German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Osterreicher German
I was told that this surname in native Austria originates as follows. Oster means East, reich means kingdom, with er meaning native of. In old Austria there were six kingdoms, with the East one being the largest with the seat of government there... [more]
Otte German
Otte was given to someone who lived in Bavaria, where the name came from humble beginnings but gained a significant reputation for its contribution to the emerging medieval society. The name Otte evolved from the Old German personal name Ott, a name of Emperors, made famous by Otto the Great (912-973), Holy Roman emperor.
Ottmar German
From the given name Ottmar.
Overholser German (Swiss)
The Oberholtzer family originated in the Swiss village of Oberholtz, south of Zurich, before the 15th century. However, in 1661, one family left Switzerland for the Palatinate in Germany.
Pacal German
South German: pet form of Pach .
Pach German
Pach is an occupational hereditary surname for a baker in Old German. Pach is also a German local name for someone who lived by a stream, which was originally derived from the German word "bach" which means stream... [more]
Packard English, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
Page German
Metonymic occupational name for a horse dealer, from Middle Low German page "horse".
Painter English, Medieval French, German
English: from Middle English, Old French peinto(u)r, oblique case of peintre ‘painter’, hence an occupational name for a painter (normally of colored glass). In the Middle Ages the walls of both great and minor churches were covered with painted decorations, and Reaney and Wilson note that in 1308 Hugh le Peyntour and Peter the Pavier were employed ‘making and painting the pavement’ at St... [more]
Pallas German, Polish (Germanized)
Nickname for a small man, from Slavic palac 'thumb'.
Pallmann German
The name Pallmann originates from the Landsuhl area of Bavaria, Germany (nor in Rhineland-Palatinate). The meaning of the name is unknown. Some Pallmanns came to America and Americanized the spelling, by dropping the second "n", while others retained the "n".
Palmberg Dutch (Rare), German (Rare)
Derived from any of the various places in Germany named Palmberg.
Palmtag German
Means "Palm Sunday" in German.
Pankratz German (East Prussian)
The name originated in Holland, as a surname chosen in 1811 when Napoleon insisted that all Dutch people have permanent surnames passed down to children. This particular family chose the name of a venerated saint - Saint Pancras, the patron saint of children... [more]
Parduhn German
Variant Of Pardon From Middle English Pardun, Pardon "Pardon" A Metonymic occupational name for a pardoner, a person licensed to sell papal pardons or indulgences. German: either a cognate of 1 (also for a sexton), from Old French pardon ‘pardon’, or perhaps a nickname from Middle Low German bardun, Middle High German purdune ‘pipe’ (instrument), ‘tenor’ (voice).
Parr German
Variant of Pfarr.
Partenheimer German
Habitational name for someone from Partenheim in Rheinhessen.
Pasch German
Topographic name for a field or meadow which was used at Easter as a playground; etymologically two sources seem to be combined: Latin pascuum ‘pasture’ and Middle Low German pāsche(n) ‘Easter’.
Pauley English, German
English: from a medieval pet form of Paul.... [more]
Paulick German
German (of Slavic origin) spelling of Pavlik, a Slavic derivative of Paul.
Paustenbach German
Thomas Paustenbach, family name associated with the town Paustenbach, Germany
Paysen German, Frisian
Patronymic from the personal name Pay, the Frisian form of Paul.
Payson German, Frisian
German and Frisian variant spelling of Paysen, a patronymic from the personal name Paul.
Pechman German
"Pechman" means "man with bad luck" in many European languages (Polish, German, and Dutch predominantly), though in German, it originally referred to one who prepared, sold, or used pitch.
Peik German
From Middle Low German pek ‘sharp, pointed tool or weapon’.
Peikert German
Probably an occupational name for a drummer.
Peiper German (Austrian)
Occupational name for a piper, from Middle High German piper. In some cases it may be derived from Sorbian pipar "pepper", thus being an occupational name for a spicer or a nickname for one with a fiery temper.
Pelle Danish, German
From the personal name Pelle, a vernacular form of Peter.
