Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
DEMERS French
From French meaning "of the seas". A famous bearer of this surname was Modeste Demers, a bishop in 18th century Vancouver.
DEMESTRE French
It's an occupational word coming from Latin. It means "master". It is of French origin.
DE MICHELE Italian, French
An Italian and French patronymic surname, meaning "son of MICHELE (1)".
DENAUT French (Rare, ?)
Possibly a variant of Denault.
DENNINGER German
Habitational name for someone from Denning in Bavaria. Denning is related to Middle Low German denne meaning "wooded vale".
D'ENTRONE Italian
Italian conjugation, meaning "from within".
DEPAUL French
Son of Paul
DEPIETRI Italian
The distinguished surname Depietri can be traced back to the ancient and beautiful region of Piedmont. Although people were originally known only by a single name, it became necessary for people to adopt a second name to identify themselves as populations grew and travel became more frequent... [more]
DEPP German
Derived from Germanic depp which is a nickname for a joker (person who plays jokes on others). A notable bearer is Johnny Depp, an American actor.
DEPPE German
Variant spelling of DEPP.
DERCKSON Swiss
Meaning: "Powerful People"
DERHODES German
We think this is German or maybe French
DERKUM German
Unknown
DERNIER French
Means Last in French
DEROBOAM French
unknown possibly french, family has french origins
DEROSA Italian
Variation of de Rosa. Southern Italian metronymic from the female personal name ROSA, from rosa ‘rose’.
DERUNGS Swiss, Romansh
Romansh from Roman occupiers of Switzerland.
DE SALVO Italian
Meaning of "De" is "From", or "Of", so probably "From Salvo".
DESANGES French (Rare)
Means "from the angels", possibly connected to the French title of the Virgin Mary Notre Dame des Anges, meaning "Our Lady of the Angels". Bearers of this surname include Louis William Desanges (1822-1905), an English artist of French descent, and French historian Jehan Desanges (1929-).
DE SANTO Italian, Spanish
Mean “Son of SANTO”.
DESCATOIRE French
Alexandre Descatoire was a French sculptor (1874-1949)... [more]
DESCHAIN French, Literature
Of French origin. This is the last name of the character of the Gunslinger Roland in Stephen King’s The Dark Tower series.
DESCHENES French
"Chenes" is French for "oak tree". In French, "Des" means more than one. "Des"+ "Chenes"= Deschenes meaning "Many oak trees."
DESMARAIS French
Habitational name for someone from any of various places named with Old French mareis, maresc ‘marsh’, as for example Les Marets, in Seine-et-Marne, Centre, Nord, and Picardy.
DE SOYE French
Meaning "From Soye" in French.
DES ROCHES French
Either a topographic name for someone living among rocks or a habitational name from any of several places named with this word, meaning "from the rocks" in French.
D'ESTAING French
Derived from Estaing, a commune in the Aveyron department in southern France.
DE STEFANO Italian
Means "son of STEFANO".
D'ESTIENNE French
From the given name ESTIENNE, a Medieval French form of STEPHEN.
DEUTCH German (Rare), Jewish (Rare)
"German". Used as a last name for those who had none in the 17-18th century. Continues to today, albeit rarely.
DEUTSCHMANN German
Originally denoted a person from Germany.
DEVALL French, English
Devall (also DeVall) is a surname of Norman origin with both English and French ties.Its meaning is derived from French the town of Deville, Ardennes. It was first recorded in England in the Domesday Book.In France, the surname is derived from 'de Val' meaning 'of the valley.'
DEVEAUX French, Bahamian Creole
Means "of the valleys", derived from French val "valley".
DEVERAUX English, French
Variant spelling of DEVEREUX.
DEVILLE French
French surname meaning, 'The Village', from French De- 'the' and Ville- 'Village'.
DEVORE French
French: variant of De Var, a habitational name for someone from a place named Var, for example in Charente. Respelling of French Devors, a habitational name, with the preposition de, for someone from Vors in Aveyron.
DEXHEIMER German
From the German village Dexheim (south of Mainz).
DI CESARE Italian
Means "son of CESARE".
DI CICCO Italian
Patronymic from a pet form of the personal name Francesco, from Latin Franciscus. The "Di" in the surname means the family of Cicco so about 100 before you had this name, it would be only Cicco.
DICKERMAN English, German, Jewish
Possibly derived from Middle High German dic(ke) "strong, thick" and Mann "man, male, husband".
