German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Born German, English
A topographical name indicating someone who lived near a stream, from the Old English "burna, burne". Alternatively, it could be contemporarily derived from the modern English word "born". Possible variants include Bourne, Burns and Boren.
Borsok Russian, Jewish, German (Austrian)
Pronouced "Boar-sook"... [more]
Bosshart German (Swiss)
Means "Brave and audacious"
Boye English, German, Dutch, Frisian, Danish
From the Germanic given names Boio or Bogo, which are of uncertain origin... [more]
Bräger German
Habitational name for someone from Bräg in Bavaria.
Brandenburg German (East Prussian, Rare)
From a state in eastern Germany, formerly known as Prussia, containing the capital city of Berlin. Ancient. Associated with the Margravate (Dukedom) of Brandenburg, the seat of power in the Holy Roman Empire... [more]
Brandis German, Jewish, Swiss
German & Swiss: Habitational name from a former Brandis castle in Emmental near Bern, Switzerland, or from any of the places so named in Saxony, Germany. A famous bearer of the name is Jonathan Brandis (1976-2003).... [more]
Branner Danish, German, English
Danish variant of BRANDER and German variant of BRANTNER.
Brase German
North German variation of Brass.
Brass English, German
English (Northumberland): variant of Brace.... [more]
Braundt German
Variant of Brandt.
Braunershrither German, Dutch, English
This name mean Leather (Tanned) Knight, or a fighter of leather armor, or in Dutch, Leather writer, one who branded print on leather
Bräunlich German
Originally a nickname for a person who had brown hair or skin, meaning "brownish" in German.
Braunstein German, Jewish
Ornamental name composed of German braun "brown" and stein "stone".
Brecht German
From a short form of any of various personal names formed with Germanic element berth " bright" "famous".
Breidegam German
"bridegroom"
Breit German
From Middle High German breit meaning "broad". a nickname for a stout or fat person.
Breitzmann German
Derived from the name of a town called "Britz" in Germany + the suffix "mann" for man.
Bremer German
Indicated a person from Bremen in the State of Bremen, Germany.
Breunig German, German (Austrian), American
Origin probably in Frankfurt am Main... [more]
Breyer German (Americanized)
Americanized variant of Brauer.
Briar German
From the given name Briar.
Brick Irish (Anglicized), English, German, Jewish
Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bruic ‘descendant of Broc’, i.e. ‘Badger’ (sometimes so translated) or Ó Bric ‘descendant of Breac’, a personal name meaning ‘freckled’... [more]
Brinck German
Means "home on or near a hill".... [more]
Briner German (Swiss)
Habitational name for someone from Brin in Grison canton (Graubünden) or from the Brin valley.
Brinker German, Dutch
From the word brink "edge, slope". This indicated that the bearer of the surname lived near a prominent slope of land
Brocker German
North German topographic name for someone who lived by a swamp, from Middle Low German brook bog + the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.
Brockhaus German
Occupational hereditary surname for a person who was physically powerful, derived from Old German brock which may refer to persons with a stocky or strong build. Or derived from Old German "Brook" or "Brauk," for people near a marshy landscape, common in northern regions.
Brockman German
German in origin, in heraldry a "brock" is represented by a badger. It could mean wet/water and man. It also has been said to mean broker.
Brook German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a water meadow or marsh, from Low German brook, Dutch broek (cf. Bruch).... [more]
Brook German, Jewish
Americanized spelling of German Bruch and Jewish Bruck.
Brosmer German
Meaning unknown.
Brottman German
Dr Mikita Brottman
Bruch German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a marsh or a stream that frequently flooded, from Middle High German bruoch "water meadow" or "marsh" (cognate to old English broc "brook", "stream" cf... [more]
Brück German
Topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge, or an occupational name for a bridge keeper or toll collector on a bridge, from Middle High German bruck(e) "bridge".
Bruck German
Variant of Brück.
Brucker German
Variant of Brück.
