German Submitted Surnames

German names are used in Germany and other German-speaking areas such as Austria and Switzerland. See also about German names.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Menzer German
Variant of Mentzer.
Merkh German (Anglicized, ?)
Anglicized form of the name Märkh, a German name that existed in southern Germany with Arabic roots tied to the village of al-Märkh in Qatar; the name became Anglicized in the early 17th century. It is one of those surnames where anyone who possesses it is related to everyone else who possesses the name.
Mesmer German
Occupational name for a maker of knives from Middle High German messer meaning "knife". A famous bearer was Franz Mesmer (1734-1815), a German doctor known for his theory of "animal magnetism", which was eventually incorporated into the field of hypnosis.
Messer German
Occupational name for an official in charge of measuring the dues paid in kind by tenants, from an agent derivative of Middle High German mezzen "to measure".
Messerschmidt German
Name given to a knife smith. From German "messer" meaning knife, and "schmidt" meaning smith.
Mette German
Matronymic surname derived from the given name Mette, a Low German short form of Mechthild.
Metz German
From a short form of the female personal name Mechthild.
Meusburger German (Austrian)
The history of this last name is that it means "Mountain Dweller." Being as part of the Austrian surnames, it's a widely used one in it's home country. A few brothers had gone to various countries, as of now there is Meusburgers in Columbia, as well as the United States and throughout Europe... [more]
Michels German, Dutch
Patronymic from the personal name Michel (see Michael). ... [more]
Mick German, Dutch, Irish
Short form of the given name Mikolaj or an occupational name from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch micke "(wheat or rye) bread"... [more]
Middendorf German
"middle of the village"
Mielke German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name Milogost and other Slavic given names beginning with the element Mil-.
Minden German, English
Habitational name from any of various places so named, for example in Westphalia (German) or Shropshire (English).
Minor English, German, French
English: variant spelling of Miner.... [more]
Mishler German
Americanized spelling of Swiss German Mischler .
Mittel German
Literally "middle", probably a topographic name from a farm occupying a middle position in a settlement. Compare Mitter.
Mittelmann German
From a byname from Middle High German mittelman "mediator, arbitrator".
Mitter German
Topographic name for someone who lived on or owned a property that was in the middle between two or more others, especially if the others were both held by men with the same personal name (for example, Mitter Hans), from the strong form of Middle High German mitte "mid, middle".
Mittermeier German (Austrian)
Literal meaning "middle farmer" its thought to have been given to farmers living between two there farms in the mountains.
Möbius German
Patronymic surname derived from the given name Bartholomäus, the German form of Bartholomew.
Möbus German
Variant of Möbius.
Mogasen German
meaning unknown
Mohler German, English
The Mohler surname is derived from the Low German word möhl which means mill. Thus the name originally denoted someone who live or worked near a mill. Variant of Müller.
Mohr German
From a short form of an old personal name, Morhart (see Morath).
Mohrbacher German
Likely arose as a name for those living near Morbach, Germany
Mohrenschildt German
From the surname Mohren and scilt "shield"
Mönch German
Derived from German Mönch "monk" (ultimately via Middle High German münch and Old High German munih from Latin monicus. Compare Monk).
Monsch German (Swiss)
Alemannic variant of Mönch.
Montag German
It means Monday in German.
Mook German
This surname means 'flying insect' from a German word that is mauke. (I think it is mauke, I am SO not sure.)
Mosbrucker German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a bridge over a swamp, from Middle High German mos meaning "bog", "swamp" + brucke meaning "bridge".
Mosele Italian, German (Austrian)
This surname is to be found in north-eastern Italy, more specifically in the Vicenza and Verona provinces. Families with this name are certain to be originally from the mountain town of Asiago, situated on a plateau north of Vicenza and now a well-known skiing resort... [more]
Most German
Metonymic occupational name for a producer or seller of must, i.e. unfermented grape juice, from Middle High German most, ultimately derived from Latin mustum vinum meaning "young (i.e. fresh) wine"... [more]
Motz German
Meaning "dirty" or "grubby".
