Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Brockman German
German in origin, in heraldry a "brock" is represented by a badger. It could mean wet/water and man. It also has been said to mean broker.
Broin Italian
Italian and French form of or comes from Brown.
Brook German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a water meadow or marsh, from Low German brook, Dutch broek (cf. Bruch).... [more]
Brook German, Jewish
Americanized spelling of German Bruch and Jewish Bruck.
Brosmer German
Meaning unknown.
Brosseau French
Derived from a diminutive of Brusse.
Brottman German
Dr Mikita Brottman
Brousseau French
Southern French variant of Brosseau.
Bruch German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a marsh or a stream that frequently flooded, from Middle High German bruoch "water meadow" or "marsh" (cognate to old English broc "brook", "stream" cf... [more]
Brück German
Topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge, or an occupational name for a bridge keeper or toll collector on a bridge, from Middle High German bruck(e) "bridge".
Bruck German
Variant of Brück.
Brucker German
Variant of Brück.
Bruckheimer German (Rare)
Bruckheimer is a German surname and is for someone who lived near a bridge.... [more]
Bruckman German, English
German (Bruckmann): variant of Bruck, with the addition of the suffix -mann ‘man’. ... [more]
Bruckner German
Topographic name for someone living by a bridge or an occupational name for a bridge toll collector; a variant of Bruck with the addition of the suffix -ner.
Bruder German
From a byname meaning "brother", occasionally used for a younger son, i.e. the brother of someone important, or for a guild member.
Brueck German
Variant of Brück.
Brueckner German, German (Silesian)
German (Brückner): from Middle Low German brugge, Middle High German brugge, brücke, brügge ‘bridge’ + the agent suffix -ner, hence a topographic name for someone living by a bridge, an occupational name for a bridge toll collector, or in the southeast (Silesia for example) a bridge keeper or repairer... [more]
Brueggeman German
Variant of German Brueggemann.
Brueggemann Low German, German
North German (Brüggemann): topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge or a metonymic occupational name for a bridge keeper or street paver, Middle Low German brüggeman (see Bruckman, Brueckner).
Bruen German
This is my 2nd great uncle's wife's Surname of German ancestry.
Brugger German, American
South German variant or Americanized spelling of North German Brügger (see Bruegger). habitational name for someone from any of various (southern) places called Bruck or Brugg in Bavaria and Austria.
Brugman Dutch, Swiss
Dutch: topographic name for someone who lived near a bridge or a metonymic occupational name for a bridge keeper, from Dutch brugge ‘bridge’ (see Bridge); in some cases, it is a habitational name for someone from the Flemish city of Bruges (or Brugge), meaning ‘bridges’... [more]
Brühl German, Jewish
Topographic name for someone who lived by a swampy area, derived from Middle High German brüel and Middle Low German brul meaning "swampy land with brushwood". It may also be a habitational name from various places named Brühl in Germany.
Bruneau French
Derived from a diminutive form of French brun "brown", a nickname for a person with brown hair or skin.
Brunello Italian
From the given name Brunello.
Bruni Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Bruno.
Bruns French
Bruns was first found in Poitou where this noble family held a family seat since ancient times. The Bruns surname derives from the French word "brun," meaning "brown"; possibly a nickname for someone who habitually dressed in the color brown.
Brunswick English, German
English habitational name from the city in Saxony now known in German as Braunschweig. ... [more]
Brusse French
Topographic name for someone living in a scrubby area of country, from Old French broce meaning "brushwood, scrub". It is also occupational name for a brush maker, from Old French brusse meaning "brush".
Brusseau French (Anglicized)
Probably an Americanized spelling of Brousseau.
Buccambuso Sicilian, Italian
Believed to be an Americanization of the surname Buccinfuso
Buch German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a beech tree or beech wood, from Middle High German buoche, or a habitational name from any of the numerous places so named with this word, notably in Bavaria and Württemberg... [more]
Buche German
Meaning "beech" and denoting someone who lived near beech trees.
Bucher German
Upper German surname denoting someone who lived by a beech tree or beech wood, derived from Middle High German buoche "beech tree".
Buchwalder German, German (Swiss)
Buchwalder is a German Surname.
Buechler German
From the common field name Büchle 'beech stand', the -er suffix denoting an inhabitant. from buchel 'beech nut', hence a metonymic occupation name for someone who owned or worked in an oil mill producing oil from beech nuts.
Buehman German
Variant of Bauer.
