German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Drost Dutch, German, Danish
Occupational name for a steward or head servant.
Drux German
Variant of Trux, which itself is a contracted form of Truxes and derived from the German word Truchsess, ultimately from Middle High German truhsaeze and Old High German truhtsazzo (from truht "band; cohort; regiment" and saza "seat; chair").... [more]
Dubach German (Swiss)
A surname describing a person from the town of Tübach in St. Gallen, Switzerland.
Dück Low German, German
North German nickname for a coward, from Low German duken ‘to duck or dive’. ... [more]
Duesler Upper German
DueslerDuesslerDüslerDußlerhttp://www.duesler.com/html/charles_duelser_s_book.HTM "Duesler / Duessler / Dueßler http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dussler-6 , http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dussler-2 Andrew & brother Jacob were the Progenitors of Duesler, Duessler, Dueßler s from 1752 Germany to America... [more]
Duesterwald German
Variant spelling of Düsterwald.
Dümmer German (Rare)
From the name of a lake in Germany.
Dummer German, English
From Middle High German tump "simple".
Duschek German
German cognate of Dušek.
Düsterwald German
Derived from Middle Low German düster "dark" combined with Old High German wald "forest".
Eargle German (Swiss, Americanized, ?)
Derived from Ergul Castle, Switzerland. Immigrants from Germany to US used Ergel, Ergil, Ergle.
Earley German, Irish
The surname Earley originally derived from the Old English word Eorlic which referred to one who displayed manly characteristics.... [more]
Early Irish, English, American, German
Irish: translation of Gaelic Ó Mocháin (see Mohan; Gaelic moch means ‘early’ or ‘timely’), or of some other similar surname, for example Ó Mochóir, a shortened form of Ó Mochéirghe, Ó Maoil-Mhochéirghe, from a personal name meaning ‘early rising’.... [more]
Earnhardt German
It is a name for a courageous or honorable person. The surname Earnhardt is composed of two German words meaning honor and bravery.
Eberhard German (Americanized)
Americanized version of Eberhardt.
Eberhart German
From the given name Eberhard
Eberling German (Austrian)
The surname Eberling was first found in Austria, where this family name became a prominent contributor to the development of the district from ancient times. Always prominent in social affairs, the name became an integral part of that turbulent region as it emerged to form alliances with other families within the Feudal System and the nation... [more]
Eberly Upper German, German (Swiss), English (American)
Variant of Eberle, which is a diminutive of Eberhard.
Ebert German, American
Believed to be a variant of Herbert or of Everett.
Eckhart German
From the given name Eckhart.
Edler German
"Noble man." It comes from Edelman.
Egert German, Jewish
Variant spelling of Eggert.
Eggert German, Jewish
Derived from the Proto-Germanic root agi meaning "edge".
Egner German
From a Germanic personal name formed with the element agi ‘point (of a sword)’.
Ehler German
Variant of Ehlert.
Ehlert German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements agil "edge", "point (of a sword)" + hard "brave", "hardy", "strong" or ward "guard".
Ehlinger German
Habitational name for someone from Ehlingen in the Palatinate.
Ehrenberg Jewish (Anglicized, Rare, Archaic), German
"In German it means 'mountain of honor'"
Ehrenreich German, Jewish, Yiddish
Jewish/Yiddish German ornamental surname meaning “Rich in honour”
Ehrhardt German
From a Germanic personal name composed of Old High German ēra, meaning ‘honor’, and hard, meaning ‘brave’, ‘hardy’, or ‘strong’.
Ehrmantraut German
A Latinized joining of the German words irmin(world, all-encompassing) and trud(strength)
Eich German
German from Middle High German eich(e) ‘oak’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived near an oak tree. In some cases, it may be a habitational name for someone from any of several places named with this word, for example Eiche or Eichen, or for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of an oak.
Eichelberg German
Habitational name from any of various places, notably one southeast of Heidelberg, named from Middle High German eichel meaning "acorn" + berc meaning "mountain", "hill", or topographic name for someone who lived on an oak-covered hill.
Eichelberger German
Habitational name for someone from any of the various places called Eichelberg.
