All Surnames

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SNIJDERS Dutch
Dutch cognate of SNYDER.
SNYDER English
Means "tailor", derived from Middle English snithen "to cut", an occupational name for a person who stitched coats and clothing.
SOARES Portuguese
Means "son of SUERO".
SOBEL Jewish
Variant of SOBOL.
SOBÓL Polish
Polish cognate of SOBOL.
SOBOL Russian, Ukrainian, Jewish
Occupational name for a fur trader, from the Slavic word soboli meaning "sable, marten". As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
SOKAL Polish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKÓŁ Polish
Polish cognate of SOKOL.
SOKOL Czech, Jewish
From Czech sokol meaning "falcon", a nickname or an occupational name for a falconer. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
SOKOLL Jewish
Variant of SOKOL.
SOKOLOF Jewish
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOKOLOFF Jewish
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOKOLOVSKY Russian
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOKOŁOWSKI Polish
Usually refers to the city of Sokołów Podlaski in Poland. It may sometimes be derived from Polish sokół meaning "falcon".
SOKOLSKY Jewish
Means "son of SOKOL".
SOLAK Turkish
From the nickname solak meaning "left-handed".
SOLBERG Norwegian, Swedish
From a place name, derived from Old Norse sól "sun" and berg "mountain". As a Swedish name it may be ornamental.
SOLDATI Italian
From Italian soldato meaning "soldier", ultimately from Latin solidus, a type of Roman coin.
SOLER Occitan, Catalan
Denoted a person from any of the numerous places in the area whose names derive from Occitan or Catalan soler meaning "ground, floor".
SOLO Basque
Means "rural estate" in Basque.
SOLOMON English, Jewish
Derived from the given name SOLOMON.
SOLOS Basque
Possibly a variant of SOLO.
SÓLYOM Hungarian
Means "hawk, falcon" in Hungarian.
SOMMA Italian
From the names of Italian places like Somma Lombardo or Somma Vesuviana, derived from Latin summa meaning "summit".
SOMMER (1) German, English
Means "summer", from Old High German sumar or Old English sumor. This was a nickname for a cheerful person, someone who lived in a sunny spot, or a farmer who had to pay taxes in the summer.
SOMMER (2) German
From Middle High German sumber or sommer meaning "basket, wickerwork, drum".
SOMOGYI Hungarian
Originally indicated a person from Somogy, a region within Hungary. It may be derived from Hungarian som meaning "cornel tree".
SONG Chinese, Korean
From Chinese (sòng) referring to the Song dynasty, which ruled China from 960 to 1279.
SONNEN German
Means "sun" from Middle High German sunne. It probably denoted someone of cheerful temperament or a person who lived in a sunny area.
SORDI Italian
From Italian sordo meaning "deaf", from Latin surdus.
SÖRENSEN Swedish
Swedish form of SØRENSEN.
SORENSON Danish, Swedish
Anglicized form of SØRENSEN or SÖRENSSON.
SÖRENSSON Swedish
Swedish form of SØRENSEN.
SORG German
Variant of SORGE.
SORGE German
Means "worry, care, anxiety" in German, from Old High German sorga.
SORIANO Italian
From place names such as Soriano Calabro and Soriano nel Cimino. It is typical of southern Italy.
SÖRÖS Hungarian
From Hungarian sör meaning "beer". Originally the name was given to beer brewers.
SORRENTINO Italian
Derived from the town of Sorrento near Naples, called Surrentum in Latin, of unknown meaning.
SOSA Spanish
Spanish form of SOUSA.
SOTO Spanish
Means "grove of trees, small forest" in Spanish, ultimately from Latin saltus.
SOUČEK Czech
From Czech suk meaning "tree knot". This could either be a topographic name or a nickname for a stubborn person.
SOUCY French
Originally denoted someone from French towns by this name in Aisne or Yonne, both derived from the Latin name Suciacum.
SOUN Khmer
Means "garden" in Khmer.
SOURD French
French cognate of SORDI.
SOUSA Portuguese
Originally indicated someone who lived near the River Sousa in Portugal, possibly derived from Latin salsus "salty" or saxa "rocks".
SOUTHERS German
Possibly an Americanized form of SAUTER.
