German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Wind English, German, Danish
Nickname for a swift runner, from Middle English wind "wind", Middle High German wint "wind", also "greyhound".
Wind German
Variant of Wendt.
Windenburg German, Ancient Germanic
Means "Windy Castle" in German.
Winehouse Jewish, German
Anglicized variant of German and Yiddish 'Weinhaus'. From German wein, 'vine, grapevine' and haus 'house, building, home', likely indicating a house with a vineyard. ... [more]
Winkel German, Jewish, Dutch, Belgian
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner of land in the country or a street corner in a town or city, from Middle High German winkel, German Winkel ‘corner’... [more]
Winkelmann German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): topographic name for someone who lived on a corner or kept a corner shop (see Winkel), with the addition of Middle High German man, German Mann ‘man’... [more]
Winninger German
Probably denoted a person from the municipality of Winningen in the state of Rhineland-Palatinate in western Germany.
Winterberg German
Habitational name from any of several places named with Middle High German winter "winter" and berg "mountain".
Winters English, German
Patronymic form of Winter.
Wirtz German
One who acted as host in a tavern or inn.
Wirz German
Variant of Wirtz.
Wissmach German
I think it is German
Witt German
Either from the given name Wittigo or from Middle Low German witte "white", a nickname for a pale person or someone with white hair.
Witter German
From a Germanic personal name, composed of the elements widu "wood" and hari "army".
Wittman German
Wittman was first found in the Palatinate in the Rhineland valley. The surname Wittman was given to someone who lived in the area that was referred to as widem which was originally derived from the German word denoting church property.
Witz German, Jewish
From the medieval personal name Witzo, a short form of any of several Germanic compound names beginning with wig ‘battle’... [more]
Witzel German
The German surname is of patronymic origin, deriving from the name of the father of the original bearer.
Witzig German
German: nickname from Middle High German witzic ‘clever’, ‘prudent’, ‘knowing’.
Woelk German
German variant spelling of Wölk (see Wolk).
Woelke German
German variant spelling of Wölke, itself a variant of Wolk.
Wohl German, Yiddish
Meaning "pleasant" in both Middle German and Ashkenazic Yiddish
Wolfgang German
From the given name Wolfgang.
Wolfmeyer German
From German wolf "wolf" and meyer "tenant farmer".
Wolford German
Means where the wolves cross the river/stream. Wolf meaning the animal and Ford meaning crossing a body of shallow water.... [more]
Wolfram English, German
From the given name Wolfram.
Wolk German, American
Surname derived from a northern German short form of the given name Walter.
Wolken German
Surname derived from a diminutive of the given name Wolter, a Low German form of Walter.... [more]
Wollschläger German
Occupational name for someone who prepared wool for spinning by washing and combing or carding it, from Middle High German wolle(n)slaher, -sleger, Middle Low German wullensleger (literally ‘wool beater’).
Woolever German
Morphed from the German surname Wohleber which means well-liver
Wowereit German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "squirrel", from Old Prussian wowere and Lithuanian voveraite (which, apart from "squirrel", also means "chanterelle").... [more]
Wozzek German
Germanized form of Voytek.
Wriedt German, Dutch
Nickname from Middle Low German wrēt, wrede meaning "fierce", "evil", "angry".
Wulfhart German
Could mean "brave wolf" from the German elements "wulf" (variant of "wolf") and "hard" (meaning "brave, hardy").
Wunder German
Miracle
Wunderlich German
A nickname for an eccentric or moody person, derived from the word wunderlich meaning "whimsical" in German.
Wünsche German
Probably denoted a person from Wendland, a region in Germany on the borders of the states of Brandenburg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Lower Saxony and Saxony-Anhalt. Alternatively, the name could have been derived from Wendling, a municipality in the Grieskirchen District, Upper Austria, Austria.
Würdemann German
From the German "Würde"-honour or dignity, and "Mann"-man or person. "Man of Honour" or "Person of Dignity".
Wurdemann German (Rare)
This is a German surname, also spelled WÜRDEMANN (original) and often rendered as WUERDEMANN in English. It come from the German "würde", "dignity" or "honor" and "mann", meaning "man" or "person".... [more]
Wurnig German
German origin from the place name am Virgen originally meaning a person from the town of Virgen in Tyrol. Construed as a family name in 1501.
Wurst German
Variant of Wurster.
Wurster German
Derived from German Wurst (Middle High German wurst) "sausage" and thus either denoted a butcher who specialized in the production of sausages, or was used as a nickname for a plump person or someone who was particularly fond of sausages.
Württemberg German
Württemberg is an historical German territory. Together with Baden and Hohenzollern, two other historical territories, it now forms the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg.
Wurtz German
A metonymic occupational name for a greengrocer or grower or seller of herbs, from Middle High German würz, meaning ‘herb’.
Wurz German
Variant of Wurtz
Wuttke German
Originally denoted a person from Wutike, a district near the town of Neuruppin in Brandenburg, Germany.
Wyandt German
Americanized form of German WIEGAND... [more]
Xander German
From a short form of the personal name Alexander.
Xanders German
Variant of Xander.
Yaeger German
Yaeger is a relatively uncommon American surname, most likely a transcription of the common German surname "Jaeger/Jäger" (hunter). The spelling was changed to become phonetic because standard English does not utilize the umlaut.
Yager German
Americanized form of JÄGER, meaning "hunter."
