All Surnames

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VOLL (1) Norwegian
Originally indicated a person who lived in a meadow, from Old Norse vǫllr "meadow, field".
VOLL (2) German
Variant of VOLK.
VOLTOLINI Italian
From the name of the alpine valley of Valtellina in Lombardy, northern Italy.
VON BRANDT German
Means "from the area cleared by fire", from Middle High German brant.
VON ESSEN German
Means "from Essen", a city in Germany, possibly a derivative of Old High German asc meaning "ash tree".
VON GRIMMELSHAUSEN German
Means "from Grimmelshausen", a town in Germany. It is itself derived from Grimmel, of uncertain meaning, and hausen meaning "houses". A famous bearer was the German author Hans Jakob Christoffel von Grimmelshausen (1621-1676).
VON INGERSLEBEN German
Means "from Ingersleben", a town in Germany, which means "INGE's village".
VONNEGUT German
Possibly from the Germanic vonn meaning "hunting track" and gut meaning "good". A famous bearer was the American author Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007).
VORONIN Russian
Derived from Russian ворона (vorona) meaning "crow".
VÖRÖS Hungarian
Means "red" in Hungarian, referring to a person with red hair or face.
VOSS German
From Middle Low German vos meaning "fox". It was originally a nickname for a clever person or a person with red hair.
VOß German
Variant of VOSS.
VOSSEN Dutch
From the given name Vos, which comes from the Frisian name Fos, which is from Old Germanic given names beginning with the element folk meaning "people".
VROOM Dutch, Flemish
From a nickname derived from Dutch vroom meaning "pious, devout".
VRUBEL Czech
From a nickname derived from Czech vrabec meaning "sparrow".
VUKOJA Croatian
Derived from the given name VUK.
VUKOVIĆ Serbian, Croatian
Derived from the given name VUK.
WADE (1) English
Derived from the Old English place name wæd meaning "a ford".
WADE (2) English
From the Old English given name Wada, a derivative of the word wadan "to go".
WÄGNER German
Variant of WAGNER.
WAGNER German
From Middle High German wagener meaning "wagon maker, cartwright". This name was borne by the German composer Richard Wagner (1813-1883).
WÄHNER German
Variant of WAGNER.
WAHNER German
Variant of WAGNER.
WAKEFIELD English
Originally indicated a person who came from the English city of Wakefield, derived from Old English wacu "wake, vigil" and feld "field".
WALDVOGEL Jewish
Ornamental name derived from German Wald meaning "forest" and Vogel meaning "bird".
WALENTOWICZ Polish
Means "son of WALENTY".
WALKENHORST German
Possibly derived from a German place name Falkenhorst, from Falken meaning "falcons" and Horst meaning "thicket".
WALKER English
Occupational name for a person who walked on damp raw cloth in order to thicken it. It is derived from Middle English walkere, Old English wealcan meaning "to move".
WALLACE Scottish, English, Irish
Means "foreigner, stranger, Celt" from Norman French waleis (of Germanic origin). It was often used to denote native Welsh and Bretons. A famous bearer was the 13th-century Sir William Wallace of Scotland.
WALLACH Yiddish
From Middle High German walch meaning "foreigner (from a Romance country)".
WALLER (1) English
Derived from Old French gallier meaning "a person with a pleasant temper".
WALLER (2) English
Derived from Old English weall meaning "wall", denoting a builder of walls or someone who lived near a prominent wall.
WALLER (3) English
From Old English well meaning "well, spring, water hole".
WALMSLEY English
Originally denoted a person from the English town of WALMERSLEY.
WALSH English, Irish
From Old English wælisc meaning "foreigner, stranger, Celt".
WALTER English, German
Derived from the given name WALTER.
WALTERS English
Derived from the given name WALTER.
WALTERSON English
Means "son of WALTER".
WALTHER German
From the given name WALTHER.
WALTON English
From the name of any of several villages in England, derived from Old English wealh "foreigner, Celt", weald "forest", weall "wall", or well "well, spring, water hole" combined with tun "enclosure".
WALTZ German
From a diminutive of the given name WALTHER.
WANG (1) Chinese
From Chinese (wáng) meaning "king, monarch". This is the most common surname in China.
WANG (2) German, Dutch
From Middle High German and Middle Dutch wange meaning "cheek", possibly a nickname for someone with round or rosy cheeks.
