Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Grandpierre French
Derived from French grand meaning "tall, large" and the male given name Pierre.
Grange English, French
English and French topographic name for someone who lived by a granary, from Middle English, Old French grange (Latin granica ‘granary’, ‘barn’, from granum ‘grain’)... [more]
Gras French
Means "fat" in french.
Grass English, German
Topographic name for someone who owned or lived by a meadow, or a metonymic occupational name for someone who made or sold hay, from Middle English gras, Middle High German gras "grass, pasture, grazing".
Grassi Italian
Variant of Grasso.
Grasso Italian
Means "fat" in Italian, used as a nickname for a stout person.
Gratz German
From a short form of a Germanic personal name reflected by Old High German gratag 'greedy'
Grau German, Jewish
Nickname for someone with gray hair or a gray beard, from German grau "gray".
Graue German
Habitational name from a place so named near Hannover.
Graue German
Variant of Grau.
Grave French
Topographic name for someone who lived on a patch of gravelly soil, from Old French grave "gravel" (of Celtic origin).
Grave German
Either from the northern form of Graf, but more commonly a topographic name from Middle Low German grave "ditch", "moat", "channel", or a habitational name from any of several places in northern Germany named with this word.
Graves English, French
English: patronymic from Grave.
Graves French, English
Topographic name from the plural of Old French grave "gravel"
Graves English, French, German
Derives from someone who had an occupation as a grave digger or a caretaker for a graveyard.
Graziano Italian
From the given name Graziano.
Grebenstein German
Means "stone from the cliff or ridge" from German greben, (cliff or ridge) and stein (stone).... [more]
Greenberger German, Jewish
Anglicized form of the German surname Grünberger, which is formed from the words grün "green", Berg "mountain", and the habitational suffix -er. This name indicated a person who lived on or near a forest-covered mountain.
Greenburgh German, Jewish
The surname Greenburgh is anglicized for the German Jewish surname Greenberg which translates into English as green mountain.
Greet German
Americanized form of German Fried.
Grégoire French
From the given name Grégoire
Gregori Italian
Patronymic or plural form of Gregorio.
Greif German
Means "Griffin" in German. From the mythological creature.
Grell German
Nickname for an irritable or irascible person, from Middle High German, Middle Low German grellen "to be angry".
Grell German
Habitational name from a place named Grelle.
Grelle German
Variant of Grell.
Grenier French
Occupational name for a grain merchant (from Latin granarius), or a topographic name for someone who lived by a granary (from Latin granarium) or a metonymic occupational name for someone who supervised or owned one.
Gretzinger German
Habitational name for someone from any of three places named Grötzingen (Old High German Grezzingun) in Baden-Württemberg.
Grewe German, Low German
Low German form of Graf via Middle Low German grave / greve.
Grieser Upper German
topographic name for someone living on a sandy site, from Middle High German griez ‘sand’ + -er suffix denoting an inhabitant.
Griezmann German (Rare)
This is the surname of French professional footballer Antoine Griezmann.
Griffo Italian
From grifo "gryphon" (Latin gryphus, Greek gryps, of Assyrian origin), hence a nickname for someone thought to resemble the mythical beast.
Griffon French
From a diminutive of Old French griffe "claw", hence a nickname for a grasping or vicious person, or perhaps for someone with a deformed or otherwise remarkable hand.
Grignon French
From French 'grignard' meaning "angry" and "contemptuous", and Old French (of Germanic origin) 'grignier' "to grit the teeth" or "curl the lips".
Grill German
From a nickname for a cheerful person, from Middle High German grille "cricket" (Old High German grillo, from Late Latin grillus, Greek gryllos). The insect is widely supposed to be of a cheerful disposition, no doubt because of its habit of infesting hearths and warm places... [more]
Grimaldo Spanish, Italian
From the given name Grimaldo.
Grimké German (Americanized)
Americanised form of the German surname Grimk or Grimke with French inspiration. This was the name of a prominent American family of abolitionists.
