Swiss Submitted Surnames

Swiss names are used in the country of Switzerland in central Europe.
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Juneau French
A nickname for someone who is "young"
Jünger German, Jewish
German (Jünger) distinguishing name, from Middle High German jünger ‘younger’, for the younger of two bearers of the same personal name, usually a son who bore the same name as his father... [more]
Junk German
Variant of Jung.
Justin French, English, Slovene
From a medieval personal name, Latin Justinus, a derivative of Justus.
Justus German, Dutch, Finnish
From the given name Justus
Kachel German
Occupational name for a potter, from Middle High German kachel "pot", "earthenware vessel".
Kachler German
Variant of Kachel.
Kackley German
Probably an Americanized spelling of German Kächele (see Kachel).
Kad German
1 German: habitational name for someone from a place called Kade near Magdeburg, Kaaden (German name of Kadeň in North Bohemia), or Kaden in Westerwald.... [more]
Kaden German
Habitational name for someone from Kaaden in North Bohemia, or any of several other places called Kaden.
Kahn German
Derived from German Kahn "small boat" as well as a Germanized form of the Jewish surname Cohen.
Kahr German
Short form of the medieval personal name Makarius.
Kalander German
Status name for the chairman or a member fraternity that held meetings on the first of each month, from Latin ad calendas.
Kalp German, Jewish
From Middle High German kalp ‘calf’, German Kalb, probably applied as a metonymic occupational name for someone who reared calves.
Kalthoff German
German (Westphalian): habitational name from a place named as 'the cold farm', from Middle High German kalt "cold" + hof "farmstead", "manor farm’, "court".
Kamm Estonian, German
It's origins are of German origin, meaning "comb"... [more]
Kandt German
Probably from Middle High German kant meaning "jug" (from Latin olla cannata meaning "pot with one spout") and hence an occupational name for a maker or seller of jugs.
Kärlin German
German surname from the personal name Karl. Also an altered spelling of German Gerling.
Karling German
A habitational name from Karling in Bavaria.
Karlsberg German
Means "Carl's Mountain" in German language, it is also used in other Germanic languages
Kasper German, Czech
From the given name Kasper.
Kasselmann German
Combination of the German place name Kassel (or Cassel) and German Mann "man".
Kastl German
From a pet form of the saint's name Castulus, itself a diminutive of the Latin adjective castus 'chaste'.
Kathriner German (Swiss, Rare)
From the given name Kathrin + er meaning "of, from."
Kau German
From Middle High German gehau "(mountain) clearing" hence a topographic name for a mountain dweller or possibly an occupational name for a logger.
Kau German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a mineshaft, from Middle High German kouw(e) "mining hut".
Kaus German
From a regional (Hessian) variant of the habitational name Kues, from a place on the Mosel river, probably so named from Late Latin covis "field barn", "rack" and earlier recorded as Couese, Cobesa.
Kausch German
Pet name derived from the Old High German personal name Gozwin, of uncertain origin.
Kausch German
From a medieval form of the Old High German personal name Chuzo.
Kaut German
Netonymic occupational name for a flax grower or dealer, from Middle High German kute, from Kaut(e) "male dove", hence a metonymic occupational name for the owner or keeper of a dovecote.
Kaut German
Topographic name from the Franconian dialect word Kaut(e) "hollow", "pit", "den".
Kautz German
Nickname for a shy or strange person, from Middle High German kuz "screech owl".
Kautzmann German
Variant of Kautz, with the addition of Middle High German -man "man".
Kaylor Scottish, German
Variant of Scottish Keillor.... [more]
Kayser German
Variant of Kaiser.
Keel German (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of German Kühl (see Kuhl), Kiehl, or Kiel.
Keel German (Swiss)
Swiss German variant of Kehl.
Kegler German
Nickname for a skilled or enthusiastic skittles player, from an agent derivative of Middle High German kegel meaning "skittle", "pin".
Kehler German
Habitational name from various places called Kehl, notably the town across the Rhine from Strasbourg. In some cases it may be a variant of Köhler.
Keim German
Unknown.
