Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Butera Italian
Means “vineyard” or “grapevine” in Italian.
Butta Italian
Italian: from a short form of a compound name formed with butta- ‘throw’, as for example Buttacavoli.Italian: from an old German feminine personal name Butta.Italian: variant of Botta.
Buttacavoli Italian
Nickname composed of the elements butta "throw" + cavoli "cabbages".
Buttafuoco Italian
Nickname composed of the elements butta "throw" + fuoco "fire".
Butter English, German
1. English: nickname for someone with some fancied resemblance to a bittern, perhaps in the booming quality of the voice, from Middle English, Old French butor ‘bittern’ (a word of obscure etymology)... [more]
Buttermann German
An occupational name for a dairyman or seller of dairy produce. See Butter.
Büttner German
Occupational name for a cooper or barrel-maker, an agent derivative of Middle High German büte(n) "cask", "wine barrel". This name occurs chiefly in eastern German-speaking regions.
Buxbaum German, Jewish
Means "box tree" in German.
Buxtehude German, Low German
From the name of the town of Buxtehude in Lower Saxony, Germany. A famous bearer of this surname was the German-Danish Baroque composer and organist Dieterich Buxtehude (c. 1637-1707).
Buzelli Italian
Chris Buzelli is an illustrator.
Byers German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Bayers.
Caan Scottish, German, Jewish
Altered spelling of Jewish Cohen, or probably denoted a person from the city of Aberdeen in Scotland. Famous bearers of this surname include American actor James Caan (1940-2022), as well as his son Scott Caan (1976-), also a noted actor.
Cabalzar Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Balzer.
Cabaniss French
Variant spelling of Cabanis, a habitational name from any of various places in Gard named Cabanis, from Late Latin capannis ‘at the huts’, ablative plural of capanna 'hut'... [more]
Cabboi Italian
Probably from Sardinian caboi "capon", a gelded cockerel, perhaps a nickname for a cowardly person.
Cabell Catalan, English, German
As a Catalan name, a nickname for "bald" from the Spanish word cabello. The English name, found primarily in Norfolk and Devon, is occupational for a "maker or seller of nautical rope" that comes from a Norman French word... [more]
Cabernard Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Bernard.
Cabibbo Italian
Ultimately from the Arabic given name Habib, meaning "beloved, darling".
Cabrel Occitan, Friulian, French, Venetian
From the Latin Capralis, meaning ‘a place full of goats’.
Cabrin Romansh
Calque of Swiss German Böckli via its Latinization Caprinus.
Caccavale Italian
Possibly a combination of cacare "to shit" and vale "valley".
Cacciatore Italian
Derived from Italian cacciatore meaning "hunter, huntsman", ultimately derived from cacciare meaning "to hunt".
Cacioppo Italian, Sicilian
Derived from Sicilian cacioppu meaning "dried tree trunk", presumably applied as a nickname for someone with wizened skin, or from caciopu meaning "short-sighted" (derived from Greek kakiopes, literally meaning "having bad eyes").
Cadalbert Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the German given name Adalbert.
Cadeddu Italian
From Sardinian cadeddu "puppy, whelp", ultimately from Latin catellus.
Caderas Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and dera "free area".
Caderousse French, Literature
A character in the classic novel The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. In the novel, Caderousse is a tailor and inkeeper who aids in the arrest of Dantès.
Cadetg Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Benedetg.
Cadieli Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Gieli.
Cadillac French
From the name of a city in France, of origin I am not sure of (anyone who knows the name's etymology edit this). This is most notably the name of the car company of the same name, named after Detroit, Michigan founder Antoine de la Mothe, Sieur de Cadillac.
Cadisch Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family", in combination with Disch.
Cadonau Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Donatus.
Cadoret French, Breton
From an old Breton given name Catuuoret meaning "protector in combat".
Caduff Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Duff, itself a diminutive of Rudolf.
Cadurisch Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and Durisch.
Cadusch Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Dusch.
Cadutsch Romansh (Archaic)
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and Dutsch.
Caesar German (Latinized)
Humanistic retranslation of Kaiser into Latin.
Caflisch Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family", in combination with Flisch.
Cagianut Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and a diminutive of the given name Gian.
Cagienard Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Gienard.
Cahannes Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the German given name Hannes.
Cahans Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Hans.
Cahenzli Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the German given name Hänsli.
Caillou French
Means "pebble" in French. Perhaps a nickname for a bald person.
Caine French, English
Originally from a French derogatory nickname for someone with a bad temper.
Cairo Italian
One who came from Cairo.
Cajacob Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Jacob.
Cajochen Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the German given name Jochen.
Cajöri Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Jöri.