Eichhorn German, Jewish
German topographic name for someone who lived on or near an oak-covered promontory, from Middle High German eich(e) ‘oak’ + horn ‘horn’, ‘promontory’. German from Middle High German eichhorn ‘squirrel’ (from Old High German eihhurno, a compound of eih ‘oak’ + urno, from the ancient Germanic and Indo-European name of the animal, which was later wrongly associated with hurno ‘horn’); probably a nickname for someone thought to resemble the animal, or alternatively a habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a squirrel... [more]
Eichhorst German
Denoted someone from a town called Eichhorn in either Brandenburg or Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany.
Eichler Upper German
South German variant of Eich, the -ler suffix denoting association. "eager"
Eickhoff German
From Middle Low German eke "oak" and hof "manor farm."
Eiermann German
Occupational name for an egg collector or dealer in eggs, from Middle High German ei 'egg' + man 'man'.
Eiland German
Topographic name for someone who lived on or owned property surrounded by water, from Middle High German eilant, "island"
Eiler German
1 North German: variant of Ehlert.... [more]
Eingeweide German
A German surname meaning "guts" or "viscera".
Einhorn German, Jewish
Derived from German Einhorn (Middle High German einhorn) "unicorn", denoting someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a unicorn.
Einstein German, Jewish
From German ein meaning “one” and stein meaning “stone”; also a habitational name from any of the various locations from Middle High German einsteinen meaning “to enclose or surround with stone”... [more]
Eisele German
From a short pet form of the personal name Isenhart, from Old High German isan ‘iron’ + hart ‘hardy’, ‘strong’. From Isenlin, a compound of Middle High German isen ‘iron’ + the hypocoristic suffix -lin, hence a nickname for a blacksmith, ironworker, or dealer in iron.
Eisen German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): metonymic occupational name for an ironworker or smith, or an ironmonger, from Middle High German isen ‘iron’, German Eisen. It may also have been used as a nickname, with reference to the strength and hardness of iron or to its color, while as a Jewish name it was also adopted as an ornamental name from modern German Eisen ‘iron’ or the Yiddish cognate ayzn.
Eisenberg German, Jewish
Means "iron hill" from German isen meaning "iron" and berg meaning "hill".
Eisenberger German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of the several places called Eisenberg. As a Jewish name it is also an ornamental name.
Eisenhauer German
Occupational name meaning "iron cutter" where Eisen- means "iron" and -hauer means "hewer". The verb 'hew' being less well used in English than in earlier times, but still understood to mean cut, such as in hewing tree limbs... [more]
Eisenhower German
Americanized spelling of German Eisenhauer.
Eisner German, Jewish
Occupational name for an ironworker, smith, or ironmonger, from an agent derivative of Middle High German īsen and German Eisen, meaning ‘iron’ (see Eisen).
Elias Greek, Catalan, Portuguese, English, Welsh, German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from the medieval given name Elias. Compare Ellis.
Elich German, American
Surname meaning "noble" from edelik or edelich. Notable bearer is professional ice hockey player Matt Elich.
Ellenberg German, Jewish, German (Swiss)
Derived from two municipalities and a village called Ellenberg in Germany. As an ornamental name, it is derived from German ölenberg, literally meaning "olive mountain".
Ellender German
Respelling of German Elender, a nickname for a stranger or newcomer, from Middle High German ellende ‘strange’, ‘foreign’, or a habitational name for someone from any of twenty places named Elend, denoting a remote settlement, as for example in the Harz Mountains or in Carinthia, Austria.
Eller German
Habitational name from places in the North Rhine and Mosel areas
Ellerhoff German
This name means "Black Alder Tree Courtyard" and was inspired by a tree in a yard at the family farm in Nettelstedt, Germany.
Elmendorf German
Derived from a village with the same name in the district of Oldenburg, Lower Saxony, Germany.
Elsing German
From a variant of the old personal name Elsung.
Elsinger German (Swiss)
Probably a derivative of Elsing.
Elverman German
The name Elverman means Eel fisherman.
Emel German
From a short form of any of the various Germanic personal names beginning with the element amal, which means ‘strength’ or ‘vigor’.
