All Surnames

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SCHÜTTMANN German
Means "watchman, guard" from Middle High German schützen "to protect".
SCHUYLER Dutch
Dutch form of SCHULER.
SCHWANGAU German
From the name of a town in southern Germany, possibly related to German Schwan meaning "swan".
SCHWARZ German, Jewish
Means "black" in German, from Old High German swarz. It originally described a person with black hair or a dark complexion.
SCHWARZENBERG German
Means "black mountain" in German.
SCHWARZENEGGER German
From a place name, derived from Old High German swarz meaning "black" and ecka meaning "edge, corner". A famous bearer of this name is actor and politician Arnold Schwarzenegger (1947-).
SCHWEITZER German
Indicated a person from Switzerland (see SCHWEIZ).
SCHWENKE (1) German
Derived from Middle High German swenken meaning "to swing".
SCHWENKE (2) German
From a given name, a Low German diminutive of SWANHILD.
SCHWINGHAMMER German
Occupational name for a blacksmith, literally meaning "swing hammer" in German.
SCIACCA Italian
Originally denoted someone from Sciacca, Sicily, Italy, which is of uncertain origin.
SCIARRA Italian
From Sicilian sciarra meaning "quarrel, dispute", originally a nickname for a quarrelsome person.
SCOLA Italian
From Italian scuola meaning "school".
SCORDATO Italian
Means "forgotten, left behind" in Italian.
SCOTT English, Scottish
Originally given to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic.
SCOTTI Italian
From the medieval given name Francescotto, a diminutive of FRANCESCO.
SCRIVEN English
Occupational name meaning "writer, clerk, scribe" in Old French, derived from Latin scriba.
SCULLY Irish
Anglicized form of Ó SCOLAIDHE.
SEABROOK English
Denoted a person from a town by this name in Buckinghamshire, England. It is derived from that of a river combined with Old English broc "stream".
SEAVER English
From the unattested Old English given name Sæfaru, derived from the Old English elements "sea, ocean" and faru "journey".
SEBASTIANI Italian
From the given name SEBASTIANO.
SEDLÁČEK Czech
Diminutive form of SEDLÁK.
SEDLÁK Czech
Means "farmer" in Czech. A sedlák had more land than a Zahradník or a Chalupník, but less land than a Dvořák.
SEEGER German
From the given name SIEGER.
SEEGERS Dutch
Means "son of SIEGER".
SEELEN Dutch
Variant of CEELEN.
SEELENFREUND Jewish
From German Seele meaning "soul" and Freund meaning "friend".
SEGAL (1) Jewish
From the Hebrew phrase סגן לויה (segan Lewiyah) meaning "assistant Levite".
SEGAL (2) French
Occupational name for a grower or seller of rye, from Old French, from Latin secale "rye".
SEGERS Dutch
Means "son of SIEGER".
SEGHERS Dutch
Means "son of SIEGER".
SEGRETI Italian
From Italian segreto meaning "secret", a nickname for a confidant.
SEIDEL German
From a diminutive of the given name SIEGFRIED.
SELBY English
From the name of a village that meant "willow farm" in Old English.
SELVAGGIO Italian
Italian form of SAVAGE.
SEMPERS English
From the name of various towns named Saint Pierre in Normandy, all of which commemorate Saint PETER.
SENFT (1) German
Occupational name for a mustard seller, from German Senf "mustard".
SENFT (2) German
Nickname for a helpful, kind person, from Old High German semfti meaning "soft, accommodating".
SENIOR English
Originally a name for the elder of two brothers.
SEPPÄ Finnish
Means "smith" in Finnish.
SEPPÄNEN Finnish
Patronymic form of SEPPÄ.
SEPÚLVEDA Spanish
Derived from the name of the Sepúlveda Valley in the mountains of Segovia, and was originally used to denote people from that region. It is possibly derived from Spanish sepultar "to bury".
SERAFIM Portuguese
Derived from the Latin given name SERAPHINUS.
