All Surnames

usage
Ford English
Name given to someone who lived by a ford, possibly the official who maintained it. A famous bearer was the American industrialist Henry Ford (1863-1947).
Forest English, French
Originally belonged to a person who lived near or in a forest. It was probably originally derived, via Old French forest, from Latin forestam (silva) meaning "outer (wood)".
Forester English
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest, or one who has charge of growing timber in a forest (see Forest).
Forestier French
French cognate of Forester.
Forney German
Name for someone who lived near ferns, from Old High German farn "fern".
Forsberg Swedish
Derived from Swedish fors meaning "waterfall" and berg meaning "mountain".
Forst German
Derived from Old High German forst "forest". Probably unrelated to the Old French word forest, which was derived from Latin, Old High German forst was derived from foraha meaning "fir tree".
Förstner German
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest (see Forst).
Fortier French
Derived from Old French fort "stronghold", indicating a person who lived near or worked at such a place.
Fortuin Dutch
Dutch cognate of Fortune.
Fortunato Italian
From the given name Fortunato.
Fortune English
From Middle English, ultimately from Latin fortuna meaning "fortune, luck, chance". This was possibly a nickname for a gambler.
Fortuyn Dutch
Dutch cognate of Fortune.
Foss English
Variant of Fosse.
Fosse English, French
Derived from Old French fosse "ditch".
Foster 2 English
Occupational name for a scissor maker, derived from Old French forcetier.
Foster 3 English
Occupational name for a maker of saddle trees, derived from Old French fustier.
Foster 4 English
Nickname given to a person who was a foster child or foster parent.
Foth Low German
From a nickname meaning "foot" in Low German.
Fournier French
Occupational name for a baker, from French fourneau meaning "oven".
Fowler English
Occupational name for a fowler or birdcatcher, ultimately derived from Old English fugol meaning "bird".
Fox English
From the name of the animal. It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair or a crafty person.
Francis English
Derived from the given name Francis.
François French
Derived from the given name François.
Franjić Croatian
Means "son of Franjo".
Frank 1 English
Derived from the given name Frank.
Frank 2 English
From Old English franc meaning "free".
Frank 3 German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Name for a person from Franconia in Germany, so called because it was settled by the Frankish people.
Frankenstein German, Literature
From any of the various minor places by this name in Germany, meaning "stone of the Franks" in German. It was used by the author Mary Shelley in her novel Frankenstein (1818) for the character of Victor Frankenstein, a scientist who creates a monster and brings it to life. The monster, nameless in the novel, is sometimes informally or erroneously called Frankenstein in modern speech.
Franklin English
Derived from Middle English frankelin meaning "freeman". It denoted a landowner of free but not noble birth, from Old French franc meaning "free".
Fransson Swedish
Means "son of Frans".
Franzese Italian
From a nickname that indicated a person who came from France. It is typical of the area around Naples.
Fraser Scottish
Meaning unknown, originally Norman French de Fresel, possibly from a lost place name in France.
Frederiksen Danish
Means "son of Frederik".
Fredriksson Swedish
Means "son of Fredrik".
Freeman English
Referred to a person who was born free, or in other words was not a serf.
Frei German
Means "free" in German, probably referring to someone outside the feudal system.
Freitas Portuguese
Means "broken" in Portuguese, a name for one who lived on broken, stony ground.
Freud German, Jewish
Means "joy" in German, a nickname for a cheerful person. A famous bearer was the psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939).
Freudenberger German, Jewish
Ornamental name from old German freud meaning "joy" and berg meaning "mountain".
Freund German
From Middle High German vriunt, modern German Freund meaning "friend".
Fried German
Derived from the given name Friedrich.
Friedrich German
Derived from the given name Friedrich.
Friel Irish
From the Irish Ó Frighil meaning "descendant of Fearghal".
Frisk Swedish
From Swedish frisk "healthy", which was derived from the Middle Low German word vrisch "fresh, young, frisky".
Fromm German
From a nickname derived from Middle High German vrom meaning "noble, honourable".
Frost English, German
From Old English and Old High German meaning "frost", a nickname for a person who had a cold personality or a white beard.
Fry English
From Old English frig (a variant of freo) meaning "free".
Frye English
Variant of Fry.
Fuchs German
From Old High German fuhs meaning "fox". It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair.