Keinath German
Possibly a variant of Keinrath, from the personal name Konrad. ... [more]
Keiner German
Reduced form of the personal name Kagenher, from Old High German gagan 'against' + heri 'army'.
Keiper German
Similar to the origins of Kuiper (Dutch) and Cooper (English), Keiper was an occupation which means "cooper" or "barrelmaker".
Kelch German
nickname from Middle High German kelch "double chin", "goiter". from another meaning of Middle High German kelch "glass", "chalice", hence a metonymic occupational name for a chalice maker or a habitational name for someone living at a house distinguished by the sign of a chalice.
Kellen German
From the name of a place in Rhineland, which is derived from Middle Low German kel (a field name denoting swampy land) or from the dialect word kelle meaning "steep path, ravine".
Kellers German
Variant of Keller.
Kelm German
Germanized form of Polish Chelm ‘peak’, ‘hill’, a topographic name for someone who lived by a hill with a pointed summit, or habitational name from a city in eastern Poland or any of various other places named with this word.
Kelner German, English, Vilamovian
Means "waiter" in German.
Kelsch German (Anglicized)
Partly Americanized form of German Koelsch.
Kemerer German
From the Old German word "kämmerer," which means "chamberlain." A chamberlain was the person in charge of the noble household; to him would fall the duty of ensuring that the castle and court of the noble ran smoothly.
Kemper German, Dutch
German: status name denoting a peasant farmer or serf, an agent noun derivative of Kamp ... [more]
Kepler German
From Middle High German kappe meaning "hooded cloak". This was an occupational name for someone who made these kind of garments. A notable bearer was German astronomer and mathematician Johannes Kepler (1571–1630).
Keppler German
Variant of Kepler.
Kerbel English, German, Russian (Rare)
Means "chervil" in German, a parsley-related herb. The surname probably came into England via Germanic relations between the two languages, hence it being most common in German & English countries.
Kerbow French
Possibly derived from the French word 'corbeau', meaning "raven".
Kercher German
1 Southern German variant of Karcher .... [more]
Kergoat Breton, French
From Breton ker "Village" or "Area" and koad "Woods".
Kerstein German
Derived from -kirsch "cherry" and -stein "stone", variant of Kirstein.
Kesler German, Dutch, Jewish
It is an occupational name that means coppersmith. In alpine countries the name derived from the definition: the one living in the basin of a valley.
Kess German (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Keß.
Kessel German
Occupational name for a maker of cooking vessels from Middle High German kezzel meaning "kettle, cauldron, boiler".
Kessenich German
Habitational name from Kessenich near Bonn.
Kessler German, Jewish
Denotes a coppersmith or maker of copper cooking vessels, derived from Middle High German kezzel meaning “kettle, cauldron”.
Keuch German
Variation of Kuch.
Kiebler German
Comes from the Middle High German word "kübel" meaning a "vat," or "barrel." As such it was an occupational name for a cooper, or barrel maker.
Kiel German
German surname of several possible origins and meanings.... [more]
Kiener German (Swiss)
Nickname derived from the dialect verb chienen 'to whimper'.
Kiestler German
Possibly a form of Kistler an occupation name for a joiner or cabinet maker.
Kiff German
Topographic name from a Westphalian dialect Kiff "outhouse, tied cottage, shack".
Kilburg German, Luxembourgish
"Kyll castle," from German burg (castle) near the Kyll river in Germany. Also "wedge mountain" in Swedish: kil (wedge) and berg (mountain).
Kilian German, Dutch, Polish, Czech
from the Irish personal name Cillín (see Killeen).
Kill German (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
Perhaps derived from Kilian.
Kill German (Rare)
A habitational name for someone from a place named Kill.
Killian Irish (Anglicized, Modern), German
Meaning "little church". From cill (Irish for "church") and -ín, a Gaelic diminutive.
Kilmester German
Kilmester is attested as a surname near Rostock in the 13th century.
Kimmel German, Jewish
Derived from Middle High German kumin and German kümmel meaning "caraway" (related to Latin cuminum, a word of Oriental origin, like the plant itself), hence a metonymic occupational name for a spicer, literally a supplier of caraway seeds... [more]
Kimmich German
The surname hence a metonymic occupational name for a spicer.
