Browse Submitted Surnames

This is a list of submitted surnames in which the person who added the name is AngelM0113.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AARONS English
Means "Son of AARON."
ADDINGTON English
Habitational name from any of various places named in Old English as Eaddingtun 'settlement associated with Eadda' or Æddingtun 'settlement associated with Æddi'.
ALTSCHULER Jewish
It is derived from the Altschul, Old Synagogue in Prague.
ANGELSON English
Means son of ANGEL.
AUSLÄNDER German
Nickname given to a foreigner.
BEAMER German (Americanized)
Americanized spelling of German BÖHMER or Bäumer.
BEEKMAN German, Anglo-Saxon
This name derives from the pre 5th century Olde German and later Anglo-Saxon word "bah" or "baecc". This word describes a stream, or as a name specifically someone who lived or worked by a stream.
BELIĆ Serbian, Croatian
Derived from the word belo meaning "white".
BENNER German
Occupational name for a basket and bassinet maker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German benne 'work basket', 'bassinet', 'cradle'.
BERGDORF German
Origin unidentified. Possibly a German habitational name from places in Hamburg and Lower Saxony called Bergedorf, Bargdorf in Lower Saxony, or Bergsdorf in Brandenburg.
BERGHORST German
Topographical name for someone who lived by a wilderness area on a mountain, from Berg 'mountain', 'hill' + Horst 'wilderness' (see Horst).
BERSON English
Means "son of Berry".
BICKERMAN English
The toponym Bickerton is derived from the Old English beocere, which means bee-keeper, and tun, which originally denoted a fence or enclosure.
BILKO Czech
From the Czech word meaning white.
BILLSON English
Means "Son of Bill."
BINGHAM English
Ultimately deriving from the toponym of Melcombe Bingham in Dorset. The name was taken to Ireland in the 16th century, by Richard Bingham, a native of Dorset who was appointed governor of Connaught in 1584... [more]
BITTERMAN English, German
Name given to a person who was bitter.
BLANDFORD English
Habitational name from Blandford Forum and other places called Blandford in Dorset (Blaneford in Domesday Book), probably named in Old English with bl?ge 'gudgeon' (genitive plural blægna) + ford 'ford'.
BLAZKOWICZ Polish
From the video game series, Wolfenstein, Blazkowicz is the main character.
BLOOMINGDALE Jewish (Americanized)
Americanized form of German BLUMENTHAL or its Dutch cognate BLOEMENDAAL.
BÓBSKI Polish
Possibly derived from the Polish word bób, which means "broad bean".
BOLLINGER German (Swiss)
Habitational name for someone from any of three places called Bollingen, in Schwyz, Württemberg, and Oldenburg, or from Bohlingen near Lake Constance (which is pronounced and was formerly written as Bollingen).
BONNAR Irish, Gaelic
Translation of the Gaelic "O'Cnaimhsighe", descendant of Cnaimhseach, a byname meaning "Midwife
BRESSER English
The surname is derived from the old English word brasian, meaning to make out of brass. This would indicate that the original bearer of the name was a brass founder by trade. The name is also derived from the old English Broesian which means to cast in brass and is the occupational name for a worker in brass.
BUECHLER German
From the common field name Büchle 'beech stand', the -er suffix denoting an inhabitant. from buchel 'beech nut', hence a metonymic occupation name for someone who owned or worked in an oil mill producing oil from beech nuts.
BUEHMAN German
Variant of BAUER.
BURDICK Anglo-Norman
This surname is derived from a geographical locality.,'of Burdet.'
BURKOWSKI Polish
It is composed of buk (Common Slavic for "beech tree") and the Slavic suffixes -ov and -ski. In some cases, the name may originate from a toponym
CERRAJERO Spanish
Occupational name for a locksmith.
CHERNIN Czech
A habitational name for someone from Cernice or some other place named with this word.
CIANCI Italian
The surname Cianci is a name for a person of small financial means. The surname Cianfari is derived from the Italian words cianfrone and cianferone, which referred to a type of medieval coin.
CLATTENBURG English (?)
Most likely something to do with a fortress. Meaning currently unknown.
CLEMSON English
Means "son of CLEM".
CLEVENGER English, Anglo-Saxon
The surname is derived from the Old English word cleofan which means to cleave or split.