Fuentes Spanish
Means "spring, well" in Spanish, derived from Latin fons.
Fuhrmann German
Derived from Middle High German vuorman meaning "cartwright".
Fujimori Japanese
From Japanese (fuji) meaning "wisteria" and (mori) meaning "forest".
Fujimoto Japanese
From Japanese (fuji) meaning "wisteria" and (moto) meaning "base, root, origin".
Fujimura Japanese
From Japanese (fuji) meaning "wisteria" and (mura) meaning "town, village".
Fujioka Japanese
From Japanese (fuji) meaning "wisteria" and (oka) meaning "hill, ridge".
Fujisawa Japanese
From Japanese (fuji) meaning "wisteria" and 沢 or 澤 (sawa) meaning "marsh".
Fujita Japanese
From Japanese (fuji) meaning "wisteria" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
Fujiwara Japanese
From Japanese (fuji) meaning "wisteria" and (wara) meaning "field, plain".
Fukui Japanese
Denoted a person who was from Fukui prefecture in Japan.
Fukuzawa Japanese
From Japanese (fuku) meaning "happiness, good fortune, blessing" and 沢 or 澤 (sawa) meaning "marsh".
Fuller English
Occupational name for a fuller, a person who thickened and cleaned coarse cloth by pounding it. It is derived via Middle English from Latin fullo.
Fülöp Hungarian
Derived from the given name Fülöp.
Fulton English
From the name of the English town of Foulden, Norfolk, meaning "bird hill" in Old English.
Funar Romanian
Means "rope maker" in Romanian.
Furlan Italian, Slovene
From the name of the Italian region of Friuli, in the northeast of Italy, which is derived from the name of the Roman town of Forum Iulii meaning "forum of Julius".
Furnadjiev Bulgarian
Occupational name for a baker, derived from Bulgarian фурна (furna) meaning "oven".
Fürst German
From a nickname meaning "(sovereign) prince" in German. The word fürst itself is derived from Old High German furisto "first".
Furukawa Japanese
From Japanese (furu) meaning "old" and (kawa) or (kawa) both meaning "river, stream".
Fusco Italian
From Italian fosco meaning "dark", from Latin fuscus. This was a nickname for a person with dark features.
Fux German
Variant of Fuchs.
Fylan Irish
Variant of Whelan.
Fyodorov Russian
Means "son of Fyodor".
Gaál Hungarian
Variant of Gál.
Gabler German
Occupational name for someone who made or sold forks, from Old High German gabala "fork".
Gábor Hungarian
From the given name Gábor.
Gabrielli Italian
From the given name Gabriele 1.
Gabriels English
Derived from the given name Gabriel.
Gabrielson English
Means "son of Gabriel".
Gadhavi Indian, Gujarati
Meaning unknown, related to the Charan caste of Gujarat.
Gadsby English
Habitational name from the villsage of Gaddesby in Leicestershire, so named from Old Norse gaddr "spur, spike (of land)" and býr "farm, settlement".
Gaertner German
German form of Gardener.
Gage French, English
Occupational name derived either from Old French jauge "measure" (a name for an assayer) or gage "pledge, payment" (a name for a moneylender). Both words were ultimately of Frankish origin.
Gagliardi Italian
From Italian gagliardo meaning "strong, vigorous".
Gagne French
Variant of Gagneux. This surname is especially common in Quebec.
Gagneux French
Derived from Old French gagnier meaning "to farm, to cultivate".
Gagnon French
Derived from old French gagnon "guard dog". The name most likely originated as a nickname for an aggressive or cruel person.
Gajos Polish
Derived from Polish gaj meaning "grove, thicket".
Gál Hungarian
Derived from the given name Gál.
Gallagher Irish
Anglicized form of the Irish Ó Gallchobhair meaning "descendant of Gallchobhar".
Gallego Spanish
Originally indicated a person from Galicia, a region in northwestern Spain.
Galli Italian
Variant of Gallo, common in northern Italy.
Gallo Italian, Spanish
Means "rooster", ultimately from Latin gallus. This was a nickname for a proud person.
Gang Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul (see Kang).
Ganza Italian
Probably from the feminine medieval given name Allegranza or Alleganza, a derivative of Allegra. It comes from northern Lombardy.
Gao Chinese
From Chinese (gāo) meaning "tall, high".