Buelter German, English
Middle European variant of Butler, also meaning "a vat or large trough used to contain wine." The name originated in southern Germany in the mid-seventeenth century.
Buerk German (Anglicized)
German from a short form of the personal name Burkhardt, a variant of Burkhart.
Buermeister German
North German: status name for the mayor or chief magistrate of a town, from Middle Low German bur ‘inhabitant, dweller’, ‘neighbor’, ‘peasant’, ‘citizen’ + mester ‘master’.
Buford English, French (Anglicized)
English: most probably a variant of Beaufort.... [more]
Bühler German
From the German word "bühl", meaning hill.
Bulgaria Italian, Spanish
Originally an ethnic name or regional name for someone from Bulgaria or a nickname for someone who had visited or traded with Bulgaria, which is named after the Turkic tribe of the Bulgars, itself possibly from a Turkic root meaning "mixed".
Bunting English, German
English: nickname from some fancied resemblance to the songbird... [more]
Buonamico Italian (Anglicized)
Di Martino Buffalmacco was a widely renouned painter in Italy cities in Florence, Bologna, Pisa although his work was not known to survived the Great Fire of Italy back in the late 1300 hundreds he was widlely known for asummed work as The Three Dead- Three Living, The Triump of Death, The Last Judgement, The Hell and the Thebasis.... [more]
Buonaparte Italian (Rare)
Derived from the given name Buonaparte
Buono Italian, English
Nickname derived from Italian buono "good".
Buonocore Italian
Nickname for a reliable or good-hearted person, derived from buono meaning "good" and core meaning "heart".
Buonopane Italian
Nickname for a person who is "as good as bread", or possibly a metonymic occupational name for a baker, derived from buono meaning "good" and pane meaning "bread".
Bur Swiss, Low German, Czech, French
Swiss and North German variant of Bauer. ... [more]
Burcy French
Denoting someone from the town of Burcy.
Burdorf German
Means little farmer in german
Burger English, German, Dutch
Status name for a freeman of a borough. From Middle English burg, Middle High German burc and Middle Dutch burch "fortified town". Also a German habitational name for someone from a place called Burg.
Burgmeier German
Occupational name for the tenant farmer of an estate belonging to a castle or fortified town, from Middle High German burc "(fortified) town, castle" and meier "tenant farmer" (see Meyer).
Burkhalter German
Topographic name composed of the Middle High German elements burc "castle" "protection" and halter from halde "slope".
Burkhardt German
Burk is German for "Strong", and hardt is the "heart of a castle".
Burmeister German
North German: status name for the mayor or chief magistrate of a town, from Middle Low German bur ‘inhabitant, dweller’, ‘neighbor’, ‘peasant’, ‘citizen’ + mester ‘master’.
Burnette French
Descriptive nickname from Old French burnete ‘brown’ (see Burnett). Possibly also a reduced form of Buronet, from a diminutive of Old French buron ‘hut’, ‘shack’.
Burr English, Scottish, German
Nickname for a person who is difficult to shake off, derived from Middle English bur(r) meaning "bur" (a seedhead that sticks to clothing). It could also be a derivation from Old English bur meaning "small dwelling, building", or it is a German topographic name derived from burr(e) meaning "mound, hill".
Bursey French
Variant of Burcy.
Buschbaum German
Means "bush tree" in German.
Buschiazzo Italian
It's a surname in northern Italy (Piedmont). It emerges from the German spelling Bosch or Busch and this means "forest" or "wooded area".
Busse German, English
German: variant of Buss. ... [more]
Butta Italian
Italian: from a short form of a compound name formed with butta- ‘throw’, as for example Buttacavoli.Italian: from an old German feminine personal name Butta.Italian: variant of Botta.
Buttacavoli Italian
Nickname composed of the elements butta "throw" + cavoli "cabbages".
Buttafuoco Italian
Nickname composed of the elements butta "throw" + fuoco "fire".
Butter English, German
1. English: nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a bittern, perhaps in the booming quality of the voice, from Middle English, Old French butor ‘bittern’ (a word of obscure etymology)... [more]
Buttgereit German
Variant spelling of Butgereit. A famous bearer is German film director and screenwriter Jörg Buttgereit (1963-).
Büttner German
Occupational name for a cooper or barrel-maker, an agent derivative of Middle High German büte(n) "cask", "wine barrel". This name occurs chiefly in eastern German-speaking regions.
Buxbaum German, Jewish
Means "box tree" in German.
Buzelli Italian
Chris Buzelli is an illustrator.
Byers German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Bayers.