WANG (3) German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From Old High German wang or Old Norse vangr meaning "grassy slope, meadow".
WANG (4) Yiddish
Name for a Jew from Hungary, ultimately from Russian Венгрия (Vengriya) "Hungary".
WARD (1) English
Derived from Old English weard meaning "guard, guardian".
WARD (2) Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Mac an Bhaird, which means "son of the bard".
WARDROBE English
From Old French warder "to guard" and robe "garment", an occupational name for a servant responsible for the clothing in a household.
WARE (1) English
From Old English wer meaning "dam, weir", indicating someone who lived near such a structure.
WARE (2) English
From the Middle English nickname ware meaning "wary, astute, prudent".
WARREN (1) English
Denoted a person who lived near a warren, from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure" (of Germanic origin).
WARREN (2) English
Originally denoted a person from the town of La Varenne in Normandy, which may derive from a Gaulish word meaning "sandy soil".
WARSZAWSKI Polish, Jewish
Place name for someone from the Polish city of Warsaw, itself derived from the given name Warsz, a short form of WARCISŁAW.
WARWICK English
From the name of an English town, itself derived from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wíc "village, town".
WASH English
Derived from the Norman name WAZO.
WASHINGTON English
From a place name meaning "settlement belonging to Wassa's people", from the given name WASSA and Old English tun meaning "enclosure, yard, town". A famous bearer was George Washington (1732-1799), the first president of the United States.
WATANABE Japanese
From Japanese (wataru) meaning "cross, ferry" and (be) meaning "edge, side".
WATERMAN (1) English
Means "servant of WALTER".
WATERMAN (2) English, Dutch
Occupational name for a boatman or a water carrier. It could also describe a person who lived by water.
WATERS (1) English
Originally given to a person who lived near the water.
WATERS (2) English
Derived from the given name WALTER.
WATKINS English
Derived from the Middle English given name Wat or Watt, which was a diminutive of the name WALTER.
WATSON English, Scottish
Patronymic derived from the Middle English given name Wat or Watt, a diminutive of the name WALTER.
WATT English
Derived from the Middle English given name Wat or Watt, a diminutive of the name WALTER.
WATTANA Thai
From Thai วัฒน (wathan) meaning "culture".
WATTS English
Patronymic derived from the Middle English given name Wat or Watt, a diminutive of the name WALTER.
WAUTERS Dutch
Means "son of WOUTER".
WAXWEILER German
Denoted a person from Waxweiler, a village in the Eifel region of Germany.
WAY English
From Old English weg meaning "way, road, path".
WAYNE English
Occupational name meaning "wagon maker, cartwright", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". A famous bearer was the American actor John Wayne (1907-1979).
WEAVER (1) English
Occupational name for a weaver, derived from Old English wefan "to weave".
WEAVER (2) English
From the name of the River Weaver, derived from Old English wefer meaning "winding stream".
WEBB English
Occupational name meaning "weaver", from Old English webba, a derivative of wefan "to weave".
WEBER German
German cognate of WEAVER (1).
WEBSTER English
Occupational name meaning "weaver", from Old English webba, a derivative of wefan "to weave".
WECHSLER German, Jewish
Means "money changer, banker", from German wechseln "to exchange".
WEDEKIND German
From the given name WIDUKIND.
WEEBER German
German cognate of WEAVER (1).
WEEKES English
Derived from Old English wíc meaning "village, town".
WEGENER Low German
Low German variant of WAGNER.
WEGNER Low German
Low German variant of WAGNER.
WEHNER German
Variant of WAGNER.
WEHNERT German
Variant of WAGNER.
WEHUNT German
Americanized form of German WIEGAND.
WEIGAND German
From the given name WIEGAND.
WEIMANN German
From German Wein meaning "wine", an occupational name for a wine seller or producer.
WEINER German
Variant of WAGNER.
WEISS German
From Middle High German wiz meaning "white". This was originally a nickname for a person with white hair or skin.
WEIß German
Variant of WEISS.
WELCH English
Variant of WALSH.
WELLS English
Derived from Middle English welle meaning "well, spring, water hole".
WELTER German
Derived from the given name WALTER.
WEMBLEY English
From the name of a town, now part of Greater London, meaning "WEMBA's clearing" in Old English.