Emmer German
A topographic name for someone who lived by land where grain was grown, a status name for someone who owned such land, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who grew or dealt in grain.
Emmerich German
From the given name Emmerich.
Engelbert German, English, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of engel (see Engel) + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The widespread popularity of the name in France during the Middle Ages was largely a result of the fact that it had been borne by a son-in-law of Charlemagne; in the Rhineland it was more often given in memory of a bishop of Cologne (1216–25) of this name, who was martyred.
Engelhardt German
Derived from the Germanic given name Engelhard, composed of German engel meaning "angel" and hard meaning "brave, hardy, strong".
Engelmann German
1 German: variant of Engel 1, with the addition of the personal suffix -mann ‘man’, sometimes denoting a pet form.... [more]
Engels German, Dutch
A patronymic surname from the given name Engel.
Englander German, Jewish
Ethnic name derived from German Engländer, meaning 'Englishman', thus denoting an incomer from England. In some cases, the Jewish name may be an ornamental adoption.
Ens German
Variant of Enns.
Eppler German
Occupational name for a fruit grower or dealer, from Middle High German epfeler meaning "grower of or dealer in apples".
Epshteyn German, Jewish
This surname may be derived from a German town known as Eppstein in Hesse. Epp probably came from Gaulish apa which means water or river and stein translates into English as stone.
Epstein German, Jewish
A habitational name for someone from a place named Eppstein, which is from Old High German ebur meaning ‘wild boar’ and stein meaning ‘stone’.
Erber Jewish, German
Meaning uncertain. Either a habitational name for someone living in a place named Erb or Erp, a name for a owner of a farm named Erbhof (derived from MIddle High German erbære "honorable, noble"), or derived from the given name Erpo.
Erdmann German
From the given name Erdmann.
Erhard German
From the given name Erhard.
Erhardt German
From the given name Erhard.
Erhart German
From the given name Erhard.
Erman German (Modern), French (Modern)
Erman is a shortened French adaption of the Swiss-German surname Ermendinger, itself derived from the older surname Ermatinger, a name connected to the village of Ermatingen on the Swiss shore of Lake Constance, and came into existence during the early or middle 18th century when Jean-Georges Ermendinger (1710-1767), a Swiss fur trader from Geneva, married into a French speaking Huguenotte family... [more]
Ermatinger German (Swiss)
The surname Ermatinger derives from the village of Ermatingen on the Swiss shore of Lake Constance. It simply means "from Ermatingen".... [more]
Ermendinger German
The surname Ermendinger was derived from the older surname Ermatinger, a name connected to the village of Ermatingen on the Swiss shore of Lake Constance, and came into existence at some point during the early 17th or late 16th century when a branch of the Ermatinger family relocated from Schaffhausen, Switzerland, to Mulhouse, Alsace... [more]
Ernsberger German (Anglicized, Modern)
Also spelled (Ehrnsberger) has been said that a Christian Ernsberger or Ehrnsberger came to the U.S. in 1710 from Germany but i dont know from where in Germany.
Ertel German
South German: from a pet form of a personal name beginning with Ort-, from Old High German ort "point" (of a sword or lance)
Esau Welsh, German
From the Biblical personal name Esau, meaning ‘hairy’ in Hebrew (Genesis 25:25).
Escher Dutch, German
German habitational name for someone from any of the various places called Esch, Esche, or Eschen.
Esler German
German: byname or occupational name for someone who drove donkeys, from Middle High German esel ‘donkey’ + the agent suffix -er.
Ess Low German, German (Swiss)
North German: topographic name for someone living on or owning land that was waterlogged or partly surrounded by water, from Middle Low German es ‘swamp’, ‘water’. ... [more]
Ettlinger German
Deriving from Ettlingen, a town in Baden-Württemberg, Germany.
Euler German, Jewish
Occupational name for a potter, most common in the Rhineland and Hesse, from Middle High German ul(n)ære (an agent derivative of the dialect word ul, aul "pot", from Latin olla).
Ewald German, Dutch (?)
From the given name Ewald.
Exner German (Silesian)
Variant of Oxner (see Ochsner).
Fabronius German
An elaboration of the name Faber.
Fahn German
A short form of the personal name Stephan (see also Steven).