Bruckheimer German (Rare)
Bruckheimer is a German surname and is for someone who lived near a bridge.... [more]
Bruckman German, English
German (Bruckmann): variant of Bruck, with the addition of the suffix -mann ‘man’. ... [more]
Bruckner German
Topographic name for someone living by a bridge or an occupational name for a bridge toll collector; a variant of Bruck with the addition of the suffix -ner.
Bruder German
From a byname meaning "brother", occasionally used for a younger son, i.e. the brother of someone important, or for a guild member.
Brueck German
Variant of Brück.
Brueckner German, German (Silesian)
German (Brückner): from Middle Low German brugge, Middle High German brugge, brücke, brügge ‘bridge’ + the agent suffix -ner, hence a topographic name for someone living by a bridge, an occupational name for a bridge toll collector, or in the southeast (Silesia for example) a bridge keeper or repairer... [more]
Brueggeman German
Variant of German Brueggemann.
Brueggemann Low German, German
North German (Brüggemann): topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge or a metonymic occupational name for a bridge keeper or street paver, Middle Low German brüggeman (see Bruckman, Brueckner).
Bruen German
This is my 2nd great uncle's wife's Surname of German ancestry.
Brugger German, American
South German variant or Americanized spelling of North German Brügger (see Bruegger). habitational name for someone from any of various (southern) places called Bruck or Brugg in Bavaria and Austria.
Brühl German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a swampy area, derived from Middle High German brüel and Middle Low German brul meaning "swampy land with brushwood". It may also be a habitational name from various places named Brühl in Germany.
Brunner German (Austrian)
Brunner came from Tyrolean and Bavarian place names, or Brno.... [more]
Brunswick English, German
English habitational name from the city in Saxony now known in German as Braunschweig. ... [more]
Buch German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a beech tree or beech wood, from Middle High German buoche, or a habitational name from any of the numerous places so named with this word, notably in Bavaria and Württemberg... [more]
Buche German
Meaning "beech" and denoting someone who lived near beech trees.
Bucher German
Upper German surname denoting someone who lived by a beech tree or beech wood, derived from Middle High German buoche "beech tree".
Buchwalder German, German (Swiss)
Buchwalder is a German Surname.
Buechler German
From the common field name Büchle 'beech stand', the -er suffix denoting an inhabitant. from buchel 'beech nut', hence a metonymic occupation name for someone who owned or worked in an oil mill producing oil from beech nuts.
Buehman German
Variant of Bauer.
Buelter German, English
Middle European variant of Butler, also meaning "a vat or large trough used to contain wine." The name originated in southern Germany in the mid-seventeenth century.
Buerk German (Anglicized)
German from a short form of the personal name Burkhardt, a variant of Burkhart.
Buermeister German
North German: status name for the mayor or chief magistrate of a town, from Middle Low German bur ‘inhabitant, dweller’, ‘neighbor’, ‘peasant’, ‘citizen’ + mester ‘master’.
Bühler German
From the German word "bühl", meaning hill.
Bunting English, German
English: nickname from some fancied resemblance to the songbird... [more]
Burdorf German
Means little farmer in german
Burger English, German, Dutch
Status name for a freeman of a borough. From Middle English burg, Middle High German burc and Middle Dutch burch "fortified town". Also a German habitational name for someone from a place called Burg.
Burgmeier German
Occupational name for the tenant farmer of an estate belonging to a castle or fortified town, from Middle High German burc "(fortified) town, castle" and meier "tenant farmer" (see Meyer).
Burkhalter German
Topographic name composed of the Middle High German elements burc "castle" "protection" and halter from halde "slope".
Burkhardt German
Burk is German for "Strong", and hardt is the "heart of a castle".
Burmeister German
North German: status name for the mayor or chief magistrate of a town, from Middle Low German bur ‘inhabitant, dweller’, ‘neighbor’, ‘peasant’, ‘citizen’ + mester ‘master’.
Buschbaum German
Means "bush tree" in German.
Busse German, English
German: variant of Buss. ... [more]
Butter English, German
1. English: nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a bittern, perhaps in the booming quality of the voice, from Middle English, Old French butor ‘bittern’ (a word of obscure etymology)... [more]
Buttgereit German
Variant spelling of Butgereit. A famous bearer is German film director and screenwriter Jörg Buttgereit (1963-).