COBALT English
Name given to a person who mined cobalt.
CORVIN Hungarian (Americanized)
Shortened and Americanized form of CORVINUS.
CRANLEY Irish
The surname Cranley was first found in Ulster (Irish: Ulaidh), where they held a family seat but were also to be found in County Offaly and Galway. The sept is styled the Princes of Crich Cualgne and are descended from Cu-Ulladh, a Prince in 576.
CREAMER English
Occupational name for a seller of dairy products, from an agent derivative of Middle English, Old French creme 'cream' (Late Latin crama, apparently of Gaulish origin).
CYR French
From the Latin personal name Quiricus or Cyricus, Greek Kyrikos or Kyriakos, ultimately from Greek kyrios 'lord', 'master'.
DAHLSTRÖM Swedish
Derived from Swedish dal "valley" and ström "stream".
DAKE English
The origins of the name Dake are from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It is derived from the personal name David. Daw was a common diminutive of David in the Middle Ages. The surname is a compound of daw and kin, and literally means "the kin of David."
DEATHRIDGE English
Name given to someone who lived near a cemetery on a ridge.
DEERE Irish
Reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Duibhidhir (see DWYER).
DE LA MUERTE Spanish (Rare)
Means "of death" in Spanish. Name given to a person who worked as a graveyard worker.
DE SANTO Italian, Spanish
Mean “Son of SANTO”.
DE STEFANO Italian
Means "son of STEFANO".
DEUTSCHLANDER Dutch
Name given to a person from Germany.
DE WINTER Dutch
Nickname for a cold or gloomy man, from Middle Dutch winter 'winter' + the definite article de.
DIERINGER German (Americanized)
Americanized form of German Thüringer, regional name for someone from Thuringia, This was also used as a medieval personal name. Americanized form of German Tieringer, habitational name for someone from Tieringen in Württemberg.
DILLON Irish
Dillon is a surname of Irish origin but with Breton-Norman roots. It is first recorded in Ireland with the arrival of Sir Henry de Leon (c.1176 – 1244), of a cadet branch of Viscounty of Léon, Brittany... [more]
DI MAGGIO Italian
Came from a child who was born in the month of May. The surname Maggio is derived from the Italian word Maggio, which literally means the month of May.
DORADO Spanish
From dorado "golden" (from Late Latin deaurare "to gild", from aurum "gold"), probably applied as a nickname to someone with golden hair.
DORMAN English
From the Old English personal name Deormann, composed of Old English deor (see Dear) + mann 'man'. This surname became established in Ireland in the 17th century; sometimes it is found as a variant of Dornan.
DREXEL German, Jewish
It originates from the pre 7th century word 'dreseler' meaning 'to turn', a verb which in medieval times had a wide range of meanings.
DRYDEN English
Possibly from an English place name meaning "dry valley" from the Old English elements drȳġe "dry" and denu "valley". A notable bearer was the English poet, literary critic, translator and playwright John Dryden (1631-1700).
DUNDREARY English
This was a nickname for someone who had dundrearies, which were long sideburns.
DYNE English
Derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "dence", the Middle English "dene", meaning a valley.
ECKHART German
From the given name ECKHART.
ECKSTRÖM Swedish
Ornamental name composed of the elements ek 'oak' + ström 'river', 'current'.
EIERMANN German
Occupational name for an egg collector or dealer in eggs, from Middle High German ei 'egg' + man 'man'.
ENS German
Variant of ENNS.
ERDMANN German
From the given name ERDMANN.
ESCOBAR Spanish
A topographic name from a collective form of escoba, meaning 'broom' (from the late Latin, scopa), or a habitational name from either of two minor places in Santander province called Escobedo.
FASS German
From Middle High German faz, German Fass 'cask', 'keg', hence a metonymic occupational name for a maker or seller of casks and kegs, or a nickname for someone as rotund as a barrel. German: variant of Fasse, Faas.
FASSBENDER German
Occupational name for a maker of keg barrels.
FELKER English
The surname Felker was a patronymic surname, created from a form of the medieval personal name Philip. It was also a habitational name from a place name in Oxfordshire. Forms of the name such as de Filking(es) are found in this region from the 12th and 13th centuries.
