Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Ceddia Italian (Modern)
Great grandparent from San Marco in Lamis, Province of Foggia, Apulia region of Italy.
Célestin French
From the given name Célestin.
Celidonio Italian
my maiden name
Celino Italian, Spanish
From the given name Celino
Celio Italian, Spanish
From the given name Celio
Cellier French
Means "storeroom" in French.
Celso Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From the given name Celso
Cembrola Italian
My family is from St. Angelo, de Oliva, Naples, Italy
Centofante Italian
Variant form of Centofanti.
Centofanti Italian
Means "a hundred soldiers on foot" in Italian, derived from Italian cento meaning "(a) hundred" and Italian fanti, which is the plural form of fante meaning "soldier, infantryman"... [more]
Cera Spanish, Italian, Catalan, Sicilian
Metonymic occupational name for a wax seller, derived from Latin cera meaning "wax".
Cerasuolo Italian
Means "cherry-colored." Appears as a word in many Italian dictionaries, but may have origins in the Greek period of Naples, where it seems to have originated. There are at least two villages found with the name, the most notable being near Monte Cassino, where many Japanese-American soldiers won Medals of Honor or other awards for heroism during WW II... [more]
Cerfbeer French, Jewish
Combination of the Medieval French and Jewish given names Cerf and Beer.
Cerva Portuguese, Italian
"Cerva" means deer.
Césaire French, Haitian Creole
From the given name Césaire. A notable bearer was Aimé Césaire (1913-2008), a Martiniquais politician and writer.
Chabot French
From chabot ‘bull-head’, a species of fish with a large head, hence a nickname for someone with a big head and a small body.
Chalamet French
Nickname for someone who played the reed or an occupational name for seller of torches, from a regional form of Old French chalemel meaning "reed" or "blowtorch". A notable bearer is American actor Timothée Chalamet (1995-).
Challoner French, Welsh
Derived from a town in France of the same name. This family derive their origin from Macloy Crum, of the line of chiefs in Wales, who resided several years in Challoner.
Chambon French
A very popular last name in France.
Champagne French
regional name for someone from Champagne, named in Latin as Campania (from campus 'plain', 'flat land'). This is also the name of various villages in France, and in some cases the family name may derive from one of these.
Champin French
It is the french form of Chapman
Champlain French
Name given to those who live in or around fields. Known barrer of the name is Samuel de Champlain who founded Quebec, Canada and after whom the lake is named.
Chapdelaine French
Compound name derived from Old French chape meaning "hooded cloak, cape, hat" and de laine meaning "of wool", probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for a maker of such apparel, or as a nickname for someone who wore a distinctive cloak or hat.
Chapel French
Occupational name for a maker of cloaks or a nickname for a person who wore a distinctive cloak, from a diminutive of Old French chape meaning "cape, cloak".
Chapin French, Spanish
From a reduced form of French eschapin or Spanish chapín, a term for a light (woman's) shoe; perhaps a nickname for someone who habitually wore this type of footwear or possibly a metonymic occupational name for a shoemaker.
Chardin French
Meaning uncertain, possibly of Norman origin.
Chariot French
Means "cart" in French. Perhaps an occupational name for a cartwright or a carter.
Charisse French
Of unknown meaning. It was used as a given name in honour of American actress and dancer Cyd Charisse (1921-2008).
Charlotte French, English
From the feminine given name Charlotte.
Charmian English, French
from the given name Charmian
Charretier French
French form of Carter.
Charrue French
French for "cartwright."
Chase French
Topographic name for someone who lived in or by a house, probably the occupier of the most distinguished house in the village, from a southern derivative of Latin casa "hut, cottage, cabin".
Chasseur French
From French meaning "hunter".
Chastang French
Derived from Olde French castanh meaning "chestnut". Possibly a location or occupation name.
Chaudron French
From french meaning "cauldron".
Chaux French
French / Switzerland.... [more]
Chell French
Probably a respelling of the French habitational name Challe, from any of the various places so named from Late Latin cala ‘rock shelter’.
Chene French
Means "oak" in French. Perhaps it's named for someone who lived by an oak tree.