Grimm English, German, Danish, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
From a nickname for a stern and forbidding individual, derived from the Old High German word grim "stern, severe". Or possibly from the given name Grímr derived from Old Norse gríma "mask, helmet"... [more]
Grindy German (Modern), French
I have seen elsewhere explanations about this name being German or French in origin. Sorry, I do not have the sources to hand
Grob German
A nickname for a strong, heavy man, or for a lout, from Middle High German g(e)rop "coarse".
Grohl German
Meaning uncertain, but likely a variant of Groll.
Groll German
Derived from grollen, 'to be angry', often used as a nickname for an angry or sulky individual.
Grosjean French, French (Belgian)
Derived from French gros "large" and the given name Jean 1. As a nickname, it is sometimes applied to a person who is perceived as stupid.
Großkreutz German
From German "groß" meaning big and "kreutz" meaning cross.
Groulx French
French spelling, often found in Canada, of Groult, Grould, possibly reduced forms of Gréoul, a personal name of Germanic origin, composed of the elements gred "hunger" + wolf, wulf "wolf".
Grove German
Form of Grob.
Grove German
Name from any of several places named Grove or Groven, which derive their name from Middle Low Germany grove ‘ditch’, ‘channel’. In some cases the name is a Dutch or Low German form of Grube.
Grove German
Variation of Graf.
Grube German
Name for someone who lived in a depression or hollow, from Middle High German gruobe "pit", "hollow". See also Gruber.
Grube German
From the personal name Grubo.
Grumbach German (Swiss), Alsatian
From the name of various places in Switzerland and Germany, for example the municipality of Grumbach in Rhineland-Palatinate.
Grunwald German, German (Swiss), Jewish
German and Swiss German (Grünwald): habitational name from any of various places named Grün(e)wald, from Middle High German gruene ‘green’ + walt ‘wood’, ‘forest’. ... [more]
Guadagnino Italian
It came from Italian word guadagno which means "earnings" and has a diminutive suffix ino which is also an occupation suffix.
Gualtieri Italian
From the given name Gualtiero.
Guàrdia Catalan, Spanish, Italian
Catalan, Spanish, and Italian from Catalan guàrdia, Spanish and Italian guardia ‘guard’, ‘watch’, a topographic name for someone who lived by a watch place, an occupational name for a member of the town guard, or a habitational name from any of the numerous places named (La) Guardia.
Guarino Italian
From the given name Guarino.
Guarracino Italian
Nothing is known of this family name other then they grew up in Manhattan, New York, other states and cities too but most can from boats and had to be quertied at Ellis Island, New York
Gubler German (Swiss)
Means "Of the Mountains"... [more]
Gucci Italian
From the given name Guccio a nickname from the names Arriguccio and Uguccio... [more]
Gucciardo Italian
From the personal name Gucciardo, a revival of French Guichard, of Germanic origin, probably composed of the elements wig 'battle' or wisa 'experience' + hard 'strong', 'brave', 'hardy'.
Guengerich German (Americanized)
Potentially from German “junge” and “reich,” meaning “rich at a young age.” Anglicized by immigrants as either Guengerich or Gingrich.
Guenther German
German: from a Germanic personal name composed of gund ‘battle’ + hari, heri ‘army’.
Guerino Italian
From the given name Guerino.
Guerrier French
Nickname for an aggressive person or occupational name for a soldier, from Old French guerrier ‘warrior’. Making it a cognitive for Guerrero and Guerriero.
Guglielmi Italian
From the given name Guglielmo.
Guglielmo Italian
From the given name Guglielmo.
Gugliuzza Italian
Derivative of the personal name Guglia.
Guidetti Italian
Derived from the given name Guido.
Guido Italian, German
From the given name Guido.
Guilbeau French
Possibly from Ancient Germanic wil, meaning "will, power", and Latin bellus, meaning "beautiful".
Guiles French
Of uncertain origin; it could be a variant of French Guill or of English Guile or Giles .