SERAFIN Polish, Italian
Derived from the given name SERAFIN or SERAFINO.
SERAFINI Italian
Derived from the given name SERAFINO.
ȘERBAN Romanian
Means "a Serb" in Romanian.
SERGEANT English, French
Occupational name derived from Old French sergent meaning "servant", ultimately from Latin servire "to serve".
SERPICO Italian
From a nickname derived from Italian serpe "serpent, reptile".
SESSA Italian
Originally indicated a person from from Sessa or Sessa Cilento, Italy (from Latin Suessa, of uncertain meaning).
SESSIONS English
From the name of the city of Soissons in northern France, itself derived from the name of the Celtic tribe of the Suessiones.
ŠEVČÍK Czech
Occupational name derived from Czech švec meaning "shoemaker, cobbler".
SEVERIJNS Dutch
Derived from the Latin given name SEVERINUS.
SÉVERIN French
Derived from the given name SÉVERIN.
SEVERINS Dutch
Derived from the Latin given name SEVERINUS.
SEVRIENS Dutch
Derived from the Latin given name SEVERINUS.
SEWARD (1) English
Derived from the given name SIGEWEARD.
SEWARD (2) English
Means "swineherd" from Old English su "sow, female pig" and hierde "herdsman, guardian".
SEWARD (3) Irish
Anglicized form of Ó SUAIRD.
SEXTON English
Occupational name for a sexton (Middle English sexteyn), a caretaker for a church or graveyard.
SEYMOUR (1) English
From Saint Maur, a French place name, which commemorates Saint MAURUS.
SEYMOUR (2) English
From an English place name, derived from Old English "sea" and mere "lake".
SGRO Italian
Nickname for a curly-haired person, from Greek σγουρος (sgouros) meaning "curly".
SHAFIR Jewish
Ornamental name meaning "sapphire" in Yiddish.
SHAIN Jewish
Means "beautiful, handsome" in Yiddish, from German schön.
SHAKESPEARE English
From a nickname for a warlike person, from Old English scacan "to shake" and spere "spear". A famous bearer was the English dramatist and poet William Shakespeare (1564-1616).
SHANNON Irish
From Irish Ó Seanáin meaning "descendant of SEANÁN".
SHAPIRO Jewish
Means "pretty, lovely" in Hebrew, from Aramaic.
SHARMA Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Assamese, Gujarati, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Nepali
Means "joy, shelter, comfort" in Sanskrit.
SHARP English
Nickname for a keen person, from Old English scearp "sharp".
SHARROW English
Originally a name for someone from Sharrow, England, derived from Old English scearu "boundary" and hoh "point of land, heel".
SHAW (1) English
Originally given to a person who lived near a prominent thicket, from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket, copse".
SHAW (2) Scottish
From a given name or byname that was derived from Gaelic sithech meaning "wolf".
SHEA Irish
Anglicized form of Ó SÉAGHDHA.
SHEACH Scottish
From the Gaelic given name SÍTHEACH.
SHEARER English
English cognate of SCHERER.
SHEEDY Irish
Anglicized form of Ó SÍODA.
SHEEHY Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic given name SÍTHEACH.
SHEENAN Irish
Variant of SHANNON.
SHEHU Albanian
From the Arabic title شيخ (shaykh) meaning "sheik".
SHEINFELD Jewish
Ornamental name derived from German schön "fine, beautiful" and feld meaning "field".
SHELBY English
Variant of SELBY.
SHELTON English
From the name of various English towns, meaning "shelf town" in Old English.
SHEPARD English
Occupational name meaning "shepherd, sheep herder", from Old English sceaphyrde.
SHERAZI Urdu
Urdu form of SHIRAZI.
SHERBURN English
Denoted a person hailing from any of the various places called Sherborne or Sherburn in England, derived from Old English scir "bright" and burna "spring, fountain, stream".
SHERIDAN Irish
From the Irish name Ó Sirideáin meaning "descendant of Sirideán". The given name Sirideán means "searcher".