Garb German
Variant of Garber.
Garber German
Variant of Gerber.
Garbo Italian
From a nickname meaning "politeness" in Italian. A famous bearer of this name was the Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990), born Greta Lovisa Gustafsson.
Garbutt English
From the given name Gerbold.
García Spanish
From a medieval given name of unknown meaning, possibly related to the Basque word hartz meaning "bear". This is the most common surname in Spain.
Garcia Portuguese, Spanish (Anglicized, Filipinized)
Portuguese form of García. It is also an unaccented form of the Spanish name used mainly in America and the Philippines.
Garçon French
Means "boy" in French, referring to a servant.
Gardener English
Occupational surname for one who was a gardener, from Old French jardin meaning "garden" (of Frankish origin).
Gardinier French
French form of Gardener.
Gárdonyi Hungarian
Originally denoted a person from Gárdony, a town near Budapest in Hungary.
Garey English
Variant of Geary.
Garfagnini Italian
Originally denoted one from the region of Garfagnana in Tuscany, Italy, near the historical city of Lucca.
Garfield English
Means "triangle field" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president James A. Garfield (1831-1881).
Garland English
Means "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. It originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
Garner 1 English
From Old French gernier meaning "granary", a derivative of Latin granum meaning "grain". This name could refer to a person who worked at a granary or lived near one.
Garnett 1 English
Occupational name referring to a person who made hinges, from Old French carne "hinge".
Garnett 2 English
From a diminutive of the given name Guarin.
Garnier 1 French
From the given name Garnier.
Garofalo Italian
From a nickname, from a southern variant of the Italian word garofano meaning "carnation".
Garrard English
From the given name Gerard.
Garrastazu Basque
From the Basque word arratz "bush" combined with the suffix sta denoting a place.
Garrett English
Derived from the given name Gerald or Gerard.
Garrido Spanish
Means "elegant, ostentatious" in Spanish.
Garrod English
Derived from the given name Gerald.
Garry English
Variant of Geary.
Gärtner German
German form of Gardener.
Garver German
Variant of Gerber.
Gary English
Variant of Geary.
Garza Spanish
Derived from Spanish garza meaning "heron".
Gáspár Hungarian
Derived from the given name Gáspár.
Gaspar Portuguese, Spanish
Derived from the given name Gaspar.
Gaspard French
From the given name Gaspard.
Gaspari Italian
From the given name Gaspare.
Gašper Slovene
Derived from the given name Gašper.
Gass German
Name for someone who lived on a street in a city, from German gasse.
Gates English
Originally denoted a person who lived near the town gates.
Gatsby English (Rare), Literature
Rare variant of Gadsby. This name was used by the American author F. Scott Fitzgerald for the central character in his novel The Great Gatsby (1925). In the book, James Gatz renames himself as Jay Gatsby at age 17 because he believes it sounds more sophisticated.
Gatti Italian
Means "cat" in Italian, originally a nickname for an agile person.
Gauthier French
Derived from the given name Gauthier.
Gautier French
From the given name Gautier.
Gavrilović Serbian
Means "son of Gavrilo".
Gavrilyuk Ukrainian
Alternate transcription of Ukrainian Гаврилюк (see Havrylyuk).
Geary English
Derived from a Norman given name that was a short form of Germanic names starting with the element ger "spear".
Gebara Basque
Habitational name for someone who lived in Gebara, a village in the province of Álava in Spain.
Geelen Dutch
Derived from the given name Geel, itself from Gillis or Gilbert.
Geels Dutch
Variant of Geelen.
Gehrig German
Variant of Gehring.
Gehring German
Derived from a short form of Germanic names starting with the element ger "spear".
Geier German
Means "vulture" in German, a nickname for a greedy person.
Geiger German
Means "fiddle player" in German, derived from Old High German giga "fiddle".
Geissler German
Occupational name for a goat herder, from southern German Geiss meaning "goat" and the suffix ler signifying an occupation.
Gelashvili Georgian
Means "son of Gela".
Gelens Dutch
Variant of Geelen.
Genadiev Bulgarian
Means "son of Genadi".
Genkov Bulgarian
Means "son of Genko".
Genov Bulgarian
Means "son of Geno".
Genovese Italian
Denoted a person from the Italian city of Genoa (Genova in Italian).
Gensch German
From the given name Gensch, a Sorbian form of John.