Calafiore Italian, Sicilian
altered form of Calaciura from the Greek name Kalokiourēs a variant of Kalokyrēs Kalokyrios meaning "good man".
Calamari Italian
From Latin calamarius "relating to a writing reed, ink pen", a name for a scribe, or perhaps a fisherman from the Italian descendant calamaro "squid, calamari".
Calandra Italian
from calandra "skylark" (from Latin calandra) probably a nickname for someone with a fine singing voice.
Calasso Italian
Possibly from the given name Galasso, or from the dialectical word cala "cove, inlet, creek".
Calcaterra Italian
Nickname from calcare meaning "to tread", "to stamp" + terra meaning "land", "earth", "ground", probably denoting a short person, someone who walked close to the ground, or an energetic walker.
Calderone Italian
From the Latin word Caldaria "cauldron". Given to someone who worked as a tinker or tinsmith. Italian cognitive of Calderón.
Calger Romansh
Derived from Romansh chalger "cobbler; shoemaker".
Caliesch Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Aliesch.
Caliezi Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Gliezi.
Caligiuri Italian
Comes from the Greek words "kalos" meaning "beautiful" and "gheros" meaning "elderly," and was often given to children in the hopes that they would retain their beauty in their old age.
Calixte French
From the given name Calixte
Calla Italian
Variant of Cala or Catllà.
Calliari Italian (Latinized, Archaic)
This is an Italian surname, in the north of Italy. Calliari is the result of the deformation of the graphically Calligari, where you can clearly see excision of the letter or character D, which is located in the middle of the surname... [more]
Calogero Italian
From the given name Calogero.
Calonder Romansh
Either derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Leonhard or from the name of the mountain Calanda.
Calörtscher Romansh
Derived from the place name Calörtsch, a village in the Swiss canton of Graubünden.
Caluori Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and a contraction of the given names Gallus and Uori.
Caluzi Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Luzi.
Calzaghe Sardinian, Italian
From Italian meaning "breeches".
Camartin Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Martin.
Camastral Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and mastral, a word denoting an Ammann (see Ammann).
Camathias Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Mathias.
Cambareri Italian
Variant of Cammareri, an occupational name from Sicilian cammareri meaning "servant".
Cambria Italian
Denoted to someone from Cambria, Sicily, possibly of Arabic origin.
Camen Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Men.
Camenisch Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and Menisch, itself derived from the given name Dumeni.
Camerano Italian
From the name of the town of Camerano near the city of Ancona in Marche, Italy.
Camerlengo Italian
From Italian camerlengo "chamberlain".
Camichel Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Michael.
Camilleri Maltese, Italian
Derived from Italian cammelliere meaning "camel driver".
Camillo Italian
From the given name Camillo.
Caminada Romansh
Derived from Late Latin caminata, denoting a room provided with a fireplace.
Camiu Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and a short form of the given name Barclamiu.
Cammarata Italian
Habitational name from any of various places in Sicily named Cammarata, all derived from Greek καμάρα (kamara) meaning "vault".
Cammareri Sicilian, Italian
Means "servant, waiter" in Sicilian.
Camoranesi Italian
Originally indicated a person from Camerano, a small town near the city of Ancona in central Italy. A famous bearer of this name is the Argentine-born Italian former soccer player Mauro Camoranesi (1976-).
Campagna Italian
Name for someone originally from any of various locations named Campagna, all derived from Latin Campania, itself from campus meaning "field".
Campanano Italian
Southern Italian:... [more]
Campion Norman, French
English (of Norman origin) and French: status name for a professional champion (see Champion, Kemp), from the Norman French form campion.
Camus French
Means "flat-nosed" in French.
Canada French, English
It derives from the Middle English "cane", a development of the Old French "cane", meaning cane, reed.
Cancrini Italian
Diminutive of Cancro.
Cancro Italian
Derived from Italian cancro "cancer". Probably an occupational name for a person who catches, cooks, sells crabs.
Candela Spanish, Italian, Sicilian, Catalan
Either an occupational name for a chandler (a candle maker or candle seller) or a nickname for a tall thin person, derived from candela meaning "candle" (from Latin candela).
Candeloro Italian
Italian cognate of Candelario.
Candido Italian
From the given name Candido.
Candreia Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Andreia.
Canella Italian
Italian regional surname denoting someone who lived by a canal. From the Italian canale 'canal', from the Latin canalis meaning "canal; conduit; groove; funnel; or ditch". Alternatively, it may come the genus name of wild cinnamon, a diminutive of the Latin canna "reed, cane".
Cannarsa Italian
Possibly means "dry throat", a joking nickname for someone who drinks too much.