SHERMAN (1) English
Means "shear man", referring to someone who used shears in his line of work, such as a sheep-shearer.
SHERMAN (2) Jewish
Means "tailor" in Yiddish, derived from שער (sher) "scissors".
SHIMIZU Japanese
From Japanese (shi) meaning "clear, pure, clean" and (mizu) meaning "water".
SHINE (1) English
Means "beautiful, attractive" from Old English sciene.
SHINE (2) Irish
Anglicized form of Ó SEIGHIN.
SHIRAZI Persian
Originally denoted someone who came from the city of Shiraz, located in southern Iran. The city's name is possibly of Elamite origin.
SHORT English
From a nickname for a short person, from Middle English schort.
SHRIVER German
German cognate of SCRIVEN.
SHVETS Ukrainian, Russian
Means "shoemaker" in Ukrainian and Russian.
SIDDALL English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English sid "wide" and halh "nook, recess".
SIDNEY English
Originally derived from various place names in England meaning "wide island", from Old English sid "wide" and eg "island". Another theory holds that it comes from the name of a town in Normandy called "Saint DENIS", though evidence for this is lacking.
SIEBERT German
Derived from the given name SIEGBERT.
SIEGEL (1) German
Occupational name for a maker of seals or signet rings, ultimately from Latin sigillum "seal".
SIEGEL (2) German
Derived from the diminutive of Germanic given names beginning with the element sigu meaning "victory".
SIEGER German
From the given name SIEGER.
SIEGERT German
Derived from the given name SIEGHARD.
SIEKERT German (Rare)
Derived from the given name SIEGHARD.
SIEMON German
Variant of SIMON.
SIENA Italian
Indicated a person from Siena in Italy, which was named after the Gaulish tribe of the Senones.
SIENKIEWICZ Polish
Patronymic from the given name Sienko, an old diminutive of SZYMON. This was the surname of the Polish writer Henryk Sienkiewicz (1846-1916).
SIERRA Spanish
Originally indicated a dweller on a hill range or ridge, from Spanish sierra "mountain range", derived from Latin serra "saw".
SIERŻANT Polish
Polish cognate of SERGEANT.
SIKORA Polish
Means "tit (bird)" in Polish.
SILJE Norwegian
Derived from the given name SILJE.
SILVA Portuguese, Spanish
From Spanish or Portuguese silva meaning "forest".
SILVEIRA Portuguese
Means "forests" in Portuguese.
SILVER English
From a nickname for a person with grey hair, from Old English seolfor "silver".
SILVESTRI Italian
Derived from the given name SILVESTER.
ŠIMEK Czech
Derived from the name Šimek, a diminutive of ŠIMON.
SIMEN English (Rare)
From the given name SIMON (1).
SIMEONOV Bulgarian
Means "son of SIMEON".
SIMMON German
From the given name SIMON (1).
SIMMONS English
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SIMMS English
Derived from the medieval given name Sim, a short form of SIMON (1).
SIMÕES Portuguese
Means "son of SIMÃO" in Portuguese.
ŠIMON Czech, Slovak
Derived from the given name ŠIMON.
SIMON English, French, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Jewish
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONEIT German
From the given name SIMON (1).
ŠIMONIS Lithuanian
Means "son of SIMONAS".
SIMONIS Dutch
Means "son of SIMON (1)".
SIMONS English, German
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONSON English
Means "son of SIMON (1)".
SIMONSSON Swedish
Swedish form of SIMONSON.
SIMPKIN English
From a diminutive of the given name SIMON (1).
SIMPSON English
Means "son of Sim", Sim being a medieval short form of SIMON (1).
SIMS English
Variant of SIMMS.
SINAGRA (1) Italian
Originally denoted a person from Sinagra on Sicily, possibly derived from Latin sinus "inlet" and ager "field".
SINAGRA (2) Italian
Derived from the given name Senagora, an Italian form of XENAGORAS.