FICHTNER German
The Fichtner family name first began to be used in the German state of Bavaria. After the 12th century, hereditary surnames were adopted according to fairly general rules, and names that were derived from locations became particularly common
FILIPPELLI Italian
Means "Son of FILIPPO." Italian form of PHILLIPS.
FINNIGAN Irish
This interesting surname is of Irish origin, and is an Anglicization of the Gaelic O' Fionnagain, meaning the descendant(s) of Fionnagan, an Old Irish personal name derived from the word "fionn", white, fairheaded.
FIORELLI Italian
The surname Fiorelli was first found in Bolgna (Latin: Bononia), the largest city and the capital of Emilia-Romagna Region. The famous University of Bolgna was founded in the 11th century, by the 13th century the student body was nearly 10,000... [more]
FLEIG German
Nickname for a restless or insignificant person from Middle Low German vleige ‘fly’.
FRANTZ German
Name given to a free man.
FREIBURG German
Derives from the German words, frei, which means free, and berg, which means hill, and is the name of a city in Germany.
FREIDHOF German
Topographical name from the German Fredihof 'graveyard', 'cemetery' (from Middle Low German, Middle High German vrithof 'enclosed farmstead or courtyard', later 'cemetery').
FRINK Anglo-Saxon, Norman
It was a name given to a person who was referred to as being free or generous. The surname was originally derived from the Old French franc, which meant "liberal, generous." ... The surname also has origins from the Norman official title, the frank which also means free.
GANN German
Topographic name for someone who lived near an expanse of scree, Middle High German gant.
GANZ German, German (Swiss)
Variant of Gans 'goose'. German: from a short form of the Germanic personal name Ganso, a cognate of modern German ganz 'whole', 'all'.
GARBRANDT Dutch, Low German
Comes from the former Duchy of Brabant.
GARRISON English
Patronymic from GARRETT.
GAST German, Ancient Germanic
From the Ancient Germanic name element Gast.
GEIST German
Habitational name for someone who lived in a house marked by the sign of the Holy Spirit (normally depicted as a dove), from Middle High German geist 'spirit'.
GEISTER German (Silesian)
Occupational name for a goatherd, from an agent derivative of Geist
GFELLER German
Topographical name for someone who lived by a gorge, Middle High German gevelle, or a habitational name for someone from any of various places in Bavaria and Austria named from this word.
GILDNER Jewish
Occupational name for a worker in gold, from Yiddish gildner 'golden'.
GOBER English, French
The surname Gober was first found in Warwickshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor. The Norman influence of English history dominated after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience prevailed.
GOETTEL German
From a pet form of GOTTFRIED, or any of the other personal names formed with Got(t)-.
GOLDWATER German (Anglicized), Jewish (Anglicized)
This name is an Anglicized form of the German or Ashkenazic ornamental surname 'Goldwasser', or 'Goldvasser'. The name derives from the German or Yiddish gold', gold, with 'wasser', water, and is one of the very many such compound ornamental names formed with 'gold', such as 'Goldbaum', golden tree, 'Goldbert', golden hill, 'Goldkind', golden child, 'Goldrosen', golden roses, and 'Goldstern', golden star.
GOODERHAM Danish
It is derived from a personal name, originally "Gudormr", which has the rather unusual translation of "battle-snake".
GREIF German
Means "Griffin" in German. From the mythological creature.
GRETZINGER German
Habitational name for someone from any of three places named Grötzingen (Old High German Grezzingun) in Baden-Württemberg.
GUTKNECHT German, German (Swiss)
Status name for a page of noble birth (Middle High German guot kneht).
HARDLEY English
The name comes from when a family lived in the village of Hartley which was in several English counties including Berkshire, Devon, Dorset, Kent, Lancashire, York and Northumberland. This place-name was originally derived from the Old English words hart which means a stag and lea which means a wood or clearing.
HAVERFORD Welsh, English
Haverford's name is derived from the name of the town of Haverfordwest in Wales, UK
HEFLER German
Derived from the Old German and German word hof, which means settlement, farm or court.
HEIDENREICH German
From the medieval personal name Heidenrich, ostensibly composed of the elements heiden 'heathen', 'infidel' (see Heiden 2) + ric 'power', 'rule', but probably in fact a variant by folk etymology of Heidrich.
HEINISCH German
From a pet form of the personal name Heinrich.
HEINTZELMAN German
From a pet form of Heinrich, with the addition of -mann ‘man’.