DICKTER German
From dichter, the German word for "poet".
DIDONATO Italian
Combination of the prefix Di and the name DONATO.
DIEBOLD German
Derived from the Germanic given name THEUDOBALD.
DIECKMANN German
"one who lives on a dike"
DIEFENBAKER German
Anglicized form of DIEFENBACH.
DIEHL German
From the given name Diel, Tiel, from Thilo, a diminutive of given names beginning with Diet-, as such as DIETRICH.
DIELMANN German (Modern)
It was once spelled as "Dielhmann" and sometimes with one "n". The meaning is unknown, but when I used Google's translator "dielh" means "the" and "mann" was "man".
DIERINGER German (Americanized)
Americanized form of German Thüringer, regional name for someone from Thuringia, This was also used as a medieval personal name. Americanized form of German Tieringer, habitational name for someone from Tieringen in Württemberg.
DIETERLIN German
From "Dieterlein", a diminuative of the given name DIETER
DIETMAR German
From the given name DIETMAR.
DIETZ German
From a short form of the personal name DIETRICH.
DIEULAFOY French
From Old French Dieu la foy meaning "God the faith". Famous bearers were the married couple of French archeologists Marcel Dieulafoy (1844-1920) and Jane Dieulafoy (1951-1916). A medical condition of the stomach causing gastric bleeding called "Dieulafoy's lesion" was named after Dr... [more]
DIFANO Italian
Rare Italian surname that comes from the city of Isola di Fano, Presaro e Urbino, Italy.
DI FRANCESCO Italian
Literally means "of Francis," and therefore may also mean "son of Francis."
DILABBIO Italian
A surname historically used in southern Italy, possibly derived from the Italian "dell avvio" meaning "of the beginning."
DILEO Italian
Southern Italian Surname.
DILLIE German
Probably an altered spelling of Dilley or Dilly or possibly of German Dillier. A variant of Dilger.
DILORENZO Italian
Derived from the given name LORENZO
DI MAGGIO Italian
Came from a child who was born in the month of May. The surname Maggio is derived from the Italian word Maggio, which literally means the month of May.
DIMARCO Italian
means "son of MARCO" in italian
DIMEGLIO Italian
First used in Venice, Italy
DIMERCURIO Italian
DiMercurio is an alternate spelling of Di Mercurio.
DIMONDSTEIN German
This is a German name which translates into English as diamond stone. It most likely belongs to a miner who mined diamonds or perhaps a jeweler.
DI MOZE Italian
Means "son of MOZE" in Italian.
DINJER German (Rare)
Occupational surname that originated in the German dialect spoken in the Rhineland-Palatinate region. ... [more]
DIO Italian
Means God in Italian. It was born as a stage name by Ronnie James Dio (July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010), an American Heavy Metal Musician.
DION French
Meaning uncertain. It may be a habitational name from any of various locations called Dion or Dionne, derived from the Gaulish element divon- meaning "(sacred) spring" or Celtic dēwos meaning "god, deity"... [more]
DIPAOLO Italian
means "son of PAOLO" in Italian
DI PEGO Italian
the origin of di Pego is unknown, but translates to 'I caught', in Italian.... [more]
DIROMA Italian
From Rome or of Rome.
DISTEL German, Low German, Dutch
Topographic name for someone who lived by a patch of ground overgrown with thistles, or perhaps a nickname for a "prickly" person, from Middle High German, Middle Low German, Middle Dutch distel "thistle".
DISTLER German
Topographic name for someone who lived in a place where thistles grew, from German Distel "thistle" (see DISTEL) and -er, suffix denoting an inhabitant.
DITTMAN German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German DITTMANN.
DITTMANN German
Variant of DITTMAR. In eastern Germany, this form has been used for Dittmar since the 15th century.
DIVITA Italian
Derives from the word vita meaning "life".
DOEPNER German
Derived from Middle Low German top and dop "pot". This is an occupational surname originally given to a potter.
DOERFLINGER German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places in Bavaria named Dörfling.
DOLL Upper German, German, English
South German: nickname from Middle High German tol, dol ‘foolish’, ‘mad’; also ‘strong’, ‘handsome’.... [more]
DONADIEU French
Meaning “given to God”, surname given to a child because they were given to a priest or monastery or either an orpan.
DONATELLI Italian
Patronymic from a pet form of DONATO.
