German schoene "beautiful, friendly".
Schönenberger German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places in Germany and Switzerland named Schönenberg.
Schops German
Means "scoop maker"
Schorgl German (Austrian)
Austrian meaning, “Lover of the land”, used by farmers.
Schorr German
In the south a topographic name from Middle High German schor(re) 'steep rock', 'rocky shore'.
Schorsch German
Possibly from the given name George, pronounced SHORSH in South-Western Germany. As a Jewish name, it may come from the surname Shor.
Schotte German
From schotte, an ethnic name for a Scottish person or somebody of such descent.
Schottenstein German, Jewish
Ornamental name meaning "bulkhead stone" in German.
Schottlander German, Jewish, Dutch
From German Schottland, 'Scotland' and, in some cases, denoted an immigrant from Scotland or Ireland. Numerous Irish fled to continental Europe after the Anglo-Norman invasion in the 13th century.... [more]
Schottler German
Occupational name for a wood turner, Middle Low German scoteler (an agent derivative of scotel ‘wooden bowl’).
Schram German, English, Yiddish
Derived from German Schramme (Middle High German schram(me)) and Yiddish shram, all of which mean "scar".
Schramm German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): metonymic nickname for a person with a scar, from Middle High German schram(me), German Schramme, Yiddish shram ‘scar’.
Schrock German
Some think that the last name Schrock comes from the German word which meant something along the lines of "Jump" or "Leaps" and was probably a nickname to someone who was a great jumper, or someone who was easily startled.
Schrödinger German
Denoted a person from Schröding, a old placename in Bavaria.
Schuch German
Likely derived from SCHUMACHER (Shoe Maker)
Schueler German
The surname Schueler was first found in southern Germany, where the name was closely identified in early mediaeval times with the feudal society which would become prominent throughout European history.
Schug American, German
From the German word Schuh "shoe". ... [more]
Schuknecht German
Occupational name for a shoemaker’s assistant, from Middle High German schuoch meaning "shoe" + knecht meaning "journeyman", "assistant".
Schuller German
Possibly a habitational name from Schüller in the Eifel.
Schuman German
From the old german scuoh "shoe" and man "man", an occupational name for a shoe maker
Schumer German
North German nickname for a person who wanders from place to place without a home or job, derived from Middle Low German schumer meaning "good for nothing, vagabond".
Schutz German
Occupational surname for an archer or a watchman (from Middle High German schützen "to guard or protect"). Also a habitational name from Schutz, a place near Trier, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.
Schwaab German
The surname of German VfB Stuttgart footballer Daniel Schwaab, born in Waldkirch, Germany.
Schwab German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): regional name for someone from Swabia (German Schwaben), from Middle High German Swap, German Schwabe ‘Swabian’. The region takes its name from a Germanic tribe recorded from the 1st century BC in the Latin form Suebi or Suevi, of uncertain origin; it was an independent duchy from the 10th century until 1313, when the territory was broken up.
Schwabe German
1. The name given to those who lived in Swabia
Schwan German
Means "Swan" in German.
Schwanbeck German
Habitational name from any of several places so named, for example near Lübeck and near Anklam.
Schwandt German
Topographic name for someone who lived in a forest clearing, from Middle High German swant (from swenden "to thin out", "make disappear", causative from swinden "to disappear" modern German schwinden.
Schwandt German
Habitational name from any of the various places called Schwand or Schwanden, all in southern Germany, named with this element, from Middle High German swant (from swenden "to thin out", "make disappear", causative from swinden "to disappear" modern German schwinden.
Schwanz German
Form of Schwan. Also means tail in German.
Schwarzberg German
Variant of Schwartzberg, which means "black mountain" in German.
Schwarzkopf German
Means "black head", from German Schwarz "black", and Kopf "head".
Schweder German, Upper German
German: ethnic name for a Swede.... [more]
Schwehr German
German: relationship name, a variant of Schwäher, a variant of Schwager.
Schweigert German
Derives from an agent derivative of the German "schweigen", to be silent, and the nickname would have been given to a silent, quiet, taciturn person.
Schweinhardt German
an occupational or nickname having to do with pigs
Schweinsteiger German
Means "Swine Climber". ... [more]
Schweitz German
Ethnic name for a Swiss, from German Schweitz meaning "Swiss".
Schwer Upper German, German, Jewish
South German relationship name from Middle High German sweher ‘father-in-law’. ... [more]
Schwertfuehrer German (Austrian)
Sword leader; military general or other leadership position
Schwimer German, Jewish
Occupational name meaning "swimmer" in German. As a Jewish name, it may be ornamental.
Schwing German
Occupational name for someone whose job was to swingle flax, i.e. to beat the flax with a swingle in order to remove the woody parts of the plant prior to spinning, from Middle German swingen meaning "to swing" or swing meaning "swingle".
Seager English, German (Modern)
English: from the Middle English personal name Segar, Old English S?gar, composed of the elements s? ‘sea’ + gar ‘spear’.... [more]
Sebert German, French
From a German personal name composed of the elements sigi meaning "victory" + berht meaning "bright", "famous".
Secrest German
Variant of German Siegrist.
See English, German
Topographic name for someone who lived by the sea-shore or beside a lake, from Middle English see meaning "sea", "lake" (Old English sǣ), Middle High German sē. Alternatively, the English name may denote someone who lived by a watercourse, from an Old English sēoh meaning "watercourse", "drain".
Sees German
Variant of Seese.
Seese German
Comes from a Germanic personal name, Sigizo, from a compound name formed with sigi ‘victory’ as the first element.
Seib German
Short form of SEIBOLD. Ultimately derived from names composed of the Germanic name element sigi "victory".