SOUTHGATE English
Name for a person who lived near the southern gate of a town or in a town named Southgate, from Old English suþ and gæt.
SOVÁNY Hungarian
Means "thin, lean" in Hungarian.
SOWARDS English, Irish
Possibly a variant of SEWARD (1) or SEWARD (3).
SÓWKA Polish
From a diminutive of Polish sowa meaning "owl".
SPADA Italian
Occupational name for an armourer or swordsman, from Italian spada "sword", Latin spatha.
SPALDING English
From the name of the town of Spalding in Lincolnshire, derived from the Anglo-Saxon tribe of the Spaldingas.
SPANNAGEL German
Occupational name for a nailsmith, from Middle High German span nagel "connecting bolt".
SPANÒ Sicilian
From Sicilian spanu meaning "sparse, thin hair", ultimately from Greek σπανιος (spanios) meaning "scarce, rare".
SPARACELLO Italian
From Sicilian sparaciu meaning "asparagus", an occupational name for an asparagus seller or grower.
SPARKS English
From an Old Norse nickname or byname derived from sparkr meaning "sprightly".
SPEAR English
From Old English spere "spear", an occupational name for a hunter or a maker of spears, or a nickname for a thin person.
SPEARING English
Patronymic form of SPEAR.
SPEARS English
Patronymic form of SPEAR.
SPECHT German
Means "woodpecker" in German.
SPEIGHT English
English form of SPECHT, probably a loanword from German or Dutch.
SPELLMEYER German
Possibly from German spielen meaning "to play, to jest" combined with meyer meaning "village headman". Perhaps it referred to someone who was played or acted as the village headman.
SPENCER English
Occupational name for a person who dispensed provisions to those who worked at a manor, derived from Middle English spense "larder, pantry".
SPEZIALE Italian
Means "grocer" in Italian, derived from Latin speciarius "spice seller".
SPIJKER (1) Dutch
Denoted a dweller by or worker at a granary, from Dutch spijker "granary".
SPIJKER (2) Dutch
Occupational name for a nailsmith, from Dutch spijker "nail".
SPIKER Dutch
Americanized form of SPIJKER (1) or SPIJKER (2).
SPILLUM Norwegian
Originally denoted a person from Spillum, Norway.
SPINI Italian
Denoted a person who lived near thorn bushes, from Italian spina "thorn, spine", from Latin.
SPIROS Greek
From the given name SPIRO.
SPITZ German
Means "sharp" in German, indicating the original bearer lived near a pointed hill.
SPITZNAGEL German
Means "sharp nail" in German, an occupational name for a nailsmith.
SPITZNOGLE German
Americanized form of SPITZNAGEL.
SPONAUGLE German
Americanized form of SPANNAGEL.
SPOONER English
Occupational name for a maker of spoons or a maker of shingles, derived from Middle English spone meaning "chip of wood, spoon".
SPURLING English
From Middle English sparewe "sparrow" and the diminutive suffix -ling.
STABILE Italian
From the medieval Italian given name Stabile meaning "stable, firm".
STABLUM Italian
Northern Italian name derived from Latin stabulum meaning "stable".
STACEY English
Variant of STACY.
STACK English
From a nickname for a big person, derived from Middle English stack "haystack", of Old Norse origin.
STACKS English
Variant of STACK.
STACY English
Derived from Stace, a medieval form of EUSTACE.
STAFFORD English
From the name of the English city of Stafford, Staffordshire, derived from Old English stæð meaning "wharf, landing place" and ford meaning "ford, river crossing".
STAINTHORPE English
Originally indicated a person from Staindrop, County Durham, England, derived from Old English stæner meaning "stony ground" and hop meaning "valley".
STAMP English
Originally denoted a person from Étampes near Paris. It was called Stampae in Latin, but the ultimate origin is uncertain.
STANEK (1) Polish
Derived from Stanek, a diminutive of the name STANISŁAW.
STANEK (2) Czech
Derived from Stanek, a diminutive of the name STANISLAV.
STANEV Bulgarian
Means "son of Stane", Stane being a diminutive of STANISLAV.
STANFORD English
Derived from various English place names meaning "stone ford" in Old English.
STANLEY English
From various place names meaning "stone clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer was the British-American explorer and journalist Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904).