Guilliot French
From a pet form of the personal name Guille, itself a short form of Guillaume.
Guillou French, Breton
Possibly derived from the given name Guillaume.
Guion French
French: from the Germanic personal name Wido (see Guy).
Guiscard French
Derived from the Medieval French given name Guiscard.
Guitry French
Based on a personal name composed of the Germanic elements wid(u), wit- ‘wood’ + ric ‘power(ful)’.
Gullette French
Comes from Guillemme or William of Normandy. Reference 1066: The Battle of Hastings.
Gulotta Italian
Italian: from the female personal name, a pet form of Gulla.
Gum German
North German:... [more]
Gunzenhauser German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from either of two places named Gunzenhausen, one in Württemberg and the other in Bavaria.
Gust German
German: from a short form of the personal name Jodocus, which is either a Latinized form of a Breton name, Iodoc, borne by a 7th-century Breton saint (compare Jost and Joyce) or from a reduced form of the personal name Augustus.... [more]
Gustavo Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
From the given name Gustavo.
Guthrie Scottish, Irish, German
Scottish: habitational name from a place near Forfar, named in Gaelic with gaothair ‘windy place’ (a derivative of gaoth ‘wind’) + the locative suffix -ach. Possibly an Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Mag Uchtre ‘son of Uchtre’, a personal name of uncertain origin, perhaps akin to uchtlach ‘child’.... [more]
Gutknecht German, German (Swiss)
Status name for a page of noble birth (Middle High German guot kneht).
Gütlin German, Yiddish
Diminutive of GUTE and GUTA, recorded in Frankfurt, Germany throughout the 14th century.
Guttenberg German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from any of various places, for example in Bavaria, called Guttenberg, from the weak dative case (originally used after a preposition and article) of Old High German guot ‘good’ + berg ‘mountain’, ‘hill’... [more]
Gutting German
Of uncertain origin. Probably from a Germanic personal name formed with god "good" or god, got "god".
Guy English, French
From a French form of the Germanic personal name Wido, which is of uncertain origin. This name was popular among the Normans in the forms Wi, Why as well as in the rest of France in the form Guy.
Haack German
One who lived at the bend or hook in the river. (See Hooker)
Habelt German
from a pet form of the Germanic personal name Habo, a short form of various compound names formed with had(u) ‘battle’, ‘strife’
Haberfeld German
Means "oat field". From the words habaro "oat" and feld "field
Haberfield German (Anglicized)
Partial anglicization of Haberfeld
Haberland German
Topographic name from Middle High German haber(e) "oats" and land "land", or a habitational name from any of various places so called.
Habermann German, Jewish
Occupational name for a grower or seller of oats, composed of the elements Haber and the agent suffix -mann.
Habsburg German
This surname may have been used by someone whose descendants originated from the House of Habsburg, which was one of the most important royal houses in Europe. It is assumed that the surname is derived from High German Habichtsburg meaning "hawk castle," but some historians and linguists believe that it may actually be derived from Middle High German hab/hap meaning "ford", as there is a river with a ford nearby.
Hack German
Variant of Haack.
Hackmann German, Jewish
Occupational name for a butcher or a woodcutter.
Hafer German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a grower of or dealer in oats, from German Hafer "oats". Compare Haber. As a Jewish surname, it is in many cases ornamental.
Hagelberg German
From German hagel meaning "hail" and berg meaning "mountain".
Hagemann German, Danish
Combination of Middle Low German hage "enclosure, hedge" and mann "man".
Hahm German
Metonymic occupational name for a sealer of weights and measures, from Middle High German hāme ‘(standard) measure’.
Hähner German
Pet form of Heinrich.
Hahner German
Occupational name for a poultry farmer, from an agent derivative of Middle High German hane "rooster".
Hahner German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Hahn or Hag.
Halberstadt German
Habitational name from any of various places so named, notably the city near Magdeburg and Halberstadt near Königstein in Saxony.