Mousel German (Austrian, Anglicized), English
Anglicisation of the German Mäusl, from the German word maus - "mouse" combined with a diminutive suffix, literally meaning "little mouse"... [more]
Mozart German
The surname was first recorded in the 14th century as Mozahrt, and later as Motzhardt in Germany. It is a compound word, the first part of which is Middle High German mos, also spelt mosz, and meaning “bog, marsh” in southern dialects (compare modern German Moos)... [more]
Mühlfeld German
Variant form of Muhlfeld.
Münch German
Variant of Mönch.
Munsch Alsatian
Alsatian variant of Monge and Münch.
Müsch German
Either a habitational name from a place named Müsch in Germany, or a topographic name meaning "bog", perhaps given to someone living near a bog.
Musch Dutch, German
From a nickname meaning "house sparrow".
Mustafi Albanian, German (Rare)
Means "the chosen one"
Mutter German
(also Mütter): occupational name for an official employed to measure grain, from Middle High German mutte, mütte 'bushel', 'grain measure' (Latin modius) + the agent suffix -er.
Nabrotzky German
Supposedly means "lived near water". Originated from Prussia.
Nabrotzky German (East Prussian)
The story I was told was:... [more]
Nacht German, Jewish
From middle German naht meaning "night".
Nachtigall German, Jewish
Nickname from Middle High German nachtegal "nightingale" from Old High German galan "to sing". Cognate to Nightingale.
Nachtrieb German
It possibly comes from the German name of a nachtrab, which is a "night bird like the owl". Another possible meaning is "night tribe".
Nadel German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a maker of needles, or in some cases for a tailor, from Middle High German nadel(e), German Nadel "needle".
Naegele German
Variant of Nagel.
Nagelschmidt German
Means "nail smith" in German
Nagler German
Form Middle High German nagel "nail".
Nantz German
From a pet form of a Germanic compound name formed with Nant- (for example, Nantwig, Nantger); its meaning is reflected in Middle High German nenden 'to dare'.
Narr German
Nickname for a foolish or silly person, from Middle High German narr ‘fool’, ‘jester’.
Nasers German
Habitational, derived from any of several places called Nesse in Oldenburg and Friesland.
Nassau German, Dutch, Jewish
From the name of the town of Nassau in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany (formerly the seat of an independent duchy in the 19th century), derived from Old High German naz meaning "damp, wet" and ouwa meaning "water meadow"... [more]
Nasser German
Someone from any of the places called Nassen, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Hesse, and Bavaria.
Nast German
Topographic name for someone who lived in a thickly wooded area, or a metonymic occupational name for a woodcutter, from Middle High German nast meaning "branch", a regional variant of ast, resulting from the misdivision of forms such as ein ast meaning "a branch".
Nau German
A variant of Neu; meaning "ship" or "boat."
Neeson Irish, Dutch, German
Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Naois ‘son of Naois’, usually Anglicized as Mcneese. Can also be an altered form of Dutch or German Niesen... [more]
Neff German, German (Swiss)
From Middle High German neve 'nephew', hence probably a distinguishing name for a close relation or familiar of a prominent personage.
Negley German (Swiss)
Altered spelling of Swiss German Nägele, Naegeli, or Nägeli, variants of Nagel.
Neher German
An occupational name for a tailor from a deritive of Middle Low German, 'nehen' which means 'to sew' or 'to embroider'
Nein German
Unexplained. Perhaps from a short form of a Germanic personal name formed with an element cognate with Old High German niuwi meaning "new".
Neinstein German, Jewish
Means “nine stones” in German
Nenninger German
Habitational name for someone from Nenningen in Württemberg.
Nerger German (Silesian)
My family name, Nerger, is listed in the "Deutsches Namenlexicon" by Hans Bahlow. The meaning, given in the lexicon, is "ernahrer" or provider.
Nerz German
From the German word Nerz meaning "Mink".
Nestle German
Variant of Nestler.
Nestler German
Derived from the middle high German word nesteler meaning "maker of string or thread".
Nettesheim German
"nice home"
Neu German (Modern)
The name Neu is a common German last name.
Neuber German
Contracted form of Neubauer.
Neuberger German
German surname meaning 'new mountaineer'
Neubert German
German (mainly Saxony): reduced form of Neubauer with excrescent -t. Compare Neuber .
Neuburg German
From the name of various places in Germany and Austria.