Kind English, German, Jewish, Dutch
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Middle High German kint, German Kind ‘child’, hence a nickname for someone with a childish or naive disposition, or an epithet used to distinguish between a father and his son... [more]
Kinder English, German
Habitational name derived from a place in Derbyshire, of unknown etymology. As a German surname, it is derived from German kind meaning "child", possibly denoting someone who had a lot of children.
Kinderknecht German
Occupational name for a servant in charge of the children at a manor, derived from kinder (plural of kind) meaning "child" and knecht meaning "servant".
Kindleberger German
One who lights bergs
Kinkle German
Derived from the Middle High German word "kunkel," which meant "spindle." It is thus supposed that the first bearers of this surname were spindle makers in occupation.
Kinne German, Dutch
German: From the female given name Kinne, a Silesian diminutive of Kunigunde.... [more]
Kippenberger German, French, Scottish
Mainly means "Shepard".
Kipping German
German: habitational name from a place named with Middle High German kip ‘point’, ‘peak’ or from Kippingen in the Rhineland.
Kipps German
Topographical name for someone living on a hill, from Kippe 'edge', 'brink'.
Kirchhoff German
An old Norse origin surname. Combination of Norse word Kirkr and Hoff means 'garden'.
Kirchofer German
German topographic name for someone living near a churchyard, or habitational name for the proprietor or tenant of a farm named as "Church Farm", from Middle High German kirche "church" + hof "farmstead", "manor farm".
Kirsch German
Means 'cherry' in German, short form of Kirschstein or other surnames starting with Kirsch.
Kirschenbaum German
From German means "cherry tree".
Kirschstein German
German surname meaning "cherry stone".
Kirshenbaum German
Means "cherry tree".
Kirstein German
Derivative of the Latin personal name Christianus, also an Americanized spelling of Kirschstein.
Kiser German
Variant of Kaiser.
Kissel German
From a pet form of the Germanic personal name Gisulf.
Kissinger German
HouseofNames.com: The Kissinger surname derives from the Old High German word "kisil," meaning "pebble," or "gravel." The name may have been a topographic name for someone who lived in an area of pebbles or gravel; or it may have evolved from any of several places named with this word.
Kittell German (Anglicized), English
English: variant of Kettle. ... [more]
Klaarwater German
"Clear water."
Klapp German
Nickname for a gossip or a slanderer, derived from Middle High German klapf and klaff meaning "prattle, malicious gossip".
Klarerstein German
German surname meaning "Clear stone".
Klarwasser German
"Clear water."
Klass German
The name is patronymic and it comes from the German first name "Clausen" which is a variant of the name "Nicholas".
Kleehammer German
Means "Cloverleaf hammer"
Kleffner German
Topographic name from Middle Low German clef, cleff "cliff", "precipice".
Kleffner German
Nickname for a prattler or gossip, from Middle High German, Middle Low German kleffer(er).
Kleinfeld German
Means "small field" in German
Kleinknecht German
A combining of the German word klein "small" and knecht "servant", originally an occupational name for a secondary hired hand. A famous historic figure who bore this surname was Jakob Friedrich Kleinknecht (8 April 1722 in Ulm - 11 August 1794 in Ansbach), a German composer of many works of chamber music and symphonies, flutist and Kapellmeister (chapel master).
Kleinman German
Nickname meaning Small Man.
Kleinschmidt German
Occupational surname which means "small smith", that is, a maker of small forged items and metal hand tools.
Kleinstein Jewish, Hebrew, German
Meaning "Little Stone".
Kliebert German
Occupational name for a woodsman or woodworker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German klieben meaning "to cleave or split".
Kliewer German, German (West Prussian), Mennonite
Germanized form of Dutch Kluiver, an occupational name for a court official, originally a hangman or torturer.
Klingbeil German
From Middle High German klingen "to ring or sound" and bīl "axe", literally "sound the axe", an occupational nickname for a journeyman, carpenter, shipwright (or any occupation involving the use of an axe)... [more]
Klingemann German
Occupational surname for a knife maker, literally meaning "knife maker, weapons smith". It is derived from German klinge meaning "blade".