Pelle German
From Middle Low German pelle "precious purple silk cloth", presumably an occupational name for a maker or seller of such cloth or for a maker of official and church vestments.
Peltz German, Jewish
Occupational name for a furrier, from Middle High German bellez, (modern German pelz) "fur", "animal skin".
Pelz German, Jewish
Variant of Peltz.
Pelzer German
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative Middle High German bellez "fur".
Penning Upper German
Shortened form of Panno, which is a personal given name.
Petke German
German surname derived from a diminutive form for Peter.
Petzold German
German. Derives from a pet form of a Slavic version of the given name Peter.
Pfarr German
From Middle High German pfarr 'district' 'parish' or pfarre(r) 'parish priest', hence an occupational name for a parson.
Pfeffer German, Jewish
Occupational name for a spicer, or a nickname for a person with a fiery temper, for a small man, or for a dark-haired person. Derived from German Pfeffer "pepper".
Pfefferle German
South German diminutive of Pfeffer, and a nickname for a person who sells spices.
Pfeil German
From Middle High German pfil ‘arrow’ (from Latin pilum ‘spike’, ‘javelin’), either a metonymic occupational name for an arrowsmith or possibly a nickname for a tall thin man.
Pflüger German
Occupational name for a Ploughman, literally meaning "Ploughman/Plowman" in German.
Pfuhl German
a topographic name for someone who lived by a swamp or pond, Middle High German phuol.... [more]
Pfund German
metonymic occupational name for a sealer of weights, or for a wholesale merchant, from Middle High German pfunt ‘pound’ (as a measure of weight and a unit of currency).
Pfundt German
Unknown meaning of German origin
Philippi German (Latinized)
Latinized patronymic derived from the given name Philipp.
Pieper German, Dutch
Occupational name for a piper.
Pink English, German
Nickname, possibly for a small person, from Middle English pink penkg ‘minnow’ (Old English pinc).English (southeastern): variant of Pinch .Variant spelling of German Pinck, an indirect occupational name for a blacksmith, an onomatopoeic word imitating the sound of hammering which was perceived as pink(e)pank... [more]
Pinn English, German
Derived from Middle English pin and Middle Low German pinne, both meaning "peg" or "pin". This was an occupational name from a maker of these things. The German name can in some cases be an occupational name for a shoemaker.
Pinsker German, Prussian
Habitational name from any of several places named near Posen (Polish Poznan) and in West Prussia.
Pionke German, Polish
Germanized form of Slavic Pinoek, which is a nickname from pionek ‘puppet’.
Pitcher English, German
From an agent derivative of Middle English pich ‘pitch’, hence an occupational name for a caulker, one who sealed the seams of ships or barrels with pitch. English variant of Pickard... [more]
Pitsenbarger German
Probably an altered spelling of Bezzenberger, which is derived from Boizenburg, a municipality in the Ludwigslust-Parchim district in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany.
Pittsenbarger German
Variant spelling of Pitsenbarger.
Plahna German (Austrian)
It is a name from the Gratkorn, Graz, Styria area of Austria
Pláňsker Czech (Rare, Archaic), Slovak (Rare, Archaic), German (Rare, Archaic)
Originating from Bohemia, a region between The Czech Republic and Germany. The name means "forest clearing", Pláň: forest, sker: clearing. It is a very rare last name with only about 20 holders of it.
Plum English, German, Jewish
English and North German: from Middle English plum(b)e, Middle Low German plum(e) ‘plum’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a plum tree, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower... [more]
Plumer German, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
Pobanz German
Nickname for a braggart or bogeyman, of uncertain Slavic origin.
Poehler German
German (Westphalian): topographic name for someone who lived by a muddy pool, from an agent noun derived from Middle Low pol ‘(muddy) pool’.
Poelzer German
pronounced,Pfowelser,it means person skilled with bird's,as in Hawk's or Eagle's(bird's of prey).From Palatine,or Austria(a Royal house).
Pöge German
German cognate of Page.
Poh German
From a dialect word for standard German Pfau ‘peacok’, a nickname for a vain person or for someone with a strutting gait.