Gentile Italian
From a nickname meaning "gentle, kind" in Italian.
George English
Derived from the given name George.
Georgeson English
Means "son of George".
Georgiev Bulgarian
Means "son of Georgi".
Gérard French
From the given name Gérard.
Gerber German
Means "tanner, leather dresser" in German, derived from Old High German garawen meaning "to prepare".
Gereben Hungarian
Means "hackle, hatchel" in Hungarian (a hackle is a tool used to comb out fibers).
Gerhard German
Derived from the given name Gerhard.
Gerhardsson Swedish
Means "son of Gerhard".
Gerhardt German
Derived from the given name Gerhard.
Gerig German
Variant of Gehring.
Germain French
From the French given name Germain.
Germano Italian
From the given name Germano.
Géroux French
Derived from the Germanic name Gerulf.
Gerst German
Occupational name for a barley farmer, derived from Old High German gersta "barley".
Gerstle German
Variant of Gerst.
Gerver German
Variant of Gerber.
Gevorgian Armenian
Alternate transcription of Armenian Գեւորգյան (see Gevorgyan).
Gevorgyan Armenian
Means "son of Gevorg".
Ghasabyan Armenian
From Armenian ղասաբ (ghasab) meaning "butcher", of Arabic origin.
Gheorghe Romanian
Derived from the given name Gheorghe.
Giannino Italian
Derived from the given name Giannino.
Giannopoulos Greek
Means "son of Giannis" in Greek.
Gibb English
Derived from the given name Gib.
Gibbs English, Scottish
Means "son of Gib".
Gibson English, Scottish
Means "son of Gib".
Giehl German
German form of Giles.
Giese German, Danish
Derived from a short form of the given name Giselbert or other Germanic names beginning with the element gisil.
Giffard English
Derived from the Germanic given name Gebhard.
Gil Spanish, Portuguese
From the given name Gil 1.
Gilbert English, French
Derived from the given name Gilbert.
Gilchrist Scottish
From Gaelic MacGilleChrìosd meaning "son of Gille Críst".
Giles English
From the given name Giles.
Gill English
Originally indicated someone who lived near a ravine, from Middle English gil (of Old Norse origin).
Gilliam English
Variant of William. A famous bearer of the name is cartoonist and filmmaker Terry Gilliam (1940-).
Gim Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul (see Kim).
Gimondi Italian
Probably derived from the Germanic given name Gismund.
Giordano Italian
Derived from the given name Giordano.
Giorgadze Georgian
Means "son of Giorgi".
Girard French
From the given name Gérard.
Giraud French
From the given name Gérald.
Giroux French
Derived from the Germanic name Gerulf.
Gismondi Italian
From the Germanic given name Gismund.
Giugovaz Italian
Italian form of the Croatian surname Jugovac.
Giuliani Italian
From the given name Giuliano.
Giunta Italian
From the old Italian given name Bonagiunta or Bonaggiunta (derived from bono "good" and aggiunto "assistant").
Gjorgiev Macedonian
Means "son of Gjorgji".
Gladwin English
Derived from the Old English given name Glædwine.
Glas German, Dutch
German and Dutch cognate of Glass.
Glass English, German
From Old English glæs or Old High German glas meaning "glass". This was an occupational name for a glass blower or glazier.
Glazier English
Means "glass worker, glazier", from Old English glæs meaning "glass".
Glen Scottish
Variant of Glenn.
Glenn Scottish
Derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". A famous bearer was American astronaut John Glenn (1921-2016).
Glöckner German
Derived from Middle High German glocke "bell". It may have referred to a person who worked at or lived close to a bell tower.
Glover English
Occupational name for a person who made or sold gloves, from Middle English glovere.
Glynn Welsh, Cornish
Topographic name for someone who lived in a valley, from Welsh glyn and Cornish glin, or a habitational name from a place named with this word.
Gniewek Polish
Derived from Gniewek, a diminutive of Zbigniew, Jarogniew, or other names containing gniew "anger".
Göbel German
Derived from the given name Göbel, a diminutive of the Old German name Godebert, which is derived from god "God" and beraht "bright".
Goddard English
Derived from the Germanic given name Godehard.
Godfrey English
From the Norman given name Godfrey.
Goebel German
Variant of Göbel.