Neuenfeldt German
Habitational name for someone from places so named in Brandenburg and Pomerania, or from places in Lower Saxony or Westphalia called Neuenfelde.
Neuer German
Inflicted form of Neu meaning "new man" see Neumann
Neufeld German, English
Neufeld is a surname of German origin, meaning "new field". It is not seldom in Germany and it is common among German speaking Mennonites from Russia.
Neuger German, French (?)
Was popularized by the German community. Famous bearers include investors Win Neuger and Dan Neuger, author Christie Cozad Neuger.
Neuhaus German, Jewish
Topographical name for someone who lived in a new house, Middle High German niuwe hus, modern German neu Haus, or a habitational name for someone from any of several places named Neuhaus ('new house') in various parts of Germany and Austria, also in Bohemia.
Neuhauser German, German (Austrian)
Means "new house" in German.
Neujahr German
nickname for someone who owed feudal dues at the New Year, or sometimes a name given to someone born on that day
Neumeyer German
German: distinguishing name for a newly appointed steward or tenant farmer, or one who was a newcomer to an area, from Middle High German niuwe ‘new’ + meier ‘steward’, ‘tenant farmer’ ( see Meyer 1)... [more]
Neuser German (Rare)
Person who had ancestors that lived in Germany near Dusseldorf in the town called Neuss.
Neustädter German
Habitational name for someone from any of many places in Germany and Austria called Neustadt.
Neuwirth German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a new innkeeper, from Middle High German niuwe ‘new’ + wirt and German neu + Wirt ‘master of a house’, ‘innkeeper’.
Nevel German
1 German: variant of Nebel .... [more]
Ney German, English
A dialectal form of the common German word neu "new".... [more]
Nibbe German
Nickname meaning ‘beak’, or from a short form of a Germanic personal name Nippo, composed of Old High German nit ‘hostility’, ‘eagerness’ + boto ‘messenger’.
Nichter German, Yiddish
Possibly means "negator, negate" from Middle High German nicht meaning "not", or "sober", from Middle High German nüchter. Perhaps it originally denoted a person who was a philosopher, judge, or bartender.
Nickal German
Variant of Nickel
Nickel German
From the German word "kupfernickel" meaning Devil's copper or St Nicholas's (OLd Nick's) copper.
Nicks English, German
From the nickname of Nicholas.
Nicolay German, French
From the given name Nicolay, a form of Nicholas through Russian Nikolay... [more]
Nied Upper German
South German: habitational name from Nied in Hesse.
Niederhäuser German, Swiss
Habitational name from any of numerous places named Niederhaus or Niederhausen, denoting the lower of two dwellings or settlements or one in a low-lying position.
Niedermeier German, German (Austrian)
Occupational name for a farmer who had a farm lower than the neighboring one(s). This surname and its variant spellings are common to Austria and Bavaria, Germany.
Niedermeyer German, Dutch
Distinguishing name for a farmer (see Meyer) who had a farm lower (Middle High German nider(e)) than the neighboring one(s).
Niehaus German
North German: topographic name from Middle Low German nie ‘new’ + hus ‘house’; or a habitational name from a common North German and Westphalian farm name with the same meaning.
Nies German
German: from a reduced form of the personal name Dionys (see Dennis), which was stressed on the last syllable; this was a popular personal name as a result of the influence of the French Saint Denis... [more]
Niesen Dutch, German
Dutch: patronymic from the personal name Nijs, a reduced form of Denijs (see Dennis)... [more]
Nietzsche German, German (Silesian)
Derived from a Silesian diminutive for the given name Nikolaus. A famous bearer was Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), a German philologist and philosopher.
Nigg German, German (Swiss)
From a short form of the personal name Niklaus, a German form of Nicholas.
Nikkel German, Dutch
Possibly an altered spelling of Dutch Nikel, from the personal name, a Dutch form of Nicholas.
Nimitz German
Derived from Russian немчин (nemchin) meaning "German", of Slavic origin. This surname was borne by Chester W. Nimitz (1885-1966), a fleet admiral of the United States Navy during World War II.
Nipper German
1. habitational name for someone from Nippe in Hesse. ... [more]
Nitsche German (Silesian)
Derived from a popular Silesian short form of the personal name Nikolaus.