Poland English, German, French (Anglicized), Irish (Anglicized)
English and German name is derived from the Middle High German Polan, which means "Poland". The surname originally signified a person with Polish connections.This French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised form of the original Gaelic spelling of Mac Póilín, which translated from Irish means "son of little Paul"... [more]
Poley French, German, Jewish
French: variant of Polet, Paulet, pet forms of Paul.... [more]
Polk German
Ethnic name for a Pole.
Polke German
Variant of Polk.
Pollak English, German
A name for someone who came from the place called Poland.
Pomerantz German
Occupational name for an importer or seller of bitter (Seville) oranges, Middle High German pomeranz (medieval Latin pomarancia, composed of the elements arancia, the name imported with the fruit.
Popp German
Derived from the given name Poppo (or possibly Boppo) which is of uncertain origin and meaning... [more]
Poppe German, Dutch, English
German and Dutch variant of Popp 1 and English variant of Popp 2.
Pöppel Upper German, German
Comes from a pet form of the personal name Popp.
Portman German (Anglicized)
Americanised form of Portmann.
Portmann German
Occupational name for a gatekeeper, derived from Middle Low German port(e) meaning "gate" and man, or a topographic name for someone who lived near the gates of a fortified town.
Posner German, Polish, Medieval
Originally denoted a person from Poznań, Poland.
Pradl Hungarian, German (Austrian)
Meaning unknown. Possibly originating somewhere in Hungary.
Precht German
Variant of Brecht.
Pregler German
Nickname for a chatterer or grumbler, from an agent derivative of Middle High German breglen ‘to chatter’, ‘complain’, ‘yell’, ‘roar’.
Preüs German
Variant spelling of Preüss.
Preüss German (East Prussian)
Origin: From the New Latin 'Prussia', the Latin form used by Peter of Dusburg for the name of the region in the now-extinct language of its Baltic inhabitants, 'Prūsa'. Prussia (German: About this sound Preußen; Latin: Borussia, Prutenia; Latvian: Prūsija; Lithuanian: Prūsija; Polish: Prusy; Old Prussian: Prūsa; Danish: Prøjsen; Russian: Пру́ссия) was a German kingdom and historic state originating out of the Duchy of Prussia and the Margraviate of Brandenburg... [more]
Prophet English, Scottish, French, German
Scottish, English, French, and German: nickname from Middle English and Old French prophete, Middle High German prophet ‘prophet’, ‘seer’, ultimately from Greek prophetes ‘predictor’, from pro ‘before’ + a derivative of phemi ‘to speak’... [more]
Prose German
From a short form of the personal name Ambrose.
Pross German
Variant of "Prosser"
Protzman German
A habitational name for someone from any of various places in Lower Saxony, Brandenburg, and Luxembourg called Protz.
Prusseit German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) name meaning "a Prussian".
Pudwill German
Of Slavic origin, habitational name from Podewils in Pomerania.
Pullman German
Variant of Puhlmann, itself a variant of Puhl.... [more]
Pulow German
Pulow is the name of a small village in the northeast of Germany. There is also a lake with the same name.
Punke German
Unexplained; possibly an altered form of Bunke, from a Middle Low German personal name.
Pusch German
Name for someone who lived near bushes or a thicket. The distinguished name Pusch is derived from the Old German word busc, which means thicket or brush.
Puschat German (East Prussian)
East Prussian German (and thus heavily Lithuanian influenced) surname derived from Lithuanian pušaite "(young) pine tree", which - allegedly - used to be a term of endearment for a young girl.
Pütt German
Habitational name from any of several places so named in Rhineland, Westphalia, and Pomerania, but in most cases a topographic name from Middle Low German putte ‘pit’, ‘well’, ‘puddle’, ‘pond’.
Putz German
German for "plaster". Likely used to denote someone who manufactured plaster
Quaas German
Nickname for a big eater, from Middle Low German quās meaning "guzzling", "feasting".
Quade Irish, German
As an Irish surname, it is a variant of Quaid.... [more]
Quaderer German
Nickname for someone stocky, from Middle High German quader meaning "building stone".