WEN Chinese
From Chinese (wén) meaning "literature, culture, writing".
WENDEL German
Derived from the given name WENDEL.
WENDELL German
Derived from the given name WENDEL.
WERNER German
From the given name WERNER.
WERNHER German
From the given name WERNER.
WEST English, German
Denoted a person who lived to the west of something, or who came from the west.
WESTBROOK English
From the name of places in England, derived from Old English west "west" and broc "brook, stream".
WESTCOTT English
From any of the several English towns by this name, derived from Old English meaning "west cottage".
WESTENBERG Dutch
Means "west of the mountain", originally referring to a person who lived there.
WESTERBERG Swedish
Derived from Swedish väster "west" and berg "mountain".
WESTLEY English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English west "west" and leah "woodland, clearing".
WETZEL German
From the given name WENZEL.
WHALEN Irish
Variant of WHELAN.
WHEELER English
Occupational name for a maker of wagon wheels, derived from Middle English whele "wheel".
WHEELOCK English
Originally indicated a person from the town of Wheelock, England. It was named for the nearby River Wheelock, which is derived from Welsh chwylog meaning "winding".
WHELAN Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Ó Faoláin meaning "descendant of FAOLÁN".
WHINERY English
From Middle English whin "gorse bush" and wray "nook of land".
WHITAKER English
From a place name composed of Old English hwit "white" and æcer "field".
WHITE English
Originally a nickname for a person who had white hair or a pale complexion, from Old English hwit "white".
WHITNEY English
Originally from the name of an English town, meaning "white island" in Old English.
WHITTEMORE English
From various English place names derived from Old English hwit "white" and mor "moor, heath, bog".
WHITTLE English
From various English place names derived from Old English hwit "white" and hyll "hill".
WIATER Polish
Derived from Polish wiatr "wind", a nickname for a quick person.
WICKHAM English
From any of various towns by this name in England, notably in Hampshire. They are derived from Old English wíc "village, town" (of Latin origin) and ham "home, settlement".
WIECK German
Means "village, town", derived from Latin vicus.
WIEGAND German
From the given name WIEGAND.
WILBUR English
From the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English.
WILCOX English
From a diminutive of the given name WILLIAM.
WILDGRUBE German
From the name of a German town, derived from German wild "wild, untamed" and Grube "hollow, pit".
WILEY English
From any of the various English towns named WILLEY or from the River WYLYE.
WILKERSON English
Means "son of WILKIN".
WILKIE English
Double diminutive of the given name WILLIAM.
WILKINS English
Means "son of WILKIN".
WILKINSON English
Means "son of WILKIN".
WILLARD English
From the given name WILHEARD or WILLIHARD.
WILLEMS Dutch
Derived from the given name WILLEM.
WILLEMSE Dutch
Derived from the given name WILLEM.
WILLEMSEN Dutch
Means "son of WILLEM".
WILLEY English
Variant of WILEY.
WILLIAM English
Derived from the given name WILLIAM.
WILLIAMS English
Means "son of WILLIAM".
WILLIAMSON English
Means "son of WILLIAM".
WILLIS English
Derived from the given name WILLIAM. A famous bearer of this surname is actor Bruce Willis (1955-).
WILLOUGHBY English
From the name of various English towns, derived from Old English wilig meaning "willow" and Old Norse býr "farm, settlement".
WILMER English
Derived from the given name WILMǢR.
WILMS Dutch
Derived from the given name WILLEM.
WILSON English
Means "son of WILL".
WILTON English
From any of the English towns named WILTON.
WINCHESTER English
From an English place name, derived from Venta, of Celtic origin, and Latin castrum meaning "camp, fortress".
WINFIELD English
From various English place names, derived from Old English winn "meadow, pasture" and feld "field".
WINKLER German
Derived from Old High German winkil meaning "corner".
WINOGRAD Jewish
Jewish form of VINOGRADOV.
WINOGRODZKI Polish
Polish cognate of VINOGRADOV.
WINSHIP English
Possibly denoted a person who came from Wincheap Street in Canterbury, England. It is uncertain origin, possibly meaning "wine market" in Old English.
WINSLOW English
Derived from an Old English place name meaning "hill belonging to WINE".
WINSTON English
Derived from the given name WYNNSTAN.