HELBER German
Occupational name for a thresher, from Middle High German helwe 'chaff' + the agent suffix -er; alternatively, it could be a habitational name from a place called Helba near Meiningen.
HELFER German
Metonymic occupational name for an assistant of some kind, or nickname for a helpful person, from Middle High German hëlfære, German Helfer 'helper', 'assistant'.
HELLER German
Nickname from the small medieval coin known as the häller or heller because it was first minted (in 1208) at the Swabian town of (Schwäbisch) Hall.
HELSTROM Scandinavian
From a place called Helstrom, meaning a house (or shelter) by a river, from the pre 7th century Olde Norse "hiamlr- straumr".
HENSCHEL German, Jewish
From a pet form of the personal name JOHANNES (see JOHN), or in some cases from a pet form of HEINRICH.
HERRICK Dutch
From a Germanic personal name composed of the elements heri, hari 'army' + ric 'power', or from an assimilated form of Henrick, a Dutch form of Henry.
HERTIG German
Hertig is associated with the popular German personal name HARTWIG, meaning "hard-battle."
HEUSER German
Deriving from one of several places named Hausen.
HIGHLANDER Scottish
Name given to a person who lived in the high lands of Scotland.
HILFIKER German (Swiss)
Altered spelling of Hilfinger, patronymic derivative of the personal name Hilfo, Helfo, a short form of a Germanic personal name based on helfe 'helper'.
HINDLE English
Habitational name from a place in the parish of Whalley, Lancashire, so called from the same first element + Old English hyll 'hill'.
HOFFER German
The name Hoffer is derived from the Old German and German word hof, which means settlement, farm or court.
HOLLINGER German, Jewish
Habitational name for someone from places called Holling or Hollingen.
HOLLINGER English, Northern Irish, Scottish
Topographical name from Middle English holin 'holly' + the suffix -er denoting an inhabitant.
HOLMAN Dutch
Topographic name for a dweller in a hollow
HOLTZMANN Upper German, German
Derived from the Upper German word "holz," which means "forest." Thus many of the names that evolved from this root work have to do with living in the woods
HÖRMANN German
The distinguished surname Hormann is of very ancient German origin. It is derived from a Germanic personal name made up of the elements "heri," meaning "army," and "man," meaning "man."
HOSNER German
Occupational name for a knitter of hose (garments for the legs), from the plural form of Middle High German hose + the agent suffix -er (see Hose 3).
HOSTETLER German
The name itself comes from the word Hostet or Hochstatt meaning "high place". Thus Hostetler is someone living in a high place or on high ground.
HÜBSCH German
Nickname from Middle High German hübesch 'courtly', 'polite', 'refined', 'agreeable', German hübsch.
HULLER English
Topographical name for a 'dweller by a hill', deriving from the Old English pre 7th Century 'hyll' a hill, or in this instance 'atte hulle', at the hill.
HUNTLEY English, Scottish
Habitational name from a place in Gloucestershire, so named from Old English hunta 'hunter' (perhaps a byname (see Hunt) + leah 'wood', 'clearing'). Scottish: habitational name from a lost place called Huntlie in Berwickshire (Borders), with the same etymology as in 1.
HUSEMANN German
Epithet for a servant or an administrator who worked at a great house, from Middle Low German hus ‘house’ (see House 1, Huse) + man ‘man’.
IRONSIDE English
Possibly from Middle English irenside (Old English iren ‘iron’ + side ‘side’), a nickname for an iron-clad warrior.
JÄGERMEISTERSSEN German
Means son of the "Master-Hunter". Originally given to the son of the master-hunter in hunting camps.
JANISSE French
Possibly a respelling of French Janisset, from a pet form of Jan, a variant spelling of Jean, French equivalent of John.
JOYSON English
Metronymic of the name Joy from the female given name Joia, deriving from the Middle English, Old French "joie, joye" meaning "joy". It may also be a nickname for a person of a cheerful disposition.
KASTL German
From a pet form of the saint's name Castulus, itself a diminutive of the Latin adjective castus 'chaste'.
KEINER German
Reduced form of the personal name Kagenher, from Old High German gagan 'against' + heri 'army'.
KEMERER German
From the Old German word "kämmerer," which means "chamberlain." A chamberlain was the person in charge of the noble household; to him would fall the duty of ensuring that the castle and court of the noble ran smoothly.