Cabaniss French
Variant spelling of Cabanis, a habitational name from any of various places in Gard named Cabanis, from Late Latin capannis ‘at the huts’, ablative plural of capanna 'hut'... [more]
Cabell Catalan, English, German
As a Catalan name, a nickname for "bald" from the Spanish word cabello. The English name, found primarily in Norfolk and Devon, is occupational for a "maker or seller of nautical rope" that comes from a Norman French word... [more]
Caccavale Italian
Possibly a combination of cacare "to shit" and vale "valley".
Cacciatore Italian
Derived from Italian cacciatore meaning "hunter, huntsman", ultimately derived from cacciare meaning "to hunt".
Cacioppo Italian, Sicilian
Derived from Sicilian cacioppu meaning "dried tree trunk", presumably applied as a nickname for someone with wizened skin, or from caciopu meaning "short-sighted" (derived from Greek kakiopes, literally meaning "having bad eyes").
Caderousse French, Literature
A character in the classic novel The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. In the novel, Caderousse is a tailor and inkeeper who aids in the arrest of Dantès.
Cadillac French
From the name of a city in France, of origin I am not sure of (anyone who knows the name's etymology edit this). This is most notably the name of the car company of the same name, named after Detroit, Michigan founder Antoine de la Mothe, Sieur de Cadillac.
Cadoret French, Breton
From an old Breton given name Catuuoret meaning "protector in combat".
Caillou French
Means "pebble" in French. Perhaps a nickname for a bald person.
Caine French, English
Originally from a French derogatory nickname for someone with a bad temper.
Cairo Italian
One who came from Cairo.
Calcaterra Italian
Nickname from calcare meaning "to tread", "to stamp" + terra meaning "land", "earth", "ground", probably denoting a short person, someone who walked close to the ground, or an energetic walker.
Calderone Italian
From the Latin word Caldaria "cauldron". Given to someone who worked as a tinker or tinsmith.
Caligiuri Italian
Comes from the Greek words "kalos" meaning "beautiful" and "gheros" meaning "elderly," and was often given to children in the hopes that they would retain their beauty in their old age.
Calixte French
From the given name Calixte
Calliari Italian (Latinized, Archaic)
This is an Italian surname, in the north of Italy. Calliari is the result of the deformation of the graphically Calligari, where you can clearly see excision of the letter or character D, which is located in the middle of the surname... [more]
Calogero Italian
From the given name Calogero.
Calzaghe Sardinian, Italian
From Italian meaning "breeches".
Cambareri Italian
Variant of Cammareri, an occupational name from Sicilian cammareri meaning "servant".
Cambria Italian
Denoted to someone from Cambria, Sicily, possibly of Arabic origin.
Camilleri Maltese, Italian
Derived from Italian cammelliere meaning "camel driver".
Camillo Italian
From the given name Camillo.
Cammarata Italian
Habitational name from any of various places in Sicily named Cammarata, all derived from Greek καμάρα (kamara) meaning "vault".
Cammareri Sicilian, Italian
Means "servant, waiter" in Sicilian.
Campagna Italian
Name for someone originally from any of various locations named Campagna, all derived from Latin Campania, itself from campus meaning "field".
Campanano Italian
Southern Italian:... [more]
Campion Norman, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: status name for a professional champion (see Champion, Kemp), from the Norman French form campion.
Camus French
Means "flat-nosed" in French.
Canada French, English
It derives from the Middle English "cane", a development of the Old French "cane", meaning cane, reed.
Candido Italian
From the given name Candido.
Canella Italian
Italian regional surname denoting someone who lived by a canal. From the Italian canale 'canal', from the Latin canalis meaning "canal; conduit; groove; funnel; or ditch". Alternatively, it may come the genus name of wild cinnamon, a diminutive of the Latin canna "reed, cane".
Cannavaro Italian
Probably from a nickname used to refer to rope makers or hemp growers. This surname is most famously borne by brothers Fabio (1973–) and Paolo Cannavaro (1981–), former football players.
Cannella Italian
Derived from the word "Cinnamon" in Italian meaning someone who was a baker and or made cinnamon.
Canteloup French
Name of several places in France. The surname means "Song of the Wolf" from canta and loup as in "place where the wolves howl".
Cantone Italian
Habitational name for someone from any of various locations named Cantone, derived from Italian cantone meaning "canton, corner".
Canzio Italian
From the given name Canzio
Capaldo Italian
Probably a diminutive of Italian capo meaning "head", perhaps used as a nickname for a stubborn or hard-headed person.