WINTER English, German, Swedish
From Old English winter or Old High German wintar meaning "winter". This was a nickname for a person with a cold personality.
WINTERBOTTOM English
From Old English winter meaning "winter" and botm meaning "ground, soil, bottom". This name probably referred to a winter pasture at the bottom of a lowland valley.
WINTHER Danish, Swedish
Danish and Swedish variant of WINTER.
WINTHROP English
Habitational name from the place names WINTHROPE (1) or WINTHROPE (2).
WINTON English
Derived from the name of several English villages. Their names derive from Old English meaning "enclosure belonging to WINE".
WIRNER German
From the given name WERNER.
WIRNHIER German
From the given name WERNER.
WIRT German
Variant of WIRTH.
WIRTH German, Jewish
Occupational name for an innkeeper, derived from German wirt meaning "host".
WITHERSPOON English
Originally given to a person who dwelt near a sheep enclosure, from Middle English wether "sheep" and spong "strip of land".
WOJDA Polish
Variant of WOJEWODA.
WOJEWODA Polish
From the Polish title wojewoda meaning "governor, voivode" (originally meaning "warlord").
WOLANSKI Polish
Denoted a person who came from one of the places in Poland called Wola or Wolany, derived from the given name Wolan meaning "to want".
WOLF German, English
From Middle High German or Middle English wolf meaning "wolf", or else from a Germanic given name beginning with this element.
WOLFE English
Variant of WOLF.
WOLTER German
From the given name WALTER.
WOLTERS Dutch
Means "son of WOUTER".
WOMACK English
Of uncertain origin. One theory suggests that it indicated a dweller by a hollow oak tree, derived from Old English womb "hollow" and ac "oak".
WONG (1) Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of WANG (1).
WONG (2) Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of HUANG.
WOOD English, Scottish
Originally denoted one who lived in or worked in a forest, derived from Old English wudu "wood".
WOODCOCK English
Nickname referring to the woodcock bird.
WOODHAM English
Indicated a person who had a home near a wood, derived from Old English wudu "wood" and ham "home, settlement".
WOODROW English
From a place name meaning "row of houses by a wood" in Old English.
WOODWARD English
Occupational name for a forester, meaning "ward of the wood" in Old English.
WOOTTON English
Derived from Old English wudu "wood" and tun "enclosure, town".
WÖRNER German
From the given name WERNER.
WÖRNHÖR German
From the given name WERNER.
WORTHAM English
Derived from the name of a town in Suffolk, England meaning "enclosed homestead".
WOUTERS Dutch
Means "son of WOUTER".
WRAGGE English
Derived from the Old Danish given name Wraghi, a variant of VRAGI.
WRAY English
Originally denoted someone who came from any of the various places of this name in northern England, from Old Norse vrá meaning "corner, nook".
WRIGHT (1) English
From Old English wyrhta meaning "wright, maker", an occupational name for someone who was a craftsman. Famous bearers were Orville and Wilbur Wright, the inventors of the first successful airplane.
WRIGHT (2) English
Americanized form of DROIT.
WRONA Polish
Derived from Polish wrona meaning "crow".
WRONSKI Polish
Derived from Polish wrona meaning "crow".
WRUCK German
From Middle Low German wrok meaning "cantankerous".
WU Chinese
From Chinese () referring to the ancient state of Wu, which was located in present-day Jiangsu province.
WUOPIO Swedish
Means uncertain, possibly referred to a dweller in a narrow bay with steep shores.
WYATT English
From the medieval given name WYOT.
WYMAN English
From the Old English given name WIGMUND.
WYNDHAM English
From the name of the town of Wymondham, meaning "home belonging to Wigmund", from the given name WIGMUND combined with Old English ham meaning "home, settlement".
WYNNE English
Derived from the given name WINE.
WYRICK Polish
Americanized form of WYRZYK.
WYRZYKOWSKI Polish
Possibly from the Polish place name Wyrzyki, of uncertain meaning, maybe "away from the river".
XANTHOPOULOS Greek
Means "son of XANTHOS".
XU Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "slowly, calmly".
XUN Chinese
From Chinese (xún) meaning "plant, ancient state".
XYLANDER German
From Greek ξυλον (xylon) meaning "wood, forest" and ανδρος (andros) meaning "man". This surname was a Greek translation of German surnames of the same meaning.