STANTON English
From one of the many places named Stanton or Staunton in England, derived from Old English stan meaning "stone" and tun meaning "enclosure, town".
STÁREK Czech
Czech cognate of STAREK.
STAREK Polish
From a nickname derived from Polish stary "old".
STARK English, German
From a nickname meaning "strong, rigid", from Old English stearc or Old High German stark.
STAROSTA Polish
Means "mayor, leader, elder" in Polish.
STARR English
From Middle English sterre meaning "star". This was usually a nickname, but it could also occasionally be a sign name from the name of an inn called the Star.
STARRETT Scottish
Originally indicated a person from Stairaird, an estate in Scotland.
STASIUK Ukrainian, Polish
From a diminutive of the given name STANISLAV.
STATHAM English
From the name of a village in the English county of Cheshire, derived from Old English stæð meaning "wharf, landing place" and ham "home, settlement".
STAUSS German
Means "buttocks" from Middle High German stuz.
STAVROS Greek
From the given name STAVROS.
STAWSKI Polish
Derived from Polish staw meaning "pond".
STEED English
Occupational name for one who tended horses, derived from Middle English steed, in turn derived from Old English steda meaning "stallion".
STEELE English
Occupational name for a steelworker, from Old English stele meaning "steel".
STEEN Low German
Low German variant of STEIN.
STEENSEN Danish
Means "son of STEEN".
STEFANIDIS Greek
Means "son of STEFANOS" in Greek.
STEFANOV Bulgarian
Means "son of STEFAN".
STEFANOVIĆ Serbian
Means "son of STEFAN".
STEFANSEN Danish
Means "son of STEFAN".
STEFANSSON Swedish
Means "son of STEFAN".
STEFFEN Low German, English
Derived from the given name STEPHEN.
STEFFENSEN Danish
Means "son of STEFFEN".
STEIN German, Jewish
From Old High German stein meaning "stone". It might indicate the original bearer lived near a prominent stone or worked as a stonecutter. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
STEINMANN German
Means "stone man" in German, used as a habitational name for a person who lived near a prominent stone or an occupational name for a stone worker.
STEINSSON Icelandic
Means "son of STEINN".
STENBERG Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from Scandinavian sten "stone" and berg "mountain". As a Swedish name it is ornamental.
STENDAHL Swedish
Ornamental name derived from Swedish sten "stone" and dahl "valley" (modern spelling dal).
STENGER German
Occupational name for a post maker, from Old High German stanga "pole".
ŠTĚPÁNEK Czech
Derived from a diminutive of the given name ŠTĚPÁN.
STEPHANIDIS Greek
Alternate transcription of Greek Στεφανιδης (see STEFANIDIS).
STEPHENS English
Derived from the given name STEPHEN.
STEPHENSON English
Means "son of STEPHEN".
STERLING Scottish
Derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning.
STERN (1) English
From Old English styrne meaning "stern, severe". This was used as a nickname for someone who was stern, harsh, or severe in manner or character.
STERN (2) German, Jewish
German cognate of STARR.
STERNBERG Jewish
Ornamental name derived from old German stern "star" and berg "mountain".
STEUBE German
Variant of STEUBEN.
STEUBEN German
Name for a dweller by a stump of a large tree, from Middle Low German stubbe "stub".
STEWART Scottish
Occupational name for an administrative official of an estate or steward, from Old English stig "house" and weard "guard". The Stewart family (sometimes spelled Stuart) held the Scottish crown for several centuries. One of the most famous members of the Stewart family was Mary, Queen of Scots.
STIDOLPH English
From the Old English given name STITHULF.
STIEBER German
Derived from Middle High German stiuben meaning "to run away". It may have been given as a nickname to a cowardly person or a thief.
STIGSSON Swedish
Means "son of STIG".
STILO Italian
Derived from the name of the town of Stilo in southern Italy. It is possibly derived from Greek στυλος (stylos) meaning "column, pillar".
STJEPANIĆ Croatian
Means "son of STJEPAN".
ST JOHN English
From a place named for Saint JOHN.
ST MARTIN French
From a place named for Saint MARTIN.
STODDARD English
Occupational name for a horse keeper, from Old English stod "stallion, stud" and hierde "herder".
STOJANOV Macedonian
Means "son of STOJAN".