Ham English, German, Scottish, Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon meaning the home stead, many places in England. One who came from Hamm in North-Rhine Westphalia, or one who came from Ham in Caithness Scotland's most northerly county. In Scotland this surname devires from the Norse word "Hami", meaning homestead.
Hamberg German, Danish, Jewish
German, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from any of several places named Hamberg. Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Hamburg.
Hamberger German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name for someone from any of various places named Hamberg. Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Hamburger.
Hamburg German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name from the great city and port at the mouth of the river Elbe, named with the Germanic elements ham ‘water meadow’ + burg ‘fortress’, ‘fortified town’.
Hamburger German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) habitational name for someone from Hamburg.
Hamel Yiddish, Dutch, German
The name Hamel has three origins.... [more]
Hamelin French
from the Norse word HAMO meaning home.
Hamer English, German
From the town of Hamer in Lancashire from the old english word Hamor combining "Rock" and "Crag". It is also used in Germany and other places in Europe, possibly meaning a maker of Hammers.
Hammer German, English, Jewish
From Middle High German hamer, Yiddish hamer, a metonymic occupational name for a maker or user of hammers, for example in a forge, or nickname for a forceful person.
Hammerschmidt German, Jewish
Occupational name for a blacksmith, from German hamer, 'hammer' and schmidt, 'smith. See Hammersmith.
Hammersmith German, English
Normally an anglicization of German Hammerschmidt. Perhaps also from Norwegian Hammersmed.... [more]
Hamp English, German
English: unexplained; compare Hemp.... [more]
Händel German
Derived from Hans or Heinrich.
Häner German
Variant of Hanner.
Haner German
Altered spelling or variant of Hahner.
Hang German (Swiss)
From the given name Hank
Hänner German
Pet form of Heinrich.
Hanner German
From a pet form of Hann, short form of Johann.
Har German
Variant of Har.
Harbach German
Habitational name from any of several places named Harbach.
Harcourt French
This name is of locational origin either from the town and ancient chateau of Harcourt near Brionne in Normandy.
Hardekop German (Rare)
Derived from Middle High German hart "hard" and kopf "head". As a surname, it was given to a hard-headed, stubborn person.
Hargier French
Known back to the 15th or 16th century in France.... [more]
Harlacher German
Habitational name for someone from Ober- or Unter-Harlachen, near Überlingen.
Harless English, German
English: probably a variant spelling of Arliss, a nickname from Middle English earles ‘earless’, probably denoting someone who was deaf rather than one literally without ears.
Harnar German
Given to one who was noisy
Harold English, Norman, German
English from the Old English personal name Hereweald, its Old Norse equivalent Haraldr, or the Continental form Herold introduced to Britain by the Normans... [more]
Harrett French
France, England
Hartung German
German, Dutch, and Danish: from a Germanic personal name, a derivative (originally a patronymic) of compound names beginning with hart ‘hardy’, ‘strong’.
Hasard French
Variant of Hazard.
Haselbauer German
Translates to 'hazel farmer'
Hassdenteufel German
A German Satzname, from the expression "Hass den Teufel" meaning "hate the devil".
Hasselbach German
Habitational name from any of the places in various parts of Germany called Hasselbach.
Hasslacher German
hass=hate; lacher=laughter... [more]
Hässli German (Swiss), French (Rare)
Swiss German diminutive form of Haas. This is a French surname via Alsace-Lorraine. A notable bearer is French footballer (soccer player) Eric Hassli (1981-).
Hattendorf German, Jewish
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): habitational name from places called Hattendorf, near Alsfeld and near Hannover. The element hatt, had means ‘bog’
Hauck German
Derived from the first name Hugo.
Haueis German
Derived from Middle High German houwen "to beat" and isen "iron". This surname denoted a smith.
Hauptman German
Variant spelling of Hauptmann.
Hauptmann German
Derived from German hauptmann, a word used for a German military rank meaning "Captain".
Haus German
Topographic and occupational name for someone who lived and worked in a great house, from Middle High German, Middle Low German hus "house" (see House).