YAKOVLEV Russian
Means "son of YAKOV".
YAMADA Japanese
From Japanese (yama) meaning "mountain" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
YAMAGUCHI Japanese
From Japanese (yama) meaning "mountain" and (kuchi) meaning "mouth, entrance". Olympic figure-skating champion Kristi Yamaguchi (1971-) bears this name.
YAMAMOTO Japanese
From Japanese (yama) meaning "mountain" and (moto) meaning "base, root, origin".
YAMASAKI Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 山崎 (see YAMAZAKI).
YAMASHITA Japanese
From Japanese (yama) meaning "mountain" and (shita) meaning "under, below".
YAMAUCHI Japanese
From Japanese (yama) meaning "mountain" and (uchi) meaning "inside".
YAMAZAKI Japanese
From Japanese (yama) meaning "mountain" and (saki) meaning "cape, peninsula".
YANCY Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized form of JANSEN.
YANEV Bulgarian
Means "son of Yane", a diminutive of YOAN (2).
YANG Chinese
From Chinese (yáng) meaning "willow, poplar, aspen".
YANKOV Bulgarian
Means "son of YANKO".
YAP English
From a nickname for a clever or cunning person, from Middle English yap meaning "devious, deceitful, shrewd".
YATES English
From Old English geat meaning "gate", a name for a gatekeeper or someone who lived near a gate.
YEUNG Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of YANG.
YI Korean
Variant of LEE (2).
YILMAZ Turkish
From the given name YILMAZ.
YONG English
Variant of YOUNG.
YONKER Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized form of JONKER.
YONKERS Dutch (Anglicized)
Americanized spelling of JONKERS.
YORDANOV Bulgarian
Means "son of YORDAN".
YORK English
From the name of the English city of York, which was originally called Eburacon (Latinized as Eboracum), meaning "yew" in Brythonic, but was altered by association with Old English Eoforwic, meaning "pig farm".
YOSHIDA Japanese
From Japanese (yoshi) meaning "lucky, good" and (ta) meaning "field, rice paddy".
YOUNG English
Derived from Old English geong meaning "young". This was a descriptive name to distinguish father from son.
YOUNGE English
Variant of YOUNG.
YOUNT German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of JUNDT.
YOXALL English
Originally indicated a person from the town of Yoxall in Staffordshire, itself derived from Old English geoc "oxen yoke" and halh "nook, recess".
YU (1) Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "in, on, at". According to legend, King Wu of Zhou bestowed the realm of Yu to his second son, who subsequently adopted this as his surname.
YU (2) Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "surplus".
YU (3) Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "consent, approve".
YU (4) Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "concerned, anxious" and also referring to the ancient state of Yu, which was situated in what is now Shanxi province.
YUEN Chinese (Cantonese)
Cantonese romanization of RUAN.
YUKIMURA Japanese
From Japanese (yuki) meaning "snow" and (mura) meaning "town, village".
ZAAL Dutch
Means "hall" in Dutch.
ZABALA Basque
Originally denoted someone who lived in a place of this name in Biscay. It is derived from Basque zabal meaning "large, wide".
ZĄBEK Polish
From Polish zab "tooth" and a diminutive suffix.
ZAHARIEV Bulgarian
Means "son of ZAHARI".
ZAHRADNÍK Czech
Derived from Czech zahrada meaning "garden". It referred to someone who owned less land than a Sedlák or a Dvořák, but more land than a Chalupník.
ZAMAN Arabic, Urdu
Derived from the given name ZAMAN.
ZAMBRANO Basque
Possibly a habitational name for someone from Zambrana, a town in the province of Álava in Spain.
ZAMORANO Spanish
Originally denoted a person from Zamora, the name of both a province in Spain and its capital city.
ZANETTI Italian
Derived from a diminutive of the given name GIOVANNI. A famous bearer is Argentinian soccer player Javier Zanetti (1973-).
ZANGARI Italian
Southern Italian name, derived from Greek τσαγκαρης (tsankaris) meaning "shoemaker, cobbler".
ZAPATERO Spanish
Spanish cognate of SAVATIER.
ZAPPA Italian
From Italian zappa meaning "hoe, mattock", probably denoting a farmer. Two musicians of Italian origin have bore this name: Francesco Zappa (1717-1803) and Frank Zappa (1940-1993).