Klinger German
Klinger is a German surname meaning ravine or gorge in Old German. The English variant of Klinger is Clinger.
Klopfenstein German
It means striking stones
Klopp German, Dutch
Habitational name from a place called Kloppe.
Klostermann German
Combination of "kloster" meaning "monastery," and common German suffix Mann.
Kluge German
Variant of Klug
Klutz German
The ancient and distinguished German surname Klutz is derived from the old Germanic term "Klotz," meaning "awkward, clumsy." The name was most likely initially bestowed as a nickname, either on someone who was clumsy or in an ironic way on someone who was exceptionally graceful.
Knab German
Variant of Knabe.
Knabe German
German status name for a young man or a page, from Middle High German knabe (English knave). In aristocratic circles this term denoted a page or squire (a youth destined to become a knight), while among artisans it referred to a journeyman’s assistant or (as a short form of Lehrknabe) ‘apprentice’... [more]
Knape German
Variant of Knapp.
Knapp German
Occupational name from the German word Knapp or Knappe, a variant of Knabe "young unmarried man". In the 15th century this spelling acquired the separate, specialized meanings "servant", "apprentice", or "miner"... [more]
Knappe German
German variant of Knapp.
Knaus German
Comes from Middle High German knuz ‘proud’, ‘arrogant’, ‘daring’, hence a nickname for a haughty person. In Württemberg knaus (and in Switzerland knus) also meant ‘gnarl’, hence a nickname for a short, fat, gnarled person; topographic name for someone living on a hillock, from knaus ‘hillock’ in the Swabian and Alemannic dialects of German
Knauss German
A variant of Knaus.
Knie Swiss
A famous bearer is the Knie family, a Swiss circus dynasty that founded it in 1803. Today the circus is an enterprise with about 200 employees, operated by Frédy and Franco Knie and it is famous worldwide.
Knodel German
dweller near a hilltop; descendant of Knut (hill, or white-haired); a lumpish, thickset person.
Knoedler German
Occupational name, probably for someone who made dumplings, from an agent derivative of Middle High German knödel.
Knoll English, German, Jewish
English and German topographic name for someone living near a hilltop or mountain peak, from Middle English knolle ‘hilltop’, ‘hillock’ (Old English cnoll), Middle High German knol ‘peak’... [more]
Knopfler English, German
Derived from Knopf (German for "button"), this surname was originally given to button makers or button sellers. A famous bearer of this surname is English musician Mark Knopfler (1949-).
Knorr German (Rare)
The name 'Knorr' was used by a collection of knights during the feudal period in Germanic History. Originally laborers to an existing feudal Lord, they gained their freedom and knight status after sucessfully protecting their master's land from invasion... [more]
Knutz German
Variant of Kuntz
Koboldt German (Rare)
Derived from German Kobold (Middle High German kobolt) "kobold; hobgoblin; puck; imp".
Kochendorfer German
Habitational name for someone from any of several places called Kochendorf, in Württemberg, Schleswig-Holstein, and Bohemia.
Köcher German
It literally means "quiver".
Koehl German
Variant of Köhl
Koehnline German
Anglicized form of the German name Köhnlein used by people who moved to the US from Germany during the 19th Century.
Koell Upper German (Rare)
(Koell) named used when came1880s to 1905 in America changed to( Kohl)... [more]
Koelsch German
German from the adjective kölsch, denoting someone from Cologne (German Köln).
Koerner German
Koerner is an occupational name for a grain merchant or possibly an administrator of a granary. ... [more]
Koeth German
Variant of Köth
Koger German
South German: occupational name for a knacker, from an agent derivative of koge ‘carrion’.
Kohlhaas German
Apparently a nickname from Middle Low German kōlhase, literally "cabbage rabbit".
Köhn German
From the given name Köhn.
Köhnlein German
From the personal name Köhn + the diminutive suffix -lein
Kohr German
1. occupational name for a guard or watchman on a tower, Middle Low German kure.... [more]
Kolb German
Comes from Middle High German Kolbe.