Goffe English
Derived from Breton or Cornish goff meaning "smith", referring to a metalworker.
Gold English, German, Jewish
From Old English and Old High German gold meaning "gold", an occupational name for someone who worked with gold or a nickname for someone with yellow hair. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
Goldhirsch Jewish
Means "golden stag" in Yiddish.
Goldschmidt German
Occupational name meaning "goldsmith" in German.
Golob Slovene
Means "pigeon" in Slovene.
Golub Croatian
Means "pigeon" in Croatian.
Gomes Portuguese
From the medieval given name Gomes.
Gómez Spanish
Spanish form of Gomes.
Gomółka Polish
Derived from Polish gomółka, a type of round cheese, ultimately from an old Polish word meaning "round".
Gonçalves Portuguese
Means "son of Gonçalo" in Portuguese.
González Spanish
Means "son of Gonzalo" in Spanish. This is among the most common surnames in Spain.
Good English
From a nickname meaning "good", referring to a kindly person.
Goode English
Variant of Good.
Goodman English
Variant of Good.
Goodwin English
Derived from the given name Godwine.
Goossens Flemish
From the Germanic given name Gozzo.
Goranov Bulgarian
Means "son of Goran".
Göransson Swedish
Means "son of Göran".
Gorbold English
From the given name Gerbold.
Gordon Scottish
From the name of a place in Berwickshire, Scotland, derived from Brythonic words meaning "spacious fort".
Gore English
From the Old English word gara meaning "triangular plot of land".
Gorecki Polish
Originally indicated a person from Górka, the name of various towns in Poland, ultimately from Polish góra "mountain".
Goretti Italian
Derived from the given name Gregorio.
Gori Italian
Derived from the given name Gregorio.
Górka Polish
Variant of Gorecki.
Gorman 1 German
From the Germanic given name Germund.
Gorman 2 Irish
From the Irish Ó Gormáin meaning "descendant of Gormán". The given name Gormán means "little blue one".
Görög Hungarian
Means "Greek" in Hungarian.
Górski Polish
From the Polish word góra meaning "mountain".
Gosse French
Derived from the Norman given name Gosse.
Gosselin French
Derived from a diminutive of the French given name Gosse.
Gott German
Derived from the Germanic given name Goda 1.
Gotti German
Variant of Gott.
Gottlieb German
Derived from the given name Gottlieb.
Gottschalk German
Derived from the given name Gottschalk.
Gough 1 Welsh
Nickname for a red-haired person, from Welsh coch "red".
Gough 2 Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Mag Eochadha meaning "son of Eochaidh".
Gouveia Portuguese
From the name of the city of Gouveia in Portugal, of unknown meaning.
Grabowski Polish
Habitational name for someone from any of the various places called Grabów, Grabowa or Grabowo, all derived from Polish grab meaning "hornbeam tree".
Grady Irish
From Irish Ó Gráda or Ó Grádaigh meaning "descendant of Gráda". The byname Gráda means "noble, illustrious".
Graf German
From the German noble title Graf meaning "count", ultimately from Greek γραφεύς (grapheus) meaning "scribe".
Graham Scottish
Derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by William de Graham.
Grahn Swedish
From Swedish gran meaning "spruce".
Graner German
Originally denoted a person from Gran, the German name for Esztergom, a city in northern Hungary.
Granger English, French
Means "farm bailiff" from Old French grangier, ultimately from Latin granum meaning "grain". It is borne in the Harry Potter novels by Harry's friend Hermione Granger.
Grant English, Scottish
Derived from Norman French meaning "grand, tall, large, great".
Granville English
Derived from a Norman place name Grainville.
Graves English
Occupational name for a steward, derived from Middle English greyve, related to the German title Graf.
Gray English
From a nickname for a person who had grey hair or grey clothes.
Grayson English
Means "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward".
Grbić Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Means "hunchback", derived from Serbian, Croatian and Slovene grba "hump".
Grec Catalan
Catalan cognate of Greco.
Greco Italian
Means "from Greece" in Italian.
Green English
Descriptive name for someone who often wore the colour green or someone who lived near the village green.
Greenberg German, Jewish
Anglicized form of Grünberg.
Greene English
Variant of Green.
Greenspan Jewish
Anglicized form of German Grünspan meaning "verdigris". Verdigris is the green-blue substance that forms on copper.