Büttner German
Occupational name for a cooper or barrel-maker, an agent derivative of Middle High German büte(n) "cask", "wine barrel". This name occurs chiefly in eastern German-speaking regions.
Buxbaum German, Jewish
Means "box tree" in German.
Byers German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Bayers.
Cabell Catalan, English, German
As a Catalan name, a nickname for "bald" from the Spanish word cabello. The English name, found primarily in Norfolk and Devon, is occupational for a "maker or seller of nautical rope" that comes from a Norman French word... [more]
Carlin German
Habitational name from a place named Carlin in Germany.
Carlsberg German
Variant spelling of Karlsberg or derived from the name of a municipality in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.
Carner German, English
Americanized spelling of German Karner or Körner (see Koerner).... [more]
Cassel English, French, German
A surname derived from the Latin military term castellum "watchtower, fort". A variant spelling of the word castle. Denoted someone hailing from the commune of Cassel in the Nord départment in northern France or the city of Kassel (spelled Cassel until 1928) in Germany... [more]
Christ German
From the Latin personal name Christus "Christ" (see Christian). The name Christ (Latin Christus) is from Greek Khristos, a derivative of khriein "to anoint", a calque of Hebrew mashiach "Messiah", which likewise means literally "the anointed".
Christl German
Pet form of the given name Christian.
Chrysler German, Jewish
From a German name referring to spinning or related to a Yiddish word, krayzl meaning "spinning top." The name can refer to a potter who spun a wheel to make utensils or to a person with curly hair or someone known for being continually active... [more]
Claassen German
The name Claassen means "son of Klaus." It's primarily German, but it's also Dutch and Danish.
Clapp German
Variant of Klapp.
Clein German
Variant of Klein.
Coard German
Derived from the first name Konrad.
Cocker English, German (Anglicized)
Originally a nickname for a bellicose person, from Middle English cock "to fight". Also an anglicized form of Köcher.
Coers German, Dutch
Derived from the given name Konrad
Coles English, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
Conrad German
Americanized spelling of Konrad.
Conradi German, Danish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Derived from a patronymic from the given name Konrad.
Coogler German (Americanized)
Americanized form of Kugler.
Coppenhaver German
Americanized spelling, probably originally spelled Kopenhaver or Koppenhaver. Means "owner of a hill".
Cords German
Derived from the first name Konrad.
Core English (American), German (Anglicized)
Core is the anglicized form of the German surname Kohr, also spelled Kürr. Alternately, it is an English name of Flemish origin.
Crabb English, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
Cramer German, English
Variant of German surname Krämer.
Crauwels Flemish, Dutch, German
Derrives from the Middle Dutch (medieval Dutch) word "crauwel" and Middle High German word "kröuwel" which means "flesh hook", "curved fork" or "trident". The word is no longer used. The first person with this name was most likely a farmer, butcher or a person that runned an inn or a hostel that was named after this tool.
Crema Italian, German
From the italian city "Crema"
Cress German, Jewish, Belarusian
A variant of the German surname Kress. From the Middle High German "kresse" meaning "gudgeon" (a type of fish) or the Old High German "krassig", meaning "greedy". Can also be from an altered form of the names Erasmus or Christian, or the Latin spelling of the Cyrillic "КРЕСС".
Crider German
Americanized spelling of German Kreider.
Crownover German (Anglicized)
Americanised spelling of German Kronauer, denoting someone from Kronau, a town near Heidelberg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It could also be an Americanised form of Kronhöfer (a variant of Grünhofer), a habitational name for someone from a lost place called Grünhof, derived from Middle High German gruene meaning "green" or kranech meaning "crane" and hof meaning "farmstead".
Custer German (Anglicized)
Anglicization of the German surname Köster or Küster, literally "sexton". A famous bearer was George Custer (1839-1876), the American cavalry general. General Custer and his army were defeated and killed by Sioux and Cheyenne forces under Sitting Bull in the Battle of Little Bighorn (1876; also known colloquially as Custer's Last Stand).