Chénier French
French surname which indicated one who lived in an oak wood or near a conspicuous oak tree, derived from Old French chesne "oak" (Late Latin caxinus). In some cases it may be from a Louisiana dialectical term referring to "an area of shrub oak growing in sandy soil" (i.e., "beach ridge, usually composed of sand-sized material resting on clay or mud... [more]
Chiara Italian
Chiara meaning clear
Chiaramonte Italian
comes from the italian word chiara meaning "clear" and the the word monte meaning "mountain", possibly denoting someone who lived by clear mountians, hills, etc.
Chiavetta Italian
From Italian "chiavetta", deriving from chiave meaning key.
Chiere French (Rare)
Possibly derived from the Old French chiere, from chier, meaning "dear, dearest".
Chiesa Italian
Means "church" in Italian, originally a topographic name for someone who lived near a church, a habitational name from any of various places named Chiesa or perhaps an occupational name for someone who worked in a church.
Chirico Italian
Surname of Italian surrealist artist, Giorgio de Chirico
Chopin French
French and English: nickname for a heavy drinker, from Old French chopine, a large liquid measure (from Middle Low German schopen "ladle"). The derived Old French verb chopiner has the sense 'to tipple’, ‘to drink to excess’... [more]
Choquette French
Altered spelling of French Choquet, a Picard form of Old French soquet, which was the term for a tax on wines and foodstuffs, hence a metonymic occupational name for a collector of such taxes.
Christ German
From the Latin personal name Christus "Christ" (see Christian). The name Christ (Latin Christus) is from Greek Khristos, a derivative of khriein "to anoint", a calque of Hebrew mashiach "Messiah", which likewise means literally "the anointed".
Christl German
Pet form of the given name Christian.
Chrysanthe French
From the Greek Χρύσανθος (Chrysanthos), meaning "golden flower". This surname was first given to children found on October 25, the feast day of Saint Chrysanthos.
Chrysler German, Jewish
From a German name referring to spinning or related to a Yiddish word, krayzl meaning "spinning top." The name can refer to a potter who spun a wheel to make utensils or to a person with curly hair or someone known for being continually active... [more]
Ciabattino Italian
Italian for "cobbler."
Cianci Italian
The surname Cianci is a name for a person of small financial means. The surname Cianfari is derived from the Italian words cianfrone and cianferone, which referred to a type of medieval coin.
Cicero Italian
From the Italian cicero "pea," "chickpea," or "lentil."
Cifrino Italian
Uncommon name originating in Italy. Legend says that it was used for the offspring of a king and one of his maids. Meaning is most likely something like "little nothing".
Cimarosa Italian
from "Cima" Top, and "Rosa" A rose or the Color Pink. A famous Bearer of this surname is the Italian composer Domenico Cimarosa(1749-1801).
Ciminelli Italian
Diminutive of Cimino
Ciminello Italian
Diminutive of Cimino
Cimino Italian
Occupational name for a spice dealer, from cimino "cumin", Sicilian ciminu.
Cinardo Italian
From Italy
Ciocca Italian
The origin has to do with hair
Ciriaco Italian, Spanish
From the given name Ciriaco.
Cirillo Italian
From the given name Cirillo.
Cirino Italian, Spanish
From the given name Cirino.
Ciro Italian, Spanish
From the given name Ciro.
Claassen German
The name Claassen means "son of Klaus." It's primarily German, but it's also Dutch and Danish.
Clair French
From the given name Clair.
Clapp German
Variant of Klapp.
Claude French
From the first name Claude.
Claudel French
From the given name Claudel.
Claudio Italian, Spanish
From the given name Claudio
Clavel French
Metonymic occupational name for a nail maker, ultimately from Latin clavellus "nail", but in some cases possibly from the same word in the sense "smallpox, rash". A fictional bearer is Miss Clavel, a nun and teacher in Ludwig Bemelmans's 'Madeline' series of children's books (introduced in 1939).
Clavell French
The first documented records of the surname Clavell appear in Catalunya between 1291 and 1327. The word clavell traces back to the Indo-European words "kleu", later "klawo" meaning a metal tool. In Latin "clavus", it eventually became a surname "Clavell".