KEURIG Dutch
Keurig is "derived from" a Dutch word meaning "excellence." A more accurate translation from the Dutch is "neat" or "tidy."
KIEBLER German
Comes from the Middle High German word "kübel" meaning a "vat," or "barrel." As such it was an occupational name for a cooper, or barrel maker.
KIENER German (Swiss)
Nickname derived from the dialect verb chienen 'to whimper'.
KINKLE German
Derived from the Middle High German word "kunkel," which meant "spindle." It is thus supposed that the first bearers of this surname were spindle makers in occupation.
KIPPS German
Topographical name for someone living on a hill, from Kippe 'edge', 'brink'.
KIPPS English
From Middle English Kipp, perhaps a byname for a fat man, from an unattested Old English form Cyppe, which according to Reaney is from the Germanic root kupp 'to swell'.
KISER German
Variant of KAISER.
KISSEL German
From a pet form of the Germanic personal name Gisulf.
KLEEHAMMER German
Means "Cloverleaf hammer"
KLEINSCHMIDT German
Occupational surname which means "small smith", that is, a maker of small forged items and metal hand tools.
KLUTZ German
The ancient and distinguished German surname Klutz is derived from the old Germanic term "Klotz," meaning "awkward, clumsy." The name was most likely initially bestowed as a nickname, either on someone who was clumsy or in an ironic way on someone who was exceptionally graceful.
KNAUER German (Silesian)
Nickname for a gnarled person, from Middle High German knur(e) 'knot', 'gnarl'. habitational name for someone from either of two places in Thuringia called Knau.
KNOEDLER German
Occupational name, probably for someone who made dumplings, from an agent derivative of Middle High German knödel.
KOLL German
From the given name Colo or KOLOMAN. Alternatively derived from Middle Low German kolle "head".
KÖLLE German
Variant of KOLL.
KONEČNÝ Czech, Slovak
From Czech and Slovak konečný meaning ''final, last, finite''. Perhaps a nickname for the youngest son of a family, a topographic name for someone who lived at the end of a settlement, or a nickname for someone who brought something to a conclusion.
KOSCHEK Hebrew
Derives from the ancient Hebrew given name "YAAKOV" meaning "following-after".
KRETZER German
Occupational name for a basketmaker or a peddler, from an agent derivative of Middle High German kretze 'basket'.
KREUTZ German
Topographical name for someone who lived near a cross set up by the roadside, in a marketplace, or as a field or boundary marker, from Middle High German kriuz(e) 'cross'.
KRONEN German
From German Krone 'crown', probably as an ornamental name. Or a nickname for a slender, long-legged individual, from a dialect form of Kranich.
KROSS Low German
Occupational name for a maker of mugs and jugs, from Middle Low German krus, kros 'pitcher', 'ceramic drinking vessel'.
LAHEY Irish
Lahey and Leahy originate from two different Gaelic surnames. Lahey, Lahy, Lahiff, Lahiffe, Laffey, and Lahive all originate from the Gaelic surname O Laithimh, which itself is a variant of O Flaithimh... [more]
LAUFFER German
The lauffer name is generally thought to have evolved from a place name to a surname. ... Versions of the name that evolve from the word "läufer," which meant "runner," are thought to have originally been an occupational name for a messenger.
LAUPER German (Swiss)
From the short form of a Germanic personal name composed of the elements liut 'people', 'tribe' + berht 'famous'. topographic name for someone who lived at a Lauben, a row of houses and stores with an arcade in front, from Middle High German loube 'arbor', 'bower', 'gallery'.
LEHNER German
Status name for a feudal tenant or vassal, from an agent derivative of Middle High German lehen 'to hold land as a feudal tenant'. variant of Leonhardt.
LERNER German, Jewish
Its literal meaning can be either "student" or "scholar".
LESNAR German
Variant spelling of German Lessner, a habitational name from any of various places in eastern Germany called Lessen, all named with Slavic les 'forest'.
LINDER German
Derived from the German word linde, which means lime tree.
LIZAK Polish
Nickname from lizac 'to lick'.
LOCKETT English
Diminutive of the male given name LUKE.
LUKENS Low German
From Low German, Lückens, a patronymic from the personal name LÜDEKE.