Cypher German (Anglicized, Rare)
Fanciful Americanized spelling of German Seifer.
Dahlke German
Eastern German: from a pet form of the Slavic personal names Dalibor or Dalimir, which are both derived from dal- ‘present’, ‘gift’.
Dahmer German, Danish
A northern German or Danish habitual name for someone from one of the many places named Dahme in Brandenburg, Holstein, Mecklenburg, or Silesia. A famous bearer of this name was Jeffrey Dahmer, serial killer (1960 - 1993).
Daleiden German, Dutch (Rare)
Habitational name from a place in the Rhineland called Daleiden.
Damm German
From a short form of a personal name containing the Old High German element thank "thanks", "reward".
Damm German, Danish
Topographic name from Middle High German damm "dike".
Dangers German
Patronymic from the personal name Anger. Habitational name for someone from the city of Angers.
Dankworth German (Anglicized)
Formed from the German forename Tancred, which mutated to a hard D in English, combined with Old English Worth "a farmstead."
Danser German, French, English
German: variant of Danzer. Altered spelling of English Dancer.... [more]
Danz German
Derived from a given name, a short form of the name Tandulf, the origins of which are uncertain. (In some cases, however, this surname may have originated as a nickname denoting a person who liked to dance, from the Middle High German word tanz, danz "dance".)
Dänzer German
Occupational name for a professional acrobat or entertainer; variant of Tanzer.
Danzig German, German (East Prussian)
Denoted a person who was from the city of Gdańsk, Poland (called Danzig in German).
Daum German, Jewish
Nickname for a short person, from Middle High German doum "tap", "plug", or dume, German Daumen "thumb".
Degraffenried German, German (Swiss)
Derived from a place in Switzerland. ... [more]
Dehn German
the Germanic ethnic name for someone from Denmark
Deitrich German
lock pick
Deitz German
Variant spelling of German Dietz.
Denninger German
Habitational name for someone from Denning in Bavaria. Denning is related to Middle Low German denne meaning "wooded vale".
Dennings English, Irish, German
Variant spelling of Denning.
Depp German
Derived from Germanic depp which is a nickname for a joker (person who plays jokes on others). A notable bearer is Johnny Depp, an American actor.
Deppe German
From a pet form of the given name Dietbert or Dietmar.
Derhodes German
We think this is German or maybe French
Derkum German
Unknown
Detweiler German (Swiss)
From the name of a village in Switzerland or from one with a similar name (Dettweiler) in France.
Deutch German (Rare), Jewish (Rare)
"German". Used as a last name for those who had none in the 17-18th century. Continues to today, albeit rarely.
Deutschmann German
Originally denoted a person from Germany.
Dexheimer German
From the German village Dexheim (south of Mainz).
Dickerman English, German, Jewish
Possibly derived from Middle High German dic(ke) "strong, thick" and Mann "man, male, husband".
Dickter German
From dichter, the German word for "poet".
Didschus German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German name meaning "tall; big", from Old Prussian didis (or Old Prussian didszullis "the tall one").
Diebold German
Derived from the Germanic given name Theudobald.
Dieckmann German
"one who lives on a dike"
Diefenbaker German
Anglicized form of Diefenbach.
Diehl German
From the given name Diel, Tiel, from Thilo, a diminutive of given names beginning with Diet-, as such as Dietrich.
Dielmann German (Modern)
It was once spelled as "Dielhmann" and sometimes with one "n". The meaning is unknown, but when I used Google's translator "dielh" means "the" and "mann" was "man".
Diem German
German: from a reduced form of the personal name Dietmar ( see Dittmar ).
Dieringer German (Americanized)
Americanized form of German Thüringer, regional name for someone from Thuringia, This was also used as a medieval personal name. Americanized form of German Tieringer, habitational name for someone from Tieringen in Württemberg.
Diesel German
From the pet form of Matthias or from any Germanic compound name beginning with theud meaning "people"
Dieterlin German
From "Dieterlein", a diminuative of the given name Dieter
Diethelm German
From the given name Diethelm.
Dietmar German
From the given name Dietmar.