Hausch German
From the Germanic personal name Huso, a short form of a compound name composed with hus ‘house’, ‘dwelling’ as the first element.
Hauser German, Jewish
From Middle High German hus "house", German haus, + the suffix -er, denoting someone who gives shelter or protection.
Hausmann German
From Middle High German hus "house" (see Haus) + man "man".
Hauswirth German
From Middle High German haus 'house' and wirt 'owner' or 'master'.
Havertz German
Variant of Ritz.
Havner German
Variant of Hafner.
Hay English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, French, Spanish, German, Dutch, Frisian
Scottish and English: topographic name for someone who lived by an enclosure, Middle English hay(e), heye(Old English (ge)hæg, which after the Norman Conquest became confused with the related Old French term haye ‘hedge’, of Germanic origin)... [more]
Haydn German
Meaning "heathen". Famous bearer is Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).
Haydt German
Varient of Heid.
Hazard English, French, Dutch
Nickname for an inveterate gambler or a brave or foolhardy man prepared to run risks, from Middle English, Old French hasard, Middle Dutch hasaert (derived from Old French) "game of chance", later used metaphorically of other uncertain enterprises... [more]
Heartfield German (Anglicized)
Anglicised spelling of Herzfeld.
Heartman German (Anglicized)
Americanised spelling of Hartmann.
Hebel German
1 German: metonymic occupational name for a baker, from Middle High German hebel ‘yeast’.... [more]
Heber German
Occupational name for a carrier (someone who loaded or transported goods), from an agent derivative of Middle High German heben "to lift".
Hebert German
Variant of Heber.
Hecht German, Dutch
From Middle High German hech(e)t, Middle Dutch heect, hecht "pike", generally a nickname for a rapacious and greedy person. In some instances it may have been a metonymic occupational name for a fisher and in others it may be a habitational name from a house distinguished by a sign depicting this fish.
Hecker German
German form of Hatcher.
Hefler German
Derived from the Old German and German word hof, which means settlement, farm or court.
Hefner German, Jewish
Recorded in several spellings including Hafner, Haffner, and Hevner, this is as surname of early Germanic origins. ... [more]
Heid German, Jewish
Topographic name from Middle High German heide, German Heide ‘heath’, ‘moor’. Compare Heath.... [more]
Heidenreich German
From the medieval personal name Heidenrich, ostensibly composed of the elements heiden 'heathen', 'infidel' (see Heiden 2) + ric 'power', 'rule', but probably in fact a variant by folk etymology of Heidrich.
Heider German
Combination of German Heide "heath, headland" and the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant. The surname can be either topographic for someone living on or near a heath, or habitational for someone from any place named with the element Heide.
Heigl German
Derived from the given name Hugo.
Heiland German
South German: from Middle High German heilant ‘savior’, ‘Christ’, presumably either a name given to someone who had played the part of Christ in a mystery play or an occupational name for a healer, from Middle High German heilen ‘to heal’, ‘save’.
Heiliger German
Heiliger means "Holy" or "Holy One" in German.
Heimbach German
Town / City in Germany
Heimburg German
German for "home". Originates in the German village of Heimburg (not to be confused with Hamburg) and the nearby castle of the same name.
Hein German, Dutch, Danish, Jewish
German, Dutch, Danish, and Jewish (Ashkenazic): from a short form of the Germanic personal name Heinrich.
Heinbokel German
(Hein) is a short form of the name Heinrich, (the German form of the name Henry) & Bokel is a place name in Lower Saxony, Schleswig-Holstein & North Rhine-Westphalia.
Heine German, Dutch, Jewish
Derived from a short form of Heinrich.
Heineken Dutch, German
Derived from Hein, a Dutch diminutive of Hendrik. A famous bearer was Gerard Adriaan Heineken (1841-1893), the founder of the Heineken N.V. brewing company... [more]
Heinemann German, Jewish
Combination of Heine, a short form of Heinrich, and Mann "man".
Heiner German
From the given name Heiner.