LYSAK Jewish
Nickname for a bald man, Ukrainian lysak.
MARINELLI Italian
Means “son of MARINO”.
MARSTELLER German
Occupational name for a stable boy in or for the supervisor of the stables on a noble estate, from Middle High German mar(c) 'noble horse' stall 'stable' + the agent suffix -er.
MARTINES Portuguese
Means "Son of MARTIN." Portuguese form of MARTÍNEZ.
MATHIS German, French
From the given name MATHIS.
MCCLINTOCK Scottish, Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Deriving from an Anglicization of a Gaelic name variously recorded as M'Ilandick, M'Illandag, M'Illandick, M'Lentick, McGellentak, Macilluntud, McClintoun, Mac Illiuntaig from the 14th century onward... [more]
MCELHENNEY Irish
This interesting surname is of Irish origin, and is an Anglicized form of the Old Gaelic "MacGiolla Chainnigh". The Gaelic prefix "mac" means "son of", plus "giolla", devotee of, and the saint's name "Canice".
MCGIVERN Northern Irish
Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Uidhrín, a patronymic from a personal name which is from a diminutive of odhar 'dun'. This surname is also found in Galloway in Scotland, where it is of Irish origin.
MCGREW Irish
Originally appeared in Gaelic as Mac Graith or Mag Raith; these are both derived from the personal name Craith.
MCTONY American
Tony McTony!
MEISTER German
Means "Master" in German.
MELGAR Spanish
Topographical name for someone who lived by a field of lucerne, Spanish melgar (a collective derivative of mielga 'lucerne', Late Latin melica, for classical Latin Medica (herba) 'plant' from Media).
MESSERSCHMIDT German
Name given to a knife smith. From German "messer" meaning knife, and "schmidt" meaning smith.
MESSIER French
Occupational name for someone who kept watch over harvested crops, Old French messier 'harvest master' (Late Latin messicarius, agent derivative of messis 'harvest').
MIOTKE Polish (Germanized)
Germanized form of Polish Miotka, a nickname derived from miotac 'to throw or toss'.
MIRAMONTES Spanish
Looker of mountains.
MOHR German
From a short form of an old personal name, Morhart (see Morath).
MOLINARO Italian
The surname Molinaro is a name for a person who owned, managed, or worked in a mill deriving its origin from the Italian word "molino," which meant mill.
MONTY French, English
Topographic name for a mountain dweller, from Old French mont 'mountain' (Latin mons, montis).
MOSSMAN English
This interesting name is a variant of the surname Moss which is either topographical for someone who lived by a peat bog, from the Old English pre 7th Century 'mos' or a habitational name from a place named with this word, for example Mosedale in Cumbria or Moseley in West Yorkshire.
MURTOV Georgian
Means "son of MURTAZ".
NANTZ German
From a pet form of a Germanic compound name formed with Nant- (for example, Nantwig, Nantger); its meaning is reflected in Middle High German nenden 'to dare'.
NAULT French
From a short form of various medieval personal names derived from Germanic personal names formed with wald 'rule' as the final element, in particular Arnold.
NEFF German, German (Swiss)
From Middle High German neve 'nephew', hence probably a distinguishing name for a close relation or familiar of a prominent personage.
NENNINGER German
Habitational name for someone from Nenningen in Württemberg.
NEUHAUS German, Jewish
Topographical name for someone who lived in a new house, Middle High German niuwe hus, modern German neu Haus, or a habitational name for someone from any of several places named Neuhaus ('new house') in various parts of Germany and Austria, also in Bohemia.
NICKAL German
Variant of NICKEL
NICKEL German
From the German word "kupfernickel" meaning Devil's copper or St Nicholas's (OLd Nick's) copper.
NIEDERMEYER German, Dutch
Distinguishing name for a farmer (see Meyer) who had a farm lower (Middle High German nider(e)) than the neighboring one(s).
NOLF German, Dutch
From a short form of the personal name Arnolf, composed of the Germanic elements arn 'eagle' + wulf 'wolf'. Dutch: from a reduced form of Nodolf, derived from the personal name Odolf by transfer of the final -n in a preceding personal name such as Jan, Simoen
ÓDINSSON Icelandic
Means "son of ÓÐINN".
OFFICE English (Modern)
Occupational name for a person who works in an office.