STOLARZ Polish
Occupational name from Polish stolarz meaning "joiner, maker of furniture".
STONE English
Name for a person who lived near a prominent stone or worked with stone, derived from Old English stan.
STOPPELBEIN German
Means "stump leg" from Middle Low German stoppel "stump" and bein "leg".
STORSTRAND Norwegian
Originally denoted someone from Storstrand farm in Norway, derived from stor meaning "big" and strand meaning "beach".
STOYANOV Bulgarian
Means "son of STOYAN".
ST PIERRE French
From a French place named for Saint PETER.
STRAND Norwegian, Swedish, Danish
From Old Norse strǫnd meaning "beach, sea shore". It was originally given to someone who lived on or near the sea.
STRANGE English
Derived from Middle English strange meaning "foreign", ultimately from Latin extraneus.
STRAUB German
From Old High German strub meaning "rough, unkempt".
STREET English
Habitational name for a person who lived in a place called Street, for example in Somerset. It is derived from Old English stræt meaning "Roman road", from Latin strata.
STRICKLAND English
From the name of a town in Cumbria, derived from Old English stirc "calf, young bullock" and land "cultivated land".
STRINGER English
Occupational name for a maker of string or bow strings, from Old English streng "string".
STRNAD Czech, Slovene
Means "bunting" in Czech and Slovene.
STROBEL German
Diminutive form of STRAUB.
STROHKIRCH German
Means "straw church" in German.
STROMAN German
Means "straw man" in German, an occupational name for a seller of straw.
STROUD English
From Old English strod meaning "marshy ground overgrown with brushwood".
STRUDWICK English
From an English place name derived from Old English strod meaning "marshy ground overgrown with brushwood" and wíc meaning "village, town".
STRUNA Slovene, Czech
From Slavic struna meaning "string, cord", possibly denoting a maker of rope.
STUBER German
Occupational name for the owner of an inn, derived from Old High German stuba "room".
STÜCK German, Jewish
From Old High German stucki meaning "piece, part".
STUMPF German
Nickname for a short person or a topographic name someone who lived near a prominent stump, from Middle High German stumpf.
STURM German
Means "storm" in German, originally a nickname for a volatile person.
STYLES English
Locational name for one who lived near a steep hill, from Old English stigol "stile, set of steps".
SUÁREZ Spanish
Means "son of SUERO".
SUCHÝ Czech
Means "dry" in Czech. This was a nickname for a thin person.
SUDWORTH English
From an English place name composed of Old English suþ "south" and worþ "enclosure".
SUERO Spanish
Derived from the given name SUERO.
SUESS German
Variant of SÜß. A famous bearer was the American children's author Dr. Seuss (1904-1991), who was born Theodor Seuss Geisel.
SULLIVAN Irish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Ó Súileabháin meaning "descendant of Súileabhán". The name Súileabhán means "little dark eye".
SULTAN Arabic
From a nickname meaning "sultan, ruler" in Arabic.
SULTANA Bengali, Urdu, Maltese
Bengali, Urdu and Maltese form of SULTAN.
SULZBACH German
Toponymic name from German places named Sulzbach meaning "salty stream", derived from Old High German sulza "salty water" and bah "stream".
SUMMERFIELD English
Originally indicated the bearer was from a town of this name, derived from Old English sumor "summer" and feld "field".
SUMNER English
Occupational name for a summoner, an official who was responsible for ensuring the appearance of witnesses in court, from Middle English sumner, ultimately from Latin submonere "to advise".
SUN Chinese
From Chinese (sūn) meaning "grandchild, descendant". A famous bearer of the surname was Sun Tzu, the 6th-century BC author of The Art of War.
SUNDÉN Swedish
From Swedish sund meaning "sound, strait".
SUNG Chinese
Alternate transcription of Chinese (see SONG).
SÜSS German
Variant of SÜß.
SÜß German
From Old High German suozi meaning "sweet".
SUTHERLAND Scottish
Regional name for a person who came from the former county by this name in Scotland. It is derived from Old Norse suðr "south" and land "land", because it was south of the Norse colony of Orkney.
SUTTON English
From various English place names meaning "south town".
SUZUKI Japanese
From Japanese (suzu) meaning "bell" and (ki) meaning "tree, wood". This is the second most common surname in Japan.