DONATO Italian
From the medieval personal name Donato (Latin Donatus, past participle of donare, frequentative of dare "to give"). It was the name of a 4th-century Italian bishop martyred in c. 350 under Julian the Apostate, as well as various other early saints, and a 4th-century grammarian and commentator on Virgil, widely respected in the Middle Ages as a figure of great learning.
D'OREVALLE French (Archaic)
Variant form of D'AUREVALLE. A known bearer of this surname was the medieval bishop Hugh d'Orevalle (d. 1084 or 1085).
D'ORIVAL French
Variant form of D'OREVAL. This is also one of the very few forms (of what is ultimately the D'AUREVALLE surname) that is still in use nowadays.
DORN German, German (Austrian), Dutch, Flemish, English
Means "thorn" in German.
DORSAY French
French form of DORSEY.
D'ORVES French
Denoted someone from Orve, a commune in the Doubs department in eastern France.
DOSCH German
Topographic name for someone living near bushes or brush, from Middle High German doste, toste ‘leafy branch’, or a habitational name from a house with a sign depicting a bush. Also an altered spelling of Dasch.
DOSS German, German (Austrian), German (Swiss)
German: Habitational name for someone from Dosse in Altmark. Variant of Dose ... [more]
DOSTER German, Belgian
A German surname, which is from an agent derivative of the Middle High German words 'doste' and 'toste' (meaning ‘wild thyme’, ‘shrub’, ‘bouquet’). It is a topographic surname which was given to someone whose land abutted an uncultivated piece of land, or possibly an occupational name for someone who dealt herbs.... [more]
DÖTTER German
From a Germanic personal name formed with theud ‘people’, ‘race’ + hard ‘hardy’, ‘strong’ or hari, heri ‘army’
DOUILLARD French
Nickname for a softie, possibly derived from Old French do(u)ille meaning "soft, tender".
D'OVIDIO Italian
Patronymic from the personal name OVIDIO.
DOW Scottish, Irish, English, Dutch (Anglicized), German (Anglicized)
Scottish (also found in Ireland): reduced form of McDow. This surname is borne by a sept of the Buchanans.... [more]
DOZIER French
Meaning "lives near willow trees" or possibly someone who made goods, such as baskets, from willow wood.
DRAGON French, English
Nickname or occupational name for someone who carried a standard in battle or else in a pageant or procession, from Middle English, Old French dragon "snake, monster" (Latin draco, genitive draconis, from Greek drakōn, ultimately from derkesthai "to flash")... [more]
DRAGONETTI Italian
Diminutive of drago or dragone "dragon".
DRAMIS Italian, Spanish (Latin American)
Not just a surname in Italy; it can also be found in Argentina and Brazil.... [more]
DRAXLER German
Derived from the Middle High German "Drehseler," meaning "turner," and was most likely initially borne by a turner or lathe worker.
DREIK French
Derived from the Old Norse given name Draki or the Old English given name Draca both meaning "dragon".
DRESSEL Italian
Italian form of DRESSLER
DREXEL German, Jewish
It originates from the pre 7th century word 'dreseler' meaning 'to turn', a verb which in medieval times had a wide range of meanings.
DREYFUS French, German, Jewish
French-influenced variant of DREYFUSS, popular amongst people of Alsatian Jewish descent.
DREYFUSS German, Jewish
Originates from the German city of Trier. The Latin name for the city was "Treveris," whose pronunciation eventually developed into Dreyfuss. The spelling variants tend to correspond to the country the family was living in at the time the spelling was standardized: the use of one "s" tends to be more common among people of French origin, while the use of two tends to be found among those of German descent
DROST Dutch, German, Danish
Occupational name for a steward or head servant.
DROUILLARD French
Probably a derogatory nickname, from a derivative of the regional term drouiller "to defecate", which also has various figurative senses.
DRURY English, French, Irish
Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from druerie "love, friendship" (itself a derivative of dru "lover, favourite, friend" - originally an adjective, apparently from a Gaulish word meaning "strong, vigourous, lively", but influenced by the sense of the Old High German element trut, drut "dear, beloved").... [more]
DRUX German
Variant of TRUX, which itself is a contracted form of Truxes and derived from the German word Truchsess, ultimately from Middle High German truhsaeze and Old High German truhtsazzo (from truht "band; cohort; regiment" and saza "seat; chair").... [more]
DUBACH German (Swiss)
A surname describing a person from the town of Tübach in St. Gallen, Switzerland.