Quandt German, History
From Middle Low German quant "prankster, joker". ... [more]
Quartz German
The name refers to the common mineral "quartz"
Quast German
habitational name from any of several places so named in northern Germany. metonymic occupational name for a barber or nickname for someone who wore a conspicuous tassel or feather, from Middle Low German, Middle High German quast(e) "tuft", "tassel", "brush", also "fool".
Quetz German
German family name originating from the town of Quetz (today Quetzdölsdorf).... [more]
Quirin German
From the given name Quirin
Raab German
Derived from German rabe "raven". As a surname, it was given to a person with black hair.
Raabe German
Cognate of Rabe.
Raasch German
Variant of Rasch.
Rabe German
German surname meaning "raven, crow".
Rabenstein German
Habitational name from any of numerous places called Rabenstein.
Rachel English, German
From the English female given name Rachel or derived from German rau "rough".
Rackers German
German (Räckers): in the Lower Rhine-Westphalia area, from a reduced form of Rädeker, itself a reduced form of Rademaker.
Rader German
Variation of Rademacher, meaning "maker of wheels" in German ("rat" meaning wheel), later shortened to Rader and other variations such as Redder, Raeder, Redler, etc.
Radler German
Occupational name, which was derived from the kind of work done by the original bearer. It is a name for a wheelmaker or wheelwright. The name stems from the German noun rat, meaning wheel. The origin is more clear in the variant Rademacher
Raffensperger German
Altered spelling of Ravensburger or Ravensberger, a habitational name for someone from Ravensburg in Württemberg, but there are a number of similar surnames, for example Raffenberg, a farm name near Hamm, and Raffsberger.
Ragatz German (Swiss)
Habitational name from Ragaz in Grison canton.
Rahe German
Nickname for a rough individual, from a North German variant of Rauh.
Raisch German, German (Swiss)
From Middle High German rīsch, rūsch ‘reed’, ‘rush’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived near a reed bed, or perhaps a metonymic occupational name for someone who used or harvested reeds... [more]
Raiter German
Occupational name for a taxman or accountant, from an agent derivative of Middle High German reiten ‘to reckon’, ‘to calculate’.
Ramp German (Swiss)
German and Swiss German: variant of Rampf, from Middle High German ramft, ranft ‘edge’, ‘wall’, ‘crust (of bread)’; applied as a topographic name for someone who lived at the limit or outer edge of some feature, for example a field, or possibly, in the sense ‘crust’, a nickname for a poor person.
Randel French, German
French: from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Rando, a short form of various compound names formed with rand ‘(shield) rim’ as the first element... [more]
Randleman German
Diminutive of the personal name Rand, a short form of various German names with the first element rand meaning shield or wolf.
Randolph English, German
Classicized spelling of Randolf, a Germanic personal name composed of the elements rand "rim (of a shield), shield" and wolf "wolf". This was introduced into England by Scandinavian settlers in the Old Norse form Rannúlfr, and was reinforced after the Norman Conquest by the Norman form Randolf.
Rang German
Variant of Range.... [more]
Range German, French
German: nickname for a ragamuffin, from Middle High German range ‘naughty boy’, ‘urchin’.... [more]
Rangel German, Spanish, Portuguese
A variant of Rengel. This name is also found in Portugal.
Ranger English, German, French
English: occupational name for a gamekeeper or warden, from Middle English ranger, an agent derivative of range(n) ‘to arrange or dispose’.... [more]
Raphael English, German
From the given name Raphael
Raphan German
Unknown
Rappold German
From a personal name composed of the Germanic elements rad "counsel", "advice" + bald "bold", "brave".
Rath German
1 German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): descriptive epithet for a wise person or counselor, from Middle High German rāt ‘counsel’, ‘advice’, German Rat ‘counsel’, ‘advice’, also ‘stock’, ‘supply’.... [more]
Rather German, Jewish
1. Occupational name for a counsellor or nickname for a wise person, from Middle High German rater ‘adviser’. ... [more]
Rathgeber German
From Middle High German ratgebe or Middle Low German ratgever "giver of advice, counselor", an occupational name for an adviser or wise man.