ZAVALA Spanish
Variant of ZABALA.
ZAWISZA Polish
Derived from the Old Polish given name ZAWISZA.
ZDRAVKOV Bulgarian
Means "son of ZDRAVKO".
ZDUNOWSKI Polish
Denoted a person from one of the various towns named Zduny in Poland, which is derived from Polish zdun meaning "potter". It can also be an occupational surname derived directly from zdun.
ZEEGERS Dutch
Means "son of SIEGER".
ZEELEN Dutch
Derived from the given name CEEL.
ZEGERS Dutch
Means "son of SIEGER".
ZELENKA Czech
Czech cognate of ZIELIŃSKI.
ZELENKO Ukrainian
Ukrainian cognate of ZIELIŃSKI.
ZELLWEGER German (Swiss)
Originally denoted a person from the Appenzell region of Switzerland. The place name is derived from Latin abbatis cella meaning "estate of the abbot". A famous bearer is actress Renée Zellweger (1969-).
ZEMAN Czech
Means "landowner", derived from Czech zem "land". A famous bearer is the soccer coach Zdeněk Zeman (1947-).
ZENI Italian
Means "son of ZENO".
ZENTAI Hungarian
Originally indicated a person from the city of Senta in Serbia (formerly a part of Hungary and called Zenta).
ZHANG Chinese
From Chinese (zhāng) meaning "stretch, extend". It may have denoted a bowmaker whose job it was to stretch bow wood.
ZHAO Chinese
From Chinese (zhào), which refers to an ancient city-state in what is now Shanxi province. According to legend, King Mu rewarded his chariot driver Zaofu with the city, at which time Zaofu adopted this surname. The later historic state of Zhao, which existed from the 5th to 3rd centuries BC, was named after this city.... [more]
ZHENG Chinese
From Chinese (zhèng), which refers to the ancient state of Zheng. Zheng existed between the 9th to 4th centuries BC in present-day Henan province. A famous bearer of this surname was the 15th-century explorer Zheng He.
ZHIVKOV Bulgarian
Means "son of ZHIVKO".
ZHOU Chinese
From Chinese (zhōu) referring to the Zhou dynasty, which held power from 1046 to 771 BC, continuing for a few more centuries as figureheads.
ZHU Chinese
From Chinese (zhū) "vermilion red, cinnabar" and also referring to the ancient state of Zhu, which existed in what is now Shandong province. This was the surname of the emperors of the Ming dynasty.
ZIELIŃSKI Polish
From Polish zieleń meaning "green". It was possibly a nickname for a person who dressed in green clothing.
ZIEMNIAK Polish
Means "potato" in Polish.
ZIĘTEK Polish
Possibly from a diminutive of Polish zięć meaning "son-in-law".
ZILBERSCHLAG Jewish
Occupational name for a silversmith from Yiddish zilber "silver" and schlag "strike".
ZILBERSTEIN Jewish
Ornamental name meaning "silver stone", from Yiddish זילבער (zilber) and שטיין (shtein), both of Germanic origin.
ZIMA Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian
From a Slavic word meaning "winter". This may have been a nickname for a person with a chilly personality.
ZIMMAN Jewish
Possibly a variant of ZIMMERMANN.
ZIMMERMANN German, Jewish
From the German word for "carpenter", derived from Middle High German zimber "timber, wood" and mann "man".
ZINGEL Jewish
From Middle High German zingel "defensive wall". This name was originally applied to a person who lived near the outermost wall of a castle.
ZINI Italian
Derived from names such as Lorenzino, a diminutive of LORENZO, or Vincenzino, a diminutive of VINCENZO.
ZINO Italian
Derived from the given name Zino, a short form of names ending with -zino, such as Lorenzino, a diminutive of LORENZO, or Vincenzino, a diminutive of VINCENZO.
ZISKIND Jewish
Ornamental name meaning "sweet child", from Yiddish זיס (zis) meaning "sweet" and קינד (kind) meaning "child", both words of Germanic origin.
ŽITNIK Slovene, Czech
From the Slavic root žito meaning "rye". This was an occupational name for a dealer in rye or a baker.
ZLATKOV Bulgarian
Means "son of ZLATKO".
ZOLTÁNFI Hungarian
Means "son of ZOLTÁN".