Noack German
Contracted form of Nowack.
Noak German
Variant of Noack.
Nolf German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Arnolf, composed of the Germanic elements arn 'eagle' + wulf 'wolf'. Dutch: from a reduced form of Nodolf, derived from the personal name Odolf by transfer of the final -n in a preceding personal name such as Jan, Simoen
Noll German
From a short form of any of various medieval personal names derived from Germanic personal names ending in -n + wald 'rule', for example Arnold and Reinwald.
Nolte German
From a short form of various medieval given names derived from Germanic given names ending with -n and wald meaning "rule", for example Arnold and Reinwald... [more]
Nonnenmacher German
Occupational name for a gelder of hogs, from Middle High German nunne, nonne meaning "nun", and by transfer "castrated hog" + an agent derivative of machen meaning "to make".
Nora Italian, German
Italian and German: from a short form of the feminine personal names Eleonora or Leonora.
Norrell English, German (?)
A locational surname from the Germanic (Old English/Old Norse) term for the north. It either refers to someone who lived in a location called Northwell, lived north of a well, spring or stream (Old English weall)... [more]
Notbohm German, Low German
Low German cognate of High German Nussbaum.
Nowack German
Variant of Nowak.
Numan English, German (Anglicized)
Variant of Neumann. A famous bearer is English musician Gary Numan.
Nungesser German
Apparently a variant spelling of German Nonnengasse, derived from a street name meaning "nuns, lane". It could also be a variant of Gnugesser, a nickname for a big eater, derived from g(e)nug meaning "enough" and esser meaning "eater" (which derived from essen meaning "to eat")... [more]
Nürnberger German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from the city of Nürnberg in Bavaria.
Nuss German
from Middle High German nuz ‘nut’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a gatherer and seller of nuts, or a nickname for a man thought to resemble a nut in some way
Obenauf German
Surname used to refer to someone who lived 'up there' (on a mountain, hill, etc.).
Oberlin German, English
From Oberst and the suffix Lynn.... [more]
Obermiller German (Americanized)
Partly Americanized form of German Obermüller, a topographic name for the miller at the ‘upper mill’.
Ochsner German (Swiss)
Means "oxen herder" in Swiss, from Middle High German ohse "ox".
Oehm German
Variant of Ohme
Oehme German
Variant form of Ohme.
Oelkers German, Dutch
Derived from a pet form of Ulrich.
Oesten German
Possibly derived from a watercourse, e.g. the Oste, tributary of the Elbe.
Oesterreich German (Austrian)
Variant transcription of Österreich.
Offenbach German, Jewish
From the name of the city of Offenbach am Main in Hesse, Germany. A famous bearer was German-born French composer Jacques Offenbach (1819-1880).
Offutt German
Possibly a respelling of German Auffahrt ‘ascension’.
Ohm German
Variant of Ohme
Ohms German
Variant of Ohme
Ohnmacht German
Means "powerlessness; helplessness; without power" in German. This was often used to describe someone very weak.
Olevian German (Latinized)
Olevian is a latinised word meaning "from Olewig" (a town today incorporated into Trier, Germany). ... [more]
Olyphant English, Scottish, French, German
Variant form of Oliphant. A famous bearer is American actor Timothy Olyphant (1968-).
Opel German
Derived from the given name Albert.
Opp German
Generally considered a (very) contracted form of given names that contained the Old High German element od "fortune; wealth" (or a variant thereof) and a second element that began with or contained the letter B, for example Audobald.
Orowitz Jewish, German
The name comes from a famous Rabbinical dynasty.... [more]
Österreich German (Austrian)
The German name for Austria, meaning "eastern kingdom".
Österreicher German, German (Austrian)
Means "One from Austria", "the Austrian".
Osterreicher German
I was told that this surname in native Austria originates as follows. Oster means East, reich means kingdom, with er meaning native of. In old Austria there were six kingdoms, with the East one being the largest with the seat of government there... [more]
Otte German
Otte was given to someone who lived in Bavaria, where the name came from humble beginnings but gained a significant reputation for its contribution to the emerging medieval society. The name Otte evolved from the Old German personal name Ott, a name of Emperors, made famous by Otto the Great (912-973), Holy Roman emperor.