SINCLAIR English
Derived from a Norman French town called "Saint CLAIR".
SINGH Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Indian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion". In 1699 Guru Gobind Singh gave all his Sikh male followers the surname Singh and all females Kaur.
SIPOS Hungarian
Occupational name for a fife player or piper, from Hungarian síp "whistle, pipe".
SISKIN Jewish
Variant of ZISKIND.
SITKO Polish
Means "a fine sieve" in Polish, a diminutive of the Polish word sito "sieve".
SITZ (1) German
Derived from a given name beginning with the Germanic element sigu meaning "victory".
SITZ (2) German
Means "house owner", derived from Old High German siz "seat, domicile".
SKÁLA Czech
Means "rock" in Czech, indicating that the original bearer lived near a prominent rock.
SKAŁA Polish
Polish cognate of SKÁLA.
SKALICKÝ Czech, Slovak
Indicated the original bearer came from a place named Skalice, Skalica or Skalička in the Czech Republic or Slovakia, derived from the Slavic root skala meaning "rock".
SKEATES English
From the Old Norse nickname or byname skjótr meaning "swift".
SKINNER English
Occupational name for a person who skinned animals, from Old Norse skinn.
SKJEGGESTAD Norwegian
From a place name, derived from Norwegian skjegg "beard" and stad "town, place".
SKOVGAARD Danish
From a place name, derived from Danish skov "wood, forest" and gård "farm, yard".
SLANE Irish
Originally indicated a person from Slane, County Meath, Ireland, which is derived from the given name SLÁINE.
ŚLĄSKI Polish
Polish cognate of SLEZÁK.
SLATER English
Occupational name indicating that an early member worked covering roofs with slate, from Old French esclat "shard", of Germanic origin.
SLÁVIK Slovak
Slovak cognate of SLAVÍK.
SLAVÍK Czech
Means "nightingale" in Czech.
SLAVKOV Bulgarian
Means "son of SLAVKO".
ŚLĄZAK Polish
Polish cognate of SLEZÁK.
SLEZÁK Czech
Originally a name for a person from SILESIA, a historical region that is nowadays split between Poland, Germany and the Czech Republic.
SLOAN Irish
Patronymic name derived from the early Irish given name SLUAGHADHÁN.
SLOANE Irish
Variant of SLOAN.
SLOOTMAEKERS Dutch, Flemish
Occupational name for a locksmith, from Dutch slot "lock" and maker "maker".
SLOVÁK Czech, Slovak
Originally described one who was from Slovakia.
ŚLUSARCZYK Polish
Diminutive form of ŚLUSARSKI.
ŚLUSARSKI Polish
Occupational name for a locksmith, from Polish ślusarz, of Germanic origin.
SMALL English
From a nickname for a small person, from Middle English smal.
SMALLS English
Variant of SMALL.
SMEDLEY English
From an unidentified place name probably meaning "smooth clearing" in Old English.
SMEETS Dutch
Variant of SMIT.
SMETS Dutch
Variant of SMIT.
SMIT Dutch
From Middle Dutch smit "metalworker, blacksmith", a cognate of SMITH.
SMITH English
Means "metalworker, blacksmith" from Old English smiþ, related to smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world. A famous bearer was the Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).
SMITS Dutch
Variant of SMIT.
SMOLA Czech
Variant of SMOLAK.
SMOLAK Polish, Czech
Occupational name for a distiller of pitch, derived from the Slavic word smola meaning "pitch, resin".
SMYTHE English
Variant of SMITH.
SNAAIJER Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNAIJER Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNEIDERS Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNEIJDER Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNEIJDERS Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNEIJER Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNEIJERS Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNEL Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNELL.
SNELL English
From Old English snel meaning "fast, quick, nimble".
SNIDER English
Variant of SNYDER.
ŚNIEGOWSKI Polish
Habitational name for a person from Sniegow, Sniegowo or other places with a name derived from Polish śnieg "snow".
SNIJDER Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNIJDERS Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNYDER English
Means "tailor" from Middle English snithen "to cut", an occupational name for a person who stitched coats and clothing.