Cape French, English (British)
French and English: metonymic occupational name for a maker of capes and cloaks, or perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore a cloak or cape, from Middle English and Old Norman French cape ‘cape’, ‘cloak’, ‘hooded cloak’ (in French also ‘hood’ or ‘hat’), from Late Latin cappa, capa, probably a derivative of caput ‘head’ (see Capp)... [more]
Capecchi Italian
Probably from Old Italian capecchio, either denoting a type of cheap batting and, by extension, upholsterers, who worked with it, or as a nickname for a person with bristly hair or beard.... [more]
Capeder Romansh
From the Romansh surname prefix Ca and the given name Peder, which is the Scandinavian (and apparently also Romansh) form of Peter.
Capon French
A name for a person who worked as a poultry farmer.
Capone Italian
Augmentative of Italian capo meaning "head", used as a nickname for a big-headed or arrogant person.
Capra Italian
From the Latin word capra meaning "nanny goat." This was a name originally borne by shepherds / goat herders.
Capraro Italian
Occupational name for a goatherd, derived from Italian capra meaning "goat".
Capricorne French
Derived from the Latin word (Capricornus) meaning "horned like a goat". Probably a nickname for an ambitious person.
Capua Italian
Capua is a city and comune in the province of Caserta, Campania, southern Italy, situated 25 km (16 mi) north of Naples on the northeastern edge of the Campanian plain. Ancient Capua was situated where Santa Maria Capua Vetere is now.... [more]
Caputo Italian
Derived from Latin caput meaning "head", used as a nickname for a big-headed or stubborn person.
Carabelli Italian
Common surname in the Lombardy region of Italy.
Caracciolo Italian
Famous bearer of this surname is Canadian-Italian singer Alessia Caracciolo (1996-).
Caramella Italian
Name given to a chalumeau player. Italian version of the French surname Caramelle.
Caramelle French
Name given to a chalumeau player, derived from the old French chalemel, calamel or chalemie, which in turn were derived from the Latin word calamus meaning "reed". Italian variations of the surname are: Caramella, Caramelli, Caramello (diminutive: Caramellino) and Caramelo.
Cardamone Italian
Occupational name for a spicer.
Cardella Italian
Habitational name from a place called Cardella in Sicily.
Cardillo Italian
Cardillo is a surname of Sicilian origin, derived from the word cardilla, meaning ''goldfinch''.
Carducci Italian
From Riccarduccio, an affectionate form of the given name Riccardo. A famous bearer of this surname is Italian poet Giosuè Carducci (1835-1907), winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1906.
Carilli Italian
Patronymic form of Carillo.
Carillo Spanish, Italian
From a diminutive of the given name Caro.
Carino Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From the given name Carino.
Carlin French
From a pet form of Charles.
Carlin German
Habitational name from a place named Carlin in Germany.
Carlin Italian
Derived from a pet form of the given name Carlo.
Carlo Italian
From the given name Carlo.
Carlotti Italian
From the given name Carlo.
Carlsberg German
Variant spelling of Karlsberg or derived from the name of a municipality in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.
Carmine Italian (Rare), English (Rare)
Derived from the given name Carmine, which in turn was derived from the color of a vivid form of red.
Carner German, English
Americanized spelling of German Karner or Körner (see Koerner).... [more]
Carniglia Italian
Italian: perhaps from Sicilian cirniglia, cirnigliu, an occupational name for a grain sifter or winnower.
Carpenito Italian
This surname derives from a person who had worked as a "carpenter".
Carre French
French (Carré): from Old French carré "square", applied as a nickname for a squat, thickset man.
Carrel French
French: from Old French quar(r)el ‘bolt (for a crossbow)’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of crossbow bolts or a nickname for a short, stout man. The word also meant ‘paving slab’, and so it could also have been a metonymic occupational name for a street layer... [more]
Carrera Spanish, Italian
Spanish: topographic name for someone living by a main road, carrera ‘thoroughfare’, originally a road passable by vehicles as well as pedestrians (Late Latin carraria (via), a derivative of carrum ‘cart’), or a habitational name from any of various places named with this word.... [more]
Cartier French, Norman
Original Norman French form of Carter. A notable bearer was Breton-French explorer Jacques Cartier (1491-1557), who is known for discovering the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
Carucci Italian
Derived from Medieval Latin names Carutius or Caruccius or from the Italian term caruccio composed by caro meaning "dear" with the endearment suffix -uccio.