Kolden German, Norwegian
From Middle Low German kolt, kolde ‘cold’, a nickname for an unfriendly person; alternatively, it may be a habitational name, a shortened form of Koldenhof ‘cold farm’ in Mecklenburg (standardized form: Kaltenhof, a frequent place name in northern Germany, East Prussia, Bavaria, and Württemberg).Norwegian: habitational name from a farm called Kolden, from Old Norse kollr ‘rounded mountain top’.
Kolesar Czech (Modern, Rare), German (Modern, Rare), German (Austrian, Modern, Rare)
Means either 'wheelwright' or 'coleminer' depending on the region.
Kolkmann German
Kolk is an old German word that means '' man who lives by the river'' and Mann is German for 'man'. The name Kolkmann comes from a man who lived by the North Rhine.
Koll German
From the given name Colo or Koloman. Alternatively derived from Middle Low German kolle "head".
Kollar German
Derived from the kolar "cartwright".
Kölle German
Variant of Koll.
Koller German
The name is derived from the Alemmanic word "Kohler," meaning "charcoal burner," and was most likely originally borne by a practitioner of this occupation.
Kölsch German
From German kölsch, denoting someone from Cologne (Köln in German).
Konitzer German
A German habitational name for someone who lives in various places called Konitz in places like Thuringia, Pomerania, Moravia, or West Prussia.
Konrad German
From the given name Konrad.
Konzelman German
Orginating from Konrad, which is a variant of Conrad, meaning "brave counsel." The second half of the name indicates one who was a councilman or advisor to someone of importance or power.
Kopf German
Means "head" in German.
Koppen German
Patronymic from a reduced pet form of the personal name Jakob.
Koppen German
Habitational name from any of several places named Koppen.
Korbeci German, Albanian
German name for Korb "basket" changed over time to Korbeci
Korbel German
Diminutive of Korb "basket".
Korn German
From Middle High German korn "grain", a metonymic occupational name for a factor or dealer in grain or a nickname for a peasant.
Kornfeld German, Jewish
Means "cornfield" in German.
Kossow German
unknown
Kot Polish, Slovak, Czech, Belarusian, Jewish, German
From a personal name or nickname based on Slavic kot "tom cat".
Koten German
Derived from German Kate / Kote, originally from Middle Low German kote "small house; hut".... [more]
Köth German
From Middle High German, Middle Low German kote ‘cottage’, ‘hovel’, a status name for a day laborer who lived in a cottage and owned no farmland.
Kott German, Polish, Czech
German: variant of Koth or Kotz.... [more]
Kräft German, Jewish
Nickname for a strong man, from Old High German kraft, German Kraft ‘strength’, ‘power’.
Krahe German, Spanish
From the German word Krähe, meaning "crow".... [more]
Krähenbühl German (Swiss)
Combination of German Krähen "crow" and Bühl "hill".
Krahn German
German: nickname for a slim or long-legged person, from Middle Low German krane ‘crane’. Compare Kranich.
Krais German, Brazilian
Brazilian adaptation of the German surname Greis; altered for easier comprehension by the Portuguese-speaking population of Brazil.
Krakau German
Indicates familial origin from Krakau.
Krakauer German
Indicates familial origin from Krakau.
Kranich German
German: nickname for a long-legged or tall and slender person, from Middle High German kranech ‘crane’.
Kratochwil German
German cognate of Kratochvil.
Kratochwill German
Variant spelling of Kratochwil.
Kratt German
German metonymic occupational name for a ''basketmaker'', from Middle High German kratte ''basket''.
Krebsbach German
From a place name meaning "crab stream" in German.
Krechter German
Possibly derived from Krämer
Kreger German
Mercenary or warrior for hire.
Kreisel German, Jewish
Jewish family name and originally a nickname for an active or disorganized person, derived from German kreisel meaning "spinning top, top", ultimately from kreis "circle". Alternatively, it could've be used as a nickname for a person with curly hair in the context of "spiral" or "curl".
Kremer German
Variant of Krämer.
Krepp German
topographic name for someone living in a hollow
Kress German
From Middle High German kresse "gudgeon", hence probably a nickname for someone thought to resemble the fish in some way or an occupational name for a fisherman.