OLANO Basque
Province of Araba, so named from ola 'forge', 'ironworks' + the diminutive suffix -no.
OLIVAS Catalan
Variant spelling of Olives, habitational name from Olives in Girona province, or a topographic name from the plural of Oliva.
ÖSTERREICHER German, German (Austrian)
Means "One from Austria", "the Austrian".
OSTRANDER Dutch
Translated as "from the east border." The name may have been originally borne by one who lived near the eastern border of a town, province, or country.
PALMERO Italian
The Palmero family lived in the territory of Palma, which is in Campania, in the province of Naples. The surname Palma was also a patronymic surname, derived from the personal name Palma, which was common in medieval times... [more]
PARKINGTON English
Habitational name from a place in Greater Manchester (formerly in Cheshire) called Partington, from Old English Peartingtun 'settlement (tun) associated with Pearta', a personal name not independently recorded.
PESKA Czech
From a pet form of the personal name Pešek
PFARR German
From Middle High German pfarr 'district' 'parish' or pfarre(r) 'parish priest', hence an occupational name for a parson.
PLATTER Scottish
Habitational name from the Forest of Plater in Angus.
PRATLEY English
Originates from a now "lost" medieval village believed to have been in the south east of England.
PRUETT English
Derived from the Middle English word "prou," meaning "brave," or "valiant," with the addition of either of two common diminutive suffixes: "-et" or "-ot." As such, this name is thought to have originally been a nickname for someone small, but brave.
PUNKE German
Unexplained; possibly an altered form of Bunke, from a Middle Low German personal name.
RADLER German
Occupational name, which was derived from the kind of work done by the original bearer. It is a name for a wheelmaker or wheelwright. The name stems from the German noun rat, meaning wheel. The origin is more clear in the variant RADEMACHER
RAFTER Gaelic
The original Gaelic form of Rafter was O Raithbheartaigh, which was modified to O Raifeartaigh. The surname is derived from the words rath bheartach meaning prosperity wielder.
RANDLEMAN German
Diminutive of the personal name RAND, a short form of various German names with the first element rand meaning shield or wolf.
REHDER German
Occupational name, which was derived from the kind of work done by the original bearer. It is a name for a wheelmaker or wheelwright.
REIDHEAD English
The origins of the Reidhead surname are uncertain. In some instances, it was no doubt derived from the Old English word "read," meaning "red," and was a nickname that came to be a surname. Either way, we may conclude that it meant "red-haired" or "ruddy complexioned."
REIMANN German
From a pet form of a Germanic personal name formed with a first element from ragin 'advice', 'counsel' or ric 'power(ful)', 'rich'.
REINHARDT German
Comes from a personal name Raginhard, composed of the elements ragin, meaning counsel, with hard, hardy, brave, strong.
REINHOLDT German
From the German given name Reinhold.
RENDELMANN German
A habitational name for someone from Rendel near Frankfurt (Hesse).
REZNOV Russian
Name given to the son of a butcher.
RICARDEZ Spanish
Means "Son of RICARDO". Spanish form of RICHARDSON.
RIESEN German
It is a name for a wood carver.
RIIS Scandinavian
Nickname from ris 'twigs', 'scrub', or a habitational name from any of several places so named in Denmark. Norwegian: habitational name from any of five farmsteads named Ris, from Old Norse hrís 'brushwood'.
ROCKFORD English
An altered spelling of English Rochford; alternatively it may be an Americanized form of French Rochefort or Italian Roccaforte.
ROCKHOLD Anglo-Saxon
Came from when the family lived in the village of Rock found in the various locations that existed in Worcestershire, Devon and also in Northumberland.The surname also has topographic origins in that it describes the area where the original bearers lived.
ROSENBORG Norwegian
Norwegian form of ROSENBERG.
RÖSSEL German
Means "knight" in German.
RUHR German
Name given to a person who lived near the Ruhr River in Germany.
RUMPLE German
It is derived from Rumbald, an Old German personal name.
RUNDGREN Swedish
Name means "Round branch". Given to a person who lived near a round branch.
RYNEARSON German, German (Swiss)
Derived from the Rhine River.
SALTER English
Occupational name for an extractor or seller of salt (a precious commodity in medieval times), from Middle English salt 'salt' + the agent suffix -er.