Yerkes German (Americanized)
Americanized spelling of German and Dutch Jerkes, a patronymic from the personal name Jerke.
Yoakam German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Joachim.
Yocum German (Anglicized), English
Americanized form of Jochum, a Low German form of the given name Joachim.
Yuengling German
"youngling" or a "young person"
Zabel German
The surname has multiple meanings. It may come from a Slavic given name, or the High German word zabel, meaning "board game" - given, perhaps, as a nickname to those who played many board games.
Zachow German
Meaning unknown. A notable bearer of this name is Friedrich Wilhelm Zachow, a organist, musician, and composer who lived from 1663 to 1712. Zachow, Wisconsin is an unincorporated community named after a local landowner, William Zachow.
Zackert English, German
An Americanization of the German surnames Zacher and Zachert. It comes from a vernacular form of the personal name Zacharias.
Zager German
habitational name from ZAGER, a place near Wollin
Zahn German
Zahn was a nickname given to a person with a peculiar tooth or a strange or defective set of teeth. It comes from the Middle High German Zan(t), which means "tooth".
Zähne German
The German surname Zähne is derived from the Middle High German word "zan," which means "tooth." It is believed that the surname takes its origin from a nickname, most likely bestowed on the original bearer due to either a prominent tooth or a missing tooth.
Zahner German
Name given to people who lived in Zahna, near Wittenberg.
Zahniser German
Alteration of German Zahneisen and/or Zahnhäuser and/or Zahneiser... [more]
Zamloch German (Austrian)
Altered, likely Americanized or Germanized, version of the Czech surname Zemlicka. Zemlicka derives from žemle, meaning "bread roll," and was a name given to bakers.... [more]
Zanto German
Unknown origin and history.
Zbären German (Swiss)
Zbären means "Bear hunter".
Zehner German
(chiefly Bavaria, Austria, Switzerland, and Württemberg): occupational name for an official responsible for collecting, on behalf of the lord of the manor, tithes of agricultural produce owed as rent.... [more]
Zehren German (Swiss)
From a prepositional phrase from Middle High German ze hērren, an occupational name for someone was in service of a lord.
Zeilinger German
Habitational name for someone from Zeiling in Bavaria.
Zeimet German, Luxembourgish
Western German and Luxembourgeois: probably a variant spelling of Zeimert, a variant of Zeumer, an occupational name for a harness maker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German zoum ‘bridle’.
Zeller German, Dutch, English, Jewish
Originally denoted someone from Celle, Germany or someone living near a hermit's cell from German zelle "cell". It is also occupational for someone employed at a zelle, for example a small workshop.
Zellmer German
Variant of Selmer.
Zelmer German
Variant of Zellmer.
Zenker German
means light
Zenner Upper German
South German: unflattering nickname for a surly, snarling person, from an agent derivative of Middle High German zannen 'to growl or howl' or 'to bare one's teeth'.
Zerfas German
Derived from a Low German and Upper German form of the personal name Servatius.
Zickuhr German
Zickuhr is a German surname that means "zigzag." Although, some person believe that Zickuhr means "cuckoo clock."
Ziegenfuss German
Meaning "goat foot".
Ziegenhorn Upper German (Archaic)
Goat horn, either 1. the horn of a goat, 2. Goat mountain, or 3. From goat mountain.
Zielenbach German
Literally translates to "aiming brook"
Zielsdorf German
Habitational name from an unidentified place, perhaps Ziersdorf in Lower Austria.
Zigler German
Variant of Ziegler.
Zillier Upper German
ancient form of selear
Zimmer German
Shortening of Zimmermann
Zinger German
The surname Zinger was first found in Saxony, where this family name became a prominent contributor to the development of the district from ancient times. ... In Old German the name meant "lively" and "spritely," or more literally, "a biting, sharp taste."
Zink German
German:... [more]
Zinn German
From the German for word for tin "tin." The name indicated someone who worked with the metal. A famous bearer is Johann Gottfried Zinn, a German botanist. Carl Linnaeus named the flower Zinnia in his honor.
Zinnman German
Occupational name for a pewter smith.
Zipplies German (East Prussian)
Lithuanian-Germanized form of the Swiss German surname Süpply
Zoller German, Jewish
Occupational name for a customs officer, Middle High German zoller.
Zopf German
Nickname for someone who wore his hair in a pigtail or plait, Middle High German zopf, zoph, or from a field name from same word in the sense ‘tail’, ‘end’, ‘narrow point’.
Zoransky German (East Prussian)
The surname Zoransky (alternatively Zoranski) is of Prussian origin and traces back to 1525 when Prussia was formed. The surname Zoransky or Zoranski is of nobility class, however, the family was stripped of its rights and titles in 1834 during the Needle losses which took place 1794-1870... [more]
Zorn German
From Middle High German zorn "wrath, anger". A notable bearer was Swedish painter Anders Zorn (1860-1920) whose father was German.
Zuber German, German (Swiss)
German: Metonymic occupational name for a cooper or tubmaker, from Middle High German zuber ‘(two-handled) tub’, or a habitational name from a house distinguished by the sign of a tub. ... [more]
Zumwalt German
German spelling Zum-Wald (to the forest) older german
Zürcher German
Habitational name for someone from the Swiss city of Zurich.
Zweinstra German
Zweinstra is a German, relatively unknown surname which is also sometimes used in Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg and Liechtenstein.
Zwilling German, Jewish
Means "a twin", as in a twin brother or twin sister. Often given to those who were twins.