Dietz German
From a short form of the personal name Dietrich.
Dillie German
Probably an altered spelling of Dilley or Dilly or possibly of German Dillier. A variant of Dilger.
Dillinger German
Denoted a person from Dillingen, a district in the region of Swabia in Bavaria, Germany.
Dimondstein German
This is a German name which translates into English as diamond stone. It most likely belongs to a miner who mined diamonds or perhaps a jeweler.
Dinjer German (Rare)
Occupational surname that originated in the German dialect spoken in the Rhineland-Palatinate region. ... [more]
Distel German, Low German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a patch of ground overgrown with thistles, or perhaps a nickname for a "prickly" person, from Middle High German, Middle Low German, Middle Dutch distel "thistle".
Distler German
Topographic name for someone who lived in a place where thistles grew, from German Distel "thistle" (see Distel) and -er, suffix denoting an inhabitant.
Dittman German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Dittmann.
Dittmann German
Variant of Dittmar. In eastern Germany, this form has been used for Dittmar since the 15th century.
Dobberstein German
Metonymic occupational name for a dice maker or a nickname for a dice player, from Middle High German topel ‘die’ + stein ‘stone’, ‘cube’.
Dobileit German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "clover; trefoil".
Doepner German
Derived from Middle Low German top and dop "pot". This is an occupational surname originally given to a potter.
Doerflinger German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places in Bavaria named Dörfling.
Doerner German
German (Dörner): see Dorner .
Doleschal German
German cognate of Doležal.
Doll Upper German, German, English
South German: nickname from Middle High German tol, dol ‘foolish’, ‘mad’; also ‘strong’, ‘handsome’.... [more]
Dorn German, German (Austrian), Dutch, Flemish, English
Means "thorn" in German.
Dörr German
Variant of Dürr.
Dortmund German
Regional name for someone from Dortmund.
Dosch German
Topographic name for someone living near bushes or brush, from Middle High German doste, toste ‘leafy branch’, or a habitational name from a house with a sign depicting a bush. Also an altered spelling of Dasch.
Doss German, German (Austrian), German (Swiss)
German: Habitational name for someone from Dosse in Altmark. Variant of Dose ... [more]
Doster German, Belgian
A German surname, which is from an agent derivative of the Middle High German words 'doste' and 'toste' (meaning ‘wild thyme’, ‘shrub’, ‘bouquet’). It is a topographic surname which was given to someone whose land abutted an uncultivated piece of land, or possibly an occupational name for someone who dealt herbs.... [more]
Dötter German
From a Germanic personal name formed with theud ‘people’, ‘race’ + hard ‘hardy’, ‘strong’ or hari, heri ‘army’
Dow Scottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
Draxler German
Derived from the Middle High German "Drehseler," meaning "turner," and was most likely initially borne by a turner or lathe worker.
Drexel German, Jewish
It originates from the pre 7th century word 'dreseler' meaning 'to turn', a verb which in medieval times had a wide range of meanings.
Dreyfus French, German, Jewish
French-influenced variant of Dreyfuss, popular amongst people of Alsatian Jewish descent.
Dreyfuss German, Jewish
Originates from the German city of Trier. The Latin name for the city was "Treveris," whose pronunciation eventually developed into Dreyfuss. The spelling variants tend to correspond to the country the family was living in at the time the spelling was standardized: the use of one "s" tends to be more common among people of French origin, while the use of two tends to be found among those of German descent
Drost Dutch, German, Danish
Occupational name for a steward or head servant.
Drux German
Variant of Trux, which itself is a contracted form of Truxes and derived from the German word Truchsess, ultimately from Middle High German truhsaeze and Old High German truhtsazzo (from truht "band; cohort; regiment" and saza "seat; chair").... [more]
Dubach German (Swiss)
A surname describing a person from the town of Tübach in St. Gallen, Switzerland.