SOARES Portuguese
Means "son of SUERO".
SOBEL Jewish
Variant of SOBOL.
SOBÓL Polish
Polish cognate of SOBOL.
SOBOL Russian, Ukrainian, Jewish
Occupational name for a fur trader, from the Slavic word soboli meaning "sable, marten". As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
SOKAL Polish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKÓŁ Polish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKOL Czech, Jewish
From Czech sokol meaning "falcon", a nickname or an occupational name for a falconer. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
SOKOLL Jewish
Variant of SOKOL.
SOKOLOF Jewish
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOKOLOFF Jewish
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOKOLOVSKY Russian
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOKOŁOWSKI Polish
Usually refers to the city of Sokołów Podlaski in Poland. It may sometimes be derived from Polish sokół meaning "falcon".
SOKOLSKY Jewish
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOLAK Turkish
From the nickname solak meaning "left-handed".
SOLBERG Norwegian, Swedish
From a place name, derived from Old Norse sól "sun" and berg "mountain". As a Swedish name it may be ornamental.
SOLDATI Italian
From Italian soldato meaning "soldier", ultimately from Latin solidus, a type of Roman coin.
SOLER Occitan, Catalan
Denoted a person from any of the numerous places in the area whose names derive from Occitan or Catalan soler meaning "ground, floor".
SOLO Basque
Means "rural estate" in Basque.
SOLOMON English, Jewish
Derived from the given name SOLOMON.
SOLOS Basque
Possibly a variant of SOLO.
SÓLYOM Hungarian
Means "hawk, falcon" in Hungarian.
SOMMA Italian
From the names of Italian places like Somma Lombardo or Somma Vesuviana, derived from Latin summa meaning "summit".
SOMMER (1) German, English
Means "summer", from Old High German sumar or Old English sumor. This was a nickname for a cheerful person, someone who lived in a sunny spot, or a farmer who had to pay taxes in the summer.
SOMMER (2) German
From Middle High German sumber or sommer meaning "basket, wickerwork, drum".
SOMOGYI Hungarian
Originally indicated a person from Somogy, a region within Hungary. It may be derived from Hungarian som meaning "cornel tree".
SONG Chinese, Korean
From Chinese (sòng) referring to the Song dynasty, which ruled China from 960 to 1279.
SONNEN German
Means "sun" from Middle High German sunne. It probably denoted someone of cheerful temperament or a person who lived in a sunny area.
SORDI Italian
From Italian sordo meaning "deaf", from Latin surdus.
SÖRENSEN Swedish
Swedish form of SØRENSEN.
SORENSON Danish, Swedish
Anglicized form of SØRENSEN or SÖRENSSON.
SÖRENSSON Swedish
Swedish form of SØRENSEN.
SORG German
Variant of SORGE.
SORGE German
Means "worry, care, anxiety" in German, from Old High German sorga.
SORIANO Italian
From place names such as Soriano Calabro and Soriano nel Cimino. It is typical of southern Italy.
SÖRÖS Hungarian
From Hungarian sör meaning "beer". Originally the name was given to beer brewers.
SORRENTINO Italian
Derived from the town of Sorrento near Naples, called Surrentum in Latin, of unknown meaning.
SOSA Spanish
Spanish form of SOUSA.
SOTO Spanish
Means "grove of trees, small forest" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin saltus.
SOUČEK Czech
From Czech suk meaning "tree knot". This could either be a topographic name or a nickname for a stubborn person.
SOUCY French
Originally denoted someone from French towns by this name in Aisne or Yonne, both derived from the Latin name Suciacum.
SOUN Khmer
Means "garden" in Khmer.
SOURD French
French cognate of SORDI.
SOUSA Portuguese
Originally indicated someone who lived near the River Sousa in Portugal, possibly derived from Latin salsus "salty" or saxa "rocks".
SOUTHERS German
Possibly an Americanized form of SAUTER.