DUBOSQUE French
DuBosque means 'of the forest' in french and was a surname given typically to someone from a rural treed area.
DUBUISSON French
A topographic name for someone who lived in an area of scrub land or by a prominent clump of bushes, derived from Old French buisson meaning "small tree, bush, scrub".
DUCASSE French
French: topographic name for someone who lived by an oak tree, from Old French casse ‘oak (tree)’ (Late Latin cassanos, a word of Celtic origin), with the fused preposition and article du ‘from the’... [more]
DUCHÊNE French
Means "from the oak (tree)", denoted a person who lived near an oak tree or an oak forest.
DUCHESNE French, English
Variant of DUCHÊNE. From the old French chesne meaning "oak", denoted a person who lived near an oak tree or an oak forest.
DÜCK Low German, German
North German nickname for a coward, from Low German duken ‘to duck or dive’. ... [more]
DUESLER Upper German
DUESLERDuesslerDüslerDußlerhttp://www.duesler.com/html/charles_duelser_s_book.HTM "Duesler / Duessler / Dueßler http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dussler-6 , http://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Dussler-2 Andrew & brother Jacob were the Progenitors of Duesler, Duessler, Dueßler s from 1752 Germany to America... [more]
DUESTERWALD German
Variant spelling of DÜSTERWALD.
DUFAU French
The name DUFAU come from two French words DU which means « of the » and FAU which is old French for a beech tree. Surnames in France were given later so the person with this name meant he/she had a beech tree in his property... [more]
DUFAULT French
Alternate spelling of Dufau, meaning "of the beech tree."
DUFRESNE French
Topographic name for someone who lived near a prominent ash tree from Old French fraisne fresne "ash" from Latin fraxinus "ash".
DUHAMEL French
Topographic name for someone who lived in a hamlet, from Old French hamel, a diminutive of ham "homestead", with fused preposition and definite article du.
DUJARDIN French
Means "from the garden" from French jardin "garden".
DULCAMARA Italian
given to my great great grandfather who was left on the doorstep of a church in Chiavari Italy. The priest took inspiration from names of plants in the garden. This one came from the plant in English would mean 'bitter sweet nightshade'
DUMAS French
Meaning "of the little farm".
DUPAIN French
Means "of the bread" in French, probably used as an occupational name for a baker.
DUPIN French
Means "of the pine tree" in French, referring to a person who lived near a pine tree or was from any of various locations named Le Pin.
DUPOUY French
Variant of DUPUY.
DUPRÉ French
Means "of the meadow" in French.
DURBIN French
Derived from the place called D'urban or D'urbin in Languedoc
DURET French
Derived from French dur meaning "hard, tough".
DÜSTERWALD German
Derived from Middle Low German düster "dark" combined with Old High German wald "forest".
DUTERTRE French
Means "of the hillock, of the mound" in French.
DUTROUX French, Belgian
Last name of MARC Dutroux, Belgian serial killer and child molester.
DUVALL French
Variant spelling of DUVAL.
DUVERNAY French
Means "from the alder grove," from Gaulish vern meaning "alder" combined with Latin -etum, whence Modern French -aie, forming names of orchards or places where trees/plants are grown)... [more]
DUVILLARD French
French surname, pronounced /dyvilaʁ/, whose bearers mainly live in Haute-Savoie. It means "from Le Villard", a village in the Rhône-Alpes region, whose name comes from the Latin 'villare' which means 'hamlet'... [more]
EAMER French, Anglo-Saxon
This interesting and unusual surname has two possible sources. ... [more]
EARLY Irish, English, American, German
Irish: translation of Gaelic Ó MOCHÁIN (see MOHAN; Gaelic moch means ‘early’ or ‘timely’), or of some other similar surname, for example Ó Mochóir, a shortened form of Ó Mochéirghe, Ó Maoil-Mhochéirghe, from a personal name meaning ‘early rising’.... [more]
EARNHARDT German
It is a name for a courageous or honorable person. The surname Earnhardt is composed of two German words meaning honor and bravery.
EBERHARD German (Americanized)
Americanized version of EBERHARDT.
EBERT German, American
Believed to be a variant of HERBERT or of EVERETT.
ECKHART German
From the given name ECKHART.
EGERT German, Jewish
Variant spelling of EGGERT.
EGGERT German, Jewish
Derived from the Proto-Germanic root agi meaning "edge".