SVÉD Hungarian
Means "Swedish" in Hungarian.
SVENDSEN Danish, Norwegian
Means "son of SVEND".
SVENSSON Swedish
Means "son of SVEN".
SVOBODA Czech
Means "freedom" in Czech. This was a medieval name for a freeman, someone who was not a serf.
SWANGO German
Americanized form of SCHWANGAU.
SWEET English
From a nickname meaning "sweet, pleasant", from Old English swete.
SWIFT English
Nickname for a quick person, from Old English swift.
SWINDLEHURST English
From the place name Swinglehurst in the Forest of Bowland in central Lancashire, derived from Old English swin "swine, pig", hyll "hill" and hyrst "wood, grove".
SWITZER German
Americanized form of SCHWEITZER.
SYDNEY English
Variant of SIDNEY.
SÝKORA Czech, Slovak
Means "tit (bird)" in Czech and Slovak.
SYMONDS English
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SYMONS English
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SZABÓ Hungarian
Means "tailor" in Hungarian.
SZABOLCSI Hungarian
From the name of the Szabolcs region in Hungary, derived from the given name SZABOLCS.
SZÁNTÓ Hungarian
Occupational name for a ploughman or tiller, derived from Hungarian szánt meaning "to plow".
SZARKA Hungarian
From Hungarian szarka meaning "magpie", often used as a euphemistic term for a thief.
SZARVAS Hungarian
Means "deer" in Hungarian.
SZCZEPAŃSKI Polish
Derived from the given name SZCZEPAN.
SZÉKELY Hungarian
Denoted a person of Székely ancestry. The Székelys are a population of Hungarians who live in central Romania.
SZEKERES Hungarian
Occupational name for a cartman, derived from Hungarian szekér meaning "cart, wagon".
SZÉP Hungarian
Means "beautiful, lovely" in Hungarian.
SZEWC Polish
Means "shoemaker" in Polish.
SZILÁGYI Hungarian
Denoted one from the region of Szilágy in Hungary, derived from Hungarian szil meaning "elm" and ágy meaning "bed".
SZŐKE Hungarian
Means "blond, fair haired" in Hungarian.
SZOMBATHY Hungarian
From Hungarian szombat meaning "Saturday".
SZŰCS Hungarian
Occupational name meaning "furrier" in Hungarian.
SZWARC Polish
Polish phonetic spelling of German SCHWARZ.
SZWED Polish
Variant of SZWEDA.
SZWEDA Polish
Derived from Polish Szwed meaning "Swede, person from Sweden".
SZWEDKO Polish
Variant of SZWEDA.
TACHIBANA Japanese
From Japanese (tachibana) meaning "orange, tangerine".
TAFANI Italian
From the nickname tafano meaning "gadfly", indicating an annoying person.
TAFT English
Variant of TOFT.
TAGGART Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Irish Mac an tSagairt meaning "son of the priest". This name comes from a time when the rules of priestly celibacy were not strictly enforced.
TÄHTINEN Finnish
Derived from the given name TÄHTI.
TAILLER French
Means "tailor" from Old French tailleur.
TAILOR English
Variant of TAYLOR.
TAKÁCS Hungarian
Means "weaver" in Hungarian.
TAKAHASHI Japanese
From Japanese (taka) meaning "tall, high" and (hashi) meaning "bridge".
TAKALA Finnish
Means "(dweller in the) back", probably denoting someone who lived in a remote area, from Finnish taka.
TAKENAKA Japanese
Means "dweller amongst bamboo", from Japanese (take) meaning "bamboo" and (naka) meaning "middle".
TAMARO Italian
Possibly from the Germanic given name THIETMAR. It is typical of the area around Trieste in northern Italy.
TAMÁS Hungarian
Derived from the given name TAMÁS.
TAMBOIA Italian
Possibly means "drummer", from Italian tamburo meaning "drum".
TAMBOLI Indian, Marathi
From the Sanskrit word ताम्बूल (tambula) meaning "betel leaves". These leaves are used in rituals and worship, and the name was originally given to a person who grew or sold them.
TAN Taiwanese
Min Nan romanization of CHEN.
TANAKA Japanese
Means "dweller in the rice fields", from Japanese (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy" and (naka) meaning "middle".