Ottmar German
From the given name Ottmar.
Overholser German (Swiss)
The Oberholtzer family originated in the Swiss village of Oberholtz, south of Zurich, before the 15th century. However, in 1661, one family left Switzerland for the Palatinate in Germany.
Pacal German
South German: pet form of Pach .
Pach German
Pach is an occupational hereditary surname for a baker in Old German. Pach is also a German local name for someone who lived by a stream, which was originally derived from the German word "bach" which means stream... [more]
Packard English, Norman, Medieval English, German (Anglicized)
English from Middle English pa(c)k ‘pack’, ‘bundle’ + the Anglo-Norman French pejorative suffix -ard, hence a derogatory occupational name for a peddler. ... [more]
Page German
Metonymic occupational name for a horse dealer, from Middle Low German page "horse".
Painter English, Medieval French, German
English: from Middle English, Old French peinto(u)r, oblique case of peintre ‘painter’, hence an occupational name for a painter (normally of colored glass). In the Middle Ages the walls of both great and minor churches were covered with painted decorations, and Reaney and Wilson note that in 1308 Hugh le Peyntour and Peter the Pavier were employed ‘making and painting the pavement’ at St... [more]
Pallas German, Polish (Germanized)
Nickname for a small man, from Slavic palac 'thumb'.
Pallmann German
The name Pallmann originates from the Landsuhl area of Bavaria, Germany (nor in Rhineland-Palatinate). The meaning of the name is unknown. Some Pallmanns came to America and Americanized the spelling, by dropping the second "n", while others retained the "n".
Palmberg Dutch (Rare), German (Rare)
Derived from any of the various places in Germany named Palmberg.
Palmtag German
Means "Palm Sunday" in German.
Pankratz German (East Prussian)
The name originated in Holland, as a surname chosen in 1811 when Napoleon insisted that all Dutch people have permanent surnames passed down to children. This particular family chose the name of a venerated saint - Saint Pancras, the patron saint of children... [more]
Parduhn German
Variant Of Pardon From Middle English Pardun, Pardon "Pardon" A Metonymic occupational name for a pardoner, a person licensed to sell papal pardons or indulgences. German: either a cognate of 1 (also for a sexton), from Old French pardon ‘pardon’, or perhaps a nickname from Middle Low German bardun, Middle High German purdune ‘pipe’ (instrument), ‘tenor’ (voice).
Parr German
Variant of Pfarr.
Partenheimer German
Habitational name for someone from Partenheim in Rheinhessen.
Pasch German
Topographic name for a field or meadow which was used at Easter as a playground; etymologically two sources seem to be combined: Latin pascuum ‘pasture’ and Middle Low German pāsche(n) ‘Easter’.
Pauley English, German
English: from a medieval pet form of Paul.... [more]
Paulick German
German (of Slavic origin) spelling of Pavlik, a Slavic derivative of Paul.
Paustenbach German
Thomas Paustenbach, family name associated with the town Paustenbach, Germany
Paysen German, Frisian
Patronymic from the personal name Pay, the Frisian form of Paul.
Payson German, Frisian
German and Frisian variant spelling of Paysen, a patronymic from the personal name Paul.
Pechman German
"Pechman" means "man with bad luck" in many European languages (Polish, German, and Dutch predominantly), though in German, it originally referred to one who prepared, sold, or used pitch.
Peik German
From Middle Low German pek ‘sharp, pointed tool or weapon’.
Peikert German
Probably an occupational name for a drummer.
Peiper German (Austrian)
Occupational name for a piper, from Middle High German piper. In some cases it may be derived from Sorbian pipar "pepper", thus being an occupational name for a spicer or a nickname for one with a fiery temper.
Pelle Danish, German
From the personal name Pelle, a vernacular form of Peter.
Pelle German
From Middle Low German pelle "precious purple silk cloth", presumably an occupational name for a maker or seller of such cloth or for a maker of official and church vestments.
Peltz German, Jewish
Occupational name for a furrier, from Middle High German bellez, (modern German pelz) "fur", "animal skin".
Pelz German, Jewish
Variant of Peltz.
Pelzer German
Occupational name for a furrier, from an agent derivative Middle High German bellez "fur".
Penning Upper German
Shortened form of Panno, which is a personal given name.