Rau German
Nickname for a ruffian, earlier for a hairy person, from Middle High German ruch, ruhe, rouch "hairy", "shaggy", "rough".
Räuber German, German (Swiss)
German, Swiss German: derogatory nickname, from Middle High German roubære ‘robber’, ‘bandit’, ‘highwayman’ (from roub, roup ‘booty’, ‘spoils’).
Rauch German
Perhaps an occupational nickname for a blacksmith or charcoal burner, from Middle High German rouch, German Rauch ‘smoke’, or, in the case of the German name, a status name or nickname relating to a hearth tax (i.e. a tax that was calculated according to the number of fireplaces in each individual home).
Raudabaugh German (Americanized)
Raudabaugh is a German-Americanized surname of Reidenbach. People include Dan Raudabaugh (American Football coach) and Dave Raudabaugh (Outlaw who was an acquaintance to Billy the kid).
Rausch German
Nickname for a noisy person, derived from ruschen, meaning "to make a noise" in Middle High German. ... [more]
Raveling German
nickname or patronymic from Middle Low German rave(n) ‘raven’
Rayl German
Variant of Rehl, which it's meaning is probably a habitational name from Rehl in Rhineland or Rehlen in East Prussia.
Recht German
Probably a habitational name from a place so named in the Rhineland.
Recht German, Jewish
Nickname for an upright person, from Middle High German reht, German recht "straight". As a Jewish name it is mainly of ornamental origin.
Reck German
Nickname from Middle High German recke ‘outlaw’ or ‘fighter’. North German and Westphalian: from Middle Low German recke ‘marsh’, ‘waterlogged ground’, hence a topographic name, or a habitational name from a place named with this term.
Recktenwald German
habitational name from Recktenwald, near Saarbrücken.
Redding English, German, Dutch
English variant spelling of Reading. In 1841 Redding was the most commonly used surname in all of Buckinghamshire. A famous bearer is Otis Redding.... [more]
Redig Dutch, Upper German
Dutch and North German variant of Redding.
Redner German
German: possibly a variant of Redmer, or an occupational name for a spokesman, Middle High German rednære.
Reese Low German, Dutch, German
Nickname for a very big man, from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch rese ‘giant’.... [more]
Reever German
Possibly an altered form of German Riefer, a patronymic from the personal name Rüef, a reduced form of Rudolf.
Rehder German
Occupational name, which was derived from the kind of work done by the original bearer. It is a name for a wheelmaker or wheelwright.
Reichenberg German, Jewish
Habitational name from various places named Reichenberg in several different areas of Germany. As an ornamental name, it is composed of German reich(en) meaning "rich" and berg meaning "mountain, hill".
Reicher German, German (Austrian), Jewish
Derived from various placenames called Reich, Reichau, Reichen.
Reichstein German
Habitational name from places named Reichstein (in Saxony) or Reichenstein (in Rhineland, Schleswig-Holstein, and Württemberg).
Reifinger German
1 German: perhaps a habitational name for someone from any of several places called Reiting in Bavaria and Austria, or from a Germanic personal name, a variant of Rediger .... [more]
Reimann German
From a pet form of a Germanic personal name formed with a first element from ragin 'advice', 'counsel' or ric 'power(ful)', 'rich'.
Reimer German
From a Germanic personal name, a reduced form of Reinmar, composed of the elements ragin "counsel" + mari, meri "fame".
Reimers German
North German variant of Reimer.
Reimschüssel German
Meaning Unknown.
Reinbold German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ragin "counsel" + bald "bold", "brave."
Reiner German
From the given name Reiner
Reinert German
North German: from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ragin ‘counsel’ + hard ‘hardy’, ‘brave’, ‘strong’, for example Reinhard ( see Reinhardt ).
Reinhard German
From the given name Reinhard
Reinhardt German
Comes from a personal name Raginhard, composed of the elements ragin, meaning counsel, with hard, hardy, brave, strong.