Clein German
Variant of Klein.
Clemenceau French
Probably derived from the French given name Clément. A famous bearer was Georges Clemenceau (1841-1929), the 54th Prime Minister of France during the First World War.
Cleto Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From the given name Cleto.
Cloud French
From the Germanic personal name Hlodald, composed of the elements hlod "famous, clear" and wald "rule", which was borne by a saint and bishop of the 6th century.
Coach French
Possibly an altered spelling of French Coache, from the Norman and Picard term for a damson, probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for a grower or seller of plums.
Coard German
Derived from the first name Konrad.
Cocker English, German (Anglicized)
Originally a nickname for a bellicose person, from Middle English cock "to fight". Also an anglicized form of Köcher.
Cocuzza Italian
From cocuzza "gourd", "pumpkin", applied either as an occupational name for a grower or seller of gourds or a nickname for a rotund individual.
Coers German, Dutch
Derived from the given name Konrad
Coit Medieval Welsh, French, English
The surname Coit was first found in Carnarvonshire, a former country in Northwest Wales, anciently part of the Kingdom of Gwynedd, and currently is divided between the unitary authorities of Gwynedd and Conwy, where they held a family seat... [more]
Colella Italian
diminutive of personal name Cola, a short form of Nicola, an Italian equivalent of Nicholas... [more]
Coles English, Scottish, Irish, German (Anglicized), English (American)
English: from a Middle English pet form of Nicholas.... [more]
Collabrusco Italian
From the region Calabria in southern Italy; widely moved to US.
Collard English, French
English and French: from the personal name Coll + the pejorative suffix -ard.
Collet French
From a pet form of Colle.
Collines French
French for "hillbanks".
Colo Italian
From the personal name Colo, a short form of Nicolo (see Nicholas). (Colò) nickname from medieval Greek kolos ‘lame’, classical Greek kylos.
Cologne French
Habitational name from a place in France called Cologne.
Comeau French, French (Acadian), Louisiana Creole
French: from a Gascon diminutive of Combe.
Comim Italian
It mans waiter in italian.
Commander Anglo-Saxon, French
From Middle English comander, comandor and comandour and also from Old French comandeor, all meaning "commander", "leader" or "ruler". The first recorded use of the name is through a family seat held in Somerset.
Condom French
Regional name for someone who lives in a French province named "Condom".
Coniglio Italian
Means rabbit in Italian from Latin "cuniculus" given to someone who hunted rabbits.
Conrad German
Americanized spelling of Konrad.
Conradi German, Danish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Derived from a patronymic from the given name Konrad.
Consalvo Italian
From the given name Consalvo.
Consiglio Italian
Meaning "counselor" or "one who gives good advice".
Constance English, French
From the given name Constance
Constant French, Dutch, English
From the given name Constant or from the word "constant"
Contardo Italian, Spanish
From the given name Contardo.
Conte Italian
Means "count (a title of nobility)" in Italian.
Contino Italian
Diminutive of Italian Conte or Conti.
Coogler German (Americanized)
Americanized form of Kugler.
Coppenhaver German
Americanized spelling, probably originally spelled Kopenhaver or Koppenhaver. Means "owner of a hill".
Corbin English, French
Derived from French corbeau meaning "raven," originally denoting a person who had dark hair.
Cordasco Italian
From the given name Corda or Cordio (a short form of Accord(i)o, literally "agreement") + the suffix -asco denoting kinship.
Corday French
Either from the French word corde meaning "cord/rope/string", or from the Latin word cor meaning "heart." This was the surname of Charlotte Corday, the assassin who killed Jacobin leader Jean-Paul Marat during the French revolution.
Corder French (Anglicized, Archaic), English (American)
Linked to both English, French and Spanish origin. Cordier, Cordero, Corder- one who makes cord. Can refer to both the act of making cords (rope), cores of fire wood, or actual location names.... [more]
Cordonnier French
An occupational surname for a cordwainer or shoemaker, and derived from Old French cordouanier, literally meaning "cobbler".