TANG Chinese
From Chinese (táng) referring to the Tang dynasty, which ruled China from 618 to 907.
TANGEMAN German
Originally indicated a person from a place named Tange in northern Germany.
TANNER English
Occupational name for a person who tanned animal hides, from Old English tannian "to tan", itself from Late Latin and possibly ultimately of Celtic origin.
TANZER German
Means "dancer" in German, derived from Middle High German tanzen "to dance".
TANZI Italian
From a short form of the given name COSTANZO.
TAPIA Spanish
Means "mud wall" in Spanish.
TAR Hungarian
Derived from Hungarian tar meaning "bald".
TARANTINO Italian
Locational name that originally designated a person who came from Taranto, a city in southeast Italy, which was originally called Ταρας (Taras) by Greek colonists. A famous bearer of this name is the American director Quentin Tarantino (1963-).
TARPINIAN Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Դարբինյան (see DARBINYAN).
TARR Hungarian
Variant of TAR.
TASH English
From Middle English at asche meaning "at the ash tree".
TASKER English
From Middle English taske meaning "task, assignment". A tasker was a person who had a fixed job to do, particularly a person who threshed grain with a flail.
TASSE French
From Old French tasse "purse, bag", an occupational name for a maker or seller of purses.
TATE English
Derived from the Old English given name TATA.
TATHAM English
From the name of the town of Tatham in Lancashire, itself from the Old English given name TATA combined with ham meaning "home, settlement".
TATTON English
Originally indicated a person from a town by this name, derived from the Old English given name TATA combined with tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town".
TATUM English
Variant of TATHAM.
TAUBE German
From a nickname meaning meaning "dove" in German.
TAVERNA Italian
From the place name Taverna, common in different parts of Italy. It means "inn, tavern" in Italian.
TAWFEEK Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic توفيق (see TAWFIQ).
TAWFIQ Arabic
From the given name TAWFIQ.
TAYLOR English
Derived from Old French tailleur meaning "tailor", ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut".
TCHAIKOVSKY Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Чайковский (see CHAYKOVSKY).
TEAGAN Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of TADHGÁN".
TEAGUE (1) Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Taidhg meaning "descendant of TADHG".
TEAGUE (2) Cornish
From Cornish tek meaning "fair, beautiful".
TEDESCO Italian
From Italian tedesco meaning "German".
TEEL English
From Middle English tele meaning "teal, duck".
TEHRANI Persian
Indicated a person from the Iranian city of Tehran, of unknown meaning.
TEKE (1) Turkish
Originally denoted someone from Teke, Turkey.
TEKE (2) Turkish
Occupational name for a goat herder, from Turkish teke "goat".
TENNFJORD Norwegian
Originally denoted a person from Tennfjord, Norway.
TENNISON English
Means "son of DENIS".
TENNYSON English
Means "son of DENIS".
TER AVEST Dutch
Means "at the edge, eave" indicating a person who lived at the edge of a forest or under a covered shelter.
TERRANOVA Italian
Means "new land" in Italian.
TERRAZAS Spanish
Originally a name for a person from Terrazas in the Spanish city of Burgos, a place name meaning "terraces".
TERRELL English
Probably derived from the Norman French nickname tirel meaning "to pull", referring to a stubborn person.
TERRY English
Derived from the medieval name Thierry, a Norman French form of THEODORIC.
TERZI Italian
From the given name TERZO, or a name for a third child.
TERZİ Turkish
Means "tailor" in Turkish, ultimately of Persian origin.
TERZIĆ Bosnian
From Bosnian terzija meaning "tailor", ultimately of Persian origin.
TESAŘ Czech
Means "carpenter" in Czech, ultimately from the Slavic word tesla meaning "adze".
TESAŘIK Czech
Diminutive of TESAŘ.
TESSARO Italian
Occupational name meaning "weaver", ultimately from Latin texarius.
TESTA Italian
From an Italian nickname meaning "head".
TEUFEL German
From a nickname meaning "devil" in German, given to a mischievous person or one who was devil-like.
TEUNISSEN Dutch
Means "son of TEUNIS".
THACKER English
Northern Middle English variant of THATCHER.
THATCHER English
Referred to a person who thatched roofs by attaching straw to them, derived from Old English þæc meaning "thatch".
THAYER French
Americanized form of TAILLER.