EGNER German
From a Germanic personal name formed with the element agi ‘point (of a sword)’.
EHLER German
Variant of EHLERT.
EHLERT German
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements agil "edge", "point (of a sword)" + hard "brave", "hardy", "strong" or ward "guard".
EHLINGER German
Habitational name for someone from Ehlingen in the Palatinate.
EHRENBERG Jewish (Anglicized, Rare, Archaic), German
"In German it means 'mountain of honor'"
EHRENREICH German, Jewish, Yiddish
Jewish/Yiddish German ornamental surname meaning “Rich in honour”
EHRHARDT German
From a Germanic personal name composed of Old High German ēra, meaning ‘honor’, and hard, meaning ‘brave’, ‘hardy’, or ‘strong’.
EHRMANTRAUT German
A Latinized joining of the German words irmin(world, all-encompassing) and trud(strength)
EICH German
German from Middle High German eich(e) ‘oak’, hence a topographic name for someone who lived near an oak tree. In some cases, it may be a habitational name for someone from any of several places named with this word, for example Eiche or Eichen, or for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of an oak.
EICHELBERG German
Habitational name from any of various places, notably one southeast of Heidelberg, named from Middle High German eichel meaning "acorn" + berc meaning "mountain", "hill", or topographic name for someone who lived on an oak-covered hill.
EICHELBERGER German
Habitational name for someone from any of the various places called Eichelberg.
EICHHORN German, Jewish
German topographic name for someone who lived on or near an oak-covered promontory, from Middle High German eich(e) ‘oak’ + horn ‘horn’, ‘promontory’. German from Middle High German eichhorn ‘squirrel’ (from Old High German eihhurno, a compound of eih ‘oak’ + urno, from the ancient Germanic and Indo-European name of the animal, which was later wrongly associated with hurno ‘horn’); probably a nickname for someone thought to resemble the animal, or alternatively a habitational name for someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a squirrel... [more]
EICHLER Upper German
South German variant of EICH, the -ler suffix denoting association. "eager"
EIERMANN German
Occupational name for an egg collector or dealer in eggs, from Middle High German ei 'egg' + man 'man'.
EILAND German
Topographic name for someone who lived on or owned property surrounded by water, from Middle High German eilant, "island"
EINGEWEIDE German
A German surname meaning "guts" or "viscera".
EINHORN German
Derived from German Einhorn (Middle High German einhorn) "unicorn", denoting someone who lived at a house distinguished by the sign of a unicorn.
EINSTEIN German, Jewish
From German ein meaning “one” and stein meaning “stone”; also a habitational name from any of the various locations from Middle High German einsteinen meaning “to enclose or surround with stone”... [more]
EISELE German
From a short pet form of the personal name Isenhart, from Old High German isan ‘iron’ + hart ‘hardy’, ‘strong’. From Isenlin, a compound of Middle High German isen ‘iron’ + the hypocoristic suffix -lin, hence a nickname for a blacksmith, ironworker, or dealer in iron.
EISEN German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): metonymic occupational name for an ironworker or smith, or an ironmonger, from Middle High German isen ‘iron’, German Eisen. It may also have been used as a nickname, with reference to the strength and hardness of iron or to its color, while as a Jewish name it was also adopted as an ornamental name from modern German Eisen ‘iron’ or the Yiddish cognate ayzn.
EISENBERG German, Jewish
Means "iron hill" from German isen meaning "iron" and berg meaning "hill".
EISENBERGER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from any of the several places called Eisenberg. As a Jewish name it is also an ornamental name.
EISENHAUER German
Occupational name meaning "iron cutter" where Eisen- means "iron" and -hauer means "hewer". The verb 'hew' being less well used in English than in earlier times, but still understood to mean cut, such as in hewing tree limbs... [more]
EISENHOWER German
Americanized spelling of German EISENHAUER.
EISNER German, Jewish
Occupational name for an ironworker, smith, or ironmonger, from an agent derivative of Middle High German īsen and German Eisen, meaning ‘iron’ (see EISEN).
ELARDO Italian
Possibly from a variant of the given name Ilardo, which may be a form of the Germanic name ADALHARD (see also ILARDI).
ELEANOR French
Derives from the given name ELEANOR. Not popular as a last name.
ELIAS Greek, Catalan, Portuguese, English, Welsh, German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from the medieval given name ELIAS. Compare ELLIS.