Kress German
From Old High German krassig, gratag "greedy".
Kress German
From a much altered pet form of the personal name Erasmus.
Kretzer German
Occupational name for a basketmaker or a peddler, from an agent derivative of Middle High German kretze 'basket'.
Kreutz German
Topographical name for someone who lived near a cross set up by the roadside, in a marketplace, or as a field or boundary marker, from Middle High German kriuz(e) 'cross'.
Kreutzer German
Variant of Kreutz otherwise it indicated that the bearer of the surname lived in Kreitz near Neuss in Germany
Kreuz German
From German meaning "cross".
Krieg German
German word meaning "war"
Krieger German
Noun to kriegen, kämpfen meaning "to fight (with words)". Describes a person who likes to argue. A wrangler, a quarreler, a brawler. Literal translation "warrior", from the German noun krieg "war" and the suffix -er.
Kriegshauser German
Probably a habitational name for someone from an unidentified place called Kriegshaus, literally "war house".
Krier German, Luxembourgish
Occupational name from Middle High German krier "herald".
Kroll German, Dutch, Polish
Nickname for someone with curly hair, from Middle High German krol 'curly', Middle Low German krulle 'ringlet', 'curl', Middle Dutch croel, crul (apparently a loanword from German)... [more]
Kronen German
From German Krone 'crown', probably as an ornamental name. Or a nickname for a slender, long-legged individual, from a dialect form of Kranich.
Kronstadt German
Means "crown state" (i.e., capital city) in German
Kroos German
Unknown
Krug German
Means "tavern keeper"
Krumbach German, German (Austrian)
From the name of various places in Austria and Germany, for example the town of Krumbach in the state of Bavaria.
Krumholz Jewish, German
German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) from Krumbholz ‘bent timber’, ‘mountain pine’, hence probably a metonymic occupational name for a cartwright or wheelwright. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
Krumreihn German
Possibly derived from Middle High German krum(b) meaning "crooked" and rein meaning "border of a field, margin", and hence a topographic name for someone who lived by a field with a crooked edge, or perhaps a nickname for a farmer who plowed a crooked furrow... [more]
Krumwiede German
Location-based name for people who lived by a gnarled old willow tree.... [more]
Kuch German
German metonymic occupational name for a pastry cook, from German kuchen ‘cake’, or simply a variant of Koch ‘cook’.
Kuchenmeister German
Occupational name for a master cook (literally "kitchen master"), a court official.
Kuchler German (Rare)
Often confused with Küchler a name for a cookie baker, Kuchler is a noble name for an old german family. Kuchler is origined in a city named Kuchl at the border of todays german bavaria... [more]
Kues German, Dutch
Habitational name from Cues, now part of Bernkastel-Kues in the Rhineland Palatinate.
Kühl German, Low German
The spelling Kühl results from a folk-etymological association with High German kühl ‘cool’ (Middle High German küel(e), a nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’... [more]
Kuhlman German
Nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm.’
Kuhlmann German
German (also Kühlmann) nickname from Middle High German küel ‘cool’, ‘calm’ (see Kuhl).
Kul German, Dutch
Derived from Old High German kol meaning "coal", perhaps an occupational name for a miner or coal seller.
Kulp German
anglicized version of Kolbe
Külper German
German cognate of Culpeper.
Kummerer Upper German (Germanized, Rare)
Kummerer means ""bringer of sorrow""
Kummerow German
Habitational name from any of various places in Brandenburg and Mecklenburg called Kummerow.
Kunis German, Dutch
From a derivative of the personal name Konrad.
Künnen German
Metronymic from the given name Kunigunde.
Künzi German, Swiss, German (Austrian)
From a pet form of the personal name Kuntz.
Künzler German
Nickname for a flatterer, from an agent derivative of Middle High German künzen "to flatter".
Kupfer German, Jewish
German (Küpfer) and Jewish (Ashkenazic) metonymic occupational name for a worker or trader in copper, Middle High German kupfer, German Kupfer ‘copper’... [more]
Kürschner German
Occupational name for a furrier, Middle High German kürsenære, from Middle High German kürsen meaning "fur coat".
Kurth German
From the given name Kurt