Dück Low German, German
North German nickname for a coward, from Low German duken ‘to duck or dive’. ... [more]
Duesler Upper German
DueslerDuesslerDüslerDußlerhttp://www.duesler.com/html/charles_duelser_s_book.HTM "Duesler / Duessler / Dueßler http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dussler-6 , http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dussler-2 Andrew & brother Jacob were the Progenitors of Duesler, Duessler, Dueßler s from 1752 Germany to America... [more]
Duesterwald German
Variant spelling of Düsterwald.
Duschek German
German cognate of Dušek.
Düsterwald German
Derived from Middle Low German düster "dark" combined with Old High German wald "forest".
Eargle German (Swiss, Americanized, ?)
Derived from Ergul Castle, Switzerland. Immigrants from Germany to US used Ergel, Ergil, Ergle.
Earley German, Irish
The surname Earley originally derived from the Old English word Eorlic which referred to one who displayed manly characteristics.... [more]
Early Irish, English, American, German
Irish: translation of Gaelic Ó Mocháin (see Mohan; Gaelic moch means ‘early’ or ‘timely’), or of some other similar surname, for example Ó Mochóir, a shortened form of Ó Mochéirghe, Ó Maoil-Mhochéirghe, from a personal name meaning ‘early rising’.... [more]
Earnhardt German
It is a name for a courageous or honorable person. The surname Earnhardt is composed of two German words meaning honor and bravery.
Eberhard German (Americanized)
Americanized version of Eberhardt.
Eberhart German
From the given name Eberhard
Eberling German (Austrian)
The surname Eberling was first found in Austria, where this family name became a prominent contributor to the development of the district from ancient times. Always prominent in social affairs, the name became an integral part of that turbulent region as it emerged to form alliances with other families within the Feudal System and the nation... [more]
Ebert German, American
Believed to be a variant of Herbert or of Everett.
Eckhart German
From the given name Eckhart.
Egert German, Jewish
Variant spelling of Eggert.
Eggert German, Jewish
Derived from the Proto-Germanic root agi meaning "edge".
Egner German
From a Germanic personal name formed with the element agi ‘point (of a sword)’.
Ehler German
Variant of Ehlert.
Ehlert German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements agil "edge", "point (of a sword)" + hard "brave", "hardy", "strong" or ward "guard".
Ehlinger German
Habitational name for someone from Ehlingen in the Palatinate.
Ehrenberg Jewish (Anglicized, Rare, Archaic), German
"In German it means 'mountain of honor'"
Ehrenreich German, Jewish, Yiddish
Jewish/Yiddish German ornamental surname meaning “Rich in honour”
Ehrhardt German
From a Germanic personal name composed of Old High German ēra, meaning ‘honor’, and hard, meaning ‘brave’, ‘hardy’, or ‘strong’.
Ehrmantraut German
A Latinized joining of the German words irmin(world, all-encompassing) and trud(strength)
Eich German
German from Middle High German eich(e) ‘oak’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived near an oak tree. In some cases, it may be a habitational name for someone from any of several places named with this word, for example Eiche or Eichen, or for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of an oak.
Eichelberg German
Habitational name from any of various places, notably one southeast of Heidelberg, named from Middle High German eichel meaning "acorn" + berc meaning "mountain", "hill", or topographic name for someone who lived on an oak-covered hill.
Eichelberger German
Habitational name for someone from any of the various places called Eichelberg.
Eichhorn German, Jewish
German topographic name for someone who lived on or near an oak-covered promontory, from Middle High German eich(e) ‘oak’ + horn ‘horn’, ‘promontory’. German from Middle High German eichhorn ‘squirrel’ (from Old High German eihhurno, a compound of eih ‘oak’ + urno, from the ancient Germanic and Indo-European name of the animal, which was later wrongly associated with hurno ‘horn’); probably a nickname for someone thought to resemble the animal, or alternatively a habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a squirrel... [more]
Eichhorst German (East Prussian)
Prussian in origin. Brandenburg area
Eichler Upper German
South German variant of Eich, the -ler suffix denoting association. "eager"
Eiermann German
Occupational name for an egg collector or dealer in eggs, from Middle High German ei 'egg' + man 'man'.
Eiland German
Topographic name for someone who lived on or owned property surrounded by water, from Middle High German eilant, "island"