Cannavaro Italian
Probably from a nickname used to refer to rope makers or hemp growers. This surname is most famously borne by brothers Fabio (1973–) and Paolo Cannavaro (1981–), former football players.
Cannella Italian
Derived from the word "Cinnamon" in Italian meaning someone who was a baker and or made cinnamon.
Canosa Italian
It derives from the toponym Canosa di puglia.
Canova Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and nova, the feminine form of the adjective nov "new".
Canschutti Romansh (Archaic)
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Anschutta.
Cantagallo Italian
From the name of a town, or possibly a nickname meaning "singing rooster".
Cantalupi Italian
Denoting a person from Cantalupo, the name of several towns and counties near wooded areas where wolves could be heard. From Italian canta "singing" and lupo "wolf". ... [more]
Canteloup French
Name of several places in France. The surname means "Song of the Wolf" from canta and loup as in "place where the wolves howl".
Cantieni Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Antieni.
Cantin French
A territorial division or district.
Cantone Italian
Habitational name for someone from any of various locations named Cantone, derived from Italian cantone meaning "canton, corner".
Cantore Italian
From cantore "cantor, singer", itself from Latin canto "sing; enchant, call forth by charms".
Canu Italian
From Sardinian canu "gray-haired, hoary-haired". Compare Canuto.
Canuto Italian, Filipino, Spanish
From an Italian nickname derived from canuto meaning "white-haired".
Canzio Italian
From the given name Canzio
Capadrutt Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Padrutt.
Capaldo Italian
Probably a diminutive of Italian capo meaning "head", perhaps used as a nickname for a stubborn or hard-headed person.
Capaul Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Paul.
Cape French, English (British)
French and English: metonymic occupational name for a maker of capes and cloaks, or perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore a cloak or cape, from Middle English and Old Norman French cape ‘cape’, ‘cloak’, ‘hooded cloak’ (in French also ‘hood’ or ‘hat’), from Late Latin cappa, capa, probably a derivative of caput ‘head’ (see Capp)... [more]
Capecchi Italian
Probably from Old Italian capecchio, either denoting a type of cheap batting and, by extension, upholsterers, who worked with it, or as a nickname for a person with bristly hair or beard.... [more]
Capeder Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Peder.
Caplazi Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Plazi.
Capol Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Pol.
Capone Italian
Augmentative of Italian capo meaning "head", used as a nickname for a big-headed or arrogant person.
Caporale Italian, Sicilian
From caporale, meaning "corporal"
Cappellano Italian
From cappellano "chaplain".
Capra Italian
From the Latin word capra meaning "nanny goat." This was a name originally borne by shepherds / goat herders.
Capraro Italian
Occupational name for a goatherd, derived from Italian capra meaning "goat".
Capri Italian
habitational name for someone from Capri the island in the Bay of Naples.
Capriati Italian
From the name of the province in Campania Italy named "Capriati a Volturno".
Capricorne French
Derived from the Latin word (Capricornus) meaning "horned like a goat". Probably a nickname for an ambitious person.
Caprio Italian
from Latin caprae ‘goats’ or possibly from Greek kapros "(wild) boar" and so a metonymic occupational name for a goatherd or swineherd or a nickname for someone thought to resemble a goat or boar.
Capua Italian
Capua is a city and comune in the province of Caserta, Campania, southern Italy, situated 25 km (16 mi) north of Naples on the northeastern edge of the Campanian plain. Ancient Capua was situated where Santa Maria Capua Vetere is now.... [more]
Caputo Italian
Derived from Latin caput meaning "head", used as a nickname for a big-headed or stubborn person.
Carabelli Italian
Common surname in the Lombardy region of Italy.
Caracciolo Italian
Famous bearer of this surname is Canadian-Italian singer Alessia Caracciolo (1996-).
Caradine English, German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of German Gardein, itself a Germanized spelling of French Jardin. It could also denote someone from the village and civil parish of Carden in Cheshire, England.
Carafa Italian
It could derive from toponyms such as Caraffa del Bianco in the province of Reggio Calabria or Caraffa in the province of Catanzaro.... [more]
Caramella Italian
Name given to a chalumeau player. Italian version of the French surname Caramelle.
Caramelle French
Name given to a chalumeau player, derived from the old French chalemel, calamel or chalemie, which in turn were derived from the Latin word calamus meaning "reed". Italian variations of the surname are: Caramella, Caramelli, Caramello (diminutive: Caramellino) and Caramelo.
Caratsch Romansh
Derived from Romansh cuirass "armor".
Carbonaro Italian
From carbonaro "charcoal burner".
Cardamone Italian
Occupational name for a spicer.
Cardella Italian
Habitational name from a place called Cardella in Sicily.