Perlman German
Occupational name for a person who makes or sells pearls.
Petke German
German surname derived from a diminutive form for Peter.
Petzold German
German. Derives from a pet form of a Slavic version of the given name Peter.
Pfarr German
From Middle High German pfarr 'district' 'parish' or pfarre(r) 'parish priest', hence an occupational name for a parson.
Pfarrer German
Means "Pastor" in German.
Pfautz German
It was originally given as a nickname for a chubby person.
Pfeffer German, Jewish
Occupational name for a spicer, or a nickname for a person with a fiery temper, for a small man, or for a dark-haired person. Derived from German Pfeffer "pepper".
Pfefferle German
South German diminutive of Pfeffer, and a nickname for a person who sells spices.
Pfeil German
From Middle High German pfil ‘arrow’ (from Latin pilum ‘spike’, ‘javelin’), either a metonymic occupational name for an arrowsmith or possibly a nickname for a tall thin man.
Pflüger German
Occupational name for a Ploughman, literally meaning "Ploughman/Plowman" in German.
Pfuhl German
a topographic name for someone who lived by a swamp or pond, Middle High German phuol.... [more]
Pfund German
metonymic occupational name for a sealer of weights, or for a wholesale merchant, from Middle High German pfunt ‘pound’ (as a measure of weight and a unit of currency).
Pfundt German
Unknown meaning of German origin
Philippi German (Latinized)
Latinized patronymic derived from the given name Philipp.
Pickle German
Pickle is an Anglicized form of the North German word “pokel” and or the Dutch word “pekel”.
Pieper German, Dutch
Occupational name for a piper.
Pink English, German
Nickname, possibly for a small person, from Middle English pink penkg ‘minnow’ (Old English pinc).English (southeastern): variant of Pinch .Variant spelling of German Pinck, an indirect occupational name for a blacksmith, an onomatopoeic word imitating the sound of hammering which was perceived as pink(e)pank... [more]
Pinn English, German
Derived from Middle English pin and Middle Low German pinne, both meaning "peg" or "pin". This was an occupational name from a maker of these things. The German name can in some cases be an occupational name for a shoemaker.
Pinsker German, Prussian
Habitational name from any of several places named near Posen (Polish Poznan) and in West Prussia.
Pionke German, Polish
Germanized form of Slavic Pinoek, which is a nickname from pionek ‘puppet’.
Pitcher English, German
From an agent derivative of Middle English pich ‘pitch’, hence an occupational name for a caulker, one who sealed the seams of ships or barrels with pitch. English variant of Pickard... [more]
Pitsenbarger German
Probably an altered spelling of Bezzenberger, which is derived from Boizenburg, a municipality in the Ludwigslust-Parchim district in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany.
Pittsenbarger German
Variant spelling of Pitsenbarger.
Plahna German (Austrian)
It is a name from the Gratkorn, Graz, Styria area of Austria
Pláňsker Czech (Rare, Archaic), Slovak (Rare, Archaic), German (Rare, Archaic)
Originating from Bohemia, a region between The Czech Republic and Germany. The name means "forest clearing", Pláň: forest, sker: clearing. It is a very rare last name with only about 20 holders of it.
Plemmons English, Irish, German
Altered spelling of Fleming.
Plemons English, Irish, German
Variant form of Plemmons. A famous bearer is American actor Jesse Plemons (1988-).
Plum English, German, Jewish
English and North German: from Middle English plum(b)e, Middle Low German plum(e) ‘plum’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a plum tree, or a metonymic occupational name for a fruit grower... [more]
Plumer German, English, Dutch
North German (Plümer) and English: variant of Plum, the suffix -er denoting habitation or occupation. Altered form of South German Pflümer, an occupational name for a grower or seller of plums, from an agent derivative of Middle High German pflume ‘plum’... [more]
Pobanz German
Nickname for a braggart or bogeyman, of uncertain Slavic origin.
Poehler German
German (Westphalian): topographic name for someone who lived by a muddy pool, from an agent noun derived from Middle Low pol ‘(muddy) pool’.
Pöge German
German cognate of Page.
Poh German
From a dialect word for standard German Pfau ‘peacok’, a nickname for a vain person or for someone with a strutting gait.