Heinisch German
From a pet form of the personal name Heinrich.
Heinl German
South German variant of Heinle.
Heinle German
This surname is derived from what may be a pet form of Heinrich.
Heintzelman German
From a pet form of Heinrich, with the addition of -mann ‘man’.
Heitmeyer German
German: distinguishing nickname for a farmer whose land included heathland, from Middle Low German heide ‘heath’, ‘wasteland’ + Meyer.
Helber German
Occupational name for a thresher, from Middle High German helwe 'chaff' + the agent suffix -er; alternatively, it could be a habitational name from a place called Helba near Meiningen.
Helbling German
Meaning "half penny" or a cheap /stingy man Know surname in Germany andSwitzerland. Helblings were French Huguenot
Held German
The German word for "hero", ultimately derived from Middle High German helt.... [more]
Heldt German
Variant of Held.
Helfer German
Metonymic occupational name for an assistant of some kind, or nickname for a helpful person, from Middle High German hëlfære, German Helfer 'helper', 'assistant'.
Hellenbrand German
Derived from germanic: hildtja = battle, brandt = sword, or prandt = burning wood/torch. Other view: Hilda is the Nordic Queen of the Underworld, Goddes of Death, so Sword/Torch of Hilda.... [more]
Heller German
Nickname from the small medieval coin known as the häller or heller because it was first minted (in 1208) at the Swabian town of (Schwäbisch) Hall.
Hellwig German, Dutch
Curiously it started out life in ancient history as the baptismal name, Hell-wig. "luck" & "war;" this name literally translates to, "battle-battle."
Helmeier German, Dutch, Danish
Variant spelling of Helmeyer.
Helmeyer German, Dutch, Danish
From Hel in Norse mythology and Meyer meaning "higher, superior". It means ´blessed´ or ´holy´. The name is mostly found in Germany, but also in the Netherlands and some parts of Denmark.
Helmke German
from a pet form of Helm
Hence German, English, Welsh
An American spelling variant of Hentz derived from a German nickname for Hans or Heinrich or from an English habitation name found in Staffordshire or Shropshire and meaning "road or path" in Welsh.
Hendel Yiddish, German, Dutch
From the given name Hendel, a Yiddish diminutive of Hannah.
Hendrickson German
Derivative of the Old German personnel “Heimric” meaning “home rule”.
Henke German
Derived from a diminutive of the name Heinrich.
Henker German
Occupational name for an Executioner, from the German word "Henker" meaning Hangman.
Henley English, Irish, German (Anglicized)
English: habitational name from any of the various places so called. Most, for example those in Oxfordshire, Suffolk, and Warwickshire, are named with Old English héan (the weak dative case of heah ‘high’, originally used after a preposition and article) + Old English leah ‘wood’, ‘clearing’... [more]
Hennen German, Dutch
Patronymic of Henne.
Henri French
From the first name Henri.
Henschel German, Jewish
From a pet form of the personal name Johannes (see John), or in some cases from a pet form of Heinrich.
Hentz German
From a nickname for Hans or Heinrich.
Hentze German, Faroese
Derived from the given names Heinrich or Hans.
Herbarth German, Norman
References Old Norse Deity "Odin" being one of the "Son's of Odin". Remember that the Geats became the Ostrogoths through the Denmark pass--referenced in Beowulf. Or, it means "Warrior of the Bearded One", perhaps a King... [more]
Herbolsheimer German
Habitational name for someone from either of two places called Herbolzheim, in Baden and Bavaria.
Herder German
An occupational surname in reference to herding animals. The anglicized pronounciation is "Her-der", but is Germanically pronounced, "Herr-der".
Hergenöther German
Habitational name for someone from Hergenroth near Limburg or from Hergenrode near Darmstadt, both in Hessen.
Hermidilla Filipino (Latinized, Rare, Archaic), Italian (Latinized, Modern, Rare)
Hermidilla is originated from Batangas province in Southern Tagalog region in the Philippines during the Spanish colony.... [more]