Reinhold German
From the given name Reinhold.
Reinholdt German
From the German given name Reinhold.
Reinholt German
From the given name Reinhold.
Reinking German
Reinking is a German-derived surname meaning "one who is neat and tidy"
Reise German, Jewish
German (Westphalia) topographic name, from Middle Low German ris, res ‘swamp’. ... [more]
Reisenauer German
Probably denoted a person from a minor place called Reisenau, or a topographic name for someone living by an overgrown water meadow, derived from Middle High German ris meaning "undergrowth" and owe meaning "water meadow".
Reiser German, Upper German
Habitational name for someone from Reis or Reissen in Bavaria (see Reis). An occupational name from Middle High German reisære ‘warrior’, ‘traveler’... [more]
Reisner German
A habitational name for someone from a place called Reisen (for example in Bavaria), Reissen in Thuringia, or Reussen on the Saale river. A variant of Reiser Also from an agent derivative of Middle High German, Middle Low German rise ‘veil’; perhaps an occupational name for someone who made veils.
Reiss German, Jewish, French (Huguenot)
German: variant of Reis or from any of several Germanic personal names composed with ric ‘power(ful)’. Also from the French Huguenot forename Ris, rendered as Reis and Reiss.... [more]
Reisser Upper German
An occupational name for a woodcutter, Middle High German risser.
Remis Greek, Dutch, German, Asturian
Greek from a medieval Greek personal name, Remis, a vernacular form of the personal name Remigius (see French Remy)... [more]
Rendelmann German
A habitational name for someone from Rendel near Frankfurt (Hesse).
Rengel German (Swiss)
From a pet form of a Germanic personal name formed with rang "curved", "bending"; "slender".
Repass German (Swiss)
An Americanization of the Swiss Rippas. The first recorded person with this surname was from Ziefen, Switzerland.
Requa German
Variant of Ricward, from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ric ‘power(ful)’ + ward ‘guardian’.
Reschke German
Derived from the Middle High German word "rasch" meaning "quick," or "hot-headed". As such, it may have originated as a nickname for a quick or rash person.
Resen German
Unknown source.
Reus Dutch, German, Catalan
Dutch: nickname for a big man, from Middle Dutch reuse(n) 'giant'. German: topographic name from Middle High German riuse 'fish trap' (Middle Low German ruse) or from a regional term reuse 'small stream', 'channel'... [more]
Reusser Swiss, German, Upper German
In Switzerland, an occupational name for a fisherman or maker of fish traps, from an agent derivative of Middle High German riuse ‘fish trap’, ‘weir basket’. A nickname from an agent noun based on Middle High German riusen ‘to moan or complain’... [more]
Rex English, German (Latinized)
English: variant of Ricks. ... [more]
Reznor German
May be a variant of the German surname Reisner, a habitational name for someone from a place called Reisen (for example in Bavaria), Reissen in Thuringia, or Reussen on the Saale river.
Rhein German
From the German name for the River Rhine, denoting somebody whom lived within close proximity to the river. The river name itself comes from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'run, flow').
Rhine German, French, English, Irish
A habitational name for an individual whom lived within close proximity of the River Rhine (see Rhein). The river name is derived from a Celtic word meaning 'to flow' (Welsh redan, 'flow').... [more]
Rhoton German, French
Rhoton is a German and French surname from the 1800s. Some people believe that it is derived from the French word for red, but the origin is overall unknown. The name represents strength and power.
Ribbeck German (East Prussian)
Possibly translates roughly to fish in some dialects.
Richers English, German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements ric ‘power(ful)’ + hari, heri ‘army’. The name was introduced into England by the Normans in the form Richier, but was largely absorbed by the much more common Richard... [more]
Rickels German
Patronymic form of Rickel or possibly Richel. May have been derived from any of a number of Old German personal names including Richild (or the feminine form Richeldis) or Richold.
Ricken German
From a short form of any of the Germanic personal names composed with rīc "power(ful)".