SAMPER Catalan
Habitational name from any of the places in Catalonia called Sant Pere, generally as the result of the dedication of a local church or shrine to St. Peter (Sant Pere).
SCHERZER German (Austrian)
Habitational name for someone from a place called Scherz in Switzerland
SCHLEP German
Probably a nickname or occupational name for a laborer or carrier, especially in a mine, from Middle Low German slepen, Middle High German slepen 'to drag or carry (a load)' (modern German schleppen, schleifen).
SCHLOSS German
Shortened form of SCHLOSSER.
SCHLOTT German, Low German
Occupational name for a locksmith, from Middle Low German slot 'lock'.
SCHOFIELD English
Habitational name from any of various minor places, in Lancashire and elsewhere, named from Middle English sc(h)ole 'hut' (see Scales) + feld 'pasture', 'open country'.
SCHORR German
In the south a topographic name from Middle High German schor(re) 'steep rock', 'rocky shore'.
SCHROOT Dutch
Nickname for a person who collects scraps of food,from the Dutch word "schroot" meaning "scrap". Name was usually given to someone who was impoverished.
SCHUELER German
The surname Schueler was first found in southern Germany, where the name was closely identified in early mediaeval times with the feudal society which would become prominent throughout European history.
SCHWEIGERT German
Derives from an agent derivative of the German "schweigen", to be silent, and the nickname would have been given to a silent, quiet, taciturn person.
SEIF German, Jewish
Metonymic occupational name for a soap maker, from Middle High German seife, German Seife 'soap'.
SIEBER German
The roots of the German surname Sieber can be traced to the Old Germanic word "Siebmacher," meaning "sieve maker." The surname is occupational in origin, and was most likely originally borne by someone who held this position
SIMPLETON English
A name for someone who is simple, derived from old English.
SONNENSCHEIN German
Surname meaning "sunshine".
STAHLER German
Occupational name for a foundry worker, from an agent derivative of Middle High German stal 'steel'.
STALLMAN German
Variant of Staller. German: topographic name for someone who lived in a muddy place, from the dialect word stal. English: habitational name from Stalmine in Lancashire, named probably with Old English stæll 'creek', 'pool' + Old Norse mynni 'mouth'.
STEIER German
Variant of STEIGER.
STEIERT German
Variant of STEIGER and STEIER.
STEIGER German
Occupational name from Middle High German stiger 'foreman', 'mine inspector'
STEINBACH German, Jewish
German habitational name from any of the many places named Steinbach, named with Middle High German stein ‘stone’ + bach ‘stream’, ‘creek’. ... [more]
STEINWEDEL German
From the German word "stein" and "wedel" which mean "stone frond", which was a name given to someone who lived near a stone wall covered in plants.
STINSON English, Scottish
This is one of the many patronymic forms of the male given name Stephen, i.e. son of Stephen. From these forms developed the variant patronymics which include Stim(p)son, Stenson, Steenson, and Stinson.
STOGNER Anglo-Saxon
The surname Stogner belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.
STORR German
Nickname for a crude man, from Middle High German storr 'tree stump', 'clod'.
STOSS German, Jewish
Nickname for a quarrelsome person, from Middle High German stoz 'quarrel', 'fight'.
STOSSEL Jewish
A diminutive form of STOSS.
STRASBURG German
It is derived from the Old Germanic phrase "an der Strasse," which literally means "on the street." Thus, the original bearer of this name was most likely someone whose residence was located on a street.
STRASSE German
It derives either from the ancient Roman (Latin) word "straet" meaning a main road, and hence somebody who lived by such a place, or from a German pre-medieval word "stratz" meaning vain.
STRASSER German (East Prussian)
Topographical name for someone living by a main street or highway, from Middle High German strasse, German Strasse 'street', 'road'.
STREITER German
Topographic name from Middle High German struot 'swamp', 'bush', 'thicket' + -er, suffix denoting an inhabitant.
STRINGFELLOW English
Nickname for a powerful man, Middle English streng ‘mighty’, ‘strong’ + felaw ‘fellow’ (see Fellows).
SUMTER English
This surname is derived from an official title. 'the sumpter.' Old French sommetier, a packhorseman, one who carried baggage on horseback
THUNDERSON English
Means "son of Thunder".
THURINGER German
Habitational name for someone from Thuringia.
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