Cardelli Italian
Diminutive form of Cardello.
Cardellini Italian
From a diminutive of Cardelli. A famous bearer of this surname is the American actress Linda Cardellini (1975-).
Cardello Italian
Variant of Cardillo or a diminutive of Cardo.
Cardillo Italian
Cardillo is a surname of Sicilian origin, derived from the word cardilla, meaning ''goldfinch''.
Cardinal English, French
from Middle English, Old French cardinal "cardinal", a church dignitary (Latin cardinalis, originally an adjective meaning "crucial")... [more]
Cardinale Italian, Italian (Tuscan), French, English
Italian cognate of Cardinal, as well as an English and French variant. A known bearer is the Italian actress Claudia Cardinale (1938-).
Cardo Spanish, Italian
From cardo "thistle, cardoon" (from Latin carduus) either a topographic or occupational name for using wool carder thistles, or from the given name Cardo a short form of given names Accardo, Biancardo, or Riccardo.
Cardon French
from the name of several places in southern France called (Le) Cardon. Or from Old Norman French cardon "thistle" (a diminutive of carde from Latin carduus) hence a topographic name for someone who lived on land overgrown with thistles an occupational name for someone who carded wool (originally a process carried out with thistles and teasels) or perhaps a nickname for a prickly and unapproachable person... [more]
Cardone Italian, Sicilian
From Sicilian carduni "thistle, teasel, cardoon" possibly a topographic name but also could mean "rough, uncouth, stingy, or miserly".
Carducci Italian
From Riccarduccio, an affectionate form of the given name Riccardo. A famous bearer of this surname is Italian poet Giosuè Carducci (1835-1907), winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1906.
Carême French
Means "lent" in French.
Carganico Italian
Possibly from cargar, an Italic descendent of Latin carrico "to load", indicating someone who carried or loaded items for transport for a living.
Carilli Italian
Patronymic form of Carillo.
Carillo Spanish, Italian
From a diminutive of the given name Caro.
Carino Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From the given name Carino.
Carioto Italian
It means “deer” and originates from Italy the surname is considerably rare the total number is still unknown
Carisch Romansh
Derived from Romansh casa "house" and, by extension, "household, family" and the given name Risch.
Carlin French
From a pet form of Charles.
Carlin German
Habitational name from a place named Carlin in Germany.
Carlin Italian
Derived from a pet form of the given name Carlo.
Carlo Italian
From the given name Carlo.
Carlotti Italian
From the given name Carlo.
Carlsberg German
Variant spelling of Karlsberg or derived from the name of a municipality in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.
Carmine Italian (Rare), English (Rare)
Derived from the given name Carmine, which in turn was derived from the color of a vivid form of red.
Carner German, English
Americanized spelling of German Karner or Körner (see Koerner).... [more]
Carniglia Italian
Derived from the Latin word “carnem”, meaning “flesh”, and likely referred to a person who worked with meat or was a butcher. The surname may have also been adopted as a nickname for someone who was particularly robust or fleshy.
Carosella Italian
From carosello "carousel, merry-go-round", possibly a nickname for a farmer, as a carousel was an allotment of grain collected by farmers. Also a type of jousting tournament.
Caroti Italian
From Italian carota "carrot", probably referring to the bearer's hair colour.
Carpenito Italian
This surname derives from a person who had worked as a "carpenter".
Carpentieri Italian
Italian cognate of Carpenter, from carpentiere "carpenter".
Carradine English, German (Anglicized)
Variant spelling of Caradine. This name is borne by members of the Carradine family of actors, notably the American actor John Carradine (1906-1988).
Carre French
French (Carré): from Old French carré "square", applied as a nickname for a squat, thickset man.
Carrel French
French: from Old French quar(r)el ‘bolt (for a crossbow)’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker of crossbow bolts or a nickname for a short, stout man. The word also meant ‘paving slab’, and so it could also have been a metonymic occupational name for a street layer... [more]
Carrera Spanish, Italian
Spanish: topographic name for someone living by a main road, carrera ‘thoroughfare’, originally a road passable by vehicles as well as pedestrians (Late Latin carraria (via), a derivative of carrum ‘cart’), or a habitational name from any of various places named with this word.... [more]
Carrier French
From carrier, "quarrier, someone who works in a quarry". cf Carrara.
Carrogu Italian
Possibly from Sardinian carroga "crow, carrion crow".
Carsin French
Of debated origin and meaning; theories include a contracted form of Caorsin.
Cartier French, Norman
Original Norman French form of Carter. A notable bearer was Breton-French explorer Jacques Cartier (1491-1557), who is known for discovering the Gulf of St. Lawrence.