Fahr German, German (Swiss)
A topographic name for someone who lived near a crossing point on a river, from Middle High German vare, meaning ferry.
Fahrenheit German
Derived from German fahren, meaning, "to ride", and Heit, which is the equivalent to the suffix "-ness". A famous bearer was Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686- 1736), a Polish physicist who invented the Fahrenheit temperature measuring system.
Falkenberg German, Danish, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Habitational name from any of several places named from Old High German falk "falcon" and berg "mountain, hill".
Falkenhagen German
Habitational name from any of several places named from Old High German falke meaning "falcon" + hag meaning "hedge", "fencing". A place so named is documented west of Berlin in the 14th century.
Falkner German
Occupational name for a falconer, Middle High German vakenoere. In medieval times falconry was a sport practised only by the nobility; it was the task of the falconer to look after the birds and train young ones.
Fass German
From Middle High German faz, German Fass 'cask', 'keg', hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of casks and kegs, or a nickname for someone as rotund as a barrel. German: variant of Fasse, Faas.
Fassbender German
Occupational name for a maker of keg barrels.
Fast German, Swedish
Either a short form of a name starting with the element fast meaning "steadfast, firm", or a nickname for a reliable steadfast person.
Fattig German (Americanized)
Coming from the name “attig” meaning German royalty or nobles. It is also thought to come from Sweden meaning “poor”.
Feck German, Frisian
From a short form of the Frisian personal name Feddeke, a pet form of Fre(de)rik (see Friederich).
Feidt German
Variant spelling of Feit.
Feigenbutz German
Occupational name for someone who sells figs.
Feiler German
Occupational name for a filemaker, from Feil + the agent suffix -er.
Feist German (Austrian)
taken from St. Veit (Vitus in Latin), Protector against fire and lightning
Feistel German
Possibly originates from a German word meaning "fist"
Feit German, Jewish
Variant of Veit. Also, nickname from Middle High German feit ‘adorned’, ‘pretty’ (the same word as French fait, Latin factus).
Felber German
Middle High German residential name "velwer" meaning Willow Tree.
Felder German, Croatian
Derived from German feld, meaning "field".
Fell English, German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a furrier, from Middle English fell, Middle High German vel, or German Fell or Yiddish fel, all of which mean "skin, hide, pelt". Yiddish fel refers to untanned hide, in contrast to pelts "tanned hide" (see Pilcher).
Feller English, German, Jewish
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative of Middle English fell, Middle Low German, Middle High German vel, or German Fell or Yiddish fel "hide, pelt". See also Fell.
Feller German
Habitational name for someone from a place called Feld(e) or Feld(a) in Hesse.
Felty Upper German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of South German Velte, from a short form of the personal name Valentin (see Valentine).
Fenrich De Gjurgjenovac German
Fenrich is a German family name, derived from a military title 'fenrich'/'fähn(d)rich' meaning "ensign" or "standard bearer" (bannerman), from early New High German fenrich. The term was formed and came into use around 1500, replacing Middle High German form vener, an agent derivative of Alemannic substantive van (flag).... [more]
Fenstermaker German
Means 'one who makes windows' in German.
Fernow German
Habitational name from a place called Fernau or Fernow.
Fett German
Nickname for a fat man, from Middle Low German vett meaning "fat".
Feuer German
Metonymic occupational name for a stoker in a smithy or public baths, or nickname for someone with red hair or a fiery temper, from Middle High German viur "fire".
Feuerbacher German
Habitational name for someone from any of the places called Feuerbach.
Feuerhahn German
Feuerhahn comes from the Old High German words (fivr) meaning "fire" & (hano) meaning "cock".
Feuerschütte German (Modern)
comes from the combination of the words "Feuer" and "Schütte", which form the word "flamethrower". Surname of a Brazilian Celebrity with German Origin "Lucas Feuerschütte"
Feuerstein German
This name comes from the German feuer meaning fire, and stein meaning stone. This was a name commonly given to a blacksmith.
Feulner German
Franconian dialect form of Feilner (see Feiler), or derived from Feuln, a town near the district of Kulmbach, Bavaria, Germany. A notable bearer is the American academic Edwin Feulner (1941-).