Carville French, Irish
As a French location name it comes from a settlement in Normandy. As an Irish name it derives from a word for "warrior".
Casa Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Means "house" in Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian.
Casagrande Italian
Habitational name for someone from any of the various locations called Casagrande or Casa Grande, derived from Italian casa meaning "house" and grande meaning "big, large".
Casals Catalan, French
Plural form of Casal.
Casanabe French
CASANABE is a French name meaning New house.
Casanova Catalan, Italian
Catalan and Italian: topographic name from Latin casa ‘house’ + nova ‘new’, or a habitational name from any of the many places named with these words.
Casapiccola Italian
Habitational name for someone from any of the various locations called Casapiccola or Casa Piccola, derived from Italian casa meaning "house" and piccola meaning "small".
Casari Italian
Smarano, Italy... [more]
Case French
Case. A hut, a hovel.
Casella Italian
From casa "house" (Latin casa "hut, cottage, cabin"), perhaps originally denoting the occupier of the most distinguished house in a village. Italian chef Cesare Casella (1960 - ) is one such bearer of this name.
Cassata Italian
Derived from the Italian word cassata, denoting a sweet cake made with cheese and candied fruit.
Cassatt French
Origin uncertain. This is not known as a surname in Britain. It may be an Americanized form of a French name such as Casault.
Casse French
Means "oak" in Gallo-Roman
Cassel English, French, German
A surname derived from the Latin military term castellum "watchtower, fort". A variant spelling of the word castle. Denoted someone hailing from the commune of Cassel in the Nord départment in northern France or the city of Kassel (spelled Cassel until 1928) in Germany... [more]
Cassiano Italian
From the given name Cassiano.
Cassio Italian
From the given name Cassio.
Castaignède French
Stéphane Castaignède is a French rugby player and coach.... [more]
Castanati Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish Origins
Castellan Italian
This name is of Latin origin. It comes from "castellanus" meaning 'castellan, steward of a castle'.
Castellaneta Italian
Originated in an area of Italy, known as the Papal States.
Castelli Italki (Italian Jew), Semitic, Italian, Spanish
Italian patronymic or plural form of Castello. ... [more]
Castello Catalan, Italian
Catalan variant of Castell or from Italian castello meaning "castle".
Castiglia Italian
A Regional name for someone from Castile in Spain. Castile was an independent kingdom between the 10th and 15th centuries, it formed the largest power in the Iberian peninsula. The name derives from the many castles in the region.
Castiglione Italian
Habitational name for someone from any of various places called Castiglione, derived from Italian castiglione meaning "castle, fortress".
Castille French
Regional name for someone from Castile in central Spain (see Castilla).
Castillon French
means "castle"
Castrogiovanni Italian
Habitational name from Castrogiovanni, the name until 1927 of Enna in central Sicily.
Catanese Italian
One who came from Catania.
Catello Italian
From the given name Catello
Catena Italian
This surname means "chain" in Italian.
Catone Italian
Derived from the name of the Roman republican statesman Cato, used as a nickname.
Catrambone Italian
Unexplained.
Cattell Anglo-Saxon, French, Ancient Scandinavian
Originated in Scandinavia as a patronym of the first name Thurkettle, a derivative of the Olde Norse name Arnkell, which is composed of arn meaning "eagle" and ketil meaning "a helmet" or "a helmeted warrior" as well as "cauldron", but helmet is the more likely translation... [more]
Cava Italian, Catalan, Spanish, Portuguese
From cava ‘cave’, ‘cellar’ (from Latin cavea), hence a metonymic occupational name for someone employed in the wine cellars of a great house, a topographic name for someone who lived in or near a cave, or a habitational name from any of numerous places named with this word.
Cavagnaro Italian
Means "basket-weaver."
Cavalcanti Italian
Means "riding" in Italian. An occupational surname for people who worked with horses.
Cavalera Italian
A bearer of this name is Brazilian metal musician Max Cavalera, whose father was Italian.
Cavallini Italian
The surname comes from the words "cavallaro," which means a horse dealer; or from "cavalieri," meaning a horseman, rider or knight.
Cave Norman, French, English
A name of various possible origins. As a Norman French name Cave can mean "bald" from cauf or it can mean "worker in a wine cellar" or "one who dwelt in or near a cave". As an English name Cave refers to a Yorkshire river whose fast current inspired the name meaning "swift".
Caviezel Romansh
Swiss surname of unknown meaning. A notable bearer is American actor Jim Caviezel (1968-).