ELICH German, American
Surname meaning "noble" from edelik or edelich. Notable bearer is professional ice hockey player Matt Elich.
ELLENBERG German, Jewish, German (Swiss)
Derived from two municipalities and a village called Ellenberg in Germany. As an ornamental name, it is derived from German ölenberg, literally meaning "olive mountain".
ELLENDER German
Respelling of German Elender, a nickname for a stranger or newcomer, from Middle High German ellende ‘strange’, ‘foreign’, or a habitational name for someone from any of twenty places named Elend, denoting a remote settlement, as for example in the Harz Mountains or in Carinthia, Austria.
ELLERHOFF German
This name means "Black Alder Tree Courtyard" and was inspired by a tree in a yard at the family farm in Nettelstedt, Germany.
ELSING German
From a variant of the old personal name Elsung.
ELSINGER German (Swiss)
Probably a derivative of ELSING.
ELVERMAN German
The name Elverman means Eel fisherman.
EMEL German
From a short form of any of the various Germanic personal names beginning with the element amal, which means ‘strength’ or ‘vigor’.
EMERY English, French, Norman
English and French from a Germanic personal name, Emaurri, composed of the elements amja ‘busy’, ‘industrious’ + ric ‘power’... [more]
EMMER German
A topographic name for someone who lived by land where grain was grown, a status name for someone who owned such land, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who grew or dealt in grain.
EMMERICH German
From the given name EMMERICH.
EMPERAIRE French
Means "Emperor".
ENGELBERT German, English, French
From a Germanic personal name composed of engel (see ENGEL) + berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’. The widespread popularity of the name in France during the Middle Ages was largely a result of the fact that it had been borne by a son-in-law of Charlemagne; in the Rhineland it was more often given in memory of a bishop of Cologne (1216–25) of this name, who was martyred.
ENGELS German, Dutch
A patronymic surname from the given name ENGEL.
ENGLANDER German, Jewish
Ethnic name derived from German Engländer, meaning 'Englishman', thus denoting an incomer from England. In some cases, the Jewish name may be an ornamental adoption.
ENS German
Variant of ENNS.
EPPLER German
Occupational name for a fruit grower or dealer, from Middle High German epfeler meaning "grower of or dealer in apples".
EPSHTEYN German, Jewish
This surname may be derived from a German town known as Eppstein in Hesse. Epp probably came from Gaulish apa which means water or river and stein translates into English as stone.
EPSTEIN German, Jewish
A habitational name for someone from a place named Eppstein, which is from Old High German ebur meaning ‘wild boar’ and stein meaning ‘stone’.
ÉRABLE French (Rare)
From érable meaning "maple."
ERASMUS French, Dutch
it means beloved one or king
ERBER Jewish, German
Meaning uncertain. Either a habitational name for someone living in a place named Erb or Erp, a name for a owner of a farm named Erbhof (derived from MIddle High German erbære "honorable, noble"), or derived from the given name ERPO.
ERDMANN German
From the given name ERDMANN.
ERMAN German (Modern), French (Modern)
Erman is a shortened French adaption of the Swiss-German surname ERMENDINGER, itself derived from the older surname ERMATINGER, a name connected to the village of Ermatingen on the Swiss shore of Lake Constance, and came into existence during the early or middle 18th century when Jean-Georges Ermendinger (1710-1767), a Swiss fur trader from Geneva, married into a French speaking Huguenotte family... [more]
ERMATINGER German (Swiss)
The surname Ermatinger derives from the village of Ermatingen on the Swiss shore of Lake Constance. It simply means "from Ermatingen".... [more]
ERMENDINGER German
The surname Ermendinger was derived from the older surname ERMATINGER, a name connected to the village of Ermatingen on the Swiss shore of Lake Constance, and came into existence at some point during the early 17th or late 16th century when a branch of the ERMATINGER family relocated from Schaffhausen, Switzerland, to Mulhouse, Alsace... [more]
ERNSBERGER German (Anglicized, Modern)
Also spelled (Ehrnsberger) has been said that a Christian Ernsberger or Ehrnsberger came to the U.S. in 1710 from Germany but i dont know from where in Germany.
ERTEL German
South German: from a pet form of a personal name beginning with Ort-, from Old High German ort "point" (of a sword or lance)
ESAU Welsh, German
From the Biblical personal name Esau, meaning ‘hairy’ in Hebrew (Genesis 25:25).
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