SOUTHGATE English
Name for a person who lived near the southern gate of a town or in a town named Southgate, from Old English suþ and gæt.
SOVÁNY Hungarian
Means "thin, lean" in Hungarian.
SOWARDS English, Irish
Possibly a variant of SEWARD (1) or SEWARD (3).
SÓWKA Polish
From a diminutive of Polish sowa meaning "owl".
SPADA Italian
Occupational name for an armourer or swordsman, from Italian spada "sword", Latin spatha.
SPALDING English
From the name of the town of Spalding in Lincolnshire, derived from the Anglo-Saxon tribe of the Spaldingas.
SPANNAGEL German
Occupational name for a nailsmith, from Middle High German span nagel "connecting bolt".
SPANÒ Sicilian
From Sicilian spanu meaning "sparse, thin hair", ultimately from Greek σπανιος (spanios) meaning "scarce, rare".
SPARACELLO Italian
From Sicilian sparaciu meaning "asparagus", an occupational name for an asparagus seller or grower.
SPARKS English
From an Old Norse nickname or byname derived from sparkr meaning "sprightly".
SPEAR English
From Old English spere "spear", an occupational name for a hunter or a maker of spears, or a nickname for a thin person.
SPEARING English
Patronymic form of SPEAR.
SPEARS English
Patronymic form of SPEAR.
SPECHT German
Means "woodpecker" in German.
SPEIGHT English
English form of SPECHT, probably a loanword from German or Dutch.
SPELLMEYER German
Possibly from German spielen meaning "to play, to jest" combined with meyer meaning "village headman". Perhaps it referred to someone who was played or acted as the village headman.
SPENCER English
Occupational name for a person who dispensed provisions to those who worked at a manor, derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry".
SPEZIALE Italian
Means "grocer" in Italian, derived from Latin speciarius "spice seller".
SPIJKER (1) Dutch
Denoted a dweller by or worker at a granary, from Dutch spijker "granary".
SPIJKER (2) Dutch
Occupational name for a nailsmith, from Dutch spijker "nail".
SPIKER Dutch
Americanized form of SPIJKER (1) or SPIJKER (2).
SPILLUM Norwegian
Originally denoted a person from Spillum, Norway.
SPINI Italian
Denoted a person who lived near thorn bushes, from Italian spina "thorn, spine", from Latin.
SPIROS Greek
From the given name SPIRO.
SPITZ German
Means "sharp" in German, indicating the original bearer lived near a pointed hill.
SPITZNAGEL German
Means "sharp nail" in German, an occupational name for a nailsmith.
SPITZNOGLE German
Americanized form of SPITZNAGEL.
SPONAUGLE German
Americanized form of SPANNAGEL.
SPOONER English
Occupational name for a maker of spoons or a maker of shingles, derived from Middle English spone meaning "chip of wood, spoon".
SPURLING English
From Middle English sparewe "sparrow" and the diminutive suffix -ling.
STABILE Italian
From the medieval Italian given name Stabile meaning "stable, firm".
STABLUM Italian
Northern Italian name derived from Latin stabulum meaning "stable".
STACEY English
Variant of STACY.
STACK English
From a nickname for a big person, derived from Middle English stack "haystack", of Old Norse origin.
STACKS English
Variant of STACK.
STACY English
Derived from Stace, a medieval form of EUSTACE.
STAFFORD English
From the name of the English city of Stafford, Staffordshire, derived from Old English stæð meaning "wharf, landing place" and ford meaning "ford, river crossing".
STAINTHORPE English
Originally indicated a person from Staindrop, County Durham, England, derived from Old English stæner meaning "stony ground" and hop meaning "valley".
STAMP English
Originally denoted a person from Étampes near Paris. It was called Stampae in Latin, but the ultimate origin is uncertain.
STANEK (1) Polish
Derived from Stanek, a diminutive of the name STANISŁAW.
STANEK (2) Czech
Derived from Stanek, a diminutive of the name STANISLAV.