Cords German
Derived from the first name Konrad.
Core English (American), German (Anglicized)
Core is the anglicized form of the German surname Kohr, also spelled Kürr. Alternately, it is an English name of Flemish origin.
Corio Italian
Variant of Coiro.
Corll German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of Karl.
Cormier French
French topographic name for someone who lived near a sorb or service tree, Old French cormier (from corme, the name of the fruit for which the tree was cultivated, apparently of Gaulish origin).
Cornacchia Italian
Nickname meaning "crow, jackdaw" in Italian, applied to someone who was talkative or thought to resemble a crow or jackdaw in some other way.
Corradino Italian
From the given name Corradino.
Corrado Italian
From the personal name Corrado.
Corrao Italian
Reduced form Corrado.
Corsaut French
Possibly a variant of Cossart.
Corsi Italian
Patronymic or plural form of CORSO.
Corso Italian, English (American), Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Either derived from the given name Bonaccorso or taken from Italian and Spanish corso, denoting someone who lived in Corsica.
Corte Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Portuguese
From corte ‘court', applied as an occupational name for someone who worked at a manorial court or a topographic name for someone who lived in or by one.
Corvino Italian, Spanish
From the given name Corvino
Corvo Italian, Portuguese
From the given name Corvo
Cosca Italian
Topographic name from the Calabrian dialect word c(u)oscu "oak", also "wood".
Cosco Italian
Masculinized form of Cosca.
Cosmo Italian
From the given name Cosmo.
Cossart English, French
From French, referring to "a dealer of horses" (related to the English word "courser"). This surname was brought to England in the wake of the Norman Conquest of 1066, and became one of the many Anglo-Norman words that made up Middle English.
Cossiga Italian, Sardinian
Sardinian translation of the place name Corsica. A famous bearer of the name is Francesco Cossiga (1928-2010), Italian politician who served as Prime Minister (1979-1980) and as President (1985-1992).
Costabile Italian
Italian name.... [more]
Costantino Italian
From the given name Costantino
Cotoni Italian
means "cottons" in Italian
Cotton English, French
English: habitational name from any of numerous places named from Old English cotum (dative plural of cot) ‘at the cottages or huts’ (or sometimes possibly from a Middle English plural, coten)... [more]
Cottrant French
Meaning unknown.
Cottrell English, French
First found in Derbyshire where the family "Cottrell" held a family seat and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege lord for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings, 1066CE... [more]
Courcel French
Variant of Courcelles.... [more]
Courcelles French
The name of several places in France, Belgium and Canada. In Middle French the word courcelle was used to describe a "small court" or a "small garden". The word is derived from the medieval Gallo-Romance and Gallo-Italian word corticella, which was formed from the Latin word cohors, meaning "court" or "enclosure", and the diminutive –icella.... [more]
Court English, French, Irish
A topographic name from Middle English, Old French court(e) and curt, meaning ‘court’. This word was used primarily with reference to the residence of the lord of a manor, and the surname is usually an occupational name for someone employed at a manorial court.... [more]
Courtier French, Medieval French, Medieval English
French: habitational name from places called Courtier (Seine-et-Marne, Aples-de-Haute-Provence), Courtié (Tarn), or Courtière (Loir-et-Cher). ... [more]
Courville French
Derived from either of two communes in the departments of Marne and Eure-et-Loir in France. It is named with Latin curba villa, denoting a settlement in the curve of a road.
Cousins French
"Relative" in Old French.
Covert English, French
The surname is probably topographical, for someone who either lived by a sheltered bay, or more likely an area sheltered by trees. The formation is similar to couvert, meaning a wood or covert, and originally from the Latin "cooperio", to cover... [more]
Cozzolino Italian
Diminutive of Cozzo.
Crabb English, Scottish, German, Dutch, Danish
English and Scottish, from Middle English crabbe, Old English crabba ‘crab’ (the crustacean), a nickname for someone with a peculiar gait. English and Scottish from Middle English crabbe ‘crabapple (tree)’ (probably of Old Norse origin), hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a crabapple tree... [more]
Cramer German, English
Variant of German surname Krämer.