Fey German, English, French, Danish
English: variant of Fay. ... [more]
Fichter German
Topographic name for someone who lived near pine trees (originally bei den Fichten, Feichten, or Feuchten), from Old High German fiohta. The vowel of the first syllable underwent a variety of changes in different dialects.
Fichter German (Austrian)
Habitational name deriving from places named with this word in Württemberg, Bavaria, Saxony, or Austria.
Fichtner German
The Fichtner family name first began to be used in the German state of Bavaria. After the 12th century, hereditary surnames were adopted according to fairly general rules, and names that were derived from locations became particularly common
Fiene German, Low German
A nickname for an elegant person, from Middle Low German fin, meaning ‘fine’. Can also be a locational name from several fields and places named Fiene.
Fifer German, American, Slovene
Americanized and Slovenian spelling of German Pfeiffer.
Finck English, German
From the German word for "finch" a type of bird
Finger English, German, Jewish
Probably applied as a nickname for a man who had some peculiarity of the fingers, such as possessing a supernumerary one or having lost one or more of them through injury, or for someone who was small in stature or considered insignificant... [more]
Fink German, Slovene, English, Jewish
Nickname for a lively or cheerful person, Jewish ornamental name derived from the Germanic word for "finch", and German translation of Slovene Šinkovec which is from šcinkovec or šcinkavec meaning "finch".
Fisch German, Jewish
From German (fisch) meaning "fish".
Fischbach German
From a place called Fischbach, or a topographic name from German meaning fisch 'fish' + bach 'stream'.
Fischbein German, Jewish
Means "fish bone".
Fische German
Variant of Fisch.
Fischkus German
tax collector (fiscal)
Fiscus German
From Latin fiscus ‘basket’, a humanistic Latinization of the German name Korb. This is a metonymic occupational name for a basketmaker or a peddler, or a habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a basket... [more]
Fishmann German
German variant of Fishman .
Fleckenstein German
German for "stain stone".
Fleig German
Nickname for a restless or insignificant person from Middle Low German vleige ‘fly’.
Fleischman German (Austrian)
Fleischman translates in English to Meat Man, or Butcher It is most often used with a single "n" for those who were persecuted as Jews. Other Germanic spellings for Christians and others not deemed Jewish are Fleischmann, or Fleishmann... [more]
Fleisig German
"industrious"
Flerchinger German
Flerchinger is a name with origins from the city of Flörschingen or Flörange in the Saarland region on the French and German border.
Flint English, German
Topographic name for someone who lived near a significant outcrop of flint, Old English, Low German flint, or a nickname for a hard-hearted or physically tough individual.
Floerchinger German
Habitational name for someone from Flörchingen in the Saar region.
Floerke German
Floerke Name Meaning German (Flörke): from a pet form of the personal names Florian or Florentinus, from Latin Florus (from florere ‘to bloom’).Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4... [more]
Florentin Romanian, French, German
From the given name Florentin.
Fogel German
Variant of Vogel
Fogle German
Variant of Vogel.
Folkerts German, English
Derived from the given name Folcher. See also Fulcher
Foltz German
It is from Germany and it is based on the personal name Volz, which was popular in former times. It means son or descendant of a Volz or Folz
Forster English (Anglicized), German, Jewish
English: occupational and topographic name for someone who lived or worked in a forest (see Forrest). ... [more]
Foust German
Foust is a name for a person who was strong and pugnacious and was derived from the Old German word "fust," which meant "fist."
Fout German
[Foust} maybe german. The Fout name can be traced back to Denmark.
Frankel German
Variant of Frank.
Frantz German
Name given to a free man.
Franz German
Derived from "Francis".
Franzelius Swedish (Rare), German (Rare)
Likely derived from the given name Franz.
Fratzke German (Rare)
Of debated origin and meaning. Theories include a Slavic origin and a derivation from Middle Low German vratz "glutton".
Freiburg German
Derives from the German words, frei, which means free, and berg, which means hill, and is the name of a city in Germany.
Freidhof German
Topographical name from the German Fredihof 'graveyard', 'cemetery' (from Middle Low German, Middle High German vrithof 'enclosed farmstead or courtyard', later 'cemetery').