Ridinger German
A habitational name for someone from a place named Riding or Rieding. It is also possibly an altered spelling of Reitinger, a topographic name from Reit(e), which means ‘clearing’ (Old High German riuti).
Riechers German
German patronymic from Richard.
Rieck German
South German: from a pet form of the personal name Ru(o)diger, a compound of Old High German hrod ‘renown’ + ger ‘spear’, ‘lance’ (see Roger). ... [more]
Riedel German
From the given name Riede.
Riedel German
Derived from a given name containing the Middle Low German name element riden "to ride".
Riedel German
Derived from Middle High German riet "damp, mossy area".
Riedemann German
Either a habitational name derived from places named Ried or Riede, or a topographic name derived from Low German Riede "rivulet".
Riegel German
From Middle High German rigel "bar, crossbeam, mountain incline", hence a topographic name or a habitational name from any of numerous places named with this word in Baden, Brandenburg, and Silesia; in some instances it may have been a metonymic occupational name for a maker of crossbars, locks, etc.
Riehl German (Austrian), German
Either from the given name Rühle or a from the location of Rühle or Riehl.
Riek German
German: variant spelling of Rieck.
Rieke German
Variant of Rieck
Riesen German
It is a name for a wood carver.
Riesenberg German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a big mountain, from Middle High German rise meaning "giant" and berg meaning "mountain".
Riesenberg German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a big mountain, from Middle High German rise meaning "giant" and berg meaning "mountain".
Riesenburg German
Variant spelling of Riesenberg.
Rieser Swiss, German
Alemannic form of Reiser. A habitational name for someone from Ries near Passau. Alemannic variant of Rüsser and Rüser, a variant of Reusser... [more]
Rieth German
"reed" -- a tall, slender-leaved plant of the grass family that grows in water or on marshy ground.
Rind German
Probably a metonymic occupational name for a cattle dealer or butcher, from Middle High German rint meaning "cow".
Rindt German
Variant of Rind.
Ringelberg German
From the mountain on which sat Castle Ringel.
Ringgold German
Comes from Germanic ring "ring" or "assembly" and wald "rule"
Rippas German (Swiss)
The first recorded person with this surname was from Ziefen, Switzerland.
Ritch English, German, German (Swiss)
1. English: variant spelling of Rich. ... [more]
Ritchings French, German, English
This surname has at least three distinct separate origins. ... [more]
Ritschel German, History
Derived from Old High German hruod "fame". This was the maiden name of Magda Goebbels who was the wife of Paul Joseph Goebbels. Her husband was Nazi Germany's propaganda minister between the years 1933 and 1945... [more]
Rittenhouse German
Means "Knight House."
Rittman German, English
From Middle High German "riet" and "mann", riet meaning reed.
Ritz German
From a short form of the personal name Rizo, itself derived in part from Richard and in part from Heinrich (see Henry).
Rix German
given to a person who resided near a hill, stream, church, or tree
Rober German
Variant of Röber (see Roeber).
Rockefeller German
Means "from Rockenfeld." Some famous bearers include founder of the Standard Oil Company and philanthropist John Davison Rockefeller (1839-1937), and 41st Vice President of the U.S.A. Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (1908-1979).
Rockman German
Possibly a habitational name for someone from Rockau in Thuringia.
Rockman German, Jewish
Possibly an altered spelling of Rochman.
Rockmann German
From German Rock (skirt) + mann (man)
Roel English, Spanish, Dutch, German
From the name Roeland, meaning "famous country".
Roemer German
Refers to a pilgrim or merchant visiting Rome.
Roeschlaub German (Rare, Archaic)
Comes from the Bavarian meaning 'Rustling Leaves'
Rohme German
From the Germanic personal name Ruom (Old High German hruom ‘fame’), a short form of Ruombald and similar personal names containing this element.
Rohr German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived in an area thickly grown with reeds, from Middle High German ror. Also a habitational name from one of the several places named with this word.
Rohrbach German, German (Swiss)
German and Swiss German: habitational name from any of numerous places called Rohrbach (‘reed brook’ or ‘channel brook’) in many parts of Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. It is a common surname in Pennsylvania.