Crauwels Flemish, Dutch, German
Derrives from the Middle Dutch (medieval Dutch) word "crauwel" and Middle High German word "kröuwel" which means "flesh hook", "curved fork" or "trident". The word is no longer used. The first person with this name was most likely a farmer, butcher or a person that runned an inn or a hostel that was named after this tool.
Crema Italian, German
From the italian city "Crema"
Crepeau French
From the Latin word, crispus, meaning "curly hair".
Crescenzo Italian
From the given name Crescenzo
Cress German, Jewish, Belarusian
A variant of the German surname Kress. From the Middle High German "kresse" meaning "gudgeon" (a type of fish) or the Old High German "krassig", meaning "greedy". Can also be from an altered form of the names Erasmus or Christian, or the Latin spelling of the Cyrillic "КРЕСС".
Crete French
French (adjectival form Crété ‘crested’): nickname for an arrogant individual, from Old French creste ‘crest (of a hill)’ (Late Latin crista), used with reference to the comb of a rooster... [more]
Crider German
Americanized spelling of German Kreider.
Crispin English, French
From the Middle English, Old French personal name Crispin.
Cristiano Italian
From the given name Cristiano.
Cristoforo Italian
From the given name Cristoforo.
Crivelli Italian
From the Italian crivello, which is derived from the Latin cribrum, meaning "sieve," (a mesh food strainer); likely an occupational name for a maker or user of sieves.
Crownover German (Anglicized)
Americanised spelling of German Kronauer, denoting someone from Kronau, a town near Heidelberg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It could also be an Americanised form of Kronhöfer (a variant of Grünhofer), a habitational name for someone from a lost place called Grünhof, derived from Middle High German gruene meaning "green" or kranech meaning "crane" and hof meaning "farmstead".
Crozier English, French
English and French occupational name for one who carried a cross or a bishop’s crook in ecclesiastical processions, from Middle English, Old French croisier.
Crumbaugh German (Anglicized), German (Swiss, Anglicized)
Americanised form of German Krumbach or Swiss German Grumbach.
Crumrine German (Anglicized)
Americanised spelling of Krumreihn.
Cuarto Italian
Italian:... [more]
Cucolo Italian, Austrian, Judeo-Italian
Used in Austria, and in southern regions of Italy.
Cugini Italian (Rare)
Means "cousins" in Italian.
Culvért French, English, Irish
English version of the Old French, Culvere. Means Peaceful and Mildest of tempers.
Cuomo Italian
Probably from a shortened form of Cuosëmo, a Neapolitan variant of the Italian male personal name Cosimo.
Curcio Italian
This name derives from Latin “curtĭus”, which in turn derives from the Latin “curtus” meaning “shortened, short, mutilated, broken, incomplete”.
Curie French
Occupational name for a farm hand, from Old French éscuerie "stable".
Cursio Italian
Variant of the italian surname Curcio
Custer German (Anglicized)
Anglicization of the German surname Köster or Küster, literally "sexton". A famous bearer was George Custer (1839-1876), the American cavalry general. General Custer and his army were defeated and killed by Sioux and Cheyenne forces under Sitting Bull in the Battle of Little Bighorn (1876; also known colloquially as Custer's Last Stand).
Cypher German (Anglicized, Rare)
Fanciful Americanized spelling of German Seifer.
Cyprien French
From the given name Cyprien.
Cyr French
From the Latin personal name Quiricus or Cyricus, Greek Kyrikos or Kyriakos, ultimately from Greek kyrios 'lord', 'master'.
D'abbadie French, English, Occitan
Means "of the Abbey" from the Occitan abadia. Variants Abadia, Abbadie, Abadie, Abada, and Badia mean "Abbey".
D'abbeville French
Means "of Abbeville" Abbeville is a commune in France. Takes its name from Latin Abbatis Villa meaning "Abbot's Village".
D'abreo Italian
Origin is Italian
D'Addario Italian
From the given name Addario.
Dahlke German
Eastern German: from a pet form of the Slavic personal names Dalibor or Dalimir, which are both derived from dal- ‘present’, ‘gift’.