Freier German
Status name of the feudal system denoting a free man, as opposed to a bondsman, from an inflected form of Middle High German vri "free".
Freier German
Archaic occupational name, from Middle High German, Middle Low German vrier, vriger, denoting a man who had the ceremonial duty of asking guests to a wedding.
Freitag German, Jewish
Means "Friday" in German.
Frey German
Status name for a free man, as opposed to a bondsman or serf, in the feudal system, from Middle High German vri "free", "independent".
Freyer German
Variant of Freier.
Frick German
Variant of Fricke.
Fricke German
Derived from a Low German diminutive of the given name Friedrich.
Frickel German
Elaboration of Frick.
Fricker German
Patronymic form of Frick.
Fricker German, German (Swiss)
Habitational name for someone from the Frick valley in Baden, Germany, or from Frick in the canton of Aargau, Switzerland.
Friedberg German, Jewish
Combination of either German vride "security, protection" or Friede "peace", with berg "hill, mountain". The name is most often locational, but may in some cases be ornamental.
Friedman Upper German (Modern), German (Swiss), Jewish
Respelling of South German and Swiss Friedmann. ... [more]
Friedmann German, German (Swiss), Jewish
German and Swiss German from a derivative of Friedrich. ... [more]
Fries German
Denoted someone from Frisia, an area along the coastal region of the North Sea stretching from Netherlands to Germany.
Frisch German
Nickname for someone who was handsome, cheerful, or energetic, from Middle High German vrisch.
Fritz German
From the given name Fritz.
Fritzen German
Variant of Fritz.
Fritzsche German
A German patronymic derived from the given name Friedrich.
Froehner German
Derived from Middle High German vröhner meaning "servant".
Fröhlich German
It literally means "happy".
Frosch German
Nickname for someone thought to resemble a frog.
Fruth German
nickname from Middle High German vruot ‘clever’, ‘astute’
Fuhrer German
Originally, an occupational name for a carrier or carter, a driver of horse-drawn vehicles.... [more]
Fulbright German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of German surname Vollbrecht, composed of the elements folk ‘people’ + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’
Fultz German
All I know is that it's a german name
Funk German
Derived from Middle High German vunke "spark". ... [more]
Funke German
German: variant of Funk.
Furman Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish, Slovene, English, German (Anglicized)
Polish, Czech, Slovak, Jewish (eastern Ashkenazic), and Slovenian: occupational name for a carter or drayman, the driver of a horse-drawn delivery vehicle, from Polish, Yiddish, and Slovenian furman, a loanword from German (see Fuhrmann)... [more]
Furrer German (Swiss)
Topographic name from the regional term furre ‘cleft in the ground’.
Furth German
German cognate of Ford.
Fust German
Variant of Faust or a nickname for a person who was strong and pugnacious, derived from Old German fust "fist".
Gaa German
Bavarian dialect variant of Gau.
Gaber Jewish, German
In Jewish, from Haber, and in German from Gabrijel.
Galishoff Upper German, German (Austrian)
Derived from the ancient Roman name "Gallus", meaning "rooster" in Latin. "Hoff" meaning house combines the growing or tending to poultry on a farm house, hence the name "Galishoff" which has been modified over the millennia... [more]
Gangelhoff German
Gangelhoff - German
Gann German
Topographic name for someone who lived near an expanse of scree, Middle High German gant.
Gans German, Dutch
Meaning "goose", perhaps referring to someone who worked with geese, related to Ganser.
Ganser German
From the Middle High German word ganser meaning "gander", occupational name for a geese shepherd.
Ganz German, German (Swiss)
Variant of Gans 'goose'. German: from a short form of the Germanic personal name Ganso, a cognate of modern German ganz 'whole', 'all'.
Gasser German (Swiss)
Occupational name for a goat herd from Middle High German geiz meaning "Goat" and (n)er an agent suffix.
Gassmann German, Jewish
From German Gasse or Yiddish גאַס (gas), both from Middle High German gazze, meaning "street", denoting someone who lived in a street of a city, town or village.... [more]
Gast German, Ancient Germanic
